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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  March 20, 2015 10:00am-11:01am EDT

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hello. i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. nigeria's president told the bbc he is hopeful boko haram can be defeated in a month. but the fate of the kidnapped chibok schoolgirls remains unclear. >> we're told by the military that there's no clues at all as to where they are. a solar eclipse takes place across the northern hemisphere. this was the scene in svalbard in norway where the sun was totally covered by the moon.
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we report from the front line in donetsk in eastern ukraine on how the cease-fire is or isn't holding. and does the pop star prince, have a secret stash of unreleased music? we investigate the rumors. hello. thanks for joining us. in less than a week nigeria's president, goodluck jonathan will be standing for re-election. well on his watch, the jihadist group, boko haram, has risen as a force in the north of the country. thousands of people have been killed. in one, hundreds of schoolgirls were kidnapped. they are still missing. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the president
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acknowledges that the army doesn't know even if those girls are still alive. and yet after a successful military offensive, he says boko haram will be driven out of the country within a month. well, that interview was carried out by our correspondent, will ross, who joins us from the capital, abuja, in what will was quite a revealing interview. >> reporter: yes and coming at a very pivotal time for this country. incumbents always win the elections here in nigeria, but this election is far closer than any that's happened before. it's set to be a very close, tense contest in just eight days' time. so president goodluck jonathan under pressure. he granted this rare interview to the bbc at state lodge here in abuja, an interesting venue. it felt very cocooned from the outside world when you go down the lengthy corridors and past all the locked doors and the security checks it feels a
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thousand miles away from the rest of the country. but of course the president is under pressure at the moment also because of what's been going on in the northeast. and we have seen a radical change of the circumstances on the ground in the northeast. towns and villages have been taken back by the kneenigerian military as well as by chadian forces and with help from cameroon and niger as well. so the whole theater of conflict has changed a great deal. and that was the subject i was keen to pick up with president jonathan and i began by asking him to assess the status what he felt was the status now of boko haram. >> for getting weaker and weaker by the day. and i'm very hopeful that it will not take us more than a month to recover all territories that have been in their hands. >> where are the jihadists? where did they go?
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>> well, they have a lot of linkages, you know, center africa, west africa. >> what i mean is, they were chased out of these towns and villages, where do you think they've gone to now? >> that's what i'm saying, the pressure is on them, they're killed. of course, some of them, they die in the process. a number of them just have killed. some of them even bleed back to reintegrate into the civilian population. >> the hope, of course, has always been for the families of the 219 abducted schoolgirls from chibok, that this operation would find them alive, but this week, we're told by the military, that there's no clues at all as to where they are. >> we ask that question every day.
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we are looking, we have not seen dead girls. that is the good news. so i believe they're still alive. i believe we'll get them. >> do you know where they are? >> no, i can't tell you where they are. we are suspecting that they may be in some forest. we cannot speak categorically, but we suspect that the bulk of them may be in some forest. >> many people are questioning how on earth has it been that during these last just few weeks, less than six weeks, the whole picture has changed in the northeast. these towns and villages have been taken back and they're wondering why that couldn't have happened months or years ago. why it's happened right now. >> yes, i agree. at the beginning of the boko haram, wherever expected that you would build up that kind of capacity, [ inaudible ] have not
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fought any war, have not manufactured weapons, so to look for equip the army and the air force. >> what do you say to all the families, though, that have lost their loved ones during this five-year period, five or six years. >> whatever goes right, accept. whatever goes right, applaud it. so i'm not shifting blames. i'm only trying to explain to you, but you appear not to appreciate what we are doing. which is unfortunate. but i'm just telling you -- >> but we can't forget that people have been killed. that's the thing. we can't just say, everything's fine now because the towns and villages have been retaken. >> wherever i hear somebody, that is nigeria -- whether it's boko haram or security personnel -- they're all nigerians. no president would be happy to lose his citizens.
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>> well goodluck jonathan there. for many people looking in from beyond the issue of the schoolgirls in chibok is still a critically important element in how they perceive the president, not at least, did you get a clear message, do you think, as to how much he does or perhaps even doesn't really know about their whereabouts? >> it's hard to know. because i asked him, as you heard there, directly if he knows where they are. he says no and then suggests they may be in this place called the sambisa forest which is where we though they were taken straight after they were abducted. other people suggest it's highly unlikely that they're being held in large groups at all. so the chance of rescuing them in any large quantity together is highly unlikely. i must say, his answers were um, hard to read really because even when asked, you know, where have all the jihadists gone he started talking about them fleeing across the country's borders,
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and then said some of them were probably in the sambisa forests and the mountains. so he seemed to give various answers for some of these specific points on the military and the insurgency in the northeast. so, not particularly clear on that. but what he was clear on is the fact that the theater has changed, the whole scene has changed in the northeast, but unlike the messages from the military, which seem to almost say the war is won, he's a little more cautious than that. he's saying these jihadists have moved. he's saying some of them have melted back into the society. they've gone into hiding. so not suggesting that huge numbers have been killed. in other words, boko haram is not a decimated force, seems to be the message from him. >> will thank you so much indeed. will ross in lagos. now to what's being called the first great astronomical event of this century. millions of people across northern europe africa and
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asia have been witnessing a solar eclipse. and the last time it happened was in 1999. now, sky watchers have flocked to the arctic where a full solar eclipse was on offer. there we are in svalbard in norway. the moon's shadow drawing an ark from the norwegian arkchipelago to the faroe islands. it happened a less than an hour ago, these pictures coming out. this was the spectacular sight also for you, from a plane above the faroe islands. incredible that the sun's corona corona, the ring of rays surrounding the moon taking on that very rosy hugh there. it's . this is the scene from moscow now, still enjoying at least a partial eclipse. never going to get totality but that's the view there. it will gradually move and wend its way on in the course of the next hour or so.
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we've got a few still pictures to bring you as well. wow, look at that an airplane flying across the eclipse. that was taken by david cook in blackburn here in england. a view of the eclipse behind a cross on the church of st. nickolay in sophia. and also students from a london school with refractive glasses on the meridian line at the royal observatory here in london in greenwich. good stuff. okay let's move on to some other stories now. islamic state extremists say they were behind the attack at the bardo museum in tunisia's capital, which killed 23 people. tunisian authorities have arrested nine people and deployed the army to protect major cities. the attack was designed to wreck the country's tourist industry. coachloads of tourists from nearby cruise ships had just arrived a to the museum near the parliament building when the government opened fire. the cruise ship "msc splendida"
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has arrived in barcelona. nine of its guests among those who reportedly lost their lives in the attack with another 12 injured. and that company along with italy's "costa crosseria" have suspended stopovers in tunis until further notice. today toons isunis is marking their independence day. many people are shaken by the events this week but it is thought they'll still come out in large numbers in a show of solidarity. >> reporter: the government has said that attackers here were tunisians. significantly, the information the government is providing says that they actually learned their skills across the border in libya, suggesting i think, the nature of what's happening in this particular region. in terms of what ordinary tunisians think, a lot of people will be shaken by what happens here. this is different from soldiers fighting jihadists in remote areas. this is right in the heart of the capital.
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and i think we may see later today, an expression of what ordinary people think during independence day celebrations. this is tunisia's independence day, but of course by coincidence, it comes two days after the attack. it is then nevertheless, a chance for ordinary people to take part in rallies, to show what they think. >> james reynolds. >> we've had reports of dozens of people being killed in suicide attack bombs in yemen. the blast happened at two mosques in the capital sanaa during friday prayers. these attacks come a day after intense gun battles in southern city of aden among rival troops loyal to yemen's former and current president left 13 dead. hopes for some sort of lasting peace in eastern ukraine seem to be fading. hostilities carry on in spite of the cease-fire which was signed in minsk. one village called peski is in the donetsk region and it comes under the control of the ukrainian government.
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>> reporter: peski was one of the wealthiest suburbs of donetsk. everyone apparently wanted to live -- and look what has happened to it now. constant fire. so he's taking us to the ukrainian position at the front line. well, technically a cease-fire line, but this doesn't really sound like a cease-fire to me. he wants us to run, one by one. no -- he's suggesting we go inside, which is probably a safer place to be.
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>> reporter: so he says the ukraine army the ukrainian military are respecting the cease-fire, but these guys they say they are from the volunteer battalion, he says that we return fire. >> reporter: it's 900 meters from here to the position of the
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separatist forces, and that's well within the kalashnikov's firing range and the firing hasn't stopped since we've been here. that's some cease-fire, huh? we heard the incoming, now we heard the outgoing. they're definitely all carrying on. >> natalia in eastern ukraine. do stay with us here on bbc world news. still coming up in the program, myanmar's president tells the bbc the country's path to democracy will continue, but with the guiding happened of the military.
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you're watching bbc world news with me david eades. the latest headlines. the nigerian president, goodluck jonathan, tells the bbc that he's confident that the boko
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haram jihadist group will be beaten although the fate of the kidnapped chibok schoolgirls remains unclear. an eclipse of the sun is underway for millions of people across europe and parts of africa and asia. also with us here in the studio is jamie. >> david, hi. let's start with greece because its struggle to stay in the euro continues. in the last few hours, prime minister alexis tsipras has pledged to come up with a new list of reforms in order to get more bailout money to stave off bankruptcy. this promise came after three hours of late-night talks, with german chancellor angela merkel and the french president, francois hollande. greece was given an extension of its bailout program a month ago, you may remember but to get anymore money, it's got to convince its eu partners it is implementing tough reforms. mr. tsipras will not disclose how much cash his country's got left, but it is clear greece's
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finances get more precarious by the day. also later on in about an hour's time we'll be going to the swiss city of basel, where thousands of the world's watchmakers, sellers, and enthusiasts are all gathered for the annual basel world watch fair. a luxury swiss watch, of course high on the shopping list for growing ranks of wealthy and middle class people across the globe. switzerland exported about 28 million watches last year. but times really are getting tougher. slowdown in china, of course and the surge in the value of the swiss franc makes them a whole lot more expensive. more in about an hour. >> nice watches. jamie, thanks very much. myanmar's president says the country's reform process is now irreversible. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, thein sein said there would be no backsliding and the country would continue towards greater democracy. our correspondent, jonah fisher spoke to the president and first asked him if there was any
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scenario whereby the army would take back full control. >> translator: let me say that there will be no backsliding. our reform process is going step by step. we are now going at a steady pace. >> reporter: for all the changes that you've made here, the power that is held by the army remains. is the army committed to reforms here? because at the moment it seems like they're not willing to give up their grip on power. >> translator: it's not true that reforms have been stalled because of the military. the permits does not get involved with political parties. and it's only concerned with the national interests. they are willing to cooperate with any organization to solve the people. >> but is the end destination for you the army having no
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political role here? >> translator: the military has two tasks. one is to fight for the country in case of war. if there's no war, they will solve the interests of the people. so solving the interests of people means, be involved in national politics. >> so you see them continuing to have a seat in parliament? they have a quarter of the seat at the moment and a veto of the constitutional change. you don't really see that being up for negotiation in the near future? >> translator: it's not only myanmar where the military are involved in transition politics. we have only 25% of the seats. in the case of indonesia, they had 40%. they were able to gradually reduce the involvement of the military from the parliament. it would be rather difficult to give the time frame for reducing this role but i can assure you that as we mature in democracy and our country, the role of
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military in parliament will reduce gradually. it will also depend on the will of the people. >> reporter: aung san suu kyi still can't be president of this country because she has british children. what if in the election in november, people overwhelmingly vote for her and her party? you talk a lot about the will of the people. if the will of the people is for her to lead this country, shouldn't that take precedence over the constitution? >> translator: this claus is not meant specifically for aung san suu kyi. in fact, this was already written in the constitution of 1947, that was drafted at the time of general aung san, her father. our country is situated between two populist countries, india and china, so the leader of our country has always had to save our sovereignty and integrity, otherwise our country would be
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dominated by these bigger ones. >> that's thein sein the president of myanmar, talking to jonah fisher. the american pop musician prince is rumored to have a very large collection of unreleased music locked away inside of a vault. well, for years, fans have speculated about whether the stories are true and how much music there may be there. the bbc's mobine moczar has been to minneapolis in search of the truth. >> reporter: many people will know prince the androgynous multi-instrumentalist who sings about sex and spirituality in the same breath. his persona inspires many myths, one about the vast number of tracks he's rumored to have kept locked away in a vault. now his former sound engineer has revealed the rumors are true, the vault exists. she help set it up. >> my goal was, i want us to have everything he's ever recorded. i started making a database for all these things and then
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that's when we began planning basic park and we realized if we're going to have a vault, let's have a vault. because if we get, i don't know if we get a tornado, if we get a flood, this is his legacy. we need to protect these things. so this idea for a vault was built into paisley park. it is a bank vault. it has like a bank vault door. it's a really really thick. >> reporter: like elvis' graceland or jackson's neverland, this is prince's utopia paisley park. and it's here that he's recorded many of his biggest albums. and now we know paisley park is home to the vault. people who have worked with prince say hundreds of musical gems are locked inside. >> when you say the word "vault," it's really a vault of treasure. i mean it's like the beatles' stuff and michael jackson's stuff. this stuff is incredible on every level, with all different type of artists. >> frequently, he would have very very excellent songs, that for whatever reason didn't have
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the concept he had in mind for a given album, so that song would fall to the wayside. >> reporter: despite keeping so much music out of the grasp of fans, prince remains hugely prolific. he released two albums of new tracks on the same day last year. but some of his collaborates believe one day, the vault should be opened as his unreleased music forms an important part of music history. >> that early work tells us something. that's information. and what good is that information, the artist might say, what do you need with that information? we don't need it we want it. it tells the us something about a unique human being, an important human being in the history of music. an important human being in popular culture. >> reporter: but perhaps prince is more interested in preserving the mystique of the vault, in which case he'll want to keep its doors firmly shut. mobine, bbc news minneapolis. >> well, we've got a whole
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documentary for this "hunting for prince's vault," it's here on saturday at 2000 "gmt." there's a feature article on the front page of the bbc website. okay we're going to leave you with a rather special imagine. marcia, what happened? peter hit me in the nose with a football. now sweetheart... shut up! marcia, eat a snickers®. why? you get a little hostile when you're hungry. better? better. marcia, marcia, marcia...
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i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. a solar eclipse takes place across the northern hemisphere. this was the scene in norway, where the sun was totally covered by the moon. nigeria's president tells the bbc he's hope tflful boko haram can be defeated within a month, but the fate of the kidnapped chibok schoolgirls remains unclear. >> we're told by the military that there's no clues at all as to where they are. tunisia's president will
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address the nation in the next hour two days after more than 20 people were shot dead by militants. and they host the world cup in october, but can england head into the tournament as six-nation champions. there's a thrilling climax to come this weekend. hello. thanks for joining us. they're already calling this the first great astronomical event of the 21st century. millions of people across northern europe, africa and asia have been witnessing a solar eclipse. the last time it happened was in 1999. sky watchers have flocked to the arctic, where a full solar eclipse was visible. now how that eclipse is being viewed from here in the uk.
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>> reporter: cornwall, and in britain, the greatest show on earth had begun. the celestial treat to be seen. the moon drifting in front of the sun. from stonehenge it was difficult to see, thanks to the clouds. here, they've been fascinated by the moon and the sun for thousands of years. >> we know people put great emphasis on the movements of the sun. the sun must have been very very important to them. so we can only imagine that an eclipse would have been a major event. >> reporter: back if cornwall they were getting a proper show. a remarkable astronomical event. in lester, school children watched it begin. >> tell me a little bit. you were just looking at the sun, what were you seeing? >> it's kind of like a bite mark out of it from the moon so it's kind of slightly red. >> reporter: there was an eerie feeling as the sun was partially
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obscured. the best solar eclipse since 1999. it's been called the first great astronomical event of this century. the lightness is the sun, not the moon. the most dramatic views were from scotland. this is from the isle of lewis. here the moon covered up 97% of the sun. but the best show was saved for the faroe islands, where there was a total eclipse. there won't be anything like today's partial eclipse in the uk until 2026. >> just amazing pictures weren't they? now, the final rug bee union matches in the 6 nations competition are being played this weekend, in what's turned out to be one of the tightest competitions for many years. england, ireland wales, as well. they're all tied on three wins each, even france could snatch the title, if other results were to go their way. all this coming ahead of rugby's
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show piece world cup later in the year which is being hosted this time be england. there's also some concern, increasing concern, about head injuries due to the more physical demands of the modern game. well with me now is brett gosper. let's start with a good bit. it is a great finish to the 6 nations. how important is that in the bigger picture with the world cup to come? >> well it is a fabulous taste for the world cup. it's very exciting for the first time four teams could actually come through this and win the tournament. i think the 6 nations and rugby world cup build off each other and create interest. but for the teams themselves it's a real psychological boost to go through and say, you won the tourm. >> which i hope we'll be saying will be england. that said there's a lot of attention being paid to the issue of well concussions, in particular, i know it's something that you've been looking at in the sport, but we've got some pictures of
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george north, the welsh winger who seems to be concussed twice in one match. mike brown, we'll see in a minute, also con cussed. how much of a concern is that for you now, despite of efforts you're making in the sport to deal with it. it clearly is a growing problem, and the public perception of it is growing. >> i think, first of all, to say that player welfare is on the top of our agenda every item we have at world rugby is what concerns ust most. there has been an incredible growth in the awareness of it as a subject in recent times and high-profile cases such as george north and mike brown and so on add to that increasing awareness. and i think what we're seeing is really there's a greater increase in that awareness, and that is a good thing, because our message is recognize and remove, if there are any symptom or suspicions of concussion. >> you don't worry, though that particularly parents and the next generation seeing these
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things, with this greater awareness, there's a real concern there, isn't it? is rugby is right sport for my son, with nfl or american football. whether a big lawsuit is hanging on some of this? >> certainly, there are lots of areas that concussion can be there are areas you can get concussions, on a simple playground other sports we show no statistics that rugby is more dangerous in this area up to the age of 12 and so on. what's important is that our laws are protocols are there to protect those players and we do anything we can to ensure that any kind of concussion is minimized, and any treatment or protocols ensure that plays are made straight away. >> there's a sort of muscleation in rugby that there never used to be, for players to get bigger and more powerful and stronger and that does lead to massive physical blows. >> it does but the conclusions we are finding, and all of this has to be evidence-based.
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the evidence that we have the statistics that we have show, in fact, that over the last 12 years or so that there has not been an increase in the number of injuries at the elite level, nor has there been an increase in severity of injuries. we've even seen a reduction in areas of injuries that are concussion-based, with shoulders, knee ligaments and so on. we believe the vast majority of this increase in concussion is coming from the fact that people are more aware, and rightly so more aware of the issues surrounding concussions and the dangers of it. but there's not a growth in concussions. >> let's get on to the world cup itself. you're a sport that is growing, but can you grow rapidly? can you expand the world cup? it's a great event as far as it goes. we've seen with cricket, quite difficult to broaden the field sometimes. >> we have discussions about, we have 20 teemams in rugby world cup, 14 in cricket. certainly the conversations that we have in terms of the numbers a world cup tend to be whether
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we will have more rather than less. we think 20 is a very good number and certainly there'll be 20 in england. there'll be 20 also in the next rugby world cup in japan. but certainly the discussions are more on those nations around the edges, who feel they're ready to step up. i think that's a sign of the health and vitality of the sport -- >> and where would you go? where would you point to to the countries which are best placed to step up? >> if those players that are just under that 20 group, this time it's russia it's obviously a big market for us places like germany as well there was a huge step up and interest in those markets, and other markets beyond that. it's up to them to show that they're really at a level where they can come to a world cup. but it won't be happening before 2023. but the good news is there seems to be a good momentum and growth in the game. we've doubled in participants 7.2 million now, since 2009. interesting, 20% of that number is women now, that's a huge growth area as well. it's the fastest growing team
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sport in the united states, so it really does have the wind in the sail. >> you have a lot of ticks there. brett gosper, thank you very much, indeed. >> my pleasure. now, in less than a we can's time nigeria's president, goodluck jonathan is standing for re-election. on his watch, the jihadist group, boko haram, has wrizrisen to force in the north of the country. after months of abductions deaths the president says a recent military force will drive boko haram out of the country and will do so within a month. our correspondent, will ross has been speaking to him. >> they're getting weaker and weaker by the day, and i'm very hopeful it will not take us more than a month to recover our territories that have been in their hands. >> where are the jihadists? where did they go? >> well, they have a lot of linkages, you know, center africa, west africa.
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>> what i mean is, they were chased out of these towns and villages, where do you think they've gone to now? >> that's what i'm saying, the pressure is on them, they're killed. of course, some of them, they die in the process. a number of them just have killed. some of them even bleed back to reintegrate into the civilian population. >> the hope, of course, has always been for the families of the 219 abducted schoolgirls from chibok, that this operation would find them alive, but this week, we're told by the military, that there's no clues at all as to where they are. >> we ask that question every day. we are looking, we have not seen dead girls. that is the good news. so i believe they're still
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alive. i believe we'll get them. >> do you know where they are? >> no, i can't tell you where they are. we are suspecting that they may be in sambisa forest. one cannot say categorically, but we believe that the bulk of them may be in sambisa forest. >> many people are questioning how on earth has it been that during these last just few weeks, less than six weeks, the whole picture has changed in the northeast. these towns and villages have been taken back and they're wondering why that couldn't have happened months or years ago. why it's happened right now. >> yes, i agree. at the beginning of the boko haram, we never expected that they would build up that kind of capacity. nigeria, outside the civil war, have not fought any war. we do not manufacture weapons.
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so we have to look how to equip our army and the air force. >> what do you say to all the families, though, that have lost their loved ones during this five-year period, five or six years. >> wlafr goes wrong, i accept. whatever goes right, applaud it. so i'm not shifting blames. i'm only trying to explain to you what you appear not to appreciate what we are doing, which is unfortunate. >> but we can't forget that people have been killed. that's the thing. we can't just say, everything's fine now because the towns and villages have been retaken. >> wherever i hear somebody, that is -- whether it's boko haram or security personnel, they're all nigerians. no president would be happy to lose his citizens. now we've got breaking news coming out of yemen, as we have reports of at least 30 people being killed in suicide bomb
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attacks there in the capital, sanaa, in fact. the blast happening at two mosques. this was during friday prayers, we're told. all this after a day of pretty intense gun battles in the southern city of aden as well between rival troops loyal to yemen's former and current president left 13 dead. it does look like a step up on that sort of figure. with me now is mohammad yahere editor of bbc arabic. i'm just having a look at some of these figures. it's difficult to tell how many could have been killed but that number could go up. >> it could go up considerably because we're seeing pictures coming up on yemenese tv stations that show pictures of utter destruction and carnage and panic, people being taken away to hospitals in emergency vehicles. and it's predictable that it's going to be difficult to count the number of victims now and
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it's likely to rise because many look like they're seriously injured. what happened is that for the coordinating attack on two mosques in the north and the south of the capital, both belonging to the shia militia, wlor in control of the capital now. in one of the mosques, there was an explosion inside the mosque why the prop sprayers were going on and another explosion outside while people were escaping. and -- >> i think we've got some pictures, actually we can bring to our viewers now. this is the aftermath of one of the attacks. >> so we're -- and we -- it's very difficult to tell who carried this out due to the complexity of the situation in yemen now. you have a situation where you have a power struggle between basically two governments. a de facto government and the houthis and the president who escaped from the capital last month and set up another capital in the southern city of aden.
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this has been recognized by various gulf countries and western countries, but the houthis were supported by iran are completely defiant. so you have this power strug going on. and at the same time, the extremist al qaeda and some elements, which are loyal to the islamic state group, are totally exploiting this chaos and trying to get a foothold. >> yeah you talk about the power struggle in there. this is a fragmented nation. i mean it's been virtually on its knees from a year or two ago. it's heading towards a failed state. >> it is on the brink of total chaos and total civil war. and unfortunately, for yemen, everything that can go wrong in a country is happening there. you have the secessionists in the south, you have al qaeda and the islamic state, you have this power struggle. the government split basically, you have two governments and two capitals. and plus, a dire economic situation. and also there's a proxy war
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going on with various regional powers backing different sides. >> it's a mess. know mohammad, thank you very much, indeed. do stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come on the program, it's the race to clean up rio's olympic venues but will the city make it across the finish line? rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth, milk chocolate... let me know if this gets too hot rolo. get your smooth on.
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you're watching bbc world news. i'm david eades. your headlines. an eclipse of the sun is underway for millions of people across europe and parts of africa and asia. the nigerian president, goodluck jonathan tells the bbc he's confident that the boko haram jihadist group will be beaten although the fate of the kidnapped chibok schoolgirls is still unclear. islamic state extremists say they were behind the attack at the bardo museum in tunisia's capital, which killed 23 people.
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the authorities there have arrested nine people and they've deployed the army to protect major cities. the attack itself seems clearly designed to wreck the country's tourist industry. coach loads of tourists from nearby cruise ships had just arrived at the museum near the parliament building when they opened fire. the cruise ship has now arrived in barcelona. nine of its guests are reported to have been killed in the attack. another 12 were injured. the company, along with one of italy's ships have now suspended stopovers in tunis until further notice. our correspondent, james reynolds, is in tunis and today it's a time to mark independence day. and he says although people are pretty shaken up it's expected they'll still come out in large numbers to celebrate as a show of solidarity. >> the government has said that the attackers here were tunisians, significantly the information the government is
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providing says that they actually learned their skills across the border in libya, suggesting, i think, the nature of what's happening in this particular region. in terms of what ordinary too phoenix tunisians think, a lot of people will be shaken by what happened. this is different from soldiers fighting jihadists in remote areas. this is right in the heart of the capital. and we think we may see later today an expression of what ordinary people think during independence day celebrations. this is tunisia's independence day, but of course it's come two days after the attack. it's a chance for ordinary people to take part in rallies to show what they think. >> james reynolds. now, getting ready for the olympics is almost a huge task always is. will the stadiums be finished on time, is security going to be tight enough? as for the water sports there's always that question of water quality. and the bbc has seen some startling evidence that rather suggests that rio de janeiro's polluted waters will be nowhere
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near clean enough for next year's games. >> reporter: from a distance rio's olympic park is taking shape. but up close, the view and the smell is less appealing. with deadlines looming to complete the sporting venues the waters here have been completely neglected. a black river of untreated sewage meets the chemically overloaded lime green lagoon. biologist mario muscatelli tells me every river around here is practically dead because they are full of sewage. in rio's iconic bay, the location for sailing events tons of untreated sewage flow every day. some parts of the bay are so polluted, they're an oxic. devoid of oxygen and life. for years, olympic hopefuls including the british team have
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been training in these waters counting on a promise to clean up the bay. >> there's a lot of debris in the water, which is really bad for racing because you get stuff caught around your boards you slow down, and that's completely by chance. >> reporter: thar making little process treating the tons of sewage and solid waste that clogs the water. this is one highly publicized but pretty crude method of trying to stop solid waste getting into the bay. a so-called ecobarrier but nothing more than a net which stops some detritu. most of the sewage and waste still gets through. >> reporter: and one leading scientist who regularly tests the water says levels of harmful chemicals is now higher than ever. >> we have been down for the last 20 years. and i'm sorry, the trend is increasing, increasing. the pollution is increasing increasing, increasing. >> reporter: when the authorities say here they're tackling the problem and this
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water will be safe by the olympics. are they right? >> of course not. they are not right. they know they are not right. >> reporter: finishing rio's olympic project is a race against time extending the metro, building stadiums and cleaning the city's waters. >> it's not easy. there are always bureaucratic delays, but the water will be fine for the game. >> reporter: some areas of the bay are less polluted than others. but the olympic games are also meant to be about legacy, leaving clean waters that rio's residents can use and be proud of. now, the bbc's cj edu is on a journey to find the best nightclub in africa. well, his last stop is johannesburg in south africa a place that for many decades has struggled with crime. in fact, some places were simply
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too dangerous to go out in at night. but where young people are socializing in johannesburg now is showing how young people are starting to change that reputation. >> reporter: i'm in an area called the place of life. it's a cosmopolitan and people from all over the city come together to have a good time. some central districts in johannesburg were known as a no-go area particularly at night. local developers are planning to change that. i think what's happening in maboneng is interesting because you have mixed income completely different ages a very very diverse community. >> reporter: a few years back i would never have been able to walk down these streets due to crime and insecurity. but what's happening here represents real change for johannesburg. young people in joburg have fought back against crime and
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decay to reclaim the streets. >> that's how i got to understand the landscape i reside now. back then it was a completely different landscape. it was obviously dilapidated, decayed, and i remember you know, when the sun sets you'd be told go home you know because of crime. and it's quite interesting to see now the shape rechange itself and becoming a space where people can live work play for evening hours, you know? >> reporter: as more and more streets in the city center become safer new clubs are springing up where south africans from all walks of life can party until morning. >> it is more lively now. everybody is aware. we hope celebrities will come here every once in a while.
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♪ >> reporter: many say these changes in the city center represent the future of south africa. dj edu, bbc news. ♪ well one panorama shot there. let's get another perspective on our world, suppose, and it is the solar eclipse, of course. that was the picture in the faroe islands, i think, at the point at which the -- this is all speeded up for you, but the point at which the total eclipse came into play as the moon got in the way of the sun and its journey into earth. so you got that wonderful arc across the arctic. only a partial eclipse across much of europe africa and asia but svalbard in norway and the islands there, the faroe
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islands, the sun completely obscured. more than 11,000 tourists eclipse chasers, and scientists with special telescopes and special glasses were all out there to enjoy the scene. thanks for watching bbc world news. we leave you with these pictures.
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picard: captain's log, stardate 46071.6. we have been called to aid a transport ship which has been attacked near rekag-seronia. hostilities between the two factions on that planet

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