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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  October 27, 2014 7:00am-8:01am EDT

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hello, i'm tim wilcox with "bbc world news." our top stories. tributes are paid to the captain of south africa's football team senzo meyiwa after he's shot dead during a burglary. >> we're going to miss senzo a lot. we're going to miss senzo a lot. senzo is a team player. prosecutors in south korea demand the death penalty for the captain of the ferry that capsized in april, leaving more than 300 people dead. ukraine's president plans
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coalition talks after a strong lead for pro-western parties in parliamentary elections. and as part of our 100 women season, we meet bolivia's top celebrity chef and discover why it's more than just recipes that are on her mind. hello. tributes have been paid to the captain of the south african football team, senzo meyiwa, who has been shot dead during a burglary. police say meyiwa was staying at his girlfriend's house near johannesburg when two armed men broke in, demanding mobile phones, money, and other valuables. he was shot in the chest. there has been many tributes on social media in south africa and condemnation of the level of gun crime there. one of meyiwa's teammates tweeted, how do you kill someone
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for a cell phone, could they not take a phone, wow, gone too soon. darren keets asked, when does it stop, south africa, when do we stop just moving on. take control of our country for all our people. another player tweeted he will be missed by everyone who ever came into contact with him. r.i.p. senzo. the national team coach paid an emotional tribute at a news conference a little earlier. this is what he had to say. >> as we were deliberating for the upcoming matches -- in sudan -- guess what, senzo's name was on the top of the list.
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in the playing 11 as well as the captain. you know it all the time. we're jotting names down, his name always came first. >> police are giving a press conference at the moment. two suspects being sought. one in the late 20s, one in the early 30s. one described as tall, slender, dark-skinned with dread locks. the other short, dark, and well-built. let's listen in to the rest of that press conference now. >> i actually have the same question. i wanted to ask whose cell phone it was. do you know whose it was? >> any more? i'll take the two.
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>> can you elaborate on the type of people involved. can you elaborate on the types of skills that they'll be providing. >> this crime speaks to the heart of south africans, not only because it's a hero, but also because it's our worst fear. we've just heard the police are
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in charge of crime in south africa. are we in charge of crime, and if it keeps increasing, are we really in control, and what are we going to do? >> thank you. >> this press conference, we'll stick for it just a little bit longer. we've heard a 250,000 round reward ha been offered for information about the killers. he, senzo, was dead on arrival at hospital. the police commissioner in the south african police service is ria piega. and they are taking questions now from the media. a huge shock as the captain of
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the national football team, 28 years old, shot in the chest, dead on arrival at hospital. just underlining the level of gun crime in south africa. let's just listen in to a few more questions. >> thanks. >> i just want to know when it comes to -- is it informed by the nature of crime or the rules? thank you. >> let me quickly just distribute the questions. i'll handle system and the police will handle some.
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beyond house robbery. preferential treatment. i will touch on that and i will ask him to come in with me on that one. the cell phone stolen. nature of the crime. i think i'll ask him to deal with that. want a little bit more. crime robberies in our homes. i'm sure we will handle it as a team. talks to also what the citizen has asked, around 17,000 people killed the previous year. prior gun control. i'm sure we can take that as introduced. and then other team members can respond. also talks to the issues of
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preferential treatment. >> thank you. good morning. good afternoon to the media. as we have already indicated on the type of cases, i think the house robberies are not that much problematic, type of trends that happen. the problem with house robberies is the problems that we experience from time to time, but if we look at the statistics provided on the cases with the police, we see the cases that are constantly report ed at an even less number. two cases depending on the time of the year when the cases are happening. and at the moment, i think as we
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compare the crimes as compared to last year, we have a decline on the house robbery cases. but the problem might be the extent of the violence -- vie len nature of these crimes. every time, getting worse and worse. but it is a crime that we have prioritized as a problem. we have ten priority crimes that we are looking at closely, that we check on a daily and weekly basis. and how often are these crimes happening. >> this is where we will just pull away from this police press conference, but $17,000, 250,000 round reward for information. police hunting two suspects. one in his 20s. slim, tall, dread locked hair.
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the other stockier as well. senzo dead on arrival, having been shot in the chest. let's get more on this with piers edwards from the bbc's africa service. a dreadful crime. a national hero. but, of course, just underlining the prevalence of gun crime in south africa. let's just turn to him as a footballer, though. how big, how great was he? >> well, we've got to put it all in perspective. the normal goalkeeper in recent years for south africa and certainly at the last world cup in 2010 was a different guy, and his number two used to be monte joseph. these guys have kept most people out of the team. but last year, senzo finally replaced monte joseph on one of the two biggest clubs in south africa. he finally got his chance and he took it, and he was very instrumental in helping the club get to the african champions league final last year. that's orlando pirates. earlier this season, the normal number one goalkeeper and
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captain got injured. in came senzo. his last four matches for the national team, he hasn't conceded a goal, which is some record. he's been made captain, as we heard from the south africa coach. so he's waited and waited, got his chance, he's absolutely seized it and obviously his opportunity has been taken away from him in the most cruel circumstances. >> and in terms of his future career, i mean, was he now having got into that position and become captain, were people considering him to be there for a long time? >> i think they were. you talk to some experts. they're very much the belief that when cune came back, he wasn't going to get in because meyiwa was playing so well. he was at the right age as well. he had a few years to go. he was definitely the future for a south africa team and a south africa team that is rebuilding and they've had many problems over the years for a variety of reasons. but they're going in the right direction at the moment. >> 28 years old. what about his early career?
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was he spotted as a child? >> i conn tell you too much about his early career, but i imagine he's just been there biding his time. one of the biggest clubs in south africa and africa, the talent is finally showing through. >> and south africa's footballing prowess still growing? >> no. well, depends on how you look at it. when they came back to international football in the early '90s, they were superb. they qualified for world cups, they won the african continental title, but they've gone steadily downhill over a period of ten, 15 years. they've just begun to regain a little momentum. in 2010, they were the first world cup hosts to never get out of the first round. but they're rebuilding. they're doing very well in their qualifiers. but they seem to be on the right track, and he was obviously
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playing a pivotal part in this sort of change in the way that south african football is going at the moment. stay with us here on bbc news. we'll have more on this developing story in a few moments time. hits, it's data mayhem. but airlines running hp end-to-end solutions are always calm during a storm. so if your business deals with the unexpected, hp big data and cloud solutions make sure you always know what's coming - and are ready for it. make it matter.
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flavored with exotic fruit juices. it's chocolate and fruit flavors like you've never experienced before. discover brookside. you're watching "bbc world news." i'm tim wilcox. the latest headlines. tributes are being paid to the captain of south africa's football team, senzo meyiwa, who's been shot dead during a burglary. prosecutors in south korea have demanded the death penalty for the captain of the ferry that capsized in april, leaving more than 300 people dead, most of them children. let's stay with that story. our correspondent steve evans sent us an update from the court hearing. >> reporter: there was an awful lot of emotion in the public gallery amongst the bereaved
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families as the prosecutor said that there should be a guilty verdict to that charge of causing homicide by virtue of willful negligence. and also then saying that for the captain, that should involve the death penalty. in this country, it has to be said nobody's been executed for crime in two decades, so the full expectation, the widespread expectation, if you like, is that even if the judges came back and agreed with the prosecutor that that would then get turned over on appeal. but more likely, that they won't come back and say the death penalty, that it will be life imprisonment and that will mean at his age that he will more than likely die in prison. he certainly expects to die in prison. he said that in his evidence. the evidence he's put, the captain's put is that he performed badly.
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he certainly didn't do his duty. but that doesn't involve -- that doesn't amount to murder. he's very keen that that charge, that ultimate charge doesn't stick to him, and more to the point, doesn't stick to his family. he admitted, or he said he accepts that perhaps he should be executed for what he did and didn't do on that day, but he doesn't want that taint of murder. so an awful lot of emotion and a very, very big decision now for the panel of judges. >> steve evans outside the court there. let's catch up with the business news. aaron has graced us with his presence again. >> talk about stress tests. banks. european union. 24 european banks have failed stress tests of their finance. this according to the european banking authority. the test was designed basically to determine whether the banks could hold up against another financial crisis. those that failed, they've got nine months to shore up their
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finances or actually risk being shut down. ten of them have taken measures to bolster their balance sheets. in the meantime, all the remaining 14 banks, they are right there in the eurozone. we'll have more throughout the rest of the day coming up on that one. how about this. in hungary, thousands of people have taken part in a protest, listen to this, against the government plans to tax the internet. one of the first such attempts certainly in the world. the right-wing government says the tax will target rich service providers, not consumers, but a lot of those protesters just don't believe them. there's the pictures right there. joining some 200,000 who joined up on facebook, on a facebook page opposing the internet tax. the government hopes to raise $80 billion a year by taxing each gigabyte of data transferred. critics call it an attack on free expression and a break on the development of fast internet services that the country badly needs. the u.s. federal reserve,
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all eyes will be on it this week, because it will call time this week on its program. that big bazuka of government bond purchases, which had been pumping very cheap money into the system around the globe. $85 billion every single month basically into the financial markets. this will mean a third round of quantitative easing being completed and marks the end of an unprecedented monetary campaign. and i can tell you what, that will certainly be leading the market direction. we're going to take a look. european markets earlier have been -- well, they've been up. they're down now. because some were breathing a sigh of relief that that stress test -- actually, the results could have been worse perhaps than what they saw. so the markets in the early stage were tentatively higher there. but all eyes, yes, will be on the u.s. federal reserve. america's central bank, will they, won't they. the expectation is they will stop that bond-buying program and wind it down completely. lots going on. you can tweet me. i'll tweet you back. you get me @bbcaaron.
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you were glued, weren't you? >> i was. especially by that graphic at the end. exit polls show that ukrainian president petro poroshenko is on course to secure a sweeping victory for pro-russian parties in sunday's parliamentary election. russia's foreign minister is reported saying the election offers the chance to implement peace agreements. >> reporter: confident strides as president petro poroshenko's bloc looks set to win in ukraine's elections. these were the first parliamentary elections in ukraine since the february revolution and it looks as if pro-western parties will dominate the new parliament. >> the results of the election bring their firm victory of old democratic, pro-european, pro-ukrainian forces, and that gives us a lot of opportunity to
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develop, to provide the reform, to present the program of strategy. >> reporter: towning is under way and early results are trickling in. his party could be on top with about 23%, followed closely by the people's front of the prime minister, and now they are speaking of forming a coalition of pro-western parties. >> translator: i just had a meeting with the president of ukraine, and we will in the shorest possible timeframe form the coalition so the new government and new parliament can carry out the reforms necessary for the country swiftly and efficiently. >> reporter: more than 51% of voters cast their ballot. pro-russian former heavyweights were sidelined. however, not everyone participated in these elections. about 3 million people in two eastern regions, donetsk and
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luhansk, ravaged by conflict, did not vote. pro-russian separatists in this area plan to hold their own polls next month. another almost two million people in crimea, which was annexed by russia in march, also did not take part, which means 27 seats from these areas will remain weakened. meanwhile, conflict is far from over in the rebel-held eastern part of ukraine. more than 3,500 people have been killed since the conflict began, including 300 who were killed after a cease-fire was agreed in september. all eyes are now on these election results to see what the outcome can yield for this war-torn country. >> once it's formed, the new coalition will be under pressure to deliver results. >> i think what we're looking at is the coalition will be very, very easy to form. there are lots of like-minded people elected during the
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elections. people who want to move closer to europe. people who declare that fighting corruption is one of the key things for them. people who basically support what mr. poroshenko has been saying about the peace plan. about a peaceful settlement in the east of the country. that will be easy. but it also puts a lot of responsibility on this coalition because now there's no excuse. previously there was the excuse that the parliament was working against mr. poroshenko, because there were supporters of the old regime of the deposed president yanukovych. now those excuses will be all gone. so the country will need to deliver. the leadership will need to deliver under extremely difficult circumstances, economically, militarily and politically. >> it's interesting, isn't it, though. you mentioned former president yanukovych. his party did relatively well, given the mood in you crane. >> indead, and i think this is
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not exactly his party. they renamed themselves, not to be tarnished by the old name. they were running as opposition bloc. and they did fairly well. which shows to you that actually, a, there are still ways in ukraine for democratic expression of the will of the people who do not necessarily support the authorities in kiev, but also the fact that the things that those parties represented still have quite a good foothold in eastern parts of ukraine. only parts of the region didn't vote, the ones under control of the pro-russian rebels. the others did. and i think they voted for who they think is somebody representing their vus. one of the losers is the communist party of ukraine. for the first time in 20 years, post-soviet independence of ukraine will not be represented in parliament. >> one final thought.
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the economic hardship that ukraine is going to have to go through now. are people prepared for those sort of measures, which is going to make people very, very unconferrabu uncomfortable, isn't it? >> ukrainians are not very stoic a lot. this is not the first time they'll have to endure very low heating in their flats. there have been wars before. 2008 and 2006. now there's no gas coming from russia at all. so this is part of the problem. the other part of the problem is certainly a large part of the industrial east of the country has been devastated and the gdp is falling, some estimates say by 10%. i think it will be very, very difficult to convince the people that the suffering they endure now is for nothing. therefore the responsibility of the authorities to deliver i think will be absolutely unprecedented. in a since, i think this
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parliamentary election is perhaps the most important of all the elections held previously in 20-odd years of ukrainian independence. >> don't forget, you can get in touch with me and some of the team on twitter. i am @bbc timwilcox. stay with us. you're watching "bbc world news." [ salesman ] congrats on the new car. [ woman ] thanks. the dealership reviews on cars.com made it easy, but... [ man ] we thought it might be a little more tense. you miss the drama? yeah. [ technician ] ask him whatever you want. okay. ♪ do you think my sister's prettier than me? ♪ [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] research, price, find. only cars.com helps you get the right car without all the drama.
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i'm tim wilcox with "bbc world news." our top story. tributes are paid to the captain of south africa's football team, senzo meyiwa, after he's shot dead during a burglary. prosecutors in south korea demand the death penalty for the cap tatain of a ferry that capsd in april. ukraine's president plans coalition talks after a strong lead for pro-western parties in parliamentary elections. and as part of our 100 women season, we meet bolivia's top
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celebrity chef and discover why it's more than just recipes that are on her mind. hello. tributes have been paid to the captain of the south african football team senzo meyiwa, who has been shot dead during a burglary. police say meyiwa was staying at his girlfriend's house near johannesburg when two armed men broke in demanding mobile phones, money, and other valuables. he was shot in the chest, and there have been many tributes on social media. condemnation too of the level of gun crime there. one of meyiwa's teammates tweeted, how do you kill someone for a cell phone, could they not take a phone, wow, gone too soon. darren keats asked, when does it
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stop, south africa? when do we stop just moving on? take control of our country for all our people. another player michael morton tweeted, i've ever had the honor of sharing a change room with. he will be missed by everyone who came into contact with him. r.i.p. senzo. in the last hour, the national police commissioner has announced a manhunt is under way for three suspects. >> indications at this stage are the global goalkeeper was killed during a house robbery in section 28, whilst visiting friends last night. it is alleged that two suspects entered the house and confronted the occupants in the white house, while said suspect was outside. a shot was fired. the goalkeeper was hit in the upper body. and taken to hospital where he
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was declared dead on arrival. the three suspects fled on foot and police have launched a manhunt. >> that was south africa's police commissioner. the national team coach paid an emotional tribute to senzo meyiwa at a news conference earlier. this is some of what he had to say. >> as we were sitting there deliberating, preparing for the upcoming match against -- sudan, guess what, senzo's name was on the top of the list. in the playing 11 as well as the captain. you know all the time, people want to know who's going to be the captain.
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without any doubt as we're jotting names down, his name always came first. in south korea, prosecutors have demanded the death penalty for the captain of the sewol ferry that sank in april. captain lee junseok. >> there was an awful lot of emotion in the public gallery amongst the bereaved families as the prosecutor said that there should be a guilty verdict to that charge of causing homicide by virtue of willful negligence, and also then saying that for the captain, that should involve the death penalty. in this country, it has to be said, nobody's been executed for crime in two decades. so the full expectation, the
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widespread expectation, if you like is, that even if the judges came back and agreed with the prosecutor that that would then get turned over on appeal. but more likely that they won't come back and say the death penalty, that it will be life imprisonment and that will mean at his age that he will more than likely die in prison. he certainly expects to die in prison. he said that in his evidence. the evidence that he's put is that he performed badly, he certainly didn't do his duty, but that doesn't amount to murder. he's very keen that that charge, that that ultimate charge doesn't stick to him, and more to the point, doesn't stick to his family. he admitted, or he said he accepts that perhaps he should be executed for what he did and didn't do on that day, but he doesn't want that taint of
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murder. so an awful lot of emotion and a very, very big decision now for the panel of judges. >> steve evans reporting outside the courtroom. egypt's president has issued an order allowing the military to protect vital public buildings in cooperation with the police. the decree follows bombings in sinai last week in which more than 30 soldiers were killed. it's believed the new law aims to protect facilities such as gas pipelines and oil fields. the order will allow the army back on to the streets of cities. exit polls show ukrainian president petro poroshenko is on course to secure a sweeping victory for pro-western parties in sunday's parliamentary election. he's now expected to begin talks to form a coalition. russia's foreign minister says the election offers a chance to implement peace agreements. >> reporter: confident strides as president petro poroshenko's
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bloc looks set to win ukraine's elections. these were the first parliamentary elections in ukraine since the february revolution, and it looks as if pro-western parties will dominate the new parliament. >> the results of the election bring their firm victory of old democratic, pro-european, pro-ukrainian forces. and that give us a lot of opportunity to develop, to provide the reform, to present the problem of strategy 2020. >> reporter: counting is under way and early results are trickling in. exit polls have suggested president petro poroshenko's party could be on top with about 23%, followed closely by the people's front of prime minister, and now they are speaking of forming a coalition of pro-western parties. >> translator: i just had a meeting with the president of
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ukraine, and we will, in the shortest possible timeframe, form the coalition so that the new government and the new parliament can carry out the reforms necessary for country swiftly and efficiently. >> reporter: more than 51% of voters cast their ballot. pro-russian former heavyweights were sidelined. however, not everyone participated in these elections. about three million people in two eastern regions, donetsk and luhansk ravaged by conflict, did not vote. pro-russian separatists in this area plan to hold their own polls next month. another almost two million people in crimea, which was annexed by russia in march, also did not take part, which means 27 seats from these areas will remain vacant. meanwhile, conflict is far from over in the rebel-held eastern part of ukraine. more than 3,500 people have been killed since the conflict began, including 300 who were killed after a cease-fire was agreed in
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september. all eyes are now on these election results to see what the outcome can yield for this war-torn country. stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come, sting's broadway debut. we head to new york for the eagerly awaited musical. [ male announcer ] tomcat bait kills up to 12 mice, faster than d-con. what will we do with all of these dead mice? tomcat presents dead mouse theatre. hey, ulfrik! hey, agnar! what's up with you? funny you ask. i'm actually here to pillage your town. [ villagers screaming ] but we went to summer camp together. summer camp is over. ♪ [ male announcer ] tomcat. [ cat meows ]
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you're watching "bbc world news." i'm tim wilcox. our latest headlines. tributes have been paid to the captain of south africa's football team senzo meyiwa, who has been shot dead during a burglary. prosecutors in south korea have demanded the death penalty for the captain of a ferry that capsized in april, leaving more than 300 people dead, most of them school children. the president of brazil,
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dilma rousseff, has been re-elected for a second term after the closest presidential election race in years. official results show that dilma rousseff won more than 51% of the vote. her rival, the center right politician aecio neves, gained just over 48%. dilma rousseff said the top priority of her second term would be political reform. here is a report from rio. ♪ >> reporter: red october in rio, dilma rousseff re-elected. the workers party has now won four consecutive elections. it was an emotional victory for those brazilians who support the government's welfare programs and state-driven economic growth. >> it's a country with more opportunity, and that's what represents this victory. democracy, liberty, and a better country for everybody.
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>> reporter: after more than 100 million brazilians voted, dilma's winning margin was just 3%. in her victory speech, she spoke of the need for reconciliation. >> translator: sometimes in history, a very close election has resulted in more significant progress than a victory won by a wider margin. this is what my hope is and how i think we can move forward. >> reporter: 12 years of tangible social benefits and the work of party rule have brought dilma rousseff back into power. but the challenges facing her are enormous. the financial markets are jumpy, and the country feels divided along north-south working class, middle class lines. in suburbs, they thought change was nigh. dilma would lose and the business-friendly aecio neves would win. it was close, but they lost. >> they're not looking for long term.
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so i vote for the long term. the medium and long term. for the short term, it's okay. but four years from now, five years from now, we'll have a huge problem. >> reporter: dilma rousseff's supporters celebrate her remarkable achievement after the closest election here ever. but with the stalling economy, corruption scandals and concerns about crime, their work has barely begun. >> we were told a little earlier there were big challenges facing dilma rousseff now because of the divisions in the country. >> it's beginning to be difficult because it shows how divided the country is right now. it seems that there is a deep division between north, south. also a narrow victory. she's beginning to have lots of challenges going ahead. yesterday during her victory speech, she addressed those divisions and said she's going
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to try to go ahead with political reforms, even though she's beginning to face a more fragmented congress. so it could be a big challenge for her as well. it's also about the economy. how to restore growth and how to restore confidence. clearly she wasn't the candidate of businessmen and investors. the question now is how she's going to bridge -- to build this bridge with investors as well. >> also in terms of the city centers. is there a national program of trying to bring about some sort of technical revolution for this country, which has such polar opposites? >> this also has been about the fear of the millions of brazilians, poor brazilians that depend on social programs. and there was a fear that any other president -- and many people, on the other hand, the
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rich people, they think that she has mishandled the economy and that's why if you compare brazil four years ago, growing at 5%, 6% per year and now they're just 1%, 2% per year. so there's a huge dissatisfaction among the rich i leet in the way things have gone the last couple years.elite in gone the last couple years. officials in iraq say a suicide car bomber has struck a check point outside the city town of jurf al-sakha, killing at least 27 shiite militiamen. it comes a day after they recaptured the town from islamic state militants. the governor of new york state has announced the partial relaxation of the mandatory quarantine arrangements for anyone suspected of carrying the ebola virus. the rule stipulates the suspected carrier must be quarantined in a state facility for three weeks. mr. cuomo says they can now be
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kept under observation at home. a nurse quan teened after treating patients in west africa says she will challenge her confinement in a federal court. the civil war in south sudan has meant many children instead of going to school are being forced to fight the u.n. estimates. that there are 11,000 child soldiers in both the rebel and government armies. tom barrage traveled to the northern area where bentiu where boys as young as 8 are being recruited. >> reporter: no pupils of this school. just the guns of the body guards. of a senior politician who came here to show us around. government soldiers fighting in south sudan's civil war now sleep here. they are the only ones who study. but months ago, it was rebel forces who came here and took more than 100 boys from their classrooms.
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we met one of those boys, who we'll call steven, age 16, and his four friends. all of them forced into an army as young recruits. when the soldiers came to his school, 15-year-old david asked why children had to fight. to defend your tribe, the soldiers replied. most of the children i saw were soldiers, says david. paul says he and more than 200 other children were taken to a training camp, sometimes beaten and given no food for two days. the boys escaped, but they're now trapped here in a camp with nearly 50,000 others. weary of war, their homes have been badly flooded. this camp and the terrible conditions here is the product of months of violence.
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but there were decades of conflict here before south sudan gained its independence three years ago, and there is a continuing culture in which boys are often seen as men and are forced to fight. most boys, sometimes as young as 8, are fighting with the rebels. but south sudan's army acknowledges that it has recruited some children. >> we are aware of 149 child soldiers that has been verified. >> reporter: the u.n. suggests it's a figure much higher than that. >> i do not think the figure is much higher than 149. maybe the same children are being seen by the u.n. and counted on a daily basis. >> reporter: here a dance to celebrate a baby born in this camp. but there are thousands of mothers across south sudan whose children are missing. boys are often recruited in a country accustomed to war. tom barrage, bbc news, in bentiu, south sudan.
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the organization human rights watch says women and girls captured by the islamist group boko haram are forced to marry, convert to islam, and endure appalling abuse in captivity. the group's new report is based on interviews with witnesses and interviews with some girls who managed to escape. human rights watch researcher interviewed many people who had been taken by the militants for the group's report. >> i've spoken to about 30 young women and girls abducted by boko haram. some were taken right from their homes, in the presence of their parents. some were picked up on their way to school. some picked up in the farm. the journey for them into boko haram's camp i think would be one of the worst experiences. just all the thoughts running through their heads about what would happen to them in the
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camp. one 15-year-old told me how she was made to carry all the stolen goods that insurgents were pilfering from the villages that they looted along the way until they got two more girls to join her and carry the stuff. when they get to the camp, they begin to carry out chores on behalf of the group. cleaning, cooking. >> but is that the worst that happens to them? >> no. >> there are reports, of course, that these girls, these women are raped as well. >> absolutely. the rape would happen sometimes after they are forced to marry members of the group. one girl, if before her marriage she was forced to go with the group on operations, she was made to carry the om in addition, hide in the bushes while shooting was beginning on around them. at one point, she was given a gun to shoot someone that she had helped into their camp.
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so many of them also were forced to convert from christianity to islam. traumatic experiences. the rape. unfortunately, there was no one to take their testimonies about what happened to them while in captivity. and so a continuing trauma of reliving the experiences. continuous fear that they could be reabducted. bolivia's top celebrity chef has been on tv for more than a decade and her current show is one of the most influential in the country. she is also known as a fierce advocate of women's rights in bolivia. as part of our 100 women season, we went along to meet her. >> translator: i am from the city of la paz, bolivia. i host a cooking program where i
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also have interviews, talk about culture, politics, business. being a chola is something you feel, something you know. it means identity. some people think that women in sports are not able to do certain things. they used to be the ones who worked as maids, cleaning ladies, or any other job people didn't want to do. i think there's still some barriers we need to break. i'd like to send my women a message of courage. they must speak up. they must shout. they must say it's enough. we don't want to be the women who live out their husbands, those who say they love us and mistreat us. no. every time a woman gets killed, every time a woman suffers, that's when i feel pain and i feel powerless. what else could i do to prevent
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it? eng women are losing the fear to speak up and decide for themselves. i think that's a big challenge for all women. especially in bolivia. >> the 100 women series here on bbc news. sting has made his debut as a broadway composer and lyricist in a musical called "the last ship." the production has been one of the more eagerly awaited shows at the new york theatre season, as tom brooks now reports. >> reporter: broadway's neil simon theatre, the site of sting's latest musical creation, which he's been working on for several years. it's set in the northeast of england where sting was born and raised. it's a story of laid off shipbuilders taking matters into their own hands and building a ship for themselves to sail off
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into the world. "the last ship" is breaking new ground for sting. >> it's a totally novel experience for me. i was on broadway as an actor. but to actually have my name as a producer and writer is something that i never anticipated. it's also been the most difficult thing i've ever tackled. so just getting it this far is some achievement. if this is as far as we get, i'm still happy. ♪ in the name of the father in the name of the son ♪ >> it's an emotional story of the returning son trying to resolve the difficult relationship he's had with his father. it's not auto biographical, but it does mirror aspects of sting's life. >> it is about a say already who leaves my town for 15 years and comes back. the only connection i have with him is i did the same. i was an exile. this is my return to the town, in a way honoring my community. and in that, i'm very satisfied. >> every effort has been made to make what takes place onstage as
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much like the northeast of england as possible, including having the largely american cast speak with accents. >> what were the words americans had difficulty with, do you think? >> well, ocean. ocean and sea. which we say a lot in this show. a bit challenging over the years. >> reporter: and also you saw naught. there's a lot of that, but they get it after a while. >> reporter: sting's name will definitely help sell tickets, but he doesn't appear onstage, and the content on the show, at least on the surface, doesn't directly relate to either him or to the group the police, which helped him become an international superstar. cast members point out that sting is everywhere to be seen in terms of his creativity if you pay attention to this production. but in new york, it's the reviews that count. its verdict was mixed, but the
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creative writing of his lyrics that ranks among the best on broadway. that assessment should please them. don brook, bbc news, new york. >> you're watching "bbc world news." stay with us. you lower handicaps... and raise hopes. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. (pro) nice drive. (vo) well played, business pro. well played. go national. go like a pro. (receptionist) gunderman group is growing. getting in a groove. growth is gratifying. goal is to grow. gotta get greater growth. i just talked to ups. they got expert advise, special discounts, new technologies. like smart pick ups.
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they'll only show up when you print a label and it's automatic. we save time and money. time? money? time and money. awesome. awesome! awesome! awesome! awesome! (all) awesome! i love logistics. what if we finally had that would be amazing. hey, what if we took down this wall? what if this was my art studio? what if we were pre-approved? shut up! from finding to financing, how'd you do that? zillow.
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