Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  February 17, 2015 9:00am-10:01am EST

9:00 am
this is bbc america. now, live from london, "bbc world news." hello. our top stories. [ gunfire ] >> there's fighting reported in eastern ukraine, putting more strain on the cease-fire. we have a special report. >> the people's republic is saying they are suppressing fire. [ gunfire ] >> run! run! >> denmark on alert as police
9:01 am
find a suspicious weapon outside a restaurant in copenhagen. indonesia's foreign minister dealing with foreign drug traffickers despite appeals. and somalia has become an unexpected hit. hello. two days after a cease-fire was meant to kick in in eastern ukraine, fierce fighting continues around the town. the ukraine army says they are in control of the transport hub. it's being contested by the peace deal separatists. both sides started the
9:02 am
withdrawal of heavy weapons. ukrainian forces refuse to pull back from the town. rebels encircled. they say ukrainian forces are accused of shelling the airport. from there, we have a report which contains images you might find distressing. >> reporter: this is what a scorched earth policy looks like. barely recognizable for what it is. donette donetsk international airport. the war in ukraine is supposed to have stopped. a battle of pictures a government against an army that turns to its russian neighbor. this is day two of a shaky cease-fire and heavy weapons supposed to be held back.
9:03 am
that's not happening here. the rebel defense minister says he'll only pull forces back when he has proof the ukrainians on the front line have withdrawn theirs. the issues that threaten the peace deal isn't that the guns haven't pulled back it's that they are still firing. this is supposed to be day two of the cease-fire in eastern ukraine. as you have been hearing -- [ gunfire ] >> -- the peace has not settled in. we are hearing the sound of a series of fires. there's another one. most appears to be outgoing for what the people of the republic are saying, they are repressing fire. run, run, run! the ukrainians insist they haven't broken the truce, accusing them of shelling their
9:04 am
own territory. [ speaking foreign language ] >> reporter: no, it's in and out. the defense minister says he's trying to stop the enemy from firing. more than r55,000 people have been killed. the last effort to stop the war failed. this is where it really broke down. today's peace deal held in most places. it's clear we are watching history repeat itself. bbc news donetsk international airport. david is in kiev. more reports of continued, fierce fighting. david? >> yes, exactly right. we don't know exactly what is happening.
9:05 am
obviously, it's very very tense and dangerous situation. the ukrainian government officials are saying there is fighting taking place around the railroad station on the outskirts. again, we cannot confirm that. if it's true it's the first time the ukrainian government admitted there's fighting going on inside the city. now, as i say, it's difficult to say what is happening. we know that fighting is ongoing. there has been showing through the night, obviously, the tensions there are very high and the question is obviously, also how this is going to affect the peace plan which seems to be coming under pressure right now. >> exactly because all five under pressure to pull back and pressure from angela merkel too. >> exactly. we have heard just in the last hour or so that the leader of
9:06 am
the people's republic says they have actually begun the pullback of heavy weapons. we cannot confirm that. that would be a positive step. however, at the same time the denetsk people's republic. the area to the south, they say they are not pulling back their weapons until -- while the fighting is going on. we are hearing the same thing from the government. this is again, if there is indeed a pullback by the people this is a positive step. the tension remains very high elsewhere. >> david, thanks very much. reports from afghanistan say 20 people most of them believed to be police officers have been killed in a suicide attack in the east of the country. four militants entered the police headquarters.
9:07 am
they detonated suicide vests in several locations. initial reports suggest the bombers were wearing police uniforms. afghan security forces have taken control of security. more on that of course as it comes in. we go to denmark next. police say a suspicious letter has been found at a cafe in copenhagen. ammunition experts have been called in. no explosives have been found. they said it was normal procedure. they said the lesser contained messages linked to saturday's attack. the head of press at the copenhagen police office will tell us more about the letter. >> only about two and a half hours ago, where one of the shootings took place saturday
9:08 am
they found a suspicious looking letter in front of it. they were worried because something was written, i don't know what but something was written on the letter that made them suspicious and they believe, of course very visible in the streets. they contacted the police. of course the police took this very serious and they blocked the area. they called in ammunition experts from the dannishish army. there were no explosives or nothing to be afraid of. they cleared the streets and things are back to normal. >> head of the police force in copenhagen. we have a correspondent there. >> one of the issues people are talking about at the moment is the issue of whether or not
9:09 am
there was a system failure in the security services about picking up omar hussein because the britain authorities made it clear they thought he became radicalized while in jail for a stabbing. the danish service ignored this. they are investigating why this was -- more was not done. apparently, there was no requirement to monitor omar hussein when he came out of jail. whether or not he should be released. that's perhaps, something that will need to be looked at in the future. this issue of radicalization in jail is something that is really worrying the authorities. that's something that is going to be investigated by the intelligent service as part of the overall investigation.
9:10 am
now, indonesia looks to the execution of australia's mayor and brazilian national. the attorney general's office told bbc they are almost certain the educations will not take place this month. in the last hour the interviews decided to execute drug traffickers. our correspondent is there. why this is getting so much attention. >> reporter: well, this is really an emotional issue for indonesia and australia. we have just heard from an official from the indonesian authority office who confirmed for now, they have decided to postpone the execution or at least it's not going to take place this month. that's according to the
9:11 am
official because the 40 execution is ready for the execution of more than five inmates. now we know that the plan for this second round of execution of drug convicts is for indonesia to execute at least seven foreign nationals and a number of indonesian nationals. the highest profile, australian nationals. their execution has strong actions from the australian public and pleas for clemency from the current and former australian leaders. indonesia maintains the reason they are doing this is because the country is facing a state of emergency in terms of drug problems and so today, the indonesian foreign minister answers the strong lobbying from australia and the strong criticisms on the international
9:12 am
media against indonesia. here is what she had to say. >> this issue is purely law enforcement issue. law enforcement against extraordinary crime. law enforcement by a sovereign country in indonesia. the decision to enforce the death penalty by the indonesian court -- any country or certain countries but an extraordinary -- >> remind us briefly what the crimes are we are talking about here. do they react well or badly to the pressure? is it unwanted in spirit or actually we need to sort it out
9:13 am
diplomatically? >> reporter: well it doesn't look like indonesia is going to sort it out diplomatically at this point. no matter what the criticism has been, even pleas from the u.n. secretary general in indonesia, the country has to carry on with the executions because of the emergency of drug problems facing the country. there was an unofficial moratorium on capital punishment for four years before this. now, indonesia has a new president and he will reject all clemency applications. that of course the problem that lawyers of these drug convicts see because as far as they're understanding of the clemency is that the president has to review the cases one by one. in particular for the australian nationals, they seem to have rehabilitated in prison. one of them has got a college
9:14 am
degree while he was in prison. the other one is now an accomplished artist. none of these things that they have done in prison seem to be taken into consideration by the indonesian government. >> thanks. stay with us here on "bbc world news." there is much more ahead. thousands of people taken to the tiny italian island.
9:15 am
9:16 am
this is "bbc world news." i have the latest headlines for you. fightings reported around the key city in eastern ukraine where they broke a cease-fire. police on high alert in denmark as a suspicious letter is found outside a cafe on saturday. now, greece said it is confident
9:17 am
they can reach compromise in debt negotiations despite the collapse of talks yesterday. they told greece it must extend the bailout agreement but athens refused to accept it. on the way to further talks to greek's finance minister explains the next move. >> the next step is responsible. europe would continue to deliberate in order to spend time. it actually achieved a very good outcome for the average american, not the average greek or dutch person or german. we know in europe how to create a very good solution an honorable solution out of initial disagreement. now you allow me to go to a european meeting. investment is the main game in
9:18 am
europe. it's deflation in forces. just like the european central bank is the monetary stability, i believe european investment bank is excellent for europe. thank you. >> well our correspondent says the eurozone and greece are still apart. >> they are going to do everything they can and deal with it in the next two days. at the moment the big sticking point is the youeuro wants them to stay on it. at the moment it is the question of who is going to blink first. they are not blinking, they are offering a united front and offering greece an ultimatum. either stick to the bail out and we talk friday or else. the or else has not been defined. clearly, it could mean the european central bank cuts
9:19 am
funding. it could be the fear of control here and greece in dangerous waters indeed. it is now racing against time for a deal to be struck or greece will be on dangerous ground. >> there in athens. tricky territory. >> yeah absolutely. we are talking a reform of job practices, employment law. a big day for that. thanks very much. we are going to start on france of course, because a major bill to reform france's employment laws is going to be voted by the lower house. we are expecting that vote today. we are talking, basically, we are talking about things like making it easier to hire and fire. there are many economists around the world that say france is somewhat archaic with employment laws that hindered the french economy. we are keeping our eyes on that one, indeed. european airlines they are playing catch up with the u.s.
9:20 am
as they add wi-fi to planes to attract customer who is want to be online in the air. data shows that u.s. airline passengers already have a chance of accessing wi-fi on 66% of -- basically, domestic flights in the u.s. that's against the worldwide average of 24%. adoption of a service similar to those in the united states is higher because of the number of countries in the region. satellite is proving too costly. we are going to talk more about this on "gmf" in just over an hour's time. we are talking why fie there. tweet me. that's it with the business wi-fi. i know you don't like phone calls in the air, but whyi-fi. >> officials tell bbc there's a
9:21 am
state of emergency for people migrating in. the center capacity 250. more than 1,000 people waiting. more boats are expected to arrive today. we have the report from there. >> reporter: the migrants. boat after boat packed with men, women and children arrive on this tiny, italian island. now they wait some with young babies at the reception center which is struggling to cope. it's been a long rescue operation for italy's coast guard. children under 9 traveling alone need to be reassured. they are lucky to be alive. many die. we treat people on the boat after the rescue. he saw babies who were just a few months or even a few days old. italy says this is europe's
9:22 am
problem, which every european government including britain must address. the dilemma remains. a vast expansive water here. some say you create a safety net, which encourages many migrants. have fewer boats ready for rescue and you can mend women and children to avoidable deaths. many believe 29 migrants who died from hypothermia after being rescued could have been saved last week if italy's search and rescue mission had not ended in november. thousands now in limbo. the charities warned with war so near and fewer boats patrolling many more people desperate to get to europe will die this year. >> sorry, we cut him off there.
9:23 am
that report from land producer. many people coming from africa. we now move to somalia and the capitol. what is your stereo type of that? what you get if you follow them on instagram? she has 42,000 followers. a reverent take on somali life. we have this report about her. ♪ >> this is the vicious fighting. >> malnutrition. >> is that it? >> welcome to this. >> this is our living these days. i just wanted to make my friends laugh.
9:24 am
>> check it out right here. >> now, my mission might be just showing that. just as normal as anywhere else in the world. a lot of people fret over african country that is have experienced war. >> astonishing. ift was like walking in the mall and seeing your reflection in a slice of mirror. we know that we come from a tradition. we recognize ourselves in
9:25 am
poetry, in africa, especially. no i don't feel privileged as all. a lot of us who came back to somalia are because we want to be here not because we live lavishly. i put myself at risk every time i leave the house knowing there's a sniper on roofs. i'm here to make that change. the biggest issue is that people will tell you you can't do certain things because you are a woman. it should be your utmost pleasure to prove them otherwise. a lot of people tell me you can't do this because you are married. yes, i'm married, i'm not purple. [ speaking foreign language ] >> when i go out, i try to look
9:26 am
for beauty within the room really. for me it is impossible. i will try to make the change happen in somalia. you want to be a part of it. >> stay with us. ow... my scalp hurts. my hair hurts. this is what it can be like to have shingles. a painful, blistering, rash. look at me. she's embarrassed by the way she looks. if you had chickenpox, the shingles virus is already inside you. 1 in 3 people will get shingles in their lifetime. as you get older, your immune system weakens and it loses its ability to keep the shingles virus in check. well i had to go to the eye doctor last week and i have to go back today. the doctor's worried its so close
9:27 am
to her eye. the shingles rash can last up to 30 days. it hurts. it's hard. don't wait until you or someone you love develops shingles. talk to your doctor or pharmacist about your risk. you owned your car for four years. you named it brad. you loved brad. and then you totaled him. you two had been through everything together. two boyfriends. three jobs. you're like "nothing can replace brad!" then liberty mutual calls. and you break into your happy dance. if you sign up for better car replacement, we'll pay for a car that's a model year newer with 15,000 fewer miles than your old one. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
9:28 am
9:29 am
9:30 am
our top stories. [ gunfire ] >> there's fighting reported in eastern ukraine, putting more strain on the cease-fire. denmark on alert again as police find a suspicious letter outside a cafe in copenhagen. the security situation improves in baghdad. we hear from a teenage suicide bomber in the name of islamic state.
9:31 am
>> you are ashamed of what you were going to do? >> yes. >> would you do more of this if you were promised a free train ticket? a new tactic to bring the weight problem under control. hello. two days after a cease-fire was meant to kick in in eastern ukraine, fierce fighting continues around the town. the ukraine army says they are in control of the transport hub. the territory is being contested by pro-russian separatists. under the peace agreement, both sides started the withdrawal of heavy weapons. they created a buffer zone here.
9:32 am
ukrainian forces refuse to pull back from the town. rebels encircled. they say it's theirs. we have the latest pictures in what appears to be a pipeline exploding, sending up all the flames into the air. it appears to be the result of shelling from ukrainian forces. pro-russian forces -- fighting there continues despite the cease-fire. you can see this is incredibly difficult. let's get the latest from david stern. >> we don't know what is happening. obviously, it's very tense and dangerous situation. the ukrainian government officials are saying there is fighting taking place around the railroad station on the outskirts. again, we cannot confirm that. if it's true it's the first
9:33 am
time they have admitted there's fighting going on inside the city. it's difficult to say what exactly is happening. we know that fighting is ongoing. there has been shelling through the night. obviously, the tensions there are very high and the question is obviously, also how this is going to affect the cease-fire which seems to be coming under increasing pressure now. >> exactly, because all five under pressure to pull back and pressure from angela merkel too. >> exactly. we have heard just in the last hour or so that the leader of the people's republic says that they have actually begun the pullback of heavy weapons. now, again, we cannot confirm that. that would be a positive step however, at the same time the den donetsk people say they are
9:34 am
not pulling back while the fighting is going on. we are hearing the same from the government. if there is a pullback by the people this is a positive step. the tension remains very high elsewhere. >> david stern in kiev. russia's president vladimir putin arrived. hungry cannot turn its back despite criticism from the european leader and nato leaders. bethany bell is in budapest. why is this so controversial? >> well, many countries are funding this at the moment precisely the cause, the conflict in ukraine. this visit is seen as very symbolic for mr. putin. he's coming to hungry a member
9:35 am
of the european and nato. he is being received here. now, as you said he can't turn his back on his country's main supplier of gas, but there is a sense of ambiguity here. last night, 2,000 people went out in protest of mr. putin's visit. they are very concerned about this. others feel that they should perhaps, stick closer to russia which is the supplier of gas and seen as being a rather more politically followed known factor where the eu relationship. >> there are specifics both sides want from these talks today. >> well gas is at the heart of it. hungary's current contract with gas ends at the end of the year.
9:36 am
they have to negotiate either an extension of that or try to re-negotiate a new deal. that's on the table. things here it's an interesting one in terms of him. he has supported the eu sanctions on russia but been vocal about the negative impact and hungary's economy suffered because of those sanctions as well. it's an interesting one and one people will watch carefully to see if mr. putin does say anything about the shaky cease-fire in ukraine. >> bethany, many thanks. police if denmark say a suspicious letter was found at a cafe in copenhagen. police say no explosives were found. the news agency reported it did have messages linked to saturday's attack. well the head of the press
9:37 am
office of copenhagen police told me more about the letter. >> only about two and a half hours ago, where one of the shootings took place saturday, they found a suspicious looking letter in front of it. they were worried because something was written, i don't know what, but something was written on the letter that made them suspicious and they believe, of course, very visible in the streets. they contacted the police. of course, the police took this very serious and they blocked the area. they called in ammunition experts from the danish army. there were no explosives or nothing to be afraid of. they cleared the streets and things are back to normal. >> head of the police force in copenhagen.
9:38 am
a candlelit vigil was held across the country to remember those killed by the gunmen. thousands gathered to observe a moment of silence. we spoke to survivors of the attack from the synagogue. >> reporter: this 12-year-old was playing games at home because the jewish school was closed for security reasons. hannah her family and friends were having a party when the gunman attacked. music drown that shots that killed their friend acting as a security guard and wounded two police officers. they have no faith in the danish prime minister's promise to protect the country's jews. >> i don't feel that the danish -- that denmark takes serious the threat against their
9:39 am
jewish community. they don't. i have been asked many times why is it really necessary for your jewish institutions to be guarded that way? is it necessary? i don't think anyone will be asking me that today, but next week they will have forgotten. >> reporter: he is critical of authorities for not stopping the gunman from carrying out the attack. >> they have been on the radar of the intelligence community so i think, it might be some work for the intelligence community in making sure people they have on their radar are dealt with correctly. i don't know if it's a question of man hours or what but there seems to be a gap somehow. they already got people in focus, but they manage to do
9:40 am
terrorist attacks anyway. >> reporter: the gunman was born in denmark. his parents palestinian refugees. he was a gang member radicalized in prison. this attack is a test of denmark's cohesion as a society. can the various minorities breach the divisions? >> hate will solve nothing. i don't hate i don't teach my children to hate though i wish that others would teach their children the same. >> reporter: you are talking arab muslim families? >> yes. >> reporter: they had no plans to abandon denmark. they love the society and they refuse to be driven out. bbc news copenhagen. reports from afghanistan say at least 20 people believed to be police officers have been killed in a suicide attack in the east of the country. four militants entered the
9:41 am
police headquarters in the provenn shl capitol and detonated bombs. they were wearing police uniforms. there's been an increase in recent months. afghan security have taken control. police say at least eight people died in a blast. earlier reports suggest a suicide bomber blew them up. gunfire from nearby vehicles and shot in the densely populated area. few attacks in recent years. prosecutors will make their final arguments in the case of dominique strauss-khan on pimping charges. the 65-year-old politician fwhuz
9:42 am
a two week hearing. it's reported they could now drop charges and cause strauss-khan to be cleared. a suicide bomber told the bbc they actively recruit teenagers as young as 14 to carry out the reports. he was caught in baghdad. john simpson has this report. >> reporter: this is turning into a different city. the nighttime curfew which lasted for years has finally been lifted and people can enjoy themselves like they used to years ago. still, everyone knows it's not 100% safe. islamic state marks the lifting of the curfew with suicide bombings. but the police are getting better at stopping them.
9:43 am
and this is a suicide bomber just captured. we were given remarkable access to him. he's only 17 just a boy, homeless vulnerable. i.s. shows him how to wear a vest. >> they promised me i would go straight to heaven he says. the majority of recruits are like me or younger. younger? how young? 14 15, 16 or 17, like me. and you were fully prepared to kill women and children as well as men? yes, sir he says. why are you crying now? cause i'm so sorry for this he
9:44 am
says. you are ashamed of what you were going to do? yes. there's no sign that he is saying this because he's being mistreated. now, he will serve time in prison. after that he could still have a decent future. police in baghdad have also had success against car bombs. each check point has a list of suspicious vehicle that is the police are on the lookout for. the interior ministry is remarkably upbeat. are you winning the war? >> i'm full confident to say yes, we are winning the war. we have hubs and we have faith that this year will be the end of the era. >> reporter: a few months ago, there were fears that i.s. might capture baghdad itself. you don't hear that now.
9:45 am
i.s. is being pushed back in the country as a whole. but, the new prime minister is well aware that iraq's third city mosul is still in i.s. hands. >> i can't announce this. we have already started preparation of a force. so we are assigning our army divisions to that task. >> mosul will be back in your hands by the end of the year? >> i hope so. >> reporter: is his optimism justified? last week i.s. scored a victory in western iraq. it isn't as strong as it was while the government forces are stronger. there are reasons to be optimistic here. john simpson, bbc news, baghdad. >> do stay with us.
9:46 am
we have much more to come in hollywood. an exhf-footballer is playing a part in a movie. enthusiast. mmm, a perfect 177-degrees. and that's why this road warrior rents from national. i can bypass the counter and go straight to my car. and i don't have to talk to any humans, unless i want to. and i don't. and national lets me choose any car in the aisle. control. it's so, what's the word?... sexy. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses. if you have a business idea, we have a personalized legal solution that's right for you. with easy step-by-step guidance, we're here to help you turn your dream into a reality. start your business today with legalzoom.
9:47 am
now?
9:48 am
this is "bbc world news." i have the latest headlines for you. fierce fighting around the key city in eastern ukraine despite a cease-fire. police on high alert in denmark as a suspicious letter planted outside a cafe by a gunman on saturday. greece is confident it can reach the compromise in the debt renegotiations despite the collapse of talks yet. the finance minister said it must extend the bailout by the end of the week. athens refused to accept that.
9:49 am
we have the latest on the talks with the greek finance minister. he explains the next move. >> the next step is responsible. europe would continue to deliberate in order to spend time. it actually achieved a very good outcome for the average european not for the average greek or dutch person or jerman. we know in europe how to create a very good solution, an honorable solution out of initial disagreement. now you allow me to go to a european meeting. investment is the main game in europe. it's deflation in forces. just like the european central bank is the monetary stability, i believe european investment bank is excellent for europe. thank you.
9:50 am
indonesia looks at the execution of australian nationals, plus the brazilian national. attorney general office told bbc it is almost certain the executions will not take place this month. indonesian foreign minister defended the decision to execute drug traffickers. >> this issue is purely law enforcement issue. it is a crime. law enforcement by a sovereign country indonesia. the decision to enforce the death penalty is not directly covert nor national or certain country, but it is an extraordinary crime.
9:51 am
in other news the japanese government will provide $15 million in aid to support the fight against islamic extremists. they say the money will assist counterterrorism in the middle east and africa. killed two japanese hostages in syria. there's an up surge in fighting in myanmar between the rebels. the rebels told bbc more than 80 civilians have been killed by soldiers in laukkai. how do you feel about doing exercise at the station on the way to work if it meant getting a free bus or train ticket at work? they are considering adopting it in an attempt to attack the biggest obesity problem in the world. we have the report. >> reporter: this is the new front line in the battle of the
9:52 am
bulge. this 23-year-old has to do ten squats and she gets a free pedomete rerks. >> there is a lot of obesity. at least for me exercise is important. it doesn't just help you look good, it improves your health. >> mexico weighs in as the second fattest nation in the world after the u.s. more than 70% of adults here are obese or overweight. the problem affects 1 in 4 children, too. as mexico is growing richer people abandoned their diet of corn and beans. instead, people got used to a diet full of tacos, tortillas. >> mexico is the biggest consumer in the world of treats. on every corner you can buy fried food at cheap prices. it's going to take more than ten squats to work off a bite of
9:53 am
this. that's not it according to this expert. some say the problem costs the government more than $3 billion a year. this initiative shows how worried authorities have become about the issue. >> ten squats probably is not enough physical activity to burn calories and control your weight. a message from the government that it is willing to pay you to do something for your health. it's a world message. >> reporter: with 5 million people using public transport in the city every day, the health department wants them burning off the tacos instead. squats are just a start. bbc news mexico city. now -- become the first to win the world cup and have a role in a nominated best picture at the oscars which takes place on sunday. plays the role of a swiss
9:54 am
doctor. our correspondent is in paris. >> won the world cup in spectacular style. >> 1998 he wins the world cup with france. 2015 a swiss doctor in "the theory of everything." and like eric and many before him, he's serious about acting. appearing on stage in paris in the hit comedy "my mother-in-law, my ex and me." why did you choose acting? >> i came back to my first passion, movies and plays. when i was 4 years old, i wanted to be an actor. when i give up my carrier, i went to l.a. to learn the process of acting. we have a chance to have two lives. i wanted to try that. >> especially when his agent
9:55 am
secured him an audition for "the theory of everything." what if i reverse time to see what happens at the beginning of time? >> it didn't work very well. a week after, she said come on you got it. i said oh my god, fantastic. >> how was filming? >> stressful. i learned a lot. when they say curtain, i said wow, i did something good. i didn't see the movie yet. it just went out in france. i would love to go there and pay my -- to get the chance to see the movie. >> you have not seen the film? >> not yet. i wasn't invited to a premier, which is understandable. i am in the movie three minutes. i'm going to go with my wife maybe sunday to see the movie. >> you are the first person in history to win the world cup and
9:56 am
have a role in a film nominated for the oscars. >> for me it's the beginning of a carrier. i don't want to stop there and say okay i did that and i was nominated, but i only played three minutes. some day, a role like they had and show what i'm capable of. we'll see. >> where do you swap the world cup where there's a medal for best oscar? >> why do you want me to swap anything when i can have both? >> and on sunday he'll find out if he completes the world cup double. bbc news. >> i wonder how they will do. the american singer/song writer died in a new york hospital. ♪ it's my party and i'll cry if i want to ♪ ♪ cry if i want to ♪ ♪ cry if i want to ♪
9:57 am
♪ you would cry too -- >> she was 68 and had cancer. she was discovered by the musician and composer christy when she was a teen canaler. great success came with her first single "it's my party." she was 16 years old. but sometimes work can get in the way. now capella university offers flexpath, a revolutionary new program that allows you to earn a degree at your pace and graduate at the speed of you. flexpath from capella university. hey, how you doin'? it hurts. this is what it can be like to have
9:58 am
shingles. a painful blistering rash. if you had chicken pox the shingles virus is already inside you. as you get older your immune system weakens and it loses its ability to keep the shingles virus in check. i just can't stand seeing him like this. he's in pain. one in three people will get shingles in their lifetime. the shingles rash can last up to 30 days. i wish that there was something i could do to help. some people with shingles will have long term nerve pain which can last for a few months to a few years. don't wait until you or someone you love develops shingles. talk to your doctor or pharmacist about your risk.
9:59 am
10:00 am
hello, you are watching gmt. i'm lucy hockings. our top story is ukraine's fragile cease-fire already on the brink of collapse? a fire ball in the sky over a key town as fighting intensifies. the leaders of russia ukraine and germany have been on the line to save the deal. christians killed in egypt. they are calling to confront the extremists. hope

41 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on