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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 24, 2016 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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at home at ealing broadway station where trains to paddington are a time in eating and that is because paddington is closed for the next six days. good morning. it's christmas eve — saturday, the 24th of december. also ahead: actress carrie fisher is rushed to hospital after a suspected heart attack on a flight from london. calls for unity as the prime minister uses her christmas message to urge british people to come together, after the brexit vote and a year of division. good morning. in sport, big sam's back. sam allardyce is the new manager of crystal palace, he signs a two and a half year deal replacing alan pardew we'll hear from the stars of the global phenomenon that is sherlock, ahead of it's return to our screens on new years day. i've been involved with a few big things and nothing is like sherlock. at the beck and call of a screaming,
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demanding baby, woken up all hours and nick has the festive forecast for us. good morning. storm barbara may be pulling away from the uk, but it remains windy today, tomorrow, and into boxing day as well. the latest on the blustery christmas forecast coming up. good morning. first, our main story. extensive railway engineering works are starting across britain today, with 200 different projects being carried out over the christmas break. passengers in london, manchester and cardiff are expected to be the hardest hit by the work. one of the biggest stations in the capital, paddington, is closed, with passengers being told to go to ealing broadway. it's where our reporter jane—frances kelly is for us this morning. good morning. it's going to be a good deal busier there than normal. yes, it is going to be busy. i have seen people turning up with quite heavy suitcases and that is because trains to paddington are terminating
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here. that is because paddington will be closed for the next six days for upgrade work. there will be work done on the kings road express, there will also be major engineering work done in wales and manchester. this is the biggest christmas upgrade done by network rail. they say that 2a,000 engineers will be working on up to 200 sites and they are investing £103 million over this christmas period. they say they have to do it, but they need the tracks to do it, but they need the tracks to be not in the use and that christmas is the time when they choose, because fewer people are actually travelling. that means also that the roads will be very busy. before you travel, it would be a very good idea, in fact the advice is, do check on various websites and the bbc travel website to find out,
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do you have a train? and also how long is that you're only going to take? is going to be a bus replacement? and at ten past nine we'll be speaking to the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. meanwhile, more disruption to transport in scotland is expected as a result of storm barbara. winds of up to 120mph were recorded yesterday, and rail, road and ferry travel is again expected to be hampered today by gale—force winds. an amber alert has also been issued for the northern isles on boxing day. the met office has named it storm conor. we'll bring you a full forecast and look ahead to this in a few moments time. the actor carrie fisher who is best known from the star wars films is in intensive care in a los angeles hospital after suffering a suspected heart attack. the 60—year—old was taken in on a flight from london. earlier on we spoke to our reporter.
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she was heading back from london to los angeles for christmas. she lives here in beverly hills, and the flight was about 15 minutes out from landing when she had what the emergency services are describing as a cardiac episode. that's been interpreted as having a heart attack. apparently there were a number of medical personnel on the flight, there were some nurses, people tried to help her. but she was reportedly unresponsive at that stage. the plane was met on the tarmac by paramedics, who also tried to work on her. she was then taken to hospital. and we know from carrie fisher's brother, todd, that she is in intensive care. he had earlier said that she had been in a critical condition, was then in a stable condition, but later clarified that he actually doesn't really know what her condition is, and simply appealed to people, as they are doing, to pray for the best, that she is in intensive care, and as he put it, the doctors are doing their best. that was peter bowes reporting. israel has angrily rejected a un
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security council resolution demanding a halt to the building of israeli settlements in occupied palestinian territory. the vote passed after the united states, israel's traditional ally, abstained, rather than using its veto. our state department correspondent barbara plett—usher reports. in a rare show of unity, the un security council passed judgement on israeli settlements. translation: 14 votes in favour. voting that they had become a serious threat to a viable peace deal with the palestinians. it was that conviction which led the us to withhold its customary protection of israel at the council, although not without much soul—searching. because there are important issues that are not sufficiently addressed in this resolution, and because the united states does not agree with every word in this text, that the united states did not vote in favour of the resolution. the israelis had managed to delay but not prevent the vote. they felt betrayed by their ally, especially angry about condemnation of their construction in occupied eastjerusalem.
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who gave you the right to issue such a decree, denying our eternal rights in jerusalem? israel has long pursued a policy of building jewish settlements on arab land captured during the 1967 war. it insists it has the legal right to do this, but most of the world disagrees, and the un resolution will make that argument even more difficult. halting settlements was the focus of president 0bama's attempts to broker peace. he failed twice. resorting to the un was his final act. the palestinians embraced this as a victory for international law. but they can't expect the same from mr 0bama's successor, donald trump, who sided with the israeli government on this. the un resolution could become a reference point for further moves against israel in international forums, but not for the next us administration. barbara plett—usher, bbc news, washington. german investigators
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are trying to establish whether the tunisian man who carried out the berlin christmas market attack had a network of supporters. questions are also being asked about the ease with which anis amri was able to flee to italy — where he was shot dead by police yesterday. 12 people died and 12 others were seriously injured when he drove into a crowded christmas market on monday the british—born astronaut, piers sellers, has died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 61. originally from east sussex, he then became an american citizen, which allowed him to join nasa's space programme. he took part in three missions between 2002 and 2010, spending a total of 35 days orbiting earth. the prime minister has called for britain to come together as it prepares to leave the eu. in herfirst christmas message theresa may says the country must prepare to forge a bold new role in the world. meanwhile, the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has used his message to call for an end to sleeping rough. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. the people have spoken
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and the answer is we're out. the eu referendum divided not just politicians but communities and families. so, against this backdrop, it's perhaps not surprising that in her christmas message, the prime minister appeals in a separate message recorded for the armed forces, theresa may tells them that the government is on their side. because i want you and all your families to know that this government is on your side. jeremy corbyn says his thoughts are with those experiencing loneliness and despair at this time of year. he recently visited a homelessness charity in london and uses his christmas message to repeat the promise he gave them. labour has pledged to put an end to
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rough sleeping in our first term of government. we would do that by doubling the number of homes available for people who have been sleeping on the street. lib dem leader of tim farron filmed his message at a centre for child refugees in france and he called for more tolerance. the least traditional message was from the greens. they say 2016 was rubbish, or words to that effect, and they hoped next year is better. but there's one thing most politicians can agree on and that is to wish their voters a happy christmas. iain watson, bbc news. temperatures at the north pole could be up to 20 degrees higher than average today, in what scientists say is a record—breaking heatwave. they say an air temperature of just below freezing, instead of the usual —30, is preventing ice from forming. the researchers claim it's directly linked to man—made climate change. the first gorilla born in a zoo has celebrated her 60th birthday. coco, who is also the oldest gorilla in america, celebrated by opening presents and eating lots of treats.
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she's got three children and is a great—great—grandmother. gorillas typically only have a life expectancy of 30 to a0 years. it's 8.10am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. last week on breakfast, we told you about the people's convoy, a team of volunteers who planned to travel to aleppo, where the bitter civil war has left civilians without access to medical care. the group had raised thousands of pounds to provide supplies and equipment and one week on, theirjourney has taken them across the turkish border and into syria, but not without difficulties along the way. we're joined now by one of the organisers. how's it going? it is good. i'm catching up with sleep. it has been feel on. the idea to do this only came about about three weeks ago. a
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group of us were watching the horrific pictures coming out of aleppo, hospitals being bombed, children's hospitals being bombed and destroyed, babies being taken out of incubators. a doctor went out in 2013 and made a panorama about the plight of hospitals out there, she called me up and said we have to do something. the something was to rebuild the hospital but was destroyed inside east aleppo. that was three weeks ago and fast forward to now, we have delivered the goods that will enable that to happen. we have raised over £220,000 injust three weeks. we worked out that whilst we were on the road, the 60s on the we had raged over £60,000 for the people's campaign to build this hospital. was that through crowdfunding? yes, this was the
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first ever crowd funded hospital. we didn't know at the beginning whether we would achieve it. it was an idea, but i think it has captured the imagination of everybody who has collectively been watching the horrifying images. you have been understandably guarded about the location of the hospital and who is working there. one of the questions people will be wondering is there is a reason that you had to provide a hospital, because the hospitals and children are being targeted. medical staff are being targeted. how safe will maybe at this new facility? absolutely. the people involved in building business hospital have u nfortu nately building business hospital have unfortunately been building hospitals inside syria for five yea rs, hospitals inside syria for five years, for the duration of the war. under wraps, quietly and studies hospitals have been attacked. we went public and loud and we let
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eve ryo ne went public and loud and we let everyone know about it and maybe that in itself will offer some protection. unfortunately, just by the experiences of the team, the tea m the experiences of the team, the team have adapted to working in a way that ensures some level of security. being a doctor in syria right now is probably one of the most dangerousjobs. right now is probably one of the most dangerous jobs. i right now is probably one of the most dangerousjobs. i know right now is probably one of the most dangerous jobs. i know that when i went, my stethoscope was at the bottom of my bag. we didn't drive ina the bottom of my bag. we didn't drive in a convoy, even across europe. we were very security conscious. it would be horrifically tragic if this was obstructed or targeted in anyway. before most of oui’ targeted in anyway. before most of our minds is the safety of the south that will be working in the.|j apologise that will be working in the.” apologise for interrupting, what has it done for the morale of these doctors to have the support?” it done for the morale of these doctors to have the support? i think morale hit an absolute all—time low after the recent spate of attacks
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that we also. 0ne after the recent spate of attacks that we also. one of the reasons for that we also. one of the reasons for that low morale is that they felt there was a wall of silence greeting them back from the rest of the world. the international higher powers, the government, the un, nothing was happening. when they heard that the idea in itself had been formed, morale is liked. it gave them something to work towards and to mobilise on their side to think, no, we can do this. i met members of the group who told me personally in a border town near syria, one paediatrician wasjust about to give up. he thought he could not do medicine any more, there was no point. when he heard about the money raised through the public around the world, he said, no, it is not time to quit. i'm back on it. amazing work that you have done. we wish the hospital and all the staff and you very well. you are
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doing some nhs hospital shifts over it the holidays, aren't you? yes. thank you. it's 8.15am and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: a record number of engineering works are underway on britain's railways, with around 10% of the network affected over christmas. theresa may has used her christmas message to urge britain to unite and move forward after the brexit vote. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has highlighted the plight of homeless people. still to come on the programme — board games — a christmas must—have or short—cut to family fisticuffs? as retailers report a boost in sales, we'll find out why experts say we're in a golden age of tabletop games. what game will you play over christmas? i think there could be a game of connect for it in our house,
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which technically is not a game. you will not fight over that? i will make sure i beat the children. what game will you be playing, nick? anything general knowledge. i liked a bit of pointless. anything that produces a family argument. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. there's a lot to talk about over the christmas period, because we are still talking about strong winds. storm barbara is starting to pull away, but still strong winds in the northern areas. still blustery today. for boxing day, we have a new storm. this will be in the far north of scotland. producing 80 or 90 mph winds. iforget this morning. looking at the reader picture, there are some snow showers across the northern half of scotland. those are
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driven on those strong winds. nasty conditions on the high roots there. watch out for snow and ice. hail and thunder more likely out of these two. pushing through on the strong wind. showers in wales will be most persistent into snowdonia. elsewhere for wales and england a lot of dry weather, but a blustery day here, too. we will continue to get the show is rattling into the northern half of the uk. winds easing a touch in the far north later on and then we will start to see some outbreaks of rain coming into northern ireland. temperatures close to normalfor ireland. temperatures close to normal for today. a bit ireland. temperatures close to normalfor today. a bit of ireland. temperatures close to normal for today. a bit of a ireland. temperatures close to normalfor today. a bit of a bite ireland. temperatures close to normal for today. a bit of a bite to that wind across the northern part of the uk. the rain will be pushing into northern ireland, scotland and parts of north wales. this mail is a fishing in across the uk just in between these two weather fronts to give an unusually mild start to
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christmas day. tebbutt is wisely up to 14 christmas day. tebbutt is wisely up to 1a or 15 celsius. plenty of quote. 0utbreaks to 1a or 15 celsius. plenty of quote. outbreaks of rain in the west of the uk and very windy again. the northern half of the uk will see deals. call the area feeding into northern scotland. snow out of those showers on the hills. some lawyers at least we'll get a weight christmas. then for boxing day, severe gales and an amber warning for the north of scotland. it will be windy. for many of us christmas can't come quickly enough but before you know it, all the presents are open and you're reaching for the ingestion tablets after too many roasties. but one man is planning to stretch the day out even more — by flying round world for 47 hours. fraser watt is flying east to west across the world, following the sun on four commercial flights.
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first, he'll fly from new zealand and travel for more than 11 hours to hong kong arriving at 9am. then he'll head to the uk for a whopping 13—hour flight landing at heathrow at 3pm. from there he'll travel more than 5,000 miles across the pond to los angeles, where he'll touch down at 7.30pm. finally, he'll have a relatively short flight ofjust under six hours, before landing in honolulu. let's speak to fraser, who is at auckland airport ahead of his record—breaking attempt. like an ad made you take this challenge on? stupidity is probably as good an and as any. it all started in a rooftop bar in christchurch when i was sitting with a friend and we were talking about how would you stretchy birthday out
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to make it last of long as possible. we did some research and found that the world record is currently held bya the world record is currently held by a german man who stretched his birthday out by going from auckland to brisbane and then wound up in honolulu. we started looking at whether you could do this honestly and do it in one single calendar day. it became a game. between my friend and i would send one back and forth. then we found this glorious itinerary that given the 47 hour day and what better day to do it on than christmas. that is why we have been longer to christmas day and i'm doing it on behalf of unicef. you cannot have a better cause on christmas day. how are you going to celebrate christmas? bubbly in an aluminium tube at 40,000 feet dodging the stars and dodging the
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dvd. definitely. make sure you stay healthy. how do your family feel about this? my son lives and works in madrid in spain. i now live in melbourne in australia. he has come back to find i'm heading off on this 47 hourjohnson across the world in an aluminium tube. what do my family think? secretly, ithink an aluminium tube. what do my family think? secretly, i think they are proud of me. superficially, they think i'm off my head. they are probably right. what will you do if there are a flight delays? what is your contingency plan? there is no contingency. i have to rely on various airlines to say what they say they will do in that is to get me there on time. there was a famous song, all want for christmas is my two front teeth, 0llie once ferguson is is flights that come and go when
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they say they will. we wish you very well on your journey. they say they will. we wish you very well on yourjourney. merry christmas. a very merry christmas to you and all of your viewers and listeners, i hope that 2017 is very good for all of them. can i tell us the website for donations? www. unicef. org/chasingsa nta you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. former newspaper editor paul horrocks is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to paul in a minute, first let's look at the front pages. let's start with the telegraph. the
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main story is taking a look at eu borders, warnings as well to how terrorists are travelling across the country. this is after the terrorist anis amri, the most wanted man in europe journeyed from berlin on to the french alps and then ended up in italy and he was not stopped at any point in that great. the front page of the daily express has nigel farage on the front page. the daily mail says if you are feeling ill, postponed christmas. a & e departments are being forced to turn away patients and health chiefs have issued this advice to prevent the spread of infection. the front page of the daily mirror what we it occupied ellie, the court have recall some chocolate sa ntas occupied ellie, the court have recall some chocolate santas because there was a possible risk of some batteries that may have found their way into them. good morning, paul.
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we touched on the front pages there. medical chiefs saying if you are ill, don't go to a & e. stay away closet is a busy time of year. however often health chiefs make that message, it still happens. i did the reason is that gp surgeries are closed, chemist are closed, so hospital a & e ‘s are going to be at. it is. we have sympathy for the emergency services particularly christmas, because they are always overworked anyway. not only facing this usual window crisis is the gear up this usual window crisis is the gear upfora this usual window crisis is the gear up for a busy time, but they are very short and of paramedics. this is in the guardian. as 999 calls hit new peaks, is in the guardian. as 999 calls hit new pea ks, the is in the guardian. as 999 calls hit new peaks, the ten regional ambulance services in england are assured of 873 paramedics and they are having to go so far as to recruit paramedics from poland,
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finland and even australia, would you believe. this comes after last week nhs england said that 36 a & e units had to temporarily divert new arrivals, because there simply wasn't room for them. a sad time for the emergency service, but particularly the ambulances. the unions i been quite vocal and making their voice heard on this article, taking a look at staff shortages and saying it is notjust about money. absolutely and i think that is why the story is often represented. people say it is about cuts, but often it is just about the shortage often it is just about the shortage of skilled people are able to do those jobs whether it is in hospitals, paramedics, and nuances. let's look at this amazing little boy, he is five years old and he has cancer. he has had 250,000 christmas cards. isn't it nice to have an
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uplifting story on christmas eve? like every five—year—old christmas eve, there are excited about opening cards on christmas day. this year, christmas has started early for him, because he has had to have 200 volu nteers because he has had to have 200 volunteers help him openly 250,000 packages that have come across the world for him. his parents are trying to campaign to help get him or treatment. he is a big sunderland football fan. it was an everton football fan. it was an everton football player who tweeted, why ca nt we football player who tweeted, why cant we get in as many cards as possible? it went viral. he is going to have a great time opening all of that on christmas day. at christmas, people often find it very stressful. i don't know how well you dealt with stress when you're editing your paper it. did you deal with it well? you just have to get on with it. you
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develop a rhino skin. the times had taken a look and this is about a way to combat stress. we did a lot of things in our office that i wouldn't wa nt things in our office that i wouldn't want a repeat on tv. throwing an axe isa want a repeat on tv. throwing an axe is a new stress buster and that was not one of them. after a hard day at the office, the latest stress buster is axe throwing. there is a company set up in london and it bills itself as like bowling, plus extreme darts on speed with a bit of danger. you can say that again. they are spreading these axe throwing centres. you are lined up in lanes and you throw taxes at a board. there is no drinking a load. it's not a there is no drinking a load. it's nota pub? there is no drinking a load. it's not a pub? no, it's not a pub, but they check you have not been
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drinking. people have been taking pictures along to stick on the boards, apparently donald trump has featured heavily. what do snowmen eat for breakfast? ice crispies. we all love cracker puns, don't we? there is nothing better than pulling a cracker on christmas day and has the best one. the times have done a survey and have got some humans to get the bestjokes and then ran them through a computer to cf the computer can determine the funniest crackerjoke. the computer can determine the funniest cracker joke. the funniest according to humans is, who corrects santa's grammar? 0na to humans is, who corrects santa's grammar? on a computer, how do you know if santa is really a werewolf? he has santa claus. the computer
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came up with that? my favourite is, who hides in the bakery at christmas? a minsk ‘s barry. —— mince pie. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. richard will have all your sports news in a few minutes. but first, at half eight, a summary of this morning's main stories. train passengers across britain are being warned they could face delays, diversions and cancellations over the christmas break. network rail is beginning a record number of engineering works, with 24,000 engineers working on the network.
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those travelling from london, manchester and cardiff are expected to be the hardest hit. meanwhile, more disruption to transport in scotland is expected as a result of storm barbara. winds of up to 120 miles an hour were recorded yesterday, and rail, road and ferry travel is again expected to be hampered today by gale—force winds. an amber alert has also been issued for the northern isles on boxing day. the met office has named it storm conor, we'll bring you a full forecast and look ahead to this in a few moments time. the american actor carrie fisher is in intensive care in a los angeles hospital after suffering a suspected heart attack. the 60—year—old was taken ill on a flight from london to los angeles. best known for her role as princess leia in the star wars films, she had been in the uk promoting her memoirs. she was heading back from london to
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los angeles for christmas. she lives here in beverly hills and the flight was about 15 minutes out from london when she had ordered emergency services are describing as a cardiac episode. that has been interpreted asa episode. that has been interpreted as a heart attack. there were a number of medical personnel on the flight, number of medical personnel on the flight, some nurses. she was reportedly unresponsive at that stage. the plane was met on the tarmac by paramedics who tried to work on her. she was taken to hospital and we know from her brother that she is in intensive care. he earlier said she had been in critical condition, was in a sta ble in critical condition, was in a stable condition that clarified that he doesn't really know what her condition is and he simply appealed to people to pray for the best. she is intensive care and doctors are doing their best. the un security council has passed a resolution demanding a halt to israeli settlement building
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on occupied palestinian land, describing it as a flagrant violation of international law. the vote was passed after the united states, israel's traditional ally, abstained. the israeli prime minister has rejected the move. a statement from his office said israel would not abide by the terms of the resolution. german investigators are trying to establish whether the tunisian man who carried out the berlin christmas market attack had a network of supporters. questions are also being asked about the ease with which anis amri was able to flee to italy, where he was shot dead by police yesterday. 12 people died when he drove a lorry into a crowded market on monday. the prime minister has called for britain to come together as it prepares to leave the eu. in herfirst christmas message theresa may says the country must prepare to ‘forge a bold new role' in the world. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn has highlighted the plight of homeless people during the festive season. temperatures at the north pole could be up to 20 degrees higher than average today, in what scientists say
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is a record—breaking heatwave. they say an air temperature of just below freezing, instead of the usual minus 30, is preventing ice from forming. the researchers claim it's directly linked to man—made climate change. the british born astronaut, piers sellers, has died of pancreatic cancer at the age of 61. originally from east sussex, he then became an american citizen, which allowed him to join nasa's space programme. he took part in three missions between 2002 and 2010, spending a total of 35 days orbiting earth. those are the main stories this morning. let's catch up on the sport news. richard is worthless. he is back. big sam alla rdyce. richard is worthless. he is back. big sam allardyce. a familiarface. he is the new crystal palace manager. he had a brief spell in charge of england, left under a
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cloud, but he has signed a deal at palace. he replaces alan pardew who was sacked on thursday. the club are just one point above the relegation from. they said they were fortunate that someone of alibis's calibre was available. his teams have never been relegated. sam alla rdyce sam allardyce will be used to these protocols. not even six months ago he did the publicity shots as england manager. that ended after just 67 days. the has gone from the bush to the palace and the lower reaches of the premier league. you get a newjob after difficulties at the club. i will hopefully sort of those difficulties out with my experience and get if you results on the board, particularly over christmas and the new year to make everybody feel comfortable. he arrives less than three months after his departure following a newspaper
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sting suggesting he offered advice about getting around fa rules. even by 2016 standards, sam allardyce has had a chaotic year. as of crystal palace. they went one up in the fa cup final. giddy memories. they lost and their overall record since january is the worst of all 92 league clubs. alan pardew was a hero asa league clubs. alan pardew was a hero as a player. now he has left them with a menacing drop. experts have tended to a survival expert. he has spent much of his career and unforgiving terrain. he has always played the pragmatic, the man for a crisis. he is an experienced premier league manager. he has been successful, he knows how to set his teams up. he did a greatjob keeping sunderland up. beware he saved sunderland up. beware he saved sunderland for relegation will be the template. their new boss can
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tell them there is always a way back. aberdeen are four points behind second placed rangers in the scottish premiership thanks to a 3—1win over motherwell at fir park. both sides were awarded penalties in an incident filled first half, but motherwell missed theirs and niall mcginn put the game beyond them in the final minutes. elsewhere dundee came from 2—0 down to beat hearts 3—2. stjohnstone won at kilmarnock one nil and partick thistle ended a seven—game run without a win to move off the bottom of the table after a 3—1win at ross county. celtic and rangers both play later today. joey barton has been charged by the football association for breaching their rules on betting. it's claimed he placed over one thousand bets over a ten year period up to may this year. barton has until the fifth of january to respond to the charge. last month barton was given a one month suspension by the scottish football association for betting on matches this season during his brief spell with rangers. barton is due to re—join burnley in january for the remainder of the season. the czech tennis player
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petra kvitova says she's confident of making a full recovery and returning to the court after a knife attack left her needing surgery on her left hand. the two time wimbledon champion was injured as she fought off an intruder with a knife who broke into her apartment earlier this week. she had surgery on her hand to repair nerve and tendon damage and has been ordered to rest for at least six months. during a session with the doctor i was able to move my fingers on my left hand which i think was the biggest gift i could have, to feed the fingers and this was the greatest christmas present i could have wished for. world rugby say they want more information from the rugby football union about how northampton handled george's north's latest head injury. the wales international has had problems with concussion in the past. a panel ruled this week that the saints won't face any sanctions relating to the incident. north didn't feature last night for his club,
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who ended a four match losing streak by beating sale sharks 24—5. northampton ran in three tries against sale who've now lost seven in a row. whilst in the pro 12, ulster moved fourth in the table after beating connacht 23—7. stuart mccloskey scored the first of their two tries. the defending pdc darts world champion gary anderson is safely through to the third round at the alexandra palace. the flying scotsman fired in six maximums and didn't drop a set in his win over andrew goldfinger gilding. checkouts of 134 and 132 helped him secure victory four sets to nil. he plays big ben benito van de pas in the next round. adrian lewis is also through. i love their nicknames. they are incredible. we were talking about nick frost. frosty the throw man.
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speaking of throwing. something even bigger than most of this. this time tomorrow morning, many of you may be opening presents around the christmas tree, but what do you do with it when you take it down? have you thought about throwing it? christmas tree throwing competitions have been a long—standing tradition in one german town, and now the idea's taken off here too. we sent mike bushell along, who else, to have a go. to win the title of most sporting championships you need equipment, clothing, shoes and months of training. for this one, clothing, shoes and months of training. forthis one, all you clothing, shoes and months of training. for this one, all you need isa training. for this one, all you need is a christmas tree. i think i have found the right place. despite the abundance of trees at the home of the third uk christmas tree throwing
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championships, only two are used in competition. a large one for the adults and a small for the children. both are recycled. it can take a while to get a grip. the spines go in your hand. you did it. yes, i am proud of myself. it is funny because it is unexpected. it is an odd ship to be thrown. christmas tree throwing has been growing in germany for a decade with the world record for a decade with the world record for distance is 12 metres. now it is an established part of the build—up to christmas here. we love crazy exports, like cheese rolling, and nothing quirky breedlove. the first discipline is the high bar and the new champion a professional boxer.” didn't realise it was five metres. i threw it and hope for the best. i loved it. it must be difficult. use
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your legs and your arms. just go for it and hope for the best. for me it was third time lucky which meant i could move on to the next discipline. there is no runner—up, you have two stabbed in a circle and use the leverage from your legs. i stepped out of the circle. i obviously needed some expert tuition. it came in the form of a reindeer. 0r tuition. it came in the form of a reindeer. or is it a moose? eddie hall, britain's strongest man. could he handle a christmas tree?m
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hall, britain's strongest man. could he handle a christmas tree? it is like 0lympicjavelin, he handle a christmas tree? it is like 0lympic javelin, it he handle a christmas tree? it is like 0lympicjavelin, it is about the arm speed, rather than brute power. just give it a good whack, thatis power. just give it a good whack, that is the best way. there we are, the bar has been set. remember, this is an official event, don't try this at home. until next year, merry christmas. the wait is almost over for fans of sherlock. the new series, which has been described by writers as the darkest yet, begins on new year's day. rumours of possible storylines have been flying around the internet, but the show‘s stars and crew have managed to keep it all a secret. we sent breakfast‘s tim muffett along to the set see if he could tease anything out of the cast. the roads we work as a demon is
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beneath. and yours have been waiting for a very long time. when you see a script for the first time, what happens? you can how brilliant imagination and work that has gone into this creation is and involves and then you pick out the details that relate to the original stories and thena that relate to the original stories and then a beautiful little character arcs. some are remarkably long time in their planning. we are getting payoffs in this series that are to do with how this began. the beck and call of a screaming baby. it must be different. sorry, what. all you do is clean up their mess. we have seen scenes being filmed outside. how does it affect the reduction? it can be like street theatre but the fans are respectful and understand we are doing a job and understand we are doing a job
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and it is in our version of an office. the first series was a hit in the uk, no one predicted what a global phenomenon sherlock would become. in china alone at least 98 million people are thought to have seen the last series. the show get a reaction unlike anything i have seen. i have been involved with bigger things and nothing is like sherlock. you are a dad now in addition. how will that affectjohn watson? the stakes get higher in a different area in his life. we would never bring bruce out on the case. exactly, don't wait up. it wouldn't be much of the show if it was a domestic series. the romance would be broken up? no, no way at all. the show couldn't operate without a
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differentiator. so i'm supposed to just go home? shall we take this? it isa just go home? shall we take this? it is a much darker series. it is very intense. when we read the three episodes we all went, all my god. we could do this. you are in this thing as well, how does that play out in your mind when you put ideas on the page? more lines. the figure seems. it's not true. there is only one writer in the world has only written a non—speaking part four might get us a non—speaking part four might get us and that is davis. there are clues and plot points that we'd never write them in case they get out and i often the one who says them andl out and i often the one who says them and i just out and i often the one who says them and ijust set them on the day
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simply never present in the script so simply never present in the script so there is no danger of them being leaked. what is the very worst thing you can do to your best friends? tell them your darkest secret. the fourth series of sherlock starts on new year's day at half past eight on bbc one. you are watching bbc news. you are the main stories. a record number of engineering works are underway on british airways. 10% of the network will be affected over christmas. theresa may has used her christmas message to average briton to unite and move forward after the brexit foot. jeremy corbyn corbyn has highlighted the plight of homeless people. it's christmas eve which, as any child will tell you, means there's just one sleep until the big day. and it also means that we're coming to the end of our bbc
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breakfast advent calendar, so let's find out who has a special message for us today. merry christmas. i just wanted merry christmas. ijust wanted to say have a fantastic time at christmas, enjoy being with your friends and family is cannot believe it is so close. i am very excited and alli it is so close. i am very excited and all i want to say is "a christmas film, get in this period and have a fantastic time and eat lots of turkey. nick, what are you having for christmas dinner? it is a turkey. i have done the desert. i have made a yule log. you are just showing off.
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i made some soup is the first course. what shall we come over? boxing day. our weather watcher was up boxing day. our weather watcher was up with the birds trudged the sunrise in eastbourne. that particular bird, a lovely view. across southern parts of the uk there haven't been strong winds. storm barbra is pulling away from those in scotland, producing cost in excess of 60 mph in the northern isles. the next area of cloud is storm corner coming in for boxing day in the far north of scotland. a blast restored to christmas yves. river pictures show rain and snow showers around. there is something wintry and christmassy in north and scotla nd wintry and christmassy in north and scotland but this combined with the wind and the ice picks for travel hazards. especially across scotland.
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difficult conditions on higher rates in northern scotland and disruption because of wind. blustery for northern ireland and northern england. showers here. wintry in the hills. he'll understand are possible. a lot of cloud in western england and wales. showers are possible but in central and eastern england are getting decent sunny spells. strong winds in northern scotla nd spells. strong winds in northern scotland will ease later today. a blustery day. the showers still across the northern half of the uk, turning to rein in northern ireland who ended the day and these temperatures are clues to average. a bite to the wind. as we go into this evening some rainfall around northern ireland and scotland and northern england, but temperatures overnight and into tomorrow are going to be heading up. neither colours moving in. still windy, plenty of cloud but a bad start to christmas day and too much of the day temperatures will be in double
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at around 12 to 14 celsius. we may see a 15 summer. plenty of cold, blustery winds in the northern uk. gales in places. fabrics of in its report in ireland, scotland, northern england and north wales. to the end of the day, northern scotland, called air moving in. snow in the hills again. higher ground in scotla nd in the hills again. higher ground in scotland may see a white christmas. 0 nto scotland may see a white christmas. 0nto the next storm coming for boxing day. the northern isles, but in scotland, 80 or 90 mph gusts are possible. and amber warning in force. it will be blustery. the best sunshine will be in the southern areas. the worst cloud and the showers will be across the northern half of the uk. it is windy to the rest of the weekend. it turns quieterfrom rest of the weekend. it turns quieter from tuesday. those temperatures. we are surprised for those for christmas day. let me
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just bring us back for you and tell you what we were talking about here. that is christmas day morning. the record for christmas day is 15.6 celsius and that was achieved twice backin celsius and that was achieved twice back in 1896 and making 20 in scotla nd back in 1896 and making 20 in scotland and tollerton. it is exceptionally mild for the time of year. it isn't often like this. we mightjust fall short year. it isn't often like this. we might just fall short of the year. it isn't often like this. we mightjust fall short of the record but i wouldn't see —— be surprised to see somewhere which 15. where would we get the 15? it could be up toward the north east of scotland, a road north aberdeenshire into the marie firth area if we get brightness coming through the cloud. before temperatures from them later in the day with the colder air moving in at the end of christmas day producing snow showers in northern scotland. that is a window of opportunity early in the day, perhaps in that part of scotland.
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it's christmas, so it's time to dust off those board games and gather the family together, but are they still as popular in the age of mobile phones and tablets? market researchers say they've seen a rise in the sales of table top games thanks to the growth of new titles targeted at families. but do theyjust cause household dust ups? does the same person always win in your house? we asked you what you enjoy, and hate, about board games. i like playing board games because it's a chance to switch off your screens, get away from work, chill out. friendly, family, have fun. i love that it brings people around the table and gives you a focal point for conversation. i'm really competitive. i love winning. i love the social aspect of being with friends and family. reminds me of christmas. we tend to do that a lot with family at christmas time in particular. there is something different for everybody. you can be brutal and kill all of yourfriends, or you can be working together and save the world.
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it can take you away from real life. it is something missing in society. people have come back to board games to reconnect with people. family arguments, you just have to stick to the rules, i think, and make sure you know the rules properly. i have been known to throw things and sulk, and i have to keep telling myself it is only a game, but it feels like a lot more than that. so the board game is back. did it ever really go away? with us to talk about this is the guardian's board game columnist 0wen duffy, and blogger anna macgowan, who fully expects to be playing a game or two tomorrow. welcome. we have a collection here. some of these are well loved. did they ever go away, board games? not really. people think they fitted with
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smartphones and digital entertainment but we are seeing a rain resurgence of games. sales are up, there are fantastic new designs come out and people are discovering this hobby and this form of entertainment. what kind of games are we seeing? a huge game. -- range. there are quick and silly games to conjugated strategic ones you can spend a whole evening playing with your friends. you don't like the geeky ones? it is like monopoly. the one that starts in good spirits but it is still going at midnight and it has fallen apart. i make at midnight and it has fallen apart. imake a at midnight and it has fallen apart. i make a strategic air early on that means i neverwin, i'll i make a strategic air early on that means i never win, i'll never catch up. we stay away from the epic games. what are the secret to not follow out? there isn't one. it is
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inevitable. you can have cruise around it. you will fall out, when you realise you have hit the point where it has fallen apart, you have two just where it has fallen apart, you have twojust stop, walk where it has fallen apart, you have two just stop, walk away, have a drink, whatever it is. also, what happens in the game, stays in the game. you do not refer to what happened in the game later that day. he cannot go i definitely did, that hand was right. then you start all over again. as long as you abide by those rules, it is ok. would you be playing board games? yes. some third—party games the kids can join in. ryu arguments can happen, but you can mitigate it. one of my favourites is to play a cooperative game. not all are competitive. there are teams were you are on the same side. there are games where you are a team can to accomplish one thing, so he might be medics trying to cure
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disease or you might be a robot pilot trying to stop on as many bad quys pilot trying to stop on as many bad guys as possible. there are things that don't put dad against mum and brother against sister. if you do when, the thing is to not run around cheering. it is your big moment, isn't it? if you do win, you have to go for the glory. i like playing games. i take board games round to my friends houses. that is growing. i know people who i wouldn't take around a little bit of scrabble and it is becoming an actual thing because it doesn't interfere with the drinking, but it stops you talking about house prices and the other stuff you don't want to talk about. there are games, break the
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ice games, if you have friends who don't know each other, you can ask questions about who they are and things like that. this is interesting in the sense that so many people are stuck on the tablets we re many people are stuck on the tablets were their phones when you are in company. how many times have we talked about that? this is moving away from that. there has been a real surge in interest in games that make people sociable. spaces where they can be silly and when they wouldn't usually in a social setting and people want something more tangible is up in the same way we have seen final record sales increase, people are maybe starting to feel that digital entertainment is quite solitary and they want something they can touch and feel. good working can bring a family together. if you need a poor game, thatis together. if you need a poor game, that is a worry, but i know a family where they have lost their dad and
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they want to stay away from the games they played together because they might revisit them in years to come, so the man has bought a new game, a quick response then and she is hoping that on christmas day, when everyone might be feeling weird she can say let's get this out. i think that is wonderful, in the spirit of that. he mentioned some of the trends coming through. what are the trends coming through. what are the big sellers we should watch out for? i did mention pandemic, which isa for? i did mention pandemic, which is a perennial bestseller. aside from collaborative games, there are things like ticket to ride, which is a real game. you have two plan a big real journey and connect a real game. you have two plan a big realjourney and connect routes using cards. it is quite engaging. there is strategy to but not so much that if you have never played before you will be elated. things i have
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enjoyed include a simple to play a ca rd enjoyed include a simple to play a card game. it is about scottish cla ns card game. it is about scottish clans battling each other for territory, but it is really like. there is a whole industry of people streaming these new games. it is lovely to see you both. the headlines are coming up, we will see shortly. hello this is breakfast, with rogerjohnson and naga munchetty. train passengers a word of disruptions after closures at paddington. stations in london, manchester and cardiff would be the worst hit. good morning.
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it's christmas eve — saturday, the 24th of december. also ahead:

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