Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  August 27, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

6:00 am
hello. our top stories this hour. one of the sides in afghanistan's disputed presidential election says it's boycotting the process double checking the votes. we'll be checking to that candidate live in the next few minutes. islamic state militants force children to watch executions. it's among the atrocities highlighted in a human rights report. ukraine's president says a road map will be drawn up after the first direct talks with vladimir putin. >> translator: i can say the
6:01 am
idea of the peace plan was finally supported by all heads of states without exception. >> translator: russia will do everything it can for the peace process, if it starts, and we think the process needs to be started as soon as possible. and later on, how californians are digging deep for water during the worst drought in the century. hello there. thanks for joining us. afghanistan's disputed presidential election is on a knife's edge today after one of the candidates withdrew from a protest to double check all the votes. abdullah abdullah pulled out after his senior campaign official dismissed the process as a joke. both candidates claim to have won the election. this audit is part of the u.n.-brokered deal to decide a winner and bring stability to
6:02 am
the country. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent david loin from the afghan capital kabul. he tells me the recount appears to have been abandoned and is at a standstill. >> reporter: well, the u.n. said last night they would continue it and put in more observers to ensure fairness, but that hasn't happened. i can say now the whole process has been paralyzed. abdullah abdullah's campaign workers didn't show up. u.n. workers who came to monitor the vote saw tables that weren't manned at all. there were no campaign workers there at all. and there is now a complete paralysis. no count going on. this is just at the final stage when the invalidation process exactly deciding which the clean votes were and which the dirty votes were is supposed to have been going on. it's that that abdullah's campaign are complaining about. they say not enough of the fraudulent votes, and most were for gani.
6:03 am
not enough have been thrown out. this feels like a very dangerous moment for afghanistan. >> well, let's put some of those points to abdullah abdullah. he joins us on the television live now from kabul. let me ask you, whact was the problem with the audit that you felt you can't carry on with it? >> first of all, as the process continued, more of the problems nobody had anticipated emerged in the type of fraud which had taken place. the vote and validation criteria, which was anticipated, did not address the different types of fraudulent vote. that was one.
6:04 am
announcement of the result came in a way that was quite against contrary to the process, through the procedures that were promised to us. the final gentleman would be in front of our agents, in front of media. in a matter of ten minutes, they announced the results for around 3,000 ballot boxes. this is also not acceptable. and throughout the process, as i mentioned, there were different types of fraud which had happened in an ingenious way, which the invalidation criteria was not sufficient. so a lot of fraudulent ballot papers. >> mr. abdullah, this is a process overseen by the united nations, so surely that should give you some trust in it. yet, you still say that the
6:05 am
process has no validity. >> the point is that one side is the united nations, the other side is is the commission. part of the job needs to be done through the commission. one of the things that they had asked for that the commission should act in a sort of hands-off manner. this role of the commission was also there throughout, and the united nations, they also think that it is very difficult. for example, in the past few days, we discovered -- we found out that in thousands of polling statio stations, one person had written
6:06 am
down the result sheets. it should be one person per polling station. >> i'm sorry to cut in on you, but to many it will just look as if you have pull out because the audit was not going in your favor. >> us asking for the audit was not to be guaranteed it would be in our favor. ours was a fair audit. no invalid boxes will go through. this is something that this audit didn't deliver. and that's why we have registered our complaints. nevertheless, we are negotiating with the united nations on some of those very valid concerns.
6:07 am
i personally had discussions with them. >> okay. mr. abdullah, the audit is not happening right now. we're just hearing from reuters that your rival has also pulled out of this audit. where do you think this leaves your country at the moment, and what responsibility do you have for trying to end this long presidential election dispute and bring stability to afghanistan? >> we were not the cause of this long disputed election. those who committed fraud, they are responsible for it. and we acted responsibly
6:08 am
throughout the process and tried to correct the process so it can deliver the just results. nevertheless, we do have responsibility towards our country in the political process, which is under way. then we will continue to find a way out of this. >> okay. abdullah abdullah, who's pulled out of the audit in afghanistan's presidential election, we thank you for speaking with us. thank you for your time. now, united nations human rights investigators have published graphic details of what they describe as atrocities being carried out in syria. the report reveals evidence of violence by the extremist group islamic state, including frequent executions that members of the public, among them children, are forced to watch. the syrian government is also held to account by the report, with the u.n. saying it continues to torture and kill its own citizens.
6:09 am
here's a report from geneva. >> reporter: war crimes and crimes against humanity are routine in which normal life has been utterly destroyed. in northern syria where islamic state controls large areas, public executions are common. the population, including children, are forced to watch. dead bodies are displayed often on crucifixes for days afterwards. women are lashed for failing to cover their faces. minor crimes punished by amputation. meanwhile, syrian government forces continue to inflict violence. barrel bombs and chlorine gas are dropped from helicopters. hospitals are she would, civilians, arrested, tortured, and killed. the u.n. investigators say no side seems capable of victory. there is no military solution to the long suffering of syria's
6:10 am
people. but no side is ready to stop fighting. the international community has been unable to broker even a brief cease-fire. instead, the u.n. fears syria's conflict is about to spread across the region with devastating consequences for millions of people. bbc news, geneva. >> now, let me take you to ukraine because its president petro poroshenko says a road map will be agreed for a cease-fire. it follows talks with his russian counterpart. mr. poroshenko had a private meeting with vladimir putin on tuesday. he said work on a cease-fire would begin as soon as possible. but the distance between the two leaders seems great. president putin wants no direct role. he says it's up to kiev to conduct its own negotiations with the rebels. >> translator: we in russia cannot talk about any conditions for the cease-fire or agreements between kiev, donetsk, and
6:11 am
luhansk. this is ukraine's business. we can only help to create an atmosphere of trust in this important and necessary process. >> well, ukraine's president said he's hopeful a peaceful solution can be achieved, but he hinted it'll only happen after the separatists have been disarmed. >> translator: i can say that the idea of the peace plan was finally supported by all heads of state without exception. we firmly insisted that first of all an agreement has to be reached to secure peace and freedom for ukraine's citizens who are illegally kept by illegal armed formations. >> petro poroshenko there. but there is no sign of an immediate end to the fighting in eastern ukraine. and after ten russian soldiers were captured in ukraine on monday, the kremlin's involvement is again being drawn into question. mr. putin, however, says they must have accidently crossed into ukrainian territory during
6:12 am
the border patrol. our correspondent in kiev is david stern. he joins us live from there. positive pronouncements from president poroshenko, but is there real progress here? >> reporter: well, very, very difficult to say. we have heard that mr. poroshenko will come up with a road map for peace, but as you've pointed out, the fighting goes on. there's another front as the ukrainians put it in the southern region of donetsk and the humanitarian crisis is rising. so the two sides are very far apart. one of the problems as far as the ukrainians are concerned is the russians say they are not an involved party. that they have no part in this. so for them, for the ukrainians, given the evidence that russian fighters if not soldiers but fighters are coming regularly through the border and there are weapons, armored vehicles, this
6:13 am
makes it very difficult to negotiate. ultimately the question is what russia wants in the end. if it's just a question of rights for the russian-speaking community, that's one thing. if it's as the ukrainians and many western official feel, that it's ultimately to have a say in ukrainian affairs, to neutralize ukraine, to basically make ukraine subservient, as they put it, then this is an entirely different matter. we'll see what the road map actually proposes and how the reaction to that is. >> okay. david stern in kiev. thanks, david. now, stay with us here on "bbc world news." still plenty more to come. she's here again. singer kate bush wows the crowd at her first concert in 35 years. ♪
6:14 am
the last four hours have seen... one child fail to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪ until now... until right booking now. ♪ planet earth's number one accomodation site booking.com booking.yeah! and it doesn't even fly. we build it in classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators. we build it raising roofs, preserving habitats and serving america's veterans.
6:15 am
every day, thousands of boeing volunteers help make their communities the best they can be. building something better for all of us. ♪ my treadmill started to dress i mibetter than i did.uts, the problem was the pain. hard to believe, but dr. scholl's active series insoles reduce shock by 40% and give you immediate pain relief from three sports injuries. amazing! now, i'm a believer. this is "bbc world news." these are the latest headlines.
6:16 am
the double checking of votes in afghanistan's disputed presidential election has been halted after one of the sides withdrew from the process. atrocities committed by the extremist group islamic state, including forcing children to watch executions, are highlighted in a human rights u.n. report on syria. okay. time to get the latest business news. aaron is here with all that. >> absolutely. let's explain this. this is the news out in the last half hour. the head of the international monetary fund, yes, the imf. there she is right there. the world's most powerful, certainly female, banker. christine lagarde. she's now under formal investigation as part of a fraud scandal that's rocked france. it relates to the sale of a french bank more than two decades ago. more coming up on "gmt." we're going to go live to paris. you have to say, it is a big scandal in france.
6:17 am
the suspect list reads like a who's who of france's big financial chiefs. so covering that in just over an hour. also, the moscow international car show gets into gear from today until september 7th. and western car firms have high hopes that russia will turn into a lucrative market for them. in fact, one optimistic prediction is that as the economy there develops, it will overtake germany as europe's biggest car market within six years. but let's not kid ourselves. there's some pessimism out there. there's this rift between russia and the u.s. and europe over russia's involvement in ukraine. as well as the russian economy taking a bit of a down turn tur. it's going to be interesting to see which car giants show up at the car show. and smartphone theft. we know it's a major problem everyone in the world. but in the united states, for example, over 3 million were stolen last year. but now a new law has been passed. smartphones in california will
6:18 am
be required to come with a kill switch to render them useless if lost or stolen. the bill is the strongest attempt by a u.s. state to fight smartphone theft which accounts for more than half of all crimes in several of california's large cities like san francisco. more than half. wow. lots going on. follow me on twitter. that's it with the business. i want to know if you killed your phone and you find it down the back of your sofa, can you -- we have a tech guest coming up. >> thanks. see you later. now, the long-term cease-fire agreed by hamas and israel on tuesday appears to be holding. the truce has brought an end to seven weeks of fighting that killed more than 2,000 people. the majority of those were palestinians. after the truce, there were scenes of jubilation in gaza.
6:19 am
>> reporter: we're seeing for the first time in a long time families on the beach. the fishermen were out at 6:00 this morning in numbers i haven't seen in a long time. people are playing in the surf. fishermen are appearing with their nets. it feels like normal life here in gaza. now, what's even more extraordinary is overnight there weren't any deaths. i didn't hear any outgoing rockets, and i didn't hear any incoming israeli artillery. but if you go just a few streets back, of course, the scenes of devastation are quite extraordinary. entire buildings have been brought down in this conflict, which lasted 50 days. but the scenes we saw last night -- we're now about 14 hours since the cease-fire was declared -- were extraordinary. thousands of people poured into the streets all across gaza, celebrating what they describe as a victory, but also celebrating the fact that israel's blockade of gaza had
6:20 am
been lifted and they feel they have a deal they can work with. the challenge always with these cease-fires -- and this is cease-fire number nine -- is will it last? we hadn't seen so much celebration in previous cease-fires. so that seems to be different. the real challenge, will it hold over the coming days. this is only a truce. it's not a peace deal. but it's a start. >> quentin somerville in gaza for us. now let's take you to california. you may know that state has been hit by its worst drought in a century. authorities are drilling deeper and more often for ground water. it looks like the problem is only going to get worse. >> nothing. >> reporter: two months ago, olivia vargas' taps just ran dry. >> nothing. >> reporter: the ground water level dropped beyond the reach of her well. now only air comes out. she's one of hundreds of households affected. depending on neighbors to share as they can't afford to dig
6:21 am
deeper wells. and it's hard for farmers too. this rig is digging a well 400 meters deep. it costs nearly $500,000. without rain, tapping ground water is the only way to keep crops alive. but with unregulated drilling, nobody knows how long it will last. and a lot of farmers want wells. california's central valley is one of the most productive agricultural areas on the planet. around 80% of the world's almonds grow here. but the trees need water, and the farmers say the government must build more reservoirs. >> they've done a great job of increasing the population of california, but they've paid no heed to the infrastructure it takes to support the doubling of population we had in 30 years. i can't tell you if there's
6:22 am
climate change or if this is just a new normal. i can't predict it. i don't really think it is, but i won't make any decisions based on guessing what the weather is going to be for the next ten years. >> reporter: nasa satellites are tracking ground water reserves around the world. their data shows california's in big trouble. >> well, it's really bad. and it's bad because what we're seeing is we're having a tremendous loss of ground water in the central valley. i expect that it will accelerate over the next year because of the severity of the droughts. i absolutely expect that this will become the new normal. >> reporter: where i'm standing should be under water. this reservoir is just a fraction of its capacity. it's a third lower than it would normally be at this time of year. until the rains come, until these reservoirs fill up again, the farmers of california's central valley will continue to rely on precious ground water to
6:23 am
feed their crops. until there's nothing left. bbc news in california central valley. now, if you're a music fan, you'll like this. british singer kate bush wowed an audience in london with her long-awaited comeback. she made her appearance at the beginning of our tour. it was the scene of her last live show in 1979. >> reporter: kate bush is back in hammersmith. 35 years after she ended her first and last tour here, taking to an extreme the old show biz adage, always leave them wanting more. >> i've been waiting. i'm so excited. i can't wait. >> i swore if she ever did a live show, no matter where it was, i would cross the atlantic even for just a weekend. >> reporter: the show has been
6:24 am
shrouded in secrecy. all fan photography and recording has been banned with all these officially released images to mark the occasion. 19-year-old kate bush made a dramatic entrance in 1978 with her gothic romanticism. >> i would hope that it would do something, that people would like it. but the extent is just incredible. >> reporter: her style flips conspicuously between late '70s punk and disco pop. her performances have always been notable for their theatricality, which she learned from the avant guard dancer lindsay kempe, who was also an influence on another brit art popper. and like david bowie, kate bush has a reputation for being an
6:25 am
enigmatic reclusivreclusive, wht entirely fair. she stopped performing live to concentrate on producing her own music and then had a family and then for the last few years has been combining the two. >> all the best artists aren't really part of a movement. they just stick out like a sore thumb. then people that follow become that movement. people like igg pop and david bowie, they're them. i think kate is right up there with them. she's made some fantastic music over the years. >> reporter: kate bush is famously meticulous. she likes to be in control of every aspect of her work, including, of course, the show. which given its scale and complexity explains, at least to some extent, what she's been doing while she's away. >> wonderful, wonderful. kate bush, love that woman.
6:26 am
okay. i want to leave you with some quite incredible pictures coming to us from tulsa, oklahoma. something triggered the fire suppression foam equipment at the air force base. the new samsung galaxy tab s, the worlds most entertaining device with a color... colorfully brilliant screen that blows the competition out of the water. what is this? i thought i was doing the announcing... stunningly thin and effortlessly light..." i was literally about to say that. it certainly has the best screen of any samsung tablet. and i would add... or of any tablet, period. or of any tablet, period. see, buddy... teamwork. introducing the galaxy tab s with twice the resolution of hdtv, it's the world's most entertaining device. 58 seconds on the clock, what am i thinking about? foreign markets. asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity
6:27 am
across the credit spectrum and gets exposure to frontier and emerging markets. if you convert 4-quarter p/e of the s&p 500, its yield is doing a lot better... if you've had to become your own investment expert, maybe it's time for bny mellon, a different kind of wealth manager ...and black swans are unpredictable. go on a first date. my passion is puppetry. here? i think we're done here. hate drama? go to cars.com research, price, find. only cars.com helps you get the right car without all the drama. years of swedish experience in in perfecting the rich,150 never bitter taste of gevalia. we do it all for this very experience. that's good. i know right? gevalia. you may know what it's like to deal with high... and low blood sugar. januvia (sitagliptin) is a once-daily pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar.
6:28 am
januvia works when your blood sugar is high and works less when your blood sugar is low, because it works by enhancing your body's own ability to lower blood sugar. plus januvia, by itself, is not likely to cause weight gain or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). januvia should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis. tell your doctor if you have a history of pancreatitis. serious side effects can happen, including pancreatitis which may be severe and lead to death. stop taking januvia and call your doctor right away if you have severe pain in your stomach area which may be pancreatitis. tell your doctor right away and stop taking januvia if you have an allergic reaction that causes swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat, or affects your breathing or causes rash or hives. kidney problems sometimes requiring dialysis have been reported. using januvia and a sulfonylurea or insulin together may cause low blood sugar. to reduce the risk, your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of the sulfonylurea or insulin. your doctor may perform blood tests before and during treatment to check your kidneys. if you have kidney problems a lower dose may be prescribed.
6:29 am
side effects may include upper respiratory tract infection, stuffy or runny nose and sore throat, and headache. for help lowering your blood sugar talk to your doctor about januvia today.
6:30 am
our top stories this hour. one of the sides in afghanistan's disputed presidential election says it's boycotting the process of double checking all the votes. islamic state militants force children to watch executions. that's among the atrocities highlighted in the latest u.n. human rights report on syria. vladimir putin says is it's up to kiev to settle its differences with pro-russian separatists following talks with ukraine's president. >> and if manchester united spothers thought it couldn't get any worse, they're thrashed in a
6:31 am
league cup by a side two divisions below them. hello there. thanks for watching. afghanistan's disputed presidential election is on a knife's edge today after one of the candidates withdrew from a process to double check all the votes. abdullah abdullah pulled out after his senior campaign official dismissed the process as a joke. both he and ashraf gani claim to have won june's election. earlier i spoke to our correspondent david loyn, who's in the afghan capital kabul. he told me the recount appears to have been abandoned and is currently at a standstill. >> reporter: well, the u.n. said last night that they would continue it and they would put in more observers to ensure
6:32 am
fairness, but that hand happened. i can say now that the whole process has been paralyzed. abdullah abdullah's campaign workers didn't show up. u.n. workers who came to monitor the vote saw tables that weren't manned at all. no gani campaign workers were there at all. and there's now complete paralysis. this is just at the final stage when with the invalidation process exactly deciding which the clean votes were and which the dirty votes were is supposed to have been going on. and it's that that abdullah's campaign are complaining about. they say not enough of the fraudulent votes. they say most fraudulent votes were for gani. this feels like a very dangerous moment for afghanistan. >> exactly, yeah. explain to us why that is. this process has been going on for a long time. there's no stability in the country. >> reporter: well, dr. abdullah has been statesmanlike in his public pronouncements.
6:33 am
behind him there are thousands of men who are saying they will take to the streets and possibly occupy government buildings. that's the specific threat that's been made by some of his senior supporters if the vote turns out to be fraudulent. since their campaign organizers are now saying the voters turned out to be fraudulent, then we can potentially see in the days to come movement towards some sort of street protest. this is all terrible news for a country where the economy is in free fall. the taliban has been threatening the afghan forces with major assaults in recent weeks and recent months. and although president karzai says he's pulling out next week, he says he's going to stand down, whether this process has ended or not. it's hard to see how they can now, from this process, be a reasonable move towards a president to afghanistan, all of afghanistan would accept one would won this election.
6:34 am
>> that's david loyn in kabul. a short while ago i spoke to abdullah abdullah. he told me he did not think the recount had been fair. >> first of all, as the process continued, more of the problems that the u.n. anticipated emerged in the type of fraud which had taken place. and the vote invalidation criteria, which was anticipated, was not sufficient to assess the different types of fraudulent vote cast. that was one. next to that, the announcement of the result came in a way that was quite against contrary to the process through the procedures that were promised for us. the final count would be determined in front of our
6:35 am
agents, in front of media. in a matter of ten minutes, they announced the results for around 3,000 ballot boxes. this was also not acceptable for us. and throughout the process, as i mentioned earlier, there were different ways and types of fraud which had happened in an ingenious way. the invalidation criteria was not sufficient to assess it. so lots of fraudulent ballot papers. >> mr. abdullah, this is a process overseen by the united nations. so surely that should give you some trust in it. yet, you still say the process has no validity. >> the point is that one side is the united nations. the other side is the commission. still, part of the job needs to
6:36 am
be done through the commission. >> to many, it will just look as if you've pulled out because the audit was not going in your favor. >> us asking for the audit was not to be guaranteed it will be in our favor. but ours was a fair audit that no invalid ballot boxes will go through. this is something this audit didn't deliver. that's why we have registered our complaints. nevertheless, we are negotiating with the united nations on some of those very valid concerns. i personally had discussions
6:37 am
with them. >> that was abdullah abdullah, the presidential candidate, speaking to me earlier. let's take you to ukraine now. the president there, petro poroshenko, says a road map will be drawn up for agreeing to a cease-fire in eastern ukraine after he had talks with his russian counterpart. mr. poroshenko had a private meeting with russia's president vladimir putin in minsk on tuesday. meanwhile, there's no sign of an immediate end to fighting in eastern ukraine. and after ten russian soldiers were captured in ukraine on monday, the kremlin's involvement is again being questioned. mr. putin, though, says they must have accidently crossed into ukrainian territory during a border patrol. so is there any real progress here? david stern is our correspondent in kiev and sent us this. >> reporter: we have heard that mr. poroshenko will come up with a road map for peace, but as you've pointed out, the fighting goes on. there's another front as the ukrainians put it in the southern part of the eastern region of donetsk, and the
6:38 am
humanitarian crisis is kririsin. so the two sides are very far apart. one of the problems as far as the ukraines are concerned is the russians say they're not an involved party. they have no part in this. so for them, for the ukrainians, given the evidence that russian fighters if not soldiers, but fighters, are coming regularly through the border and there are weapons, armored vehicles, this makes it very difficult to negotiate. ultimately the question is what russia wants in the end. if it's just a question of rights for the russian-speaking community, that's one thing. if it is as the ukrainians and many western officials feel, that it's ultimately to have a say in ukrainian affairs, to neutralize ukraine, to basically make ukraine subservient, as they put it, then this is an entirely different matter. so we'll see what the road map actually proposes and how the russian reaction to that is. >> our correspondent david stern in ukraine there. now, united nations human rights investigators have published graphic details of
6:39 am
what they describe as aprocessties being carried out in syria. their report reveals evidence of violence by the extremist group islamic state, including frequent executions that the public is forced to watch, including children. the u.n. says it continues to torture and kill its citizens. >> reporter: war crimes and crimes against humanity are routine in which normal life has been utterly destroyed. in northern syria where islamic state controls large areas, public executions are common. the population, including children, are forced to watch. dead bodies are displayed often on crucifixes for days afterwards. women are lashed for failing to
6:40 am
cover their faces. minor crimes punished by amputation. meanwhile, syrian government forces continue to inflict violence. barrel bombs and chlorine gas are dropped from helicopters. hospitals are she would, civilians, arrested, tortured, and killed. the u.n. investigators say no side seems capable of victory. there is no military solution to the long suffering of syria's people. but no side is ready to stop fighting. the international community has been unable to broker even a brief cease-fire. instead, the u.n. fears syria's conflict is about to spread across the region with devastating consequences for millions of people. bbc news, geneva. earlier i spoke to the bbc news world affairs reporter. he said the u.n. was critical of all sides in the conflict. >> government forces, it means the original rebel groups, the
6:41 am
free syrian army, and the new actors on the battlefield, which is the islamic state. it's accusing all of them of carrying out atrocities. this commission, appointed by the u.n. human rights council, has been bringing out these reports for three years now, basically since the conflict in syria began. i have to say, the reports i've seen, this is the bleakest so far. >> as you said, we had heard this before. this perhaps is the first time it brings the islamic state as a separate entity up there with the others. where does it leave the deliberations for western government about what to do? >> it's very strong about the international community. it also castigates the international community, saying it has failed in what it calls its elemental duties, ie to protect civilians and stop atrocitie atrocities. i think it's said this before, that there should be an arms embargo at the very least.
6:42 am
of course, that's part of the problem. various countries, various individuals, different groups are fueling the conflict by sending in very significant amounts of arms and other supplies for the different fighting groups in the country. so it's very, very critical tfo the international community as well. okay. let me bring you other stories making headlines around the world. brazil's presidential debate is taking place, just two weeks after the death of one of the leading candidates, eduardo campos. his replacement is narrowing the lead with the incumbent. an american journalist who was freed on sunday after being held captive by syrian militants for nearly two years has arrived back in the united states. peter theo curtis says he was moved by all the people who welcomed him home. he was held by the al nusra front, front. the nigerian government says
6:43 am
it has so far managed to contain the ebola outbreak. the health minister said only one person was still being treated for the disease. two others had been released from hospital. five people have now died from ebola in nigeria, which is far fewer than in other countries in west africa. now, another game, another dismal performance by english football giants manchester united. they've been knocked out of the capital one cup after a 4-0 thrashing at the hands of mk dawn, who are a club two divisions below them. the former premier league champions and their new manager have yet to win this season, having played three games. so where has it all gone wrong? let's speak to our sports correspondent at the bbc sports center. this is a terrible start, isn't it? >> absolutely. one point from the first three games, as you say. still looking for that first win. and now such an unbelievable
6:44 am
defeat, which knocks them out of the league cup. something short of a disaster for united. they have appealed for calm. they've made the point united have made a lot of changes this summer. they brought in a lot of players. there are more potentially to leave and come in. he says you can't build a new team in a month. while that may buy him a bit of time, you know, the united spending has been nearly $220 million so far this season. people want results. yes yes, he will have a bit of time because the players need to gel together. but results need to come soon. >> at the same time, man united have just broken a british transfer record. is that going to turn it around for them?
6:45 am
was it 60 million they spent on him nearly? >> yeah, nearly $99 million, 6 million in british pounds. they're hoping that will turn it around for them. demaria, what he brings is creativi creativity. this is somebody that, you know, really is a provider. they've got wayne rooney up front. they have robin van persie up front. they have a lot of class in their strikers. they just need someone to come in and add that bit of creativity and flare. it's a huge price tag. it comes with a huge pressure. and really, it needs to come from a team. they can't rely on one player solely to make the difference. >> okay. good point there, azi. thanks very much. stay with us here on "bbc world news." plenty more to come, including this. the former hitman of pablo
6:46 am
escobar's drug cartel is released from jail early. and it doesn't even fly. we build it in classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators. we build it raising roofs, preserving habitats and serving america's veterans. every day, thousands of boeing volunteers help make their communities the best they can be. building something better for all of us. ♪ my treadmill started to dress i mibetter than i did.uts, the problem was the pain. hard to believe, but dr. scholl's active series insoles reduce shock by 40% and give you immediate pain relief from three sports injuries. amazing! now, i'm a believer. rejoice for you have entered the promised land of accomodation booking.com booking.yeah!
6:47 am
6:48 am
this is "bbc world news." these are the late elst headlin. the double checking of votes in afghanistan's disputed presidential election has been halted after one of the sides withdrew from the process. atrocities committed by the extremist islamic state group, including forcing children to watch executions, are highlighted in the latest u.n. human rights report on syria. now, one of colombia's most notorious killers has been released from prison after 22 years. he's known as popeye. he's said to have killed hundreds of people himself and ordered thousands of killings. he was a top hitman for the colombian drug lord pablo escobar in the 1980s and 1990s.
6:49 am
he was convicted for his part in the killing of a former presidential candidate in 1999. he turned state witness against a former minister who ordered the killing. sounds complicated, doesn't it? with me is william marquez, who's lived through some of the worst of the violence in colombia. glad you're here in one piece to talk to us, william. why has he been released early, first of all? >> you have to understand in colombia, there are no life sentences, even for such high-profile murders. at the time he handed himself in, there was a deal that if you did so, you would get a reduced sentence. so his sentence was 35 years, more or less. he paid 22. so legally, he was able to walk free. >> i just gave a few brief details of what he's supposed to have done. but there's a long list of crimes. >> oh, yeah. a bombing campaign against the government and its institutions.
6:50 am
he blew up or coordinated the blowing up of the intelligence service building. he blew up or coordinated the blowing up of an airplane, where, by the way, some people i knew were in. and also, just tortures and murders that he confessed to. >> there's some story also about his ex-girlfriend. tell us that. >> yes, yes. he was the lover of pablo escobar's former girlfriend. >> so his boss, who's a crime lord, he was going out with his girlfriend. >> yeah, and his girlfriend also was an informant for the authorities. pablo escobar ordered popeye to kill her. >> wow. nice people. what's been the reaction to his release? >> well, some people are appalled, obviously. i mean, people say that he has to pay a longer sentence, even life in prison. as i told you, there is no life in prison in colombia.
6:51 am
others, however, say that he has paid the time that he was due. the thing is, one has to remember that he is about the only one, the only surviving member of the cartel to ever be convicted and had a sentence in jail for such a long time in colombia. >> strangely, despite this huge catalog of crimes, some people have some warmth of feeling toward the cartel. >> indeed. pablo escobar did some quote/unquote good things for some people. he built stadiums, homes, gave money to poor people. if there's any relief to victims, it's what is popeye going to do now that he's free? because he's certainly going to have to look over his shoulder everywhere he goes because there's probably a price on his head. >> wow. yeah, there certainly is i'm sure. okay. william marquez, thanks. very interesting. now, i'm going to take you to the u.s. a 9-year-old girl there has
6:52 am
accidently killed her shooting instructor while she was being shown how to use a high-powered automatic weapon. charles was giving the girl a lesson at the last stop firing range in arizona when she pulled the trigger on an uzi submachine gun and lost control of it. the accident happened after the gun was switched from single to full automatic mode. footage has been released by the sheriffs department that shows the instructor teaching the 9-year-old shortly before he was shot. take a look. >> otherwise the gun won't fire, okay? grab right there. there you go. just like that. okay. turn this leg forward. there you go. just like that. all right. go ahead and give me one shot. all right. all right. full auto. >> we've frozen the video there.
6:53 am
you can imagine how gruesome it is after it carries on. we didn't want to show you that. but he died after being air lifted to hospital. questions have been asked about why a 9-year-old girl was allowed to fire a machine gun. but in the state of arizona, children are legally allowed to shoot firearms from the age of 8. now, a magnitude 5.7 earthquake has hit iceland overnight. it's the biggest since tremors began ten days ago. intense seismic activity at iceland's largest volcano has raised worries an eruption could cause another ash cloud like one that shut down much of europe's air space back in 2010. so far, thankfully, no evidence of an eruption. the aviation code remains at orange, not its highest level. now, may of this year marked the end of the line of one of india's most beloved cars, the ambassador. production that was once omnipresent on indian streets
6:54 am
have stopped following falling demand. it's led to an outpouring of nostalgia among lovers, me included. ♪ >> reporter: for more than 50 years, she was the pride of india. the ultimate style and status symbol. even as india changes, the ambassador survived. everyone who could owned an ambassador. it was the car you simply fell in love with. growing up in india, the ambassador was the only car i ever knew. it was a prized possession in my family. took us to work, school, took us to long family holidays. and i learned how to drive in one. if you look inside it, it's not exactly state of the art. a very basic dashboard, no
6:55 am
air-conditioning, no stereo system. the clutch pedal, the gear levers are all a bit clunky. it takes a real effort to use one. but as they say, if you can drive an ambassador, you can drive anything. and on the streets, the ambassadors felt power and privilege. white ones carrying cabinet ministers is and top civil servants. black ones reserved for army generals. this man has been driving one since 1969. like so many taxi drivers, he loves the ambassador. many cabbies have switched to newer cars, but he's hanging on to his. >> translator: it's a very good car. it's so spacious that you can fit many people inside. it does break down at times, but
6:56 am
you can easily fix it. this car has given me so much. my livelihood. i've even managed to send two of my children abroad. >> reporter: foreign visitors, too, fell under its spell. germany's ambassador to india can barely contain his enthusiasm as he shows off his favorite wheels. >> we have bmws there, and they're very good cars, but they're not unique cars. this is a car which is unique. it expresses also our affection for india, you know, and the uniqueness of india. that's india. >> reporter: but india has changed. the ambassador's out of sync with the dynamic, fast-paced outlook and is now merely a fading memory. >> i remember traveling in an ambassador when i was a child.
6:57 am
they had a particular smell to them, a particular feel to them. wonderful cars. what a shame they're going to be off the roads. you can get in touch with me on twitter. love to hear from you. plenty more coming up here on "bbc news." stay with us. thanks for watching.
6:58 am
3rd and 3. 58 seconds on the clock, what am i thinking about? foreign markets. asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity across the credit spectrum and gets exposure to frontier and emerging markets. if you convert 4-quarter p/e of the s&p 500, its yield is doing a lot better... if you've had to become your own investment expert, maybe it's time for bny mellon, a different kind of wealth manager ...and black swans are unpredictable. and it doesn't even fly. we build it in classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators. we build it raising roofs, preserving habitats and serving america's veterans.
6:59 am
every day, thousands of boeing volunteers help make their communities the best they can be. building something better for all of us. ♪ [ music and whistling ] when you go the extra mile to help business owners save on commercial auto insurance, you tend to draw a following.
7:00 am
[ brakes screech ] flo: unh... [ tires squeal, brakes screech, horn honks ] ooh, ooh! [ back-up beeping, honking ] a truckload of discounts for your business -- now, that's progressive. hello. you're watching "gmt" here on bbc world news. with a cease-fire in gaza supposedly long-term now in place, what happens next to address the root causes of a seemingly endless spiral of conflict? as signs of normality return to gaza, we'll hear from senior politicians on both sides about the chances of lasting peace. >> this was an unnecessary round of violence between us and the palestinians, hamas and gaza, that brought only misery and suffering to both sides. afghanistan's fragile political agreement is in danger of collapse as one

74 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on