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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  January 21, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

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this is bbc america. now, live from london "bbc world news". >> hello. i'm with "bbc world news." our top stories. president obama declares the united states now has an opportunity to turn the page after years of war and recession. france announce s as a wrath of new security measures four men charged with terrorist attacks two weeks ago. russia says moscow doesn't want a new cold war and his country will not allow one to occur. rebels in yemen tighten their grip on the capital taking over the palace of the country's second largest airport is
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closed. we take a look at the difference between extreme wealth and poverty in istanbul. hello. welcome to the program. president obama has declared an end to the final crisis saying the u.s. has turned the page after years of war and recession. in his state of the union address he appealed to the republican controlled congress to back his strategy for what he calls middle class economics and he would veto any bill that would threaten his administration's achievements. reporting from washington. >> the president of the united states. >> reporter: the capitol hill for his sixth and penultimate state of the union speaking for the first time before a republican congress.
quote quote
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the president set out to ex extricate america from its foreign wars is now having to cope with a myriad of new challenges abroad not least the jihadist threat to ancient allies like france. >> we will continue to hunt down terrorists and dismantle their network and we reserve the right to act unilaterally as we have done relentlessly since i took office to take out terrorists who pose a direct threat to us and our allies. >> reporter: some members of congress took their key for that and made their show of solidarity for those killed in paris. from the domestic front, michelle obama must be pleased with her husband's approval ratings now edging back up after a dismal few months. the president is hoping he can improve his standing further by proposing tax change for those emerging from the final crisis. >> we have picked ourselves up
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and dusted ourselves off and begun again the reworking of america. >> reporter: his speech suggests a newfound confidence at the white house that america's economy is bouncing back. that and the fact that b of a rack obama doesn't have to fight for re-election means he can afford to bolder in his final two years in office. the french prime minister has announced nee changes after the terrorist attacks two weeks ago. he says the groups should be monitored and announced 21/2 thousand new security personnel would be recruited over the next couple of years to tackle the problem and said unprecedented action would be taken to combat the fight against terrorism. >> interior minister has asked the deployment of 10,500
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soldiers which is unprecedented and 8,000 staff police soldiers assured the permanent prosection of sensible sites. synagogues synagogues, jewish schools, mosques and schools and public spaces. to combat terrorism, it means determination. perseverance, coher rance of our action. action. >> >> that was within the last hour. let's talk this over with our correspondent, hugh scofield. give us an update on the figures he describes the number of new security service personnel and also this number of people that the french security personnel want to watch in france. >> you mentioned the figure there of 1300 people.
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in fact it's much more than that. 1300 people are people related to what you might call the syrian network, the islamic state network, the people the french authorities believe have traveled or are traveling or this at the moment with the intention of fighting the islamic state. those 1300 people are at the top of the list. two weeks ago it showed it's certainly not just them that need watching. there are other networks an radicalized people who pre-tate that was the kouachi brothers certainly were. there are over 3,000 people they say they need to watch. given that in theory it takes 20 people to watch one suspect permanently around the clock. you can see the extent of manpower that is needed. it's possible to measure all 3,000 of those suspects are being watched. a proper stakeout requires a lot
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of people. they're talking about a big increase of the number of intelligence officers. overall there will be 2,6 year-to-date2,680 people recruited on the road and a lot of analysis needed and one of the big shortcomings that was apparent in all of this was the lack of communication, the lack of proper analysis information coming in but not properly assessed. there will be a big recruitment drive now and very significant in france to get the caliber of person who cannot just accumulate information but analyze it and come to proper conclusion. >> the french secret service came under criticism for not continuing to monitor these men. we've also had an update on four men who have been arrested -- charged, rather in connection with coulibaly. bring us up on that
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investigation. >> this is the connection to the coulibaly connection. we know he was a hoodlum and bandit, if you like had connections in the underworld before he turned to radical islam. it seems he activated those and acquired the weapons up to his attacks. of the 12 people picked up last friday having connection with him, four have been sort of charged and can expect now to face charges and the charges are provide providing logistical help to coulibaly in the context of terrorist operation. it's not clear if these people were radicalized on the face of it. not likely seems they were themselves from the paris underground world who knew how to get hold of weapons and supplied coulibaly with them. they left behind some clues. one even left his mother's identity card in the car coulibaly drove to the supermarket attacks. they've been picked up an canned be expected to be charged now.
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>> hugh thank you very much from paris. as always thank you very much. lets move to israeli officials saying a palestinian man stabbed at least 17 people on a bus in tel aviv the 23-year-old man was shot in the leg by officers as he tried to escape. our correspondent in jerusalem is there now. >> reporter: the latest we're hearing is really the police are now questioning a man said to be a 23-year-old palestinian in the north of the west bank someone who had entered israel illegally. we understand he was on this bus in the early morning rush hour when he began stabbing other passengers and then attacked the driver. he managed to get off the bus and was pursued by members of the security services including some prison officers who just happened to see what was going on. he was apprehended after he was shot in the leg and the police have taken him into custody. to put this in some context, this was the latest in a spate
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of attacks we have seen in the past few months. back in november there was an israeli soldier stabbed to death by a young palestinian in tel aviv. many of these attacks have actually been in jerusalem, though. in november there were five people killed when two palestinian cousins entered a west jerusalem synagogue armed with meat cleavers and with a gun. we also have hit-and-run attacks here in jerusalem where pedestrians have been pelted as they crossed the road. what israeli leaders consistently said they blame palestinian officials including the president abbas saying they have been inciting this violence from the palestinian side and blaming the government's policy for increase in violence we have seen particularly a row over access to the disputed holy side in the city of jerusalem a site sacred to muslims and jews and
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say israeli government policies in jerusalem and the west bank where palestinians want for their future state, this is contributing to the rising tension and we have had in the past few months some palestinians killed and people who would be considered arab-israelis in israeli towns and cities killed in clashes with israel military and police. >> and president obama is talking about the gap between rich and poor in his state of the union. aaron his here and you have much more. >> many people are digesting what the president said last night. thanks very much. as you've been hearing the key message from president obama in his state of the union about the world's number one economy basically turning a page and new
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focus on so-called middle class economics. no doubt what president obama had to say on the economy is what the american people want to hear. do the experts agree with his prognosis. we will be getting expert views from chief economists all the big bosses gathered at the swiss ski resort of davos for the world economic forum, talking about that the next couple of days. today is arguably -- arguably -- you know what i mean the most important day. never have a hashbrown in the morning. still in my teeth. the most important day for microsoft's recent history as it's expected to unveil the most recent operating system. it's okay i do it all the time. it's establishing itself against rival apple. last year apple reported increasing sales with the rest of the pc market including windows and power machines.
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if microsoft gets it right it's likely to rescue the company from the flop of windows 8 apparently put many people off with those tile and complicated screen pages. spacex has raised a billion dollars from google. we're talking about the space manufacturer backed by a billionaire billionaire. the money would go towards innovation in space transport and satellite manufacturing. the deal is you have to move by tech giant google to try to spread remows access to -- spread access to remote parts of the world. that's it. i'm going off and finish my breakfast. >> thank you very much. as aaron said never have a hashbrown first thing in the morning. wise advice. please stay with us.
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welcome to "bbc news" world news. our main headlines for you. france has outlined new security measures in the wake of the paris attack. it comes with charges in the attacks. president obama used his state of the union to highlight economic successes and challenged republicans to close back taxes for the rich. insulting the -- on twitter, this decision has already sparked protests in the capital. a prominent democracy
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campaigner in bahrain has been sentenced to six months in jail. his crime, insulting messages in social media of the government. he says it's the way the authorities have handled it which is insulting. >> a message to the people of bahrain we don't respect you. >> reporter: this case has triggered protests in the capital, at times violent as demonstrators clashed with police. they're also calling for the release of opposition leader shaikh ali salmon pictured on their banner. he was arrested in december which his party boycotted. he he's set to go on trial accused of promoting violent regime change. >> when you arrest me or others it will be two figures recruiting for a peaceful struggle and peaceful try for
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democracy and human rights and justice, then you are making no room for peaceful approach and making way for violence that is dangerous. >> reporter: he is head of the bahrain center for human rights is appealing his sentenced and released from jail but can't leave the country. there has been unrest four years the majority shiite calling for greater political rights from their sunni leaders. there is chaos and confusion in yemen after the latest rise in fighting between houthi rebels and the force. it is in part of the capital center. the houthi leader accused the president putting his interests ahead of the yemeni people coming hours after the
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president's home was shelled and seized control of the presidential palace. there are reports the country's second largest airport in the port city of aden has been closed. a short time ago i was told there was some optimism that the sides can start talking again. >> the speech of the houthi spiritual leader yesterday gave more time for negotiations so there is hope that clashes could ease and give negotiations time to succeed. houthi right now is powerless and needs to cooperate with all parties to reach a deal. there is a meeting with them in the next hour to make sure this happens as soon as possible. the problem is last september when the houthis took over sa sanna, they signed a deal that
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gives the partners power over every decision making in yemen. when the president signed this he wasn't expecting it to be as serious as it is today. the houthis want to be partners in decision making. the president does not want to involve them saying this is his authority forgetting he did sign a deal last september to give them that authority. this is what caused the uprise of the houthis. it is chaotic because the other parties are saying you cannot give the houthis as much influence you are giving them because we also are a big part of this country and power mix and we need to be given the same share as the houthis. >> the editor-in-chief there of "the post." looking into a speech by a prominent british morning that used insulting terms to describe a united nations envoy after he high lighted the plight of the
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muslim minority. jenna fisher is in yong gon. >> reporter: to give you the background the reporter was here on a 10 day trip to report on the human rights situation. she documented and spoke about the conditions particularly of the muslim population at the far west of this country and laws being proposed by the monks in this country making it harder for muslims to marry buddhists and the most famous notorious monk was speaking friday in response to this visit. the words he used as you said we can't use them on air are some of the most offensive words used in relations to women. he likened her as being a prostitute and stronger words as well. extremely offensive and she has put out a statement this monday responding obliquely in a way
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she had -- during the course of her trip -- been personally subjected to the kind of sexist intimidation female human rights defenders sometimes experience when tackling controversial issues. very strong words from the monk and indeed words many people will be surprised to hear coming from a monk something also can take place, it's three or four days since the monk made that comment. we have heard very little in the way of condemnation from political figures here. >> inion yonggone. we have little from the political leaders when they comment at davos. we look at the whole issue part of a new season called "a richer world," looking at the problems caused by inequality in istanbul. >> reporter: in this city you can live in a luxury apartment
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with the view of a slum where people are either unemployed or earn less than $4 a day. this divided city. it is istanbul. turkey has more than 40 billionaires tripling in the last decade the fastest emerging market and construction the driving force. the 14 million residents are used to living in a 24 hour building site away from the touristic spots coming to see the super rich house next to the super poor. the economy has dramatically changed people's lives, all of us live longer eat better better educated and connected. how true is that for everyone? you can follow the bbc's "richer world" season by clicking on bbc/richerworld.
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as she said there, we will be showing the scenes on "a richer world" in the weeks and month on the bbc. join in and follow our coverage on your mobile tablet or computer or tv of course the old-fashioned way here on "bbc world news." do join us. it will be great to hear your thoughts. a new genre of music from tanzania known as bon go flavor is becoming very popular across africa. it's a version of hip-hop and r&b. back then most artists weren't considered seriously. that has all changed. >> reporter: award winning artist here is laying down the track for his latest single sang mostly in intoswahili, it was originally seen as western culture trying to find its way into a very conservative
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society. >> they are always fighting us like, you know, don't do music you know because it's something from the streets, you know. not any future in it. >> reporter: ay started his career 14 months ago and one of the few artists who persevered believing one day his career would be big. his tenacity paid off. he's now making a very lucrative career out of bongo flavor a career many young people are very keen to pursue. ♪ >> reporter: these days there are a number of centers set up privately to teach and train young people to sing and play instruments free of charge.
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♪ >> reporter: this young lady has traveled hundreds of kilometers to get here and learn how to sing. she says one day she would like to be as big as rihanna. >> reporter: since i'm here at the house of talent i just thought, why don't i give it a go and see if i can actually sing? ♪ >> stop stop. you need more training. >> reporter: looks like i can't sing. the music that hardly got any airtime is now the most played on radio and even crossing borders. >> translator: in nigeria if you say you're an artist and want to work with them they are happy to do it. although we don't speak the same language we've come to understand each other.
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they play our music and we play theirs. >> reporter: what started like a nightmare to many especially parents at the time have ended up becoming a dream not only to the pioneers but also to the new generation. "bbc news"," salam. >> he won't that bad, was he. see you soon. bye-bye. mmm, a per fe 177-degrees. and that's why this road warrior rents from national. i can bypass the counter and go straight to my car. and i don't have to talk to any humans, unless i want to. and i don't. and national lets me choose any car in the aisle. control. it's so, what's the word?... sexy. go national. go like a pro. push your enterprise and you can move the world. ♪ ♪ but to get from the old way to the new you'll need the right it infrastructure.
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our top stories. president obama declares the united states has an opportunity to turn the page after years of war and recession. france's security measures four men charged in connection with the paris attacks two weeks ago. men taking over the presidential palace as the country's second largest airport is closed. we take a lack at the tanzania music trend, which is
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sweeping across africa! frs hello and welcome. president obama has declared an end to the financial crisis saying the u.s. has turned the page after years of war and recession. in his state of the union address, he appealed to the republican-controlled congress to back his strategy for what he called middle class economics. but made clear he would veto any bill that would threaten his nation's achievements. >> the president of the united states. >> reporter: the capitol hill for his sixth and penultimate state of the union speaking for the first time before a republican congress. the president set out to extricate america from its foreign wars is now having to
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cope with a myriad of new challenges abroad, not least the jihadist threat to ancient allies like france. >> we will continue to hunt down terrorists and dismantle their network and we reserve the right to act unilaterally as we have done relentlessly since i took office to take out terrorists who pose a direct threat to us and our allies. >> reporter: some members of congress took their cue for that and made their show of solidarity for those killed in paris. from the domestic front, michelle obama must be pleased with her husband's approval ratings now edging back up after a dismal few months. the president is hoping he can improve his standing further by pro- proposition tax riders for the very wealthy. that way, he says everyone can emerge from the financial crisis. >> we have picked ourselves up and dusted ourselves off and begun again the reworking of america. >> reporter: his speech suggests
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a newfound confidence at the white house that america's economy is bouncing back. that and the fact that barack obama doesn't have to fight for re-election means he can afford to be a bit bolder in his final two years in office. "bbc news," washington. russia's foreign minister has said russia will call for an immediate cease-fire in ukraine. he also criticized president barack obama state of the union of the address saying the americans have set a course for confrontation. he said the tone of the speech showed the united states wanted to dominate the world. the french prime minister has announced new security measures in the wake of the paris attacks two weeks ago. more than 1300 people in france were suspected of involvement with radical islamic groups and should be monitored. he added 21/2 thousand2 1/2 security
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personnel will be added over the coming years. >> translator: one thing is certain, the number of radicalized individuals launching terrorist attacks in france has been increase ging. around 1,300 people either french or foreigners need to be monitored because they have been involved in jihadist networks linked to the conflicts in syria and iraq and increase of 130% in one single year. >> that was manuel valsls, the french prime minister. i asked for explanation of those figures. >> 1300 people are related to what you might call the syrian network, islamic state network people officials believe have
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traveled or are traveling with intention of the islamic state. those 1300 people there are certainly not just them that needs watching. there are other radicalized people who pre-date that as the kouachi brothers certainly were. overall 3,000 people they say they need to watch. given that in theory, it takes 20 people to watch one suspect permanently around the clock. you can see the extent of manpower that is needed. it's possible to measure all 3,000 of those suspects are being watched around the clock. >> explaining those figures in paris for us. let's turn to switzerland where delegates are meeting in davos in the economic forum. global inequality will become one of te issues. despite nations becoming wealthier, healthier and more
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educated, the gap between rich and poor is widening. it's part of the new series "a richer world 2015." >> the world is getting richer. the disparity remains. the richest 1% owns half the world's wale. that means 85 people have $3.5 billion. more people own cars. in botswana you are three times to have a car than a decade ago. many of us have mobile phones. some of the quickest take off is in developing countries. more than three-quarters of
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households own a fridge. there are down sides to a richer world. it can be bad for your health. more than a third of americans are obese. this is a growing problem in many countries. the richer world can put more pressure on natural resources like water. an extra 2 billion people have safe water compared to 25 years ago but water table levels have fallen. by 2030 almost half of the world's population may live in areas of extreme water stress. more children are finishing primary school and more people have access to the internet and better access to health care. will some of the poorest people in the world also get richer? global inequality one of the themes being discussed by the
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bbc and no doubt one of the top things being discussed at davos. joining us now is richard branson hoping to launch a new global satellite launcher to provide internet connectivity to people who do not have it. thank you. davos is certainly the place to launch a new adventure. tell us more about this. >> there are 3 billion people in the world who don't have access to the internet or don't even have a mobile phone or wifi. what we're planning to do is put up a very large array of satellites around the world, which will give many of them the chance to get internet access and wifi access. you can have internet access get educated. you have a mobile phone, you can start a business. we think it's going to be a very worthwhile venture. >> which countries in particular are you targeting and which kind of age and wage brackets are you
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targeting? >> we're really targeting anybody in the world who doesn't currently have internet or have mobile phones. in some of the poorer countries in the world, that's a lot of people. in some of the richer countries, people who live in rural areas. so the network will be global. then we'll talk to individual countries and find out which ones would welcome us and which ones won't. i think most will actually welcome this initiative. >> indeed. now, richard, we're only 10 weeks off to thefrom the fatal virgin galactic crash. are you still determined going ahead with that and focused on getting tourists up into space? >> yes we are. first of all, the network i just told you about will be part of virgin galactic's program.
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we'll be launching satellites into space from a mother ship through a rocket we built called launcher 1 and launcher 2. we also are building the second spaceship, which will take people to space. so that program obviously has been delayed, but we hope will be back on track by the end of the year. >> so richard, you've obviously just become a grandfather. congratulations. thinking about the future. >> thank you very much. >> thinking about the future of the world's children is something very much no doubt on your mind and also tackling global inequality is something on the top of the agenda at davos. the kind of themes the kind of people that will be attracted by this space project, for example, they're not going to be the lowest income members of the community. how do you bridge the gap between rich and poor? >> well when airline travel
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started, it was people with deep pockets that used to cross the atlantic. now, enormous amounts of people can actually travel by plane. the same will apply to space travel. initially, it will be people with quite deep pockets but they will be the pioneers to enable us one day hopefully transport people via space from ceylon don or australia in an hour and a half or a couple of hours. you do need the pioneers in order to help the mass of people one day benefit from new innovations. >> okay. so richard branson, thank you very much for talking us through that. congratulations once again. >> thank you very much. >> enjoy your time at davos. global inequality is one of the things being explored at davos as we were hearing from richard there and part of the theme "a
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richer world" where we will have a series of more programs and documentaries coming over the weeks and months on "bbc world news." we want you to get involved as well. you can follow our coverage on your mobile tablet computer even on the television old-fashioned style. go to bbc.com,/richer world. tweet us using the # the #bbcricherworld. is there a chance to bridge that gap. it's not an easy one, is it? first of all, let me bring you up to date with some news. in the last few hours, prime minister shinzo abe has arrived to take on the challenge and response to islam misists demanding
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$200 million for two kidnapped victims. and the british iraq inquiry report will not be published until may. it was expected to report within a year. the complexity of the issues has led to several delays. don't go away. we have more on the program and the latest on the situation where yemens are reportedly in charge of the presidential palace. ♪♪ the adventures you've been imagining. the heroes you've been admiring. the worlds you've been dreaming of. the thrills you've been craving. the moments you've been missing.
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offers flexpath, a revolutionary new program that allows you to earn a degree at your pace and graduate at the speed of you. flexpath from capella university. welcome to "bbc world news." our main headlines. president obama has proposed changes to tax fors the rich.
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and four men are charged in connection with the paris attacks. the resistance army has been transferred to the international criminal court detention center in the hague with a key figure in the rebels that for decades terrorized people in central africa. >> reporter: this is the detention center close to the beach in hague. and that is where dominic ongwen is being housed. and the issue of child soldiers this man was kidnapped and groomed by the notorious army when he was just 10 years old and likely to present some ethical and legal dilemmas for the court and high lyly likely they
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will use his progress as a child soldier for leniency. his surname means born at the time of the white ant. he quickly rose up the lra to become a fierce commander famous for slicing off the lips limes and noses of its victims. he is being charged with crimes against humanity and war crimes and slavery and inhumane acts. not a member of the courts but helped to facilitate his transfer from the african republic to the hague has said this is an historic ploy to the lra. it means only two of their command ers commanders, joseph kony and deam bow are still at large. human rights have said all eyes will be on the icc to deliver
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fair and meaningful justice that will resonate with the lra's victims. finally from the prosecutor of the icc, says dominic ongwen's transfer brings us one step closer to ending the lra's reign of terror in the great lakes region. >> anna reporting from the hague. there is chaos and confusion in yemen after the latest fighting from rebels and sources. currently in control of large areas of the country including parts of the capital of sanna. in a live presidential address, the president accused of putting his interests ahead of the people coming hours after his people shelled the president's home and seized control of the presidential palace. meanwhile, there were reports of the country's second largest air
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force in the port city has been closed along with seaports and crossings. and recently returning fromto uk from yemen said it is part of their negotiating strategy. >> i think this is unlikely this will push to a cue final in the sense the houthis could have done that in september. they took control of the capital then and didn't push hadi out then. we have seen this violence in the last couple of days and kidnapping of the chief of staff on saturday. this is all about the houthis negotiating for what they want. >> in theory they want a power sharing government. is there any chance? is that likely? >> it's not really about that. a new government formed early last year and about the changes in the constitution. a draft constitution at the
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moment. they're not happy about that issue of federalism how that country is due to be divided and pushing for the implementation of another deal when they took over sanaa in september. the houthis haven't kept to their own part of that deal. to push the houthi to push on with implementation are slightly hypocritical in that stance. >> the level of violence they're not concerned if they do get any kind of power or authority that will escalate? >> at the moment really they have the control over the government, even though they haven't had physically their men in ministries or a houthi president, they have been taking a silent hand behind closed doors so they've been going into ministries particularly on the issues of where the government is running -- how it's running its finances, very much trying to take control of that with their view of this is our crackdown on corruption and this is how we're preventing it. really, they had that silent hand of control for some months but obviously they haven't been
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able to manipulate the government quite the way they wanted to or as easily they would have liked and hence we end up with this situation of conflict now. >> you lived there for four years and relatively recently returned back to the uk. how have you seen the country changed? >> i think it's changed significantly in the last year because of the rise of the houthis. when they took control of sanaa in september, everybody was surprised. we were expecting them to get there but the fact they were able to get there in the space of four day, there was fighting and the minister of interior commanded his troops to step down and they took control and pushed on further west and farther south and the real front line of this confrontation where we should be looking at for further violence is east of sanaa. there is huge tension building up because the government hasn't been standing up to the how thys in the last few -- houthis in the last few months -- and
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they're not prepared to do that. . >> she has lived in yemen for the last four years. a 23-year-old man was detained after being shot in the leg by officers as he tried to escape. many of those stabbed were seriously and at least moderately wounded while at least four suffered light injuries, the victims being treated in local hospitals. the security in the area tightened and israeli police treated the incident as a terror attack. a prominent democracy campaigner in bahrain has been sentenced to six months in jail for insulting the government on twitter. he is appealing against the sentence and remains on bail. >> reporter: he is a promoter of democracy in bahrain has been sentenced to six months in jail his crime, insulting the
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officials on social media. he says it is the way the authorities are handling this is insulting. >> we send a message to the people of bahrain we don't respect you. >> reporter: this case has triggered protests in the capital and violence as it triggered violence and they're calling for the release of shaikh salma pictured on their banners. he was arrested in december which his party then boycotted. he he's set to go on trial accused of promote inging violent regime change. >> when you arrest me or salam, you're not promoting a peaceful struggle for human rights and justice, you are making no room for a peaceful world and you are allowing people who believes in
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violence to take control and that's very dangerous. >> reporter: he is head of the bahrain center for human rights is appealing against his sentence. he's been released on bail but can't leave the country. there's been unrest in bahrain for four years now the majority shiite calling for greater political rights from their sunni leaders. a journalist was recently shot dead while attending a wedding. human rights watch says threats and violence against journalists in afghanistan is increasing. and as a result the speech is under threat. reporting from kabul. >> reporter: the free media is one success story in afghanistan. one woman grills the afghan general in charge of communications for the afghan army an unthinkable sight in the former taliban period. all is not as it should be. journalists are routinely threatened and killed and killers allowed to get away with
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it. >> people who make violence against media think there is no result and do it again. >> reporter: they think they can do it and get away with it? >> with impunity. no one is following the cases in afghanistan. >> reporter: a local journalist was the first media casualty of 2015 in afghanistan. his colleagues staged a protest after he was shot at the weekend while attending a wedding in the eastern province. the communist complaint particularly by rural journalists is they face intimidation if they reported land grabs. to protect themselves, hey hold back from doing the reports. >> they shy away from these critical issues and practice self-sensorship. many journalists told us they routinely have to sensor
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themselves in order to survive and keep doing work as journalist and protect themselves. >> reporter: every night, newspapers have put out personal risks for editors and reporters if they offend those in the government taliban or criminal interests. >> we face threats on a daily basis. everyday when i do not receive a threatening call i think i've not done the right job. >> reporter: it has been almost 14 years since the fall of the taliban, a dictatorial regime in afghanistan, still, the business of producing a daily newspaper is not a safe occupation. human rights campaigners have appealed to the new government to come out more strongly to protect those on the front line of free speech. "bbc news," kabul. we have lots more as always on our website. do get in touch with me if you have comments let me know on twitter.
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m so glad we could be here for larry.
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hello. you're watching gmt on "bbc world news." i'm lucy hopkins. president obama say inging the page has been turned and calling for a new chapter in u.s. history that creates a fairer economy. >> will we accept an economy where only a few of us do speck tack you larly well or an economy that creates rising income and chances for everyone who

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