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-- www.vitac.com hello. i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories. new hope for the fight against ebola with a promise in weeks that it can be contained with the right measures in place. >> it will be possible as it was possible in the past to contain this epidemic four to six months. a march to the chief executive by people angered by people that he did not get the
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vote. the pentagon is examining this i.s. video. and on day six of the swedish hunt for a mystery submarine, the search narrows to the bay capital. hello. a top red cross official says that with proper measures, the ebola outbreak can be brought under control in four to six months. his comments come with an emergency committee of the world health organization meeting shortly to make its latest assessment of the ebola outbreak in west africa. along with potential news of vaccines and treatments, let's find out the latest. a treatment is developed using
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antibodies from the blood of those that survived infection. facilities are set up in liberia to process blood. the vaccine could be available in weeks. the red cross says the outbreak can be controlled but irrational restrictions should not be imposed. >> it creates a lot of fear and extreme panic that sometimes lead to very irrational type of behavior like closing borders, isolating countries, et cetera. those are no solutions. the only solution is how can we join our efforts to contain those kind of epidemic at epicenter? >> there's concern in sierra le leone that ebola is continuing to spread. more than 300 homes have been
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quarantined on the outskirts of the capital. there's no security to stop people from coming and going. we'll get an update. first a liberian father tells how ebola devastated his family. >> saturday 21st of september is a day i'll never forget. i got a call from my wife's number, but it was not her. i answered the phone, but nobody spoke. she was staying with our three children while i was north of liberia. that night my brother called me. your wife has died. i said what? i dropped the phone. we were together 23 years. later that same week, i received another call from there. my brother taking care of my wife had become infected and
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died too. my two youngest children were take ton the center. my girls were very sick, and they died. i felt more helpless. my oldest son was still there. he called he and said everyone got sick. i don't know what to do. i told him to come here to be with me. when my son arrived, i noticed james looking for tired than usual. i was worried about him. when the test came back positive, it was a night of agony for me. after some time, my son started doing much better. he was moving around. i prayed that he would be free of ebola and test negative. i just wanted us to be together again. then something amazing happened. something i could not actually believe until i saw it. when i saw him come out, i felt so very, very happy. >> the story there of a liberian father. his family's ordeal at the hands
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of the virus. for more on the potential treatments and vaccines and find out more about the meeting, head to our correspondent in geneva. >> it will be with key experts all over the world taking part by conferencing. all they want to do is look at how the ebola epidemic, the measures the who and effected countries are taking so far and what effect they're having. they'll look at border screenings, screenings at airports, quarantine times for people who may have become infected or suspected to be infected. all those things to see how effective those measures have been. it may be that travel regulations will be reassessed. it's understood the world health
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organization is not key because of the damage to emerging african economies to make them any stricter than they are at the moment. >> of course there's the worry about this virus spreading if more restrictions are not put in place. i want to also ask you about exactly where we are and time scale on treatments and vaccines. >> the race is on to develop effective treatments for ebola and to develop an effective vaccine. we have to stress neither treatment or vaccine are going to be ready tomorrow to help the people infected with ebola today or who will become infected. there will be more cases in the next weeks possibly months. promising vaccines are going to be tested here in the next two weeks. w.h.o. hopes they'll be tested
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on health workers in infected countries, maybe in january. to go from there to a licensed approved vaccine is still a big step. it has to be more tested and produced in the millions of doses. that will take time. we're talking months, maybe a year. the same goes for treatments. you mentioned the blood serum treatment in your introduction. that can start to be tested quite soon. again, we can speed up medical testing somewhat, but you can't get rid of it all together if you want to make sure it's a useful and safe treatment and that it helps more than it harms. >> i also asked our correspondent in west africa if developments have given developments for hope on the ground. >> these are early stages, trials of trials almost. some trials in europe would
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perhaps be moved to trials in africa. it is the case this disease which first developed in what's now called democratic republic of congo has been on and off in africa. this huge outbreak of it now in west africa is unprecedented. ebola has been known about for some time. because it occurs in poor countries, the pharmaceutical companies have not seen a market developing a vaccine over those decades. it's now a few cases have appeared in america, spain, and so on. very few cases with 4,500 have died here. the western world is waking up and beginning to do something. very few efforts in the last few weeks including the united nations who has a coordination body in ghana where i am, those
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efforts won't have significant effect for at least a month. >> you mentioned the drc. there's a different strain there. why is that not something the international authorities are quite worried about? >> why is it something the international community is not worried about because it occurred in a forested area deep in the democratic area of congo. that's essentially they haven't woken up and done something about this. >> that's mark in west africa. tensions on the ground very much. we'll be updating our website. if you want to find out more on ebola, there's a lot on our website. now things pretty tense also in hong kong because televised talks between campaigners and government failed yesterday.
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marchers have gone to the leader's home. taxi drivers upset about their losses in weeks of disruption. they want to use a crane to remove barricades. >> reporter: they want the public to to have say in who runs for position. in rather controversial remarks made to western newspapers earlier this week, the current chief executive said public nomination wouldn't be possible because poor residents would have too much voting power. it has not gone down with demonstrators that represent a
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dozen different organizations. >> said that poor and underprivileged class does not deserve the rights of universal suffrage. i think he is only expressing his true side. if people do not have a vote, then we cannot monitor. we cannot keep the government under our control. the economic interest of the privileged class would be like out of control. we can see why are hong kong's property price is so high. our salary cannot afford to buy purchase of property either. >> both hong kong and beijing governments have said the public
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nomination is not permitted under the law. now comments that hong kong's unique electoral system is meant in part to share more light on why they may be unwilling to give into protestors. the pentagon is examining video posted by islamic state fighters which appears to show the militants with weapons and ammunition dropped by the town in kobani. they're intended for kurdish fighters. u.s. officials admitted one out of 27 bundles dropped have gone a stray. the fighting in kobani has pushed relations between the turkish government and turkey's kurdish population to lowest point in years. some say if kobani falls there will be no peace process.
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we report from the turkish border. >> not far from the border, they are burying more of the dead today. two men and one woman. kurdish fighters gave their lives defending kobani. today they're showing little restraint. here the flag of the kurdish working party which is outlawed here. some didn't want to be filmed for fear of harassment. it wasn't sure the deaths were from. many here are enraged with the turk piish government for not helping fellow kurds on the other side of the border. with a representative in
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parliament, the mood is angry. kurd constitutes 20% of the population. turkey is sitting on the fence watching kurds die in kobani. it's removed the little trust there was. >> translator: the peace process going on in this country past two years where no one died will end. we will go back to 15 years ago. >> even so many refugees from syria including syrian kurds has not helped the standing of turkish government. >> there are 1.6 million syrian refugees here in this country. many of them kurds from northern syria including 200,000 or so from kobani. many of them believe the turkish government is in with islamic state against the kurds. >> kobani may still survive on the hills of the turkish side of
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the border. many come to watch what is happening to their town and houses. some with high hopes and historical dreams. >> when all troops unite and all parts of kurdistan become one, even if kobani is destroyed, we'll build it again. >> for the moment, a war has to be won. bbc on the turkish syrian border. >> stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come, an exclusive report from ukrainian rebel territory with the electorate will not be voting this weekend in the people's republican. you need a permit... to be this awesome. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. and only national is ranked highest in car rental
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to six months the measures are put in place. protestors have marched to residence of hong kong's chief executive angered by his suggestion poor people should not get a vote. we are all moving around. that fuels all our news practically doesn't it, you and me included? >> something i know actually quite well. i'm a gypsy basically. hello there. moving a broad has become common. according to the united nations, 215 million people are living outside their home country. there's a growing trend for people to pop from one country to the next. we'll get rid of him. the latest survey of top places to to live as a foreign worker shows switzerland ranks higher for lifestyle. china takes third with the largest proportion of high earning exports in the world. more than a third of foreign workers in china earn over
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$200,000 a year. the texan oil man who inherited a fortune from his father and lost it all died at the age of 88. seen here with queen elizabeth. he was among the the world's richest men. he and his brother tried to corner the silver market and lost $4.5 billion. he filed for bankruptcy in 1988. his funeral takes place in dallas, texas. the second largest car maker reported a car increase in the growth in home region and china. it made up for the decline in latin america and russia. sales rose 1.6%, just over $15.5 billion. follow me on twitter @bbc aaron. more on "gmt" coming up soon. australia wasn't in that top ten
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list. >> unbelievable. thanks very much. ukrainians go to the poll this is weekend in a parliamentary election dominated by the ongoing military conflict in the east. we are reporting from across the country this week. yesterday he was in a part of the east controlled by ukrainian forces. today he reports from rebel territory from the self-proclaimed people's republic who's cities have strong trade links with russia. there will be no election this weekend. >> reporter: 40,000 people work here. today it's around 3,000. now the last time i was here seven months ago i spoke to some of the workers. many told me they were angry at what had happened in the pro eu revolution there. many were worried they would lose their jobs if ukraine refocused on the west rather than the east. no one could imagine then what
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would happen next. there would be a war here that would claim thousands of lives. >> reporter: during the fighting, 156 shells and rockets hit the factory. the factory got off lightly compared to other parts of
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luhansk. the militants that control the city say on these ruins, they're building their own state, so called luhansk people's republic. it's a similar story, 150 kilometers away in the neighboring republic. this is donetsk, capital of self-proclaimed donetsk people's republic. militants are busy state building creating their own police force, tax inspectors. from the campaign posters around town, there's going to be an election here too but not for ukrainian parliament. >> this is head of the people's election economy. he's giving a press conference for what they're having here for local parolemeliament.
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>> meanwhile, many of the shops here are boarded up. most banks aren't working. there's heavy fighting going on still on the edge of the city in places and reports of fighting amongst the rebels. no one really knows here how this attempt to break away from kiev is going to end. steve rosenburg, bbc news in eastern ukraine. >> to pakistan where a leading antigovernment cleric says he's ending the the two month protest. he started the campaign against the government with a mass rally in august. >> the announcement came last night. since then, protestors have been packing up.
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they have been camped out last two po months. the movement was led by cleric from canada. he has been allied with politician han. the group here the past two moves, a school, salon, people bathing here. there was an a attack on parliament. joining me now is a man who's been supporter for two months. what do you feel about the protest wind othing up? do you feel disappointed? >> if i say we wanted certain result, in that way yes it's a bit sad we didn't get that. on the other hand i would say that the revolution is not like one day process. it takes time. if it takes proper time, in that way yes, we feel very good. we've gone city to city to tell
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people that what we have objectives and people are getting away. once they've got all away, i think we'll get the proper protest. you know, if we sit here and get the results that we came here for, maybe people will not. it would be incomplete. i'm hoping that when people know what this is all about, what their rights are, how to stand up for their rights, and then we get the revolution, it will have proper results. people will get what they should have got. >> all right. thank you very much. now he has said he will take rally around pakistan. khan is going to stay at the site and continue. protestors are questions whether this revolution will continue.
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>> just to let you know i'm on twitter @geeta guru-murthy. we have this red cross saying the ebola virus can be contained in four to six months. we're back in five minutes with more on the latest news. 3rd and 3. 58 seconds on the clock, what am i thinking about? foreign markets. asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories. new hope for the fight against ebola with the serum promised within weeks and a prospect it can be contained with right measures in place. >> it will be possible as it was possible in the past to contain this epidemic within four to six months. >> protestors march to the residence of hong kong chief executive angered by his suggestion poor people should not get the vote.
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the u.s. examines an islamic state video which appears to show weapons intended for syrian df defenders of kobani in the wrong hands. the search for the submarine narrows to the bay. hello. a top red cross official says with proper measures the ebola outbreak can be brought under control in four to six months. the secretary general of red cross society warned against the imposition of what he called a rational restriction. >> it creates a lot of fear and extreme panic that sometimes lead to very irrational type of
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behavior like closing borders, cancelling flights, isolating countries et cetera. those are no solutions. the only solution is how can we join our efforts to contain those kind of viruss and epidemic at epicenter? >> head of the red cross there. the world health organization says a serum made from the blood of recovered ebola patients could be available in west africa in weeks. they're working to advance two potential vaccines. the virus has killed thousands in begin that, sierra leone and liberia. a father gives a recount of his family's experience with the virus. >> it is a day i'll never forget in my life. i got a call from my wife's number, but it was not her.
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i answered the phone, but nobody spoke. she was staying in monrovia with three of our children. they said that night my brother called me. your wife has died. i said what? i dropped the phone. we were together 23 years. later that same week, i received another call from monrovia. my brother who was working as a nurse had been taking care of my wife. he became infected and died too. then my two youngest children were taken to the center. my girls were very sick and died. i felt more helpless. my oldest son was still in monrovia. he called me and said everyone got sick. i don't know what to do. i told him to come here to be with me. when my son arrived i noticed him looking more tired than usual. i was worried about him.
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when the test came back positive it was a night of agony for me. after some time, my son started doing much better. he was moving around. i pray had the he would be free of ebola and test negative. i just wanted us to be together again. then something amazing happened. something i could not actually believe until i saw it. when i finally saw him come out, i felt so very, very happy. >> the story of a liberian father and his family's terrible ordeal at the hands of the virus. well as the infection continues to grow, the british troops have arrived in sierra leone's capital free town to help. >> reporter: urgently needed help arriving at the heart of the ebola outbreak. around 100 british medics flew
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into the town with secretary of state of international developments. here's what they're here to do. there aren't enough well train add health workers to deal with this outbreak. british medics are teaching the basics including how to wear personal protection equipment or pte. >> it is training a country like this with nurses and everything which is extremely hard. most of them used to work without gloves. to get them to wear gloves, hand washing. even in nursing school, they don't be using it. >> this sort of work is vital for bringing this outbreak under control. the health workers are getting training on how to care for ebola patients safely. british medics hope to train hundreds of caregivers in the coming weeks. as this outbreak continues to
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spiral out of control, a key question is how much of a difference these measures can make at this late stage. the system is overwhelmed. as well as medic, there aren't enough treatment facilities, beds or labs to test virus. britain is funding new ebola care centers. >> we are late. we are behind the curb on this one. in many ways, this unit was the first march. the intention was top set up units like this. >> the british government insists it is taking the lead sending 125 million pounds to the crisis. >> i think we're on the front foot. i think the challenge is getting the rest of the world to understand the crisis unfolding in west africa and to get action. i very much hope when you have the european council this week, we'll be successful in getting
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his lobbyists with us. >> today a familiar face back at work. uk nurse who recovered after catching ebola is now part of the big push top get this outbreak under control. bbc news. let's move on now to events in hong kong. let's show you live pictures coming into us from the territory this evening as it is valid where tensions are still going on. lots of people still there taking pictures. we've seen in the past sometimes people are taken away by the police. not clear what exactly is happening in this shot. we have seen quite a few people on the streets again continuing their protests because talks
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between the campaigners and government broke down yesterday. some protestors have been marching to the official residence of the leader of hong kong because they are angry about comments he made about the territory's less wealthy citizens. he actually said he didn't think necessarily he wanted the poorer members of society to have a huge vote. elsewhere, taxi drivers are upset about loss of income during weeks of disruption, tried to remove barricades at one stage using a crane. >> reporter: they want the public to have a say in who runs for position of executive in three years. in controversial remarks made to newspapers this week, the current executive was quoted saying public nominations
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wouldn't be possible in part because it would give the city's poorer residents too much voting power. these startling remarks have not gone down well amidst these demonstrators that represent a dozen different organizations. >> said that the poor and underprivileged class does not deserve the rights of universal suffrage. i think he has only expressing his true side. if people does not have a vote, we cannot keep the government under our control. the impact of this underprivileged class would be out of control.
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you can see why hong kong property price is so high and our salary cannot afford to purchase a property either. >> reporter: hong kong and beijing governments said public nomination is not permitted under the law. now comments by the executive that the electoral system is meant in part to contain popularism sharing more light on why they're unwilling to give into protests. the pentagon is examining video posted by islamic state fighters which appears to show the militants with weapons and ammunition dropped by the united states. the drops were for kurdish fighters battling i.s. for several weeks. one out of 27 bundles dropped has gone a stray.
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the fighting in kobani has pushed relations between the turkish government and kurdish population to lowest in years. if kobani falls there, will be no peace process. we report from the syrian turkey bord border. >> this town not far from the border, they're burying more of their dead today. two men and one woman. kurdish fighter who is gave their lives defending kobani. today they're showing restraint. here the flag of the kurdistan party pkk outlawed here. some didn't want to be film med for fear of harassment from turkish intelligence services. it wasn't clear whether the death was syrian or turkish
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kurds. we are all kurds they told me. many here are enraged at turkish government for not helping fellow kurds on the other side of the border. at the offices of illegal kurdish party with representative in parliament, mood is angry. kurds constitute 20% of the population here and turkey is sitting on the fence watching kurds die in kobani has removed little trust there was. >> translator: peace process going on past two years are will end. we will go back to 15 years ago. >> even hosting so many refugees from syria including syrian kurds has not helped the standing of kurdish government.
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>> there are 1.6 million here including 200,000 from kobani. many believe the turkish government is in ka hoots with the islamic state against the kurds. >> kurds in turkey and region have their own problems too. many are at each other's throats. something put on show here at the main square by the artist fighters from kobani here to recuperate. >> these are kurds fighting, shouting at each other. the result being that occurs. >> yes. >> this is a grim view of your ethnic politics? >> yes. >> kobani may still survive on the hills of the turkish side of the border. many refugees come to watch what is happening to their town and houses. some with high hopes and
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historical dreams. >> translator: when we have driven away i.s. and all kurds unite and all parparts of kurdi become one, even if kobani is destroyed, we'll rebuild it again. >> for the moment a war has to be won. bbc on the turkish syrian border. now south korea has demolished a christmas tree shaped tower near the boarder with north korea. the 20 meter high tower has been decorated each year with christmas lights including a cross at the top which the atheist found disapproved. the submarine search goes
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on. this is a suspected foreign s submari submarine. this is the largest maritime search in years. ships equipped to detect submarines are among five searching in the bay. >> the search goes on. this is day six. the swedish navy is leading the hunt for an unidentified vessel lurking beneath the waves. in public the swedish authorities are cautious making month accusations, but the assumption among defense analysts is clear that a russian submarine possibly a mini sub has run into trouble deep inside territorial waters. this photo taken by a resident and released shows an image of what they're looking for. it's difficult to locate a sub
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underwater. there's no proper anti-sub marine properties under water. if it's found, nothing can be ruled out. >> if we find the submarine, there's the possibility to use weapons to get it to stop what it's doing. again, this is information or intelligence gathering information so we can be sure, yes, we are having underwater activities that shouldn't be there in our waters. >> there are echoes of the cold war intensified by current tensions over ukraine. moscow strongly denies that any of its vessels are involved here. sweden says time is on its side. it will keep looking. here in the capital the drama is having political impact.
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the government plans to increase defense spending amid questions about the country's military readiness. russia's aggression in ukraine is changing strategic calculations across the region. chris morris, bbc news. >> stay with us here on bbc world news. much more to come. every dog has its day. the show aiming to tackle malaysian canine taboo. ome hered something stronger. others come to build something faster... something safer... something greener. something the whole world can share. people come to boeing to do many different things. but it's always about the very thing we do best. ♪ but it's always about the very thing we do best.
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the only fda approved, non-hormonal option. brisdelle. this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. the top red cross official says the ebola outbreak could be contained in four to six months if right measures are put in place. protestors have marched to residents of hong kong's chief executive by his comments that poor people should not get a
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vote. this is in the third day. among the proposals are measures to guarantee courts more. this is widespread abuse within the legal system. >> these are victims of china's corrupt legal system. driven by despair, they want a capital that appeals to leaders. instead of being listened to, protestors have been herded on to police. >> they're rounding us up to send us back home. we're going to jail. this is an absolutely extraordinary scene. holding up papers documenting the grievances they have against the government. these petitions are cram into
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buses and taken to center miss the capital and shipped back to the provinces. this is what justice often looks like in china. elsewhere in the capital, most are blissfully unaware of what's going on. china's leaders are holding a meet to promote the law. he wants to reduce abuses in local courts. for people like this, that means taking on the party, impossible task. she shows me the area she was detained by police two days after complaining about corrupt officials. traumatized by her experiences, she tells me how her farm land was seized against her wishes.
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>> translator: local officials all protect each other. the courts won't help. people spend years trying to resolve problems legally. it never works no matter what we do. our officials bribe their way out of trouble. china's leaders may talk about the rule of law, but when faced with catalog of complaints, they resort to repression. bbc news beijing. now canada has raised the terrorism threat level from low to medium after officials have increase of chat area from islamist group. an attack on two soldier s mondy was linked to terrorism. one of the soldiers. >> he was being monitored by federal investigators.
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his passport was confiscated earlier this year when he tried to leave for turkey. officials believed he had jihadist ambitions. he hadn't broken any laws, so they couldn't arrest him. on monday he ran over two canadian soldiers walking through a parking lot 40 kilometers southeast of montreal. he fled the scene with police in pursuit. after a high speed chase the suspect lost control of his car and was shot dead when he confronted police. canada has never been blighted by home grown terrorism. this incident has left canadians shocked. >> i'm horrified by what took place. this is a terrible act of violence against our country, against our military, against our value. >> on tuesday, six canadian teams took off from cold lake alberta. they're heading for middle east to join the fight against
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islamic state militants. back at home, an increase in general chatter from radical islamist groups has prompted canada to raise the terrorism threat level from low to medium. bbc news. in other news today, police in canada have found the bodies of four infants in a storage locker. an investigation doesn't appear to find inference of a report from them missing. bradlee has died at 83. he was former washington post editor. now like many indians, i'm not that big on the idea of owning pets. it's a hygiene thing. many countries in india and muslim majority, dog ownership
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is frowned upon. one man is trying to change that by holding a pet a dog event. jennifer went to meet him. >> reporter: he is organizing malaysia's first pet a dog event. it's quite brave of him as a muslim because he's terrified of dogs himself. islamic scholars tell him dog saliva is unclean. he's tried to make things simple putting dog owners in red shirts and shows scared of dogs in yellow. >> we're not afraid anymore. >> police are guarding this event because he has received threats. dog ownership is controversy malaysia. >> when his owners take him for a walk, often muslims try to stay away from him. those that don't, well they end upkeeping it quiet. that's the problem.
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religion is so controversial, some won't ask to touch a dog. >> if a muslim touches a dog, they can pure identify themselves with a washing ritual. it's still difficult to have dogs as pets. those that do often have to hide from neighbors. >> it's a sin. if you have one, you're a sinner. i got caught. >> and there are more serious consequences. last year a dog trainer was arrested after posting a video of her cleaning dogs while a muslim call to prayer was heard in the background. she was accused of insulting islam. this islamic teacher says muslims can keep dogs for valid reasons such as hunting, security or educational events like this. what about petting a dog?
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>> if it has a valid reason to pet a dog. >> for example, to save a dog. rescue, whatsoever. >> it is permitted islam. thanks for watching. i'm geeta guru-murthy. see you very soon. bye bye. you pay your auto insur premium every month on the dot. you're like the poster child for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. it's part of a hershey's bar. we break it. we bite it. we sneak it. we smoosh it. we savor it. we love it.
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm david eades. our top stories as ebola deaths accelerate around sierra leone's capital. could a treatment be ready in weeks? the world health organization says serum with blood from recovered patients is being developed. there are two potential vaccines. guns for fighting islam pick state in the hands of islamic

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