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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  August 29, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm tim willcox with bbc world news. our top stories. evidence of human rights aabuses in ukraine, in the region controlled by pro russian separatists. more than 3 million refugees from the war in syria and half the people in the country itself have left their homes according to the refugee agency. >> displaced multiple times, exhausted there. they've exhausted savings and resources. they have no other option but to find a way out. malaysia airlines to cut 6,000 workers following two separate air disasters that hit
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the company this year. red alert. eruption near a volcano forces the air traffic control to shut down around the site. hello. pro russian separatist in eastern ukraine are detaining and torchering civilians according to the group. in some cases their family members. the report is released as the west raises accusations of direct russian involvement. >> they've seen escalations before, but now it may be entering a critical phase.
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pro russian rebels have launched a counter attack and pushed back government forces. key towns have fallen including the ukraine's southern coast. kiev and western officials say this time there is a key difference. kremlin forces are spearheading the attack. moscow denies its troops are there, but nato says these images show russian position inside ukraine. they say at least 1,000 russian servicemen are fighting and using the latest military equipment. >> over the past two weeks we have noticed a significant escalation in both the level and sophistication of russia's military interference in ukraine. these latest images provide concrete examples of russian activity inside ukraine, but they are only the tip of the iceberg in terms of the overall
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scope of russian troops and weapons movements. >> western experts say this bm tank is available only to russian army supporting claims of moscow's involvement. a alarm in the international community is growing. at united nations security council, concern and criticism. russia said it was not involved in the conflict. >> russia has repeatedly and deliberately violated the sovereignty territory of ukraine. the forces in ukraine make that plain for the world to see. >> eu and u.s. leaders are speaking of deeper sanctions against moscow. so far, those already in place have failed to stop the conflict. with the kremlin defiant, many are are asking not when but
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where the fighting will end. bbc news kiev. while western leaders ponder response to the presence of russ russia in ukraine, the group says since april armed fighters supporting luhansk and donetsk are detaining hundreds of civilians including journalists, pro activists and non orthodox religious leaders. a report shows a photo of what the group says is the basement of the security services. civilians were kicked, stabs, burned with cigarettes, all subjective to mark execution. this is a half destroyed list of detainees found after insur is gents left last month which have the names of those that have been taken.
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human rights watch says it has what the group says is a mass grave where the bodies of four christians were found after the men were abducted from a protestant church service. i spoke to the author of that report. i asked if there's a particular group of civilians target aed. >> these people deemed to be critics of the self-proclaimed authorities in eastern ukraine. those critics are activists, journalists, religious activists who are not russian orthodox and being perceived as disa approving of the self-proclaimed. it's as simple as that. then of course other people are not really activists. for example they have voiced a critical opinion on social
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media. the documented cases like that or people who neighbors reported as insider for ukraine. that's enough for insurgents to come and get them and torture them actually to use them as hostages. when talking about torture, most of the people we interviewed and is overall we interviewed dozens of former captains, there was talk of beatings and torture that usually occurred the first night or first to second day. that's the roughest period of all. they also said to us that even though they were tortured during interrogation, they're not really trying to get any information from them but rather aimed at breaking their will and
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punishing them. >> is there any evidence this is being carried out by ukrainian soldiers as well? >> well, indeed we actually received some reports about ukrainian forces volunteering battalions holding people and treating detainees with cruelty. there's other reports that we are going to investigate. >> human rights watch there. let's go to moscow. damming evidence on both sides. any reaction from russian issue today about this latest report steve? >> reporter: no reaction yet to this report, but in the last hour the russian foreign minister lavrov issued strong denial that russia launched a
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military incursion into eastern ukraine. he said there are no facts to back up the claims by the west that russia sent troops to eastern ukraine. he said it was conjecture. he also said previous satellite images provided by western governments reportedly showing russian military hardware in eastern ukraine were computer games. strong denial there in complete contrast to what we were hearing yesterday when kiev said russia had moved heavy artillery to eastern ukraine. i nato said more than 1,000 russian troops were in eastern ukraine. even one of the rebel leaders, pro moscow leaders, admitted that there were russian troops fighting on the side of the armed separatists there. >> and it's interesting. i spoke to the russian ambassador to the eu yesterday. he said nine russian soldiers were in ukraine detained by
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authorities. on the diplomatic fronts, nato meeting today. we're just hearing steve, the prime minister of ukraine says he will now ask parliament to abandoned the non alliance status and put it on the course of nato. that will be extremely provocative won't it for moscow? >> yes. the russians couldn't possibly accept that. russian officials have maintained that is a big red line for moscow. they do not want to see ukraine become a member of nato. russia believes this is national security. the fact kiev says the ukrainian government says it wants to set out on that path to nato membership doesn't mean that's a short path. it doesn't mean ukraine automatically will be accepted into nato. if ukraine is accepted into nato, somewhere down the path, then that will cause enormous opposition here in the kremlin.
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steve rosen berg in moscow. thank you very much. to syria now. a refugee agency released a report calling the situation the biggest humanitarian emergency of our era. the number of refugees registered in neighboring countries has reached 3 million, 1 million more than a year ago. the picture is bleaker. inside syria, there are 6.5 million people displaced. that means half of syria's 18 million population are living away from their homes. we have a spokeswoman there. i asked her how the agency was coping. >> agencies with over 150 partners that we worked with as
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part of the response are quoting difficulty for growing needs. donor support has been very generous since the crisis started. we've had $4.1 billion in funds. however, we are still $2 billion short from the needs that we need until the end of the year to provide the basic assistance for the refugees who are now here and continue to come into the neighboring countries. >> how is the local population reacting to this? >> the local population in countries like lennon have shown generosity and hospitality from the beginning. lebanese homes are hosting up to 40 syrian refugees who they didn't know before. s this is the fourth year of conflict. at this stage, frustrations are growing between the two communities. syrians are frustrated. they want to go back home. the lebanese population is
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starting to feel strain of this crisis on a very small country with already very weak infrastructure. >> turning to what's happening inside syria itself. given the numbers of displaced people there, how concerned are you about their condition? the situation inside syria as we know is very difficult. it's difficult for 6.5 million people displaced inside syria. we are concerned. our teams on the ground are working there. at the moment, i can tell you more about the situation in neighboring countries as i know more about that. inside syria we do know there's a lot of concern for the 6.5 million who are displaced inside syria. >> do you think the numbers of people trying to leave the country will increase in the next few months as well? >> we've heard from refugees we've spoken to in recent months that leaving syria is becoming
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increasingly difficult. we've heard accounts from lebanese and jordan of increasing check points inside syria. as a result people have to pay more bribes to get through check points. conditions are are getting more difficult. we're hearing from people leaving and they say this is their last resort. prices are going up inside syria. people have been displaced multiple times, exhausted their savings and resources and have no other option but to find a way out. the world health organization has warned as many as 20,000 people could be infected with ebola. it needs half a billion to contain the virus. the outbreak was reported in west africa in march and become the deadliest spread of the disease since discovery in 1976. more than 3,000 case have been
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reported more than 1,500 deaths in four countries. in liberia alone, more than 600 have lost their lives to the disease. our correspondent has been to the liberia ivory coast border where preparations are made to prevent ebola from spreading further. >> unnerving silence replaces the normally vibrant border. all crossing points into liberia and guinea were closed over the weekend in efforts to avoid ebola. trucks are beginning to pile up on this side of the border. authorities say health and more important than trade. people here have no idea when the borders will reopen. people are suffering financially. the borders are closed. this family is on the other side and can't come back. she says it's difficult for t, e
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fear of ebola is worse. >> we've been told not to eat bush meat, shake hands, not to have sex. >> reporter: beyond the mountains lies liberia. to the east is guinea. the rain forest separates ivory coast from the two worst hit ebola nations. this is one of five ebola treatment centers in the region. doctors are practicing what to do if a suspected case arrives. every detail is considered. >> translator: we've done the maximum possible to be ready and vigilant to control the situation. as soon as any suspected case ali arriv arrives, you can never be ready enough, but i think we're strong enough to fight the virus. >> reporter: the heat inside the suit is biggest difficult.
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two to three hours is most anybody can last. countries are accused of closing borders and suspending flights. ivory coast says it landfall do anything it can to fight ebola. bbc news, ivory coast. stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come. dismantling one of brazil's largest environmental criminal gangs. police take action against the group accused of invading and burning huge areas of the amazon. fail to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪ until now... until right booking now. ♪ planet earth's number one accomodation site booking.com booking.yeah!
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you're watching bbc world news. i'm tim willcox. our latest headlines. human rights watch in moscow publishing evidence of human rights evidence in the region controlled by pro russian separatists. the united nations says 3 million syrians have fled the country to escape the war. the u.n. agency says the syrian crisis is the biggest
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humanitarian emergency of our era. now marion is here. >> weirdly surprisingly no name change. i've been looking at the finer details. >> it's the brand people are not going to. >> i know. roots will change, jobs will go. the name will stay the same. as expected there's been a shakeup at malaysia airlines. the company has been struggling. this year it's been hit by twin stars. the disappearance of mh370 over the ocean and shooting down of mh 17 over ukraine. hundreds of lives were lost and a national icon tarnished perhaps forever. malaysia airlines is said to get $1.9 billion lifeline from the main shareholder. it's going to shed a third of
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the work force, 6,000 people will lose their jobs. it's going to focus on a different region. now long haul routes will be abandoned. losses are mounting, and the company is warning of more to come. bookings plunged to a third pushing the company to a collapse. what have we heard? malaysia employs 6,000 staff. 3,000 will lose their jobs. long hall routes will be abandoned. new management brought next year. more on that throughout the day on bbc world news. from malaysia to europe where there's growing concern about the state of the region's economy. we've had the latest inflation figures for 18 countries with eu currency. prices rose just 3% that month,
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smallest increase since october 2009. what does it mean? inflation has been locked in what the president called a danger zone of below 1% since october last year. let's take a look at numbers now. the european central bank's target for healthy inflation is 2% a year. anything below 1% is danger zone. in july, it dropped to 0.4%. figures for august show 0.3%. this is going to put pressure on the ebc to stimulate the economy when it meets next week. that's the round up of our business. tim, back to you. >> thank you very much indeed. here in britain, police are searching for a 5-year-old boy with a brain tumor has been take an way from the hospital by his parents without the doctor's consent. there's concerns about this boy who needs constant care.
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he was taken from southern england on thursday. police think he's been take ton france and have launched a major investigation to find him. jane francis kelly has this. >> reporter: police say they are seriously concerned for the life of 5-year-old asher king who needs constant medical attention after undergoing surgery. medical staff were treating him at south hampton general hospital where he was receiving care for a brain tumor. he cannot speak and is unable to walk. tv footage shows his father pushing him in a wheelchair or buggy. police released a picture of the 51-year-old on social media sites. together with his mother. officers say they left the hospital at 2:00 yesterday afternoon. the family which includes six siblings drove in a gray car from south hampton to ports mouth where they live and boarded a ferry.
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they arrived in cherbourg. there's a raise add alert there. the hamp shire police said if we do not locate him today, there are serious concerns for his life. he's receiving constant medical care in the uk due to recent surgery and ongoing issues. without the specialist 24 hour care, he's at risk for additional health complications placing him at substantial risk. they've launched an urgent appeal to locate the little boy. they're asking people with information to contact them. bbc news. police in northern brazil say they're in the process of dismantling what they say is one of the country's biggest environmental gangs. the the group is accused of invading, burning, selling huge ars of the amazon forest. >> police call these men the
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biggest destroyers of the amazon rain forests. their arrests are a huge step forward in saving one of the world's natural wonders. the gang is accuse canned of causing hundreds of millions of of environmental damage. they've made millions more by invading, burning large areas of public land and selling these illegally for farming and grazing. they could face 30 years in jail. brazil's government committed them for reducing the forest. deforstation increased by 28% last year after years of decline. many loggers and illegal miners are able to operate with impunity. with dismantling of the
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country's biggest criminals, it represents victory for those brazil say should be doing more to protect natural resources. now when you think of google, you usually think of search engines or computers. the company has now taken to the skies. this is the first drone aircraft can designed to deliver small packages over long distances to isolated areas. the program is under development for two years and now made public. google hopes to eventually use it to deliver aid to disaster zones. what weighs more than a ton and feeds hundreds. mexico city's largest ever enchilada. mexican chefs toiled for hours preparing this dish at the national enchilada fair a. they were hoping to beat the record set four years ago.
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they didn't quite measure up. enchilada date back to miam times. there's beef, cheese, vegetables. a record attempt that failed at last bite. you're watching bbc news. keep watching. i missed so many workouts, my treadmill started to dress better than i did. the problem was the pain. hard to believe, but dr. scholl's active series insoles reduce shock by 40% and give you immediate pain relief from three sports injuries. amazing!
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bbc world news. our top stories. new evidence of human rights abusers in eastern ukraine. more than 3 million refugees from the war in syria and almost half the people from the country have fled their homes according to the u.n. refugee agency. >> people displaced multiple times have exhaust a -- exhausted their savings and resources. a special report on how the
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coast is struggling to fight the ebola virus. and the biggest threat to the amazon is the destruction. hello. pro russian separatists in eastern ukraine are detaining and torching civilians. that is according to to human rights watch. the group accused them of targeting critics, journalists, political activists and in some cases their family members. the report is released just as the west raises accusations that direct russian involvement in the conflict. david stern has the latest on the fighting. >> reporter: ukraine's conflict has seen escalations before, but it may now be entering a critical phase. pro russian rebels have launched a counter attack ask and pushed
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back government forces. key towns have fallen including the one along the ukraine southern coast kiev and western fishes say this time there's a difference. kremlin forces are spearheading the attack. moscow dethighs troops are there, but nato says these satellite images show russian positions in craukraine. they say 1,000 are fighting and using the latest equipment. >> in the past two weeks we've noticed significant escalation in level and sophistication of russ russia's military interference many ukraine. these latest images provide concrete examples of russian activity in side ukraine. they're only the tip of the iceberg in terms of overall scope of russian troops and
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weapons movements. >> western experts say this 72 bm tank is available only to russian army supporting claims of moscow's involvement. alarm in the international community is growing. at the united nations security council, a lot of concern and criticism. russia said it was not involved in the conflict. >> russia has deliberately and repeatedly violated the sovereignty. that is plain to see. >> eu and u.s. leaders are speaking of deeper sanctions against moscow. so far, those already in place have failed to stop the conflict. with the kremlin defiant, many are asking not when but where the fighting will end. david stern, bbc news, kiev.
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well, while western leaders ponder their response to presence of russia's military in eastern ukraine, human rights watch in moscow published evidence of human rights evidence controlled by pro russian separatists. the group says since april, armed fighters supporting the self-proclaimed republic of luhansk and donetsk detain add journalists, pro activist and non orthodox religious leaders. it lists four locations for torture including this filmed by the bbc last month. it's here the group says civilians were beaten, kicked, stabbed, burned with cigarettes and subjective to marked persecution. this list had the names of those that had been taken. it says it has evidence of extra
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a judicial executions. this is what is said to be a mass grave where the bodies of four men were found after they had been abducted from a church service. i spoke to the author of the report and asked her if there was a particular group of civilians targeted by these separatists. >> it's about these people deemed to be critics of the self-proclaimed authorities in eastern ukraine. those critics are activists, journalists. activists in particular who are not russian orthodox and are being perceived as disapproving of the self-proclaimed authority. it's as simple as that. of course other people are not really activists but have the same for example voiced a critical opinion on social media. the documented cases like that
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or people who neighbors reported as for ukraine. that's enough for insurgents to come and get them and torture them actually to use them as hostages. when we're talking about torture, most of the people interviewed in dozens of former captains said beatings and torture usually occur the first night or first to second day. that's the roughest period of all. they also said to us that even though they were tortured during interrogations, they're not really trying to get any information from them but rather aimed at breaking their will and punishing them. >> is there any evidence that
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this is being carried out by ukrainian soldiers as well? >> well indeed we actually received some reports about ukrainian forces volunteer battalions holding people in detention and treating the detainees with cruelty. there's other reports that we are going to investigate. >> human rights watch in moscow. the world health organization has warned as many as 20,000 people could be infected with ebola. it says it needs half a billion to contain the virus. the outbreak was first reported in west africa in march and since become the deadliest spread since discovery in 1976. according to most recent figures, more than 3,000 cases have been reported including
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1,500 deaths from the virus in four countries n. liberia alone, more than 600 have lost their lives to the disease. our correspondent has been to the liberia coast border where they're trying to stop the spread. >> the normally vibrant border is replaced. all crossing points into liberia and guinea were closed in efforts to avoid liberia. trucks are beginning to pile up on this side of the border. authorities say health is more important than trade. people here have no idea when borders are going to reopen. people are suffering financially, but many are relieved the borders are closed. this family is on the other side. they can't come back. she says it's difficult, but the fear of ebola is worse. >> translator: i'm afraid of
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death. it's not a trip you can return from. we're told not to eat bush meat, not to shake hands, and not to have sex. >> reporter: beyond these mountains lies liberia where the virus is out of control. to the east is guinea. thick rainforest is all that separates the two worst hit ebola nations. this is one of five ebola treatment centers in the region. doctors are practicing what to do if a suspected case arrives. every detail is considered. >> translator: we've done the maximum possible to be ready and vigilant to control the situation as soon as any suspected case arrives. you can never be ready enough, but i think we're strong flu fluff -- strong enough to fight this. >> the heat inside the suit is biggest difficulty, he says. two or three hours is the
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longest anyone can last. closing borders and suspending flights are active be but the ivory coast says it will do everything can to fight ebola. bbc news, ivory coast. >> british scientists are trying to develop a possible vaccine. human trials could begin in the next few weeks. professor from jenna institute joining us now from oxford. how long have you been working on this virus? >> less than a movement. this has happened incredibly quickly. >> that's you personally. in terms of other teams -- surely you can't develop something that quickly or can you? >> teams elsewhere in italy and north america were doing preclinical studies, research tests on animals, on a new vaccine candidate that looks
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quite promising in those tests. it's never been given to a human being. >> is it similar in construction do the medicine that's been given to some people and appeared to have saved lives? >> it's quite different. z-mapp is a treatment given to patients with the disease. this is a vaccine given to people to stop them from getting infected. this is fundamentally different. it's similar to vaccines we have done clinical trials in oxford particularly for malaria. we're reasonably confident this time of vaccine will be safe. the trial we're planning in the next few weeks has three objectives to confirm the vaccine is safe, to look at what immune response produces to see if it looks like it will work and thirdly, determine the best dose to give to people in west
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africa. >> how many strains are there? i read of it would have. are there more than that? will that affect what's in the clinical trials? >> those are the two major strains. this is strain occurred in guinea. luckily the outbreak is very similar. 97% identical to the other strange. that's what the vaccine had been made for. it will be the strain vaccine we're testing. we're confident that will work well against the guinea strain. >> you're describing things s p simply to me. can i ask this last question, how does it work. create antibodies to stop the fever or what can you -- is there a parallel? >> that's a great question. it works in two ways. it does produce antibodies. the challenge is get enough neutralizing antibodies that stop the virus getting into
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cells to be useful. the second way it works is stimulating the cellar arm of the system, getting white blood cells to target infected cells to kill ebola once inside the cell. this vaccine does induce both types of cells powerfully. >> you're confident this will have quite a good impact. how many doses can be produced and how quickly could it be administered? >> the good news is that in the preclinical studies, one doze was required. we hope that's all we'll need in humans but can't be sure of that. there's a back up plan for a booster dose and what's going on now as well at the manufacturing facility. there's about 10,000 doses being made. that would be quite useful in africa if we could have that ready by the end of the year. >> that would be sold at cost,
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would it? is this an opportunity to make a lot of money? >> i don't think there's selling involved. this would be provided to who for emergency use. there's a major company involved that's participating in the manufacture. this is not a commercial enterprise. >> you seem very confident. if this doesn't work, that would presumably take you back to square one? >> we don't have too many vaccine options. there's two plausible candidates. we think this is the better one. if neither work, we're not going to have a vaccine for this outbreak. thank you very much indeed. >> thank you. to syria now. the united nations refugee agency released a report calling the situation the biggest humanitarian emergency of our era. the conflict in syria started three and a half years ago. the number of syrian refugees registered in neighboring countries has reached 3 million. that's a million more than a year ago.
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the pictures even bleaker because inside syria that's 6.5 million displaced people. when those figures are added up, it means nearly half of syria's population are live aing away f their homes. lebanon has seen the largest influx of refugees from syria. i asked our cohow agencies were coping. >> just over 150 partners we work with as part of the refugee response are having difficulty to respond to existing and growing needs. the donor support has been very generous since the crisis started. we've had over $4.1 billion in funds, however we are still $2 billion short from the needs that we need until the end of the year to provide basic assistance for the refugees who are here now and continue to come into the neighboring
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countries. >> how's the local population reacting to this? >> the local population in countries like lebanon have shown generosity and hospitality from the beginning of the crisis. lebanese homes are hosting up to 40 syrian refugees who they didn't know before. this is the fourth year of the conflict. at this stage, frustrations growing between the two communities. the syrians are frustrated. they want to go back home. the lebanese population is starting to feel strain of this crisis on a small country with weak infrastructure. >> turning to what's happening inside syria itself, given the numbers of displaced people there, how concerned are you about their condition? >> the situation inside syria as we know is very difficult for the already 6.5 million people displaced inside syria.
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we are very concerned. our teams on the ground are working in there. at the moment, i can tell you more about the situation in neighboring countries as i know more about that. inside syria we know there's a lot of concern for these 6.5 million people who are displaced inside syria. >> do you think the numbers of people trying to leave the country will increase over the next few months as well? >> we've heard from refugees that we've spoken to in recent months that leaving syria has become difficult. we've heard accounts of increasing check points inside syria. result people have to pay more bribes to get through check points. conditions are getting more difficult for people to leave. we're hearing from people who are leaving at this stage which is their last resort. prices are going up inside syria. people that have been displaced multiple times in syria have
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exhausted savings and resources. now they have no other option but to find a way out. stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come. running off with the crown. why a former miss asia was dethroned. ven fly. we build it in classrooms and exhibit halls, mentoring tomorrow's innovators. we build it raising roofs, preserving habitats and serving america's veterans. every day, thousands of boeing volunteers help make their communities the best they can be. building something better for all of us. ♪
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at the summit next week, we will meet president poroshenko to make clear nato's unwaivering support for ukraine.
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we condemn in the strongest terms russia's continued disregard of international obligations. we urge russia to seize its illegal military actions. stop its support to armed separatists and take immediate and verifiable steps towards deescalation of this grave crisis. with that i'm ready to take public questions. wall street journal. >> secretary general, the prime minister said he wanted ukraine to move toward nato membership. i wanted to ask for your reaction whether that came up today in today's meeting and whether it will be discussed in a summit in wails. >> first of all we respect
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ukraine's decisions as regard for ukraine's security policy and alliance affiliations. this is a fundamental principle that each and every nation has inherit right to decide itself on security policies and its alliance affiliations. i'm not going to interfere with political discussions in ukraine but let me remind you of nato's decision taken at the summit in 2008 according to which ukraine will become a member of nato provided of course that ukraine so wishes and provided ukraine provide the necessary criteria. in the meantime, ukraine has decided to pursue a so called non alliance policy. we fully respect that.
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we fully respect if parliament decides to change. that policy because we adhere to principle that each and every nation has the right to decide itself without interference from out side. we hope that other nations adhere to the same principle. >> was that discussed at today's meeting? >> it was not discussed today. >> secretary general, we right now completely new situation, but i would like to repeat old question. how nato can really help or nato member countries in ukraine situation. thank you. >> at the summit in whales next
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week, we'll take decisions as to how we will will enhance our how to increase our cooperation with ukraine. among other initiatives, we are establishing four trust funds to finance concrete initiatives within four areas. command and control, cyber defense, help through military personnel including wounded personnel. i'm very please had already at today's meeting several allies announced contributions to these trust funds. it was signalled that more announcements may come forward
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at the summit in wales next week. the whole purpose of these trust funds is to finance activities that can assist ukraine in reforming and modernizing the armed forces with a few to making them with a view to make them stronger to ukraine. >> thanks very much. that's all we have time for this afternoon. >> so that was the head of nato just talking about that request or that statement by the prime minister that he would seek to end the non alliance status of ukraine with a view to become a member of nato which would be provocative for russia on the border. now police in northern brazil say they are in the process of dismantling what they say is one of the country's
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biggest environmental criminal gangs. the the group is accused of burning, invading is and selling huge areas of the forest. >> brazilian police call these men the biggest destroyers of the amazon rainforest. their arrest as are a huge step forward in saving one of the world's natural wonders. the gang is accused of causing hundreds of millions of of environmental damage and alleged to have made millions more by invading, logging and burning large areas of public land and selling these illegally for farming and grazing. they could face more than 30 years in jail. brazil's government has committed themselves to reducing the destruction of the forest. last year, deforestation increased nearly a third after a year of decline. corruption is still rice in the
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interior with miners and loggers able to operate. >> that's it so far from me, tim willc willcox, and the team. bye bye for now. i missed so many workouts, my treadmill started to dress better than i did. the problem was the pain. hard to believe, but dr. scholl's active series insoles reduce shock by 40% and give you immediate pain relief from three sports injuries. amazing! now, i'm a believer.
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news with me. our top stories. evidence emerges of human rights violations committed during the conflict in ukraine. the new u.n. report says pro russian rebels and ukraine's military has carried out murders, torture and abduction. 3 million and rising, the number of syrians who fled their country. it's a new grim milestone, but nearly half the population has left their homes. aviation in iceland is on red alert after a volcano

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