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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 28, 2016 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. more than 80% of men and women in england aged between a0 and 60 are overweight, inactive, or drinking too much. health officials for the charity diabetes uk say these people are greatly increasing their risk of getting a debilitating disease like diabetes. good morning, it's wednesday, 28 december. also this morning: carrie fisher, best known for playing princess leia in the star wars films, has died at the age of 60. harrison ford says she was one of a kind. the japanese prime minister offers his "everlasting condolences" to those killed in the attack on pearl harbour as he becomes the first to join an american president at the memorial. we've spent almost £5 billion in bargain stores this year, meaning those shops have grown faster than the discounter supermarkets.
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i've been to meet the boss of one of them to see what's going on. good morning. in sport, swansea city sack bob bradley afterjust 11 games in charge. the swans are second bottom of the premier league. milder winters and wetter summers have caused a drop in numbers of butterflies and bees according to an audit of our wildlife by the national trust. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start to the day. there is patchy fog around, some of which will be slow to clear, if at all. we have some sunshine in the forecast and some rain coming in across the north—west. i will have more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. we will see you then. good morning. first, our main story. middle aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80% of 40— to 60—year—olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise. it says modern life is putting
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middle aged people at a greater risk of developing diseases like diabetes. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. lee parker is running for his life. aged 41 and weighing 22 stone, he was told by his seven—year—old son that he loved him even though he was fat. it was the nudge lee needed. since august, when he changed his diet and began to exercise, he has lost 5 stones. it was a case of, with us, should we just order a pizza tonight because we have food in but we could not be bothered cooking. so i think you just become a bit lazy and a bit drowned out with the daily grind of routine. there are many people in lee's position. almost 80% of women aged 40—60 are either overweight, obese, physically inactive or drinking more than official guidelines. among men, almost 90% fall into the same category. among the potentially devastating outcomes of this accumulation of health risks is diabetes.
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it has doubled in this age group in the last 20 years and already costs the nhs in england an estimated £14 billion per year. we are aging as a population but too many of us are ageing with a number of chronic diseases. the reason why we are seeing these increases in chronic diseases, such as cancers, stroke and heart disease, is in a large part because of behaviours which are adopted during our 40—60—year—old age period. for example, still smoking, or not getting enough physical activity, or perhaps drinking too much alcohol. the big impact, of course, is that this is going to put a huge burden on health services. to get the message across, in march, public health england launched a health quizz as part of its one you campaign. it says more than a million people have now taken the quiz and now have a route map to change their lives. robert pigott, bbc news we'll be speaking to a woman who changed her lifestyle after taking the quiz later in the programme. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her one of a kind.
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the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. 0ur entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at her life. clever and confident, occasionally caustic. what the hell are you doing?! somebody has to save our skins. will somebody get this big walking carpet out of many i way? carrie fisher's leia wasn't your typical princess waiting to be rescued. for luck. what appealed to me was that george lucas, who wrote and directed it, didn't wanta lucas, who wrote and directed it, didn't want a damsel in distress, didn't want a damsel in distress, didn't want a damsel in distress, didn't want your stereotypical princess, you know. the galactic princess grew up hollywood royalty, so princess grew up hollywood royalty, so taut of 19505 movie prince55 grew up hollywood royalty, so taut of 19505 movie legend debbie reynolds. throughout her acting career 5he battled drug addiction and mental illness. writing about it
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was a form of therapy for her. people used to ask me, you know, right after i got 5ober, you know, are you happy now? i would say, among other things, happy is are you happy now? i would say, among other things, happy is one of the many emotions i will go through in our day. the many emotions i will go through in ourday. i the many emotions i will go through in our day. i love you. and insta ntly in our day. i love you. and instantly recognisable face in our day. i love you. and insta ntly recog ni5a ble face after star wars, from time to time there we re star wars, from time to time there were appearances in other films like when harry met sally. her mother led tribute5, 5aving. .. per when harry met sally. her mother led tribute5, 5aving... per star wars co—5tar mark hamill tweeted... harrison ford 5aid co—5tar mark hamill tweeted... harrison ford said in a statement... in 2015 she replies to her role as prince55 in 2015 she replies to her role as princess leia in star wars to force a way to and that is how million5 will remember her —— star wars the
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force awakens. let's speak now to our la reporter peter bowe5. interesting hearing the thoughts of people, led by harrison ford, amongst others, 5he people, led by harrison ford, amongst others, she was a real character, wasn't 5he, amongst others, she was a real character, wasn't she, and so much affection for her? she was an incredible character and there is a tremendous amount of sadness at her loss. it really has struck a chord with people because she was such a ver5atile per5on. ye5, with people because she was such a ver5atile per5on. yes, she was known for one defining role in the star wa r5 for one defining role in the star war5 film from the 705 and then the repri5e last year but there was so much more to her. she was a comic genius, 5he much more to her. she was a comic genius, she was very, very funny and often it was directed at herself. it was 5elf—deprecating humour 5he would bring into her performances, 5he would bring into her performances, she did a 1—woman show at one point,
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5he she did a 1—woman show at one point, she wrote many books in which she talked about her life, she talked about many problems, that i 5he talked about her life, she talked about many problems, that i she was an alcoholic, 5he about many problems, that i she was an alcoholic, she had problems with drugs and she also had problems with depression. she could joke about all of that but equally 5he depression. she could joke about all of that but equally she was serious about it as well. she is a very transparent per5on. people really felt as if they knew her. she wasn't ju5t felt as if they knew her. she wasn't just another celebrity. she was a person who re5onated in ordinary people's lives, especially those going through similar problems — they felt they could learn something from her and that she wanted to share that with them. peter, for the moment, thank you. la reporterjeanne wolf will tell us her memories of working with carrie fisher in just a few minutes' time. president 0bama and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, have laid wreaths at the site of the japanese attack of pearl harbor 75 years ago. it's the first visit by leaders of both countries since the attack, in which 2,500 americans died. the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but didn't include an apology.
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0ur tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has more. it has taken 75 years for a japanese present and us president to come here to pearl harbor. inscribed, the names of the 21100 americans killed in japan's 5urpri5e names of the 21100 americans killed injapan's surprise attack on december 19 a1. 0utside, they cast flower5 into the waters where the wreck of the uss arizona 5till lie5. prime minister abe spoke of his 5adne55 at the young american lives cut short, of their hopes and dreams left unfulfilled. translation: when i contemplate that 5olemn reality, i am rendered entirely speechless. 20 years am rendered entirely speechless. 20 yea r5 have am rendered entirely speechless. 20 years have passed. ..
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am rendered entirely speechless. 20 years have passed... for 75 years and americans have been taught to remember pearl harbor, but today president obama called on americans to ta ke president obama called on americans to take a different lesson from this place. even when hatred burns hottest, even when the tug of tribalism is at its most primal, we must resist the urge to turn inward, we must resist the urge to demonise those who are different. it was a directjibe at his successor donald trump, who has been accused of stoking hatred against everybody from muslims to mexicans. for mr abe too there is deep concern about what will happen to japan's most important partnership, when mr trump enters the white house in 23 days' time. campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member.
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the campaign group, leave means leave, is hoping for a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. sean's here. what does all this mean? well, leave means leave, another campaign group, they want us to leave the eu and they want us to live within a couple of years. one of the members of leave means leave isa of the members of leave means leave is a former head of the chambers of commerce in the uk. they have got in touch with the chamber of commerce around the eu to get them to lobby their governments to say, get a move on. because leave means leave has said it is not in the benefit of the eu countries or the uk if we end up with a deal at some point where taxes are higher, creating more trade barriers between the uk and countries around the eu if we leave. of course, it is not quite so
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straightforward, because, one, they can only lobby governments, that don't have power, and also, those countries want something in return, freedom of movement is an issue, can you have freedom of movement without ta riffs you have freedom of movement without tariffs in the eu pace it is a long way from anything being resolved. it is part of the ongoing process. thank you very much indeed. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised from charging patients, staff and visitors for parking in the last year, up 5% on the year before, and rising year on year. patient groups have criticised rising parking costs but the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers. the co—operative group says it will open 100 stores across britain next year. the move would create 1,500 jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70m in the new shops,
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which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. almost 300 nail bars have been visited by immigration officials in recent weeks in a renewed bid to crack down on illegal workers in the industry. over 70 shops are likely to face fines, and more than a dozen vulnerable people were identified as being at risk of modern slavery. the overall number of potential slavery victims being trafficked into britain has risen by 2a5% over the last five years according to officialfigures. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a real impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording dramatic falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity points to a combination of milder winters and wetter summers for dramatic boosting grass growth.
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which they say has been good news for farmers making hay, but has hurt many british insects. not something i would have expected. it is 6:13am and hugh is here with the sport. bad news for paul bradley. in the press release, when he was sacked by swansea city, he said football is a cruel game, and he has got it absolutely right. 0h, isn't it? yeah. swansea city have sacked manager bob bradley after just 85 days in charge. the former usa coach was appointed in october and won two of his 11 games. the club is currently second bottom of the premier league. ryan giggs and wales manager chris coleman are among those being named as possible successors. liverpool are back up to second in the premier league after a a—1 win over stoke at anfield. daniel sturridge scored what was liverpool's 100th league goal under managerjurgen klopp. there was a second major win in as many days for trainer colin tizzard as his horse native river won
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the welsh grand national a day after thistlecrack won the king george chase. and world number one michael van gerwen survived a scare against the 32nd seed cristo reyes to reach the last 16 of the pdc world darts championship. former champions phil taylor and raymond van barneveld are also through. and that is all the sport for now, but i'm sure we will discuss it. yes, stay with us, and sean is here with us as well, you have found some stories to talk about, haven't you? there are some. we are looking at the papers, dominated by one story, the papers, dominated by one story, the news yesterday of the death of carrie fisher, only 60 years old, and for many people caught up, of course, 19 years old when she first got the role in star wars, and a fascinating life. we will talk more about that through the morning. the
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front of the times, a peach of carrie fisher, i am looking forward to people sending in their favourite quotes, she was the master of the 1—liner, she was also an fantastic writer ——a picture. and the times has a story about middle—aged people who are in denial about eating too much and drinking too much and maybe being overweight. yes, those stories replicated on the front of the daily mail, the carry fisher image you can see, and eight in 10 middle—aged britons overweight, almost a quarter of men in active according to the report. and, lads, what do we have? i cannot figure out what is better, getting up at 5am on boxing day morning and heading to the shops, or doing a little bit of googling on christmas day, looking for the sales. i think that we know the answer. well, i don't know. do you like shopping, sean? no, buti searched on christmas day in the
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evening andl searched on christmas day in the evening and i felt guilty. what were you looking for? unsurprisingly, it was a suit. laughter you have to build up your collection in this game. i went to two shops yesterday andl game. i went to two shops yesterday and i left, i couldn't stand it. were you looking for something specific? finally enough, it was a suit. you could have at least bought another one. was it matter? i am not big on shopping and it was too busy. it is now all about online. well, yeah, and the downside to that is, as the guardian has said, it is tough for shops on the high street, with the knock—on effect of, will there be more closures? because neither of you have bought a suit. they will do. they will go and look at the shops and buy it online. is that what people do? that is quite complicated, anyway. it is, isn't it. i will get some tips from you later. the mad world of mascots in the daily mail. you might well remember wilfried zaha at the
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weekend being accused of diving by the watford mascot. they have lifted many misdemeanours from mascots over the years. it is interesting how the role of the mascot is changing and you may be familiar with the mascot daunting opposition players. it is creeping into british football. what has he done? he thought wilfried zaha had tried to earn a penalty unfairly. at the end of the game he just went for a little scared in front of the crystal palace winger, which upset him. 0h, front of the crystal palace winger, which upset him. oh, i think we have those pictures coming up at 6:30am. i was there with bristol against northampton when the wolves mascot had a fight with three little pigs at half time on the pitch. and the pigs were another mascot? part of some advertising going on and they we re some advertising going on and they were winding each other up. really? they would never get on. ijust want i just want to share this from the daily mail. this is a now famous dog
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belonging to someone who is really quite private about what goes on behind closed doors. this is life at number 11 downing street. this is the goal of the chancellor who has his own social media account. there he is. rex stop a series of pictures of the dog enjoying christmas. yes. having tea and biscuits, relaxing on the sofa, taking out the recycling... people are always fascinated by pets. thank you so much and we will see you later on. the time hours 18 minutes past six. we have carol now with the weather for a winter is getting warmer apparently? today we have a bit of everything going on because we began ona everything going on because we began on a cold note with frost around. temperatures in some parts are
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currently —5 and we have fog patches. no fog this morning although some is starting to form in the south. we already have patchy fogs in other parts. visibility to 50 minutes at the moment. watch out because in places it is dense. in scotla nd because in places it is dense. in scotland and the far north of england there is as much fog, pockets of frost here and there but producing some rain across the outer hebrides. nothing too substantial. throughout the morning, some of that fog will lift into low cloud but some of us will see sunshine across southern areas into wales, parts of northern england, northern ireland, but scotland is well. you can see the difference in the literature. 10 celsius compared to the four, for example, around manchester. if you are stuck somewhere where we hang on to the fog all day, the temperature will struggle to rise above freezing. perhaps one or two degrees
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at that will be yet. as we have through the evening and overnight we will see fog reforming once again across england and wales in particular. for scotland and northern ireland will be more cloud around the time and the weather front of the north—west will be making the difference. freezing fog patches for some of frost around for others. the kind of whether you would expect at this time of year. as we had on into tomorrow, some of this fog once again will be socialist. that will lift a low cloud, others may not clear at all. along the south coast later today parts of wales and northern ireland in the north—east they will see some sunshine on whether still plaguing the far north—western scotland it will be windy but milder. as we move from thursday to friday high pressure still across the south of the uk. you can tell by looking at the uk. you can tell by looking at the isobars it will be windy and a weather front starts to push that
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little further south across scotland bringing rain with it as it does. the northern half of the country is still in the mild category. we have ten to 11 degrees. as we come further south under the cloud, especially as there is any fog across those parts temperatures will be further down. as we head into the weekend another front coming southwards will bring rain and as it pushes southwards during the course of the weekend, getting into the far side later cool air will come in behind it with a northerly and we may see some snow. wintry showers certainly across the north. a bit of everything and the forecast this morning. they do very much. we will talk to you later on. "one of a kind... brilliant, original. funny and emotionally fearless." the words of harrison ford to describe carrie fisher after her death at the age of 60. it's just one of many tributes from the actress's friends and colleagues. peter mayhew, who played chewbacca in the star wars films says "there are no words for this loss.
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carrie was the brightest light in every room she entered. i will miss her dearly". anthony daniels, who played c3po, writes "i thought i had got what i wanted under the tree. i didn't. in spite of so many thoughts and prayers from so many. i am very, very sad." whoopi goldburg describes carrie fisher as "funnier and smarter than anyone had the right to be. sail on, silver girl. condolences, debbie and billie." the american tv host ellen degeneres says "carrie fisher was a brilliant writer, actor, and friend. she was so much fun. i can't believe she's gone." and samuel ljackson, who appeared in the star wars prequels says: "the light in the galaxy is dimmed by the loss of our princess leia. may the force be with her!!" we're joined now by hollywood reporterjeanne wolf. good morning to you. i should say we
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speak to you quite often about stories that you are covering in hollywood but actually this story, carrie fisher she was your friend. yes. she was a long—term friend and also i interviewed her many times and was friendly with her mother. you said you are looking for favourite quotes from harry and i think my favourite is that she is proud i am so sane about being so crazy. we remember her, don't we as an actor and if you look at her career it is almost like at every turn she was doing her best not to act. 0h, turn she was doing her best not to act. oh, yes. she said she didn't wa nt to act. oh, yes. she said she didn't want to act but she also understood her need for attention and the fun she had when fans reached out to her. and, when suddenly, star wars became a worldwide phenomenon and
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teenagers were falling in love with her, girls were calling her a role model and men, she was getting all kinds of crazy sexy messages. we remember her always as princess leia, a role she reprised more recently. did shoot higher of that? how comfortable was she with that image of herself as a 19—year—old? she never liked it when people claim she was tired of being princess leia. she said she continued throughout the years to hate the hairdo. she would never get over that. she plays a very small part in the latest star wars movie and i went to see it this weekend after there was news that she had had the heart attack and, i tell you, in the theatre full of mixed strangers you could feel the sign. you could hear the emotion and the care people have for her. this was just an instant
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median of the film. many people knew that although she had a very gilded copy would life it was not always easy for her, was it? it was very ha rd easy for her, was it? it was very hard for her. she suffered, in those days they courted manic depression and now it is known as bipolar. she suffered from a deep depression and when the world is telling you how famous you worried how lucky you are to have a famous mother and father and how beautiful and wonderful you are and you feel so down... i think that you reach for anything to feel better. so she had a series of addictions, everything from cocaine to prescription drugs. she spoke freely about her time spent in a mental institution which she said was the worst thing that ever happened to her. but the thing about her down challenges, the thing about the tragedy of her life that she shared them. and as she grew and
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shared them. and as she grew and shared so personally and, you must remember, this was a long time ago, far before the confessional books that when she shared her deepest feelings she did it also a humourous perspective and she created a community of people who care for each other who felt better because of what she said. did not feel so alone and so different. it is wonderful to talk to you this morning. wonderful pictures of carrie fisher with her dog. she took the dog was heard to a lot of press conferences and interviews is what. quite a character. we will have more later this morning. we will speak to her co—star warwick davis, he will speak to us before i got this morning. it is 26 minutes past six and it has been a mild and wet year weatherwise. and tim muffett's in beautiful somerset for us this
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morning to tell us what that's meant for the uk's wildlife population. iam here i am here at a national trust property and master the west of bristol. it is rather cold this morning to pull generally speaking this has been a mild winter and a wet summer and that has been the pattern for the last few years. so what impact has that had on our wildlife? how will this lawn here. it looks beautiful at the moment that they have to my wit for longer and they are not alone. grass growth has been extraordinary this year. we would take a look at that and the other impact the weather has had on oui’ other impact the weather has had on our wildlife a little later. first, however, here is the news the weather and travel from where you r. good morning r. from bbc london news, i'm charley figgis. residents who say their lives have been "turned upside down" since a fire ripped through their west london tower block, are taking legal action.
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the blaze was caused by a faulty whirlpool tumble dryer in august. the home appliance manufacturer says "the safety of consumers is their number one priority" — but a lawyer representing those affected has concerns. the obligation is on manufacturers to get it right the first time. consumers purchasing products and they expect them to be safe that is an obligation that manufacturers can not ignore and we don't see why this should be a different kettle of fish was a 17—year—old boy has died and another has life—threatening injuries after a crash in leigh on sea. the car they were in was being followed by a marked essex police car. the case has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. there's a limited service on the tubes this morning. waterloo & city line is closed as are parts of the circle line district line. that allows for track and drainage replacement. a special train service
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operates between broadway. on the rail, no service from travel heath. greater anglia services are not running between liverpool street and wit. paddington station is closed and no service on heathrow connected oi’ and no service on heathrow connected or express. let's look at the quick look at the roads now. as you can see that road is down to one lane at baker street. that will cause delays later on in the day. let us have a look at the weather. actually start this morning with temperatures as low as minus four degrees overnight. for we are watching quite carefully this morning for your morning commute. that could affect you if you are out on the roads. high pressure control of our weather over today in the next few days so while
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will try to settle eventually when the fog lifts it is a fine afternoon. more fog tonight. over the next few days disruption could be an issue from the fog. watch out for it on your local radio station especially. as we go through this morning here is the fog in the breeze from the frost listings through the day. brightening up by the end of the literally they. light winds. as we go through this evening at overnight you see the fog starting to reformat again through the night it could be quite an issue. another chilly night is what with temperatures down to freezing. a very slow start to your day tomorrow. the fog could take a really long time to list and that could have an impact in some spots it will reach just three or four degrees. that is the scenario or the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and sally. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. it's 6:31am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as health officials say the majority of us are dangerously unhealthy in middle age, we'll be meeting one woman who recognised the signs and turned her life around. more of us own smart gadgets than ever before, but are they making our homes more vulnerable to cyber attacks? we'll have some top tips on how to beat the hackers. and we'll be speaking to star wars actor warwick davis about his memories of his co—star carrie fisher. all that still to come. time now 6:31am. but now a summary of this morning's main news. middle aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80% of a0— to 60—year—olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise, putting them at a greater risk of
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developing diseases like diabetes. they're being urged to take an online quiz to see how healthy they really are. we'll be speaking to one of the professors who helped devise the quiz injust a few minutes' time. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her "one of a kind". the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. at 8:a0am we'll be speaking to carrie fisher's star wars co—star warwick davis. japanese prime minister shinzo abe has offered his sincere and everlasting condolences to the victims of his country's attack on the united states at pearl harbour 75 years ago. standing alongside the us president obama, the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but fell short of apologising. campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations
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across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group, leave means leave, wants a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. the government says it's working to secure the best possible deal. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 health trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised parking fees last year, that's up 5% on the year before. patient groups have criticised rising parking charges and the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers. the co—operative group says it will open 100 stores across britain next year. the move would create 1,500 jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70
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million in the new shops, which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. almost 300 nail bars have been visited by immigration officials in recent weeks in a renewed bid to crack down on illegal workers in the industry. over 70 shops are likely to face fines, and more than a dozen vulnerable people were identified as being at risk of modern slavery. the overall number of potential slavery victims being trafficked into britain has risen by 2a5% over the last five years according to officialfigures. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a dramatic impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording dramatic falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity points to a combination of milder winters and wetter summers for dramatic boosting grass growth, which has been good forfarmers making hay, but led to falls in insect numbers. it does feel like winter is warmer
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and summer is wetter. it does, although this morning is pretty nippy. it is freezing out there, everybody, stay at home if you can. i would. bob bradley, out in the cold. hugh jenkins said i would. bob bradley, out in the cold. huthenkins said the club is going through such a tough time they really needed to find the answers to turn things around. they didn't give him very long, though, did they? not very long at all, sally. swansea city have sacked manager bob bradley after just 85 days in charge. the swans are currently second bottom of the premier league, having won just two games since bradley's appointment in october. they're now looking for their fourth manager of 2016, with ryan giggs, who missed out on the job last time, and wales manager chris coleman both being linked with the role. swa nsea's next match
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is against bournemouth on new year's eve. liverpool are up to second in the premier league after a a—1 win over stoke at anfield. they had to come from behind afterjon walters put stoke ahead. adam lallana pulled them back level before roberto firmino put them in frontjust before the interval. an own goal pushed liverpool further in front before daniel sturridge added a fourth, which was liverpool's 100th league goal under managerjurgen klopp. they're now six points behind league leaders chelsea. we need all of them, and especially daniel, of course. in four days there is another game. hopefully they all stay healthy and fit. two days later is another game, and then three days later there is another game. we have enough opportunities for everybody who is fit, so hopefully they are all fit. brighton are the new leaders in the championship after a 3—0 win over struggling queens park rangers. the win gives brighton a two point lead over newcastle at the top. sam baldock was among
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the goalscorers. chris hughton's side are now unbeaten in 17 games. in the day's other championship game, derby beat birmingham 1—0. ian cathro has won his first match in charge of hearts. they beat kilmarnock a—0 and stay fourth in the scottish premiership. aberdeen stay a place above them in third, they beat hamilton academical 2—1. in rugby union's premiership, harlequins survived a frantic finish to beat gloucester 28—2a in a thrilling match at twickenham. quins centrejoe marchant scored two tries to put the hosts 28—10 ahead going into the last 20 minutes. gloucester hit back with two late tries but couldn't find another as quins held on to move into the top six. in the pro 12, ospreys beat scarlets 19—9 to move up to second. what a christmas it's been for racing trainer colin tizzard. he's claimed his second major victory in as many days after his horse native river won the welsh grand national. after thistlecrack won the king george chase on boxing day, native river was favourite for this one and hit the front with 13
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left to jump. a meet up with thistlecrack at the cheltenham gold cup in march could now be on the cards. we spoke about him earlier — there will be no fa investigation into watford mascot harry the hornet after his alleged mocking dive in front of crystal palace's wilfried zaha on boxing day. palace manager sam allardyce had suggested the mascot‘s behaviour should be "looked at" by the fa and the premier league. the incident happened after the final whistle and zaha had to be restrained by staff. no sting in the tail for harry the hornet. if you have a favourite mascot story, either of good or bad behaviour. we have excellent stories here about mascots. there have been a few, haven't they are? yeah.
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—— there? modern life is being blamed for a major blight on the health of middle aged people. public health england says more than 80% of those aged between a0 and 60 are either overweight, inactive or drinking too much. it says they're putting themselves at risk of diabetes, which already costs the nhs an estimated £1a billion a year. researchers say obesity has gone up by 16% over the last two decades. many who took part in the study didn't even recognise what a healthy body weight looked like. so public health england wants people to take a health quiz, to try get people to change their bad habits. joining us from our london newsroom is professor muir gray, one of the clinical advisors behind the campaign. very good morning to you. thank you for your time this morning. can you give us a snapshot of the scale of the problem we are facing? maybe we are used to talking about younger people and obesity. maybe older people and obesity. maybe older people with other conditions. you
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are concentrating on the a0 to 60 age group. we prefer the term middle age. midlife isn't the beginning of the end. it is the end of the beginning. we know that in changing your approach in midlife, you can reduce the risk of not only type 2 diabetes, which is a preventable condition, you can reduce the risk of dementia. this is terrifically exciting information. we have research showing the problems of old age can be reduced. midlife people are sometimes called the sandwich generation, they have children on one side, elderly parents on the other, they have tough jobs, driving to work, sitting all the time at work. it is an environmental problem as much as a lifestyle problem. that is the message. the message is, people can change. this group of people, a0 to 60, they have had a lot of messages over the years. they can't have, well, they can have
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ignored, but they cannot have not heard the previous messages. why are they not adapting their lifestyles? we haven't got the message right in the past. we have blamed individuals for laziness or ignorance. actually, we haven't taken into account, as i say, the pressure on the sandwich generation. and the one new program, and the how are you quiz, i don't know it if you have tried it, it begins by saying, what do you want to achieve? how do you see the future? why do you want to be healthy? and what obstacles do you face? it is notjust lifespan, it is health span. it is health and enjoyment, notjust living longer and dying miserably at the end. the keyissueis and dying miserably at the end. the key issue is to help people adapt, and that means changing the way they work. maybe you guys should stand up for part of your morning program, rather than sitting all the time. laughter we are sitting on the sofa,
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which perhaps we shouldn't do. very dangerous. absolutely. question one is, what is your name, your christian name, the question number two is, what is your sex, and then it asks, quite poignant, how are you feeling? it gives you a range of options. one of them is, if you excuse options. one of them is, if you excuse the language, are you feeling really knackered, or are you full of beans? there is a scale of how you are feeling. what is the relevance to that question? you could catch someone on an to that question? you could catch someone on an individual day and, you know, they feel fine, the next day they are lousy, so why ask that question? it you have to start where people are, i think it is a marketing slogan. healthca re people are, i think it is a marketing slogan. healthcare is what you do for yourself, what we think you do for yourself, what we think you should do. you have to start where people are. they are consistent. they know what we are getting at. this is one of the
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wonders of the form, we don't even call it the smartphone, the value of the phone is you can personalise it, so the phone is you can personalise it, so instead of putting up an advertisement to speak to everyone, we can communicate with you. you have to start by saying, and i have set it to you this morning, well, how are you guys? you are may be up or down one to the next, by people generally have a position in life, and that is where we start, we start with you the individual, there is only one of you. that is the approach. and as with the mobile phone and the ability to do the quiz online, then it is a personal message, not a broadcast message. some people say people on tv don't listen, so look at this, we are making an effort. we have stood up. good! 50 minutes! do you know, can we start a trend, stanley cup news? i think it has been done before, hasn't it? —— standing up news.
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carroll, are you standing up? she is a lwa ys carroll, are you standing up? she is always standing up. she is the healthiest of all of us. morning, carol. good morning all, indeedy, and you might want to start running because it is called to start. temperatures locally in england and wales —5, with frost and fog around, some is dense, especially in the west midlands, east wales, visibility to 15 metres. you can see quite a lot of fog is forming. if you are travelling, bear that in mind. as we push into north england, northern ireland and scotland, we have variable cloud, some brightness when the cloud comes up, some showers ahead of a band of rain waiting in the wings across the hebrides. through the day the fault will lift, some into low cloud, some won't lift at all, but there would be some sun for some. across
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southern coastal counties, wales, northern england, northern ireland and parts of scotland too. it is breezy in the north. maehl here. further south, threes, fours and fyvie. —— and fives. if you are stuck with the fog all day, it will be grey and it will also be cold, temperatures around freezing, slightly above, slightly below, then this fog will reform for england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland, more cloud around, a touch of frost and we might see frost for england and whales also, and freezing fog to boot. tomorrow, very similarto freezing fog to boot. tomorrow, very similar to date freezing fog to boot. tomorrow, very similarto date in freezing fog to boot. tomorrow, very similar to date in that it will take a while for the fog to lift —— wales. some of it into low cloud, some won't lift at all and the best areas for sometime southern coastal counties into the south—west, parts of wales, parts of northern ireland, eastern england and north—east
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scotland. but by now the rain making more progress across the outer hebrides. throw in cloud and showers ahead of it with the north—west highlands. as we move into friday, watch the squeeze on the isobars, turning that bit windier, not to the extent of last week, with a weather front pushing further south, and further south we have high pressure hanging on by the skin of its teeth. light wind here. with the combination of the cloud, wind and rain in the north it will be seven —— fairly mild. further south, we will see some sunshine, but there will see some sunshine, but there will also be some fog and you know the drill, without much wind it won't move rapidly at all. as we head into the weekend, of course, including new year's day, we have the weather front in the north sinking steadily south, bringing rain with it as it does so. look how the isobars rain with it as it does so. look how the isoba rs change, rain with it as it does so. look how the isobars change, coming from a northerly direction, so it is going to turn colder, the front should clear on new year's day, behind it, well, we are looking at some
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sunshine with the risk of some wintry showers too, but mainly in the north, sally and charlie. are you still standing up? no, no, no, go and have a nice sitdown, carol. standing up is hard work. sean's here now — and he's talking about something most of us like — bargains! i love a bargain. but you won't go online? you do not like them that much? i go online on boxing day. have i missed the bargains by then? we are talking about bargain stores here. pound land, powerand we are talking about bargain stores here. pound land, power and world and the others. poundworld, 99p stores, poundstretcher, b&m and home bargains — spending at bargain stores totalled £a.9 billion in the year tojuly, up 17% from the previous year. you the stores have had a big rise in first time visitors — more than 2.2 million households shopping there for the first time. almost a third of the increase in spending down to shoppers
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switching away from mainstream supermarkets and likes of boots, superdrug. nearly four—fifths of households in britain now buy from bargain stores — that makes them more popular than the bigger german discount supermarket chains aldi and lidl, which are visited by three—quarters of households. to try and find out why they have had such a good year i went along to meet the boss of one of those retailers. once upona once upon a time in the not so distant past we would have gone to a big supermarket for the weekly shop. their market share has been eaten away. the shoppers continued to change. we have had the rise of the discounters and recently it has been the turn of the bargain store selling groceries like these at the same rate as places like waitrose. notjust same rate as places like waitrose. not just the groceries same rate as places like waitrose. notjust the groceries in the kitchen that we purchase more. homewares things like cushions and
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candles and plant pots and, of course, christmas decorations. spending in these stores is up by almost 20% on last year, now totalling more than £5 billion. what has been driving the recent change? ten yea rs has been driving the recent change? ten years ago we were known for groceries and clearance to. that is not the business today. today it is far more about general merchandise. housewares, diy, toys, christmas decoration, gardening. what is now about items you sell here that maybe you would not necessarily have seen ten yea rs you would not necessarily have seen ten years ago? the scale. we have 100 buyers travelling around the world from the very best that she is looking from particular product. having done so we get the volume, bring them in and we have a different mindset of competition. so thatis different mindset of competition. so that is how they sell what is on offer. but what sort of shoppers are heading in store? this is about democratising shopping. everyone
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across the country we sharply because we all want a bargain and we are not prepared to pay more than we have to for things we buy everyday. how do you decide where to shop? it depends on which area you are in because if you are in this area you pick certain things up here. and then we will come here for another thing. we have a test is next to our place. what's at a price pressures do you have? everything you see here in soft furnishings is made overseas and there are price pressures because of the weakness of sterling. in ourfavour, because of the weakness of sterling. in our favour, however, because of the weakness of sterling. in ourfavour, however, our business is growing at 20% a year. by reinvesting the benefits of that increased volume, wherever it is managed, we can keep prices steady. the price set to rise next year in the competition for retailer will only get hotter. the big quadra super markers will use their power on the march of the discounters will
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continue. with four out of every five people now shopping at a discount, the days of putting all their baubles in one basket are now long gone. it was a nice basket there. it just long gone. it was a nice basket there. itjust goes to show that it is not just one there. itjust goes to show that it is notjust one shop any more. and you wonder, don't you, if they are all converging to the same thing? you have the big supermarkets with a little cheaper aisles and you have the discounters with the premium products. you see shops at the end and their selling homewa res products. you see shops at the end and their selling homewares which a lot of them do. i don't know how you choose where to go? you probably just go to many different places to find your bargains. thank you very much. as we've been hearing from carol this morning, today's weather is expected to be mostly foggy and cold, but the majority of us are yet to see the bitter temperatures you might expect for december. in fact, like last winter, this one has been pretty mild so far, and that's had a huge impact on the uk's wildlife. let's find out more
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from breakfast‘s tim muffett, who's at tyntesfield national trust estate, near bristol, for us this morning. good morning to you. i am about ten miles west of bristol. this national trust house each year has an assessment of its properties across the uk. it tries to work out what impact the weather has had an the wildlife because as you say, although it is cold this morning this winter has been a mild one and as heard, most winters within the last few years have been the same. what impact has that hat? if you think that this eu have needed to mow the lawn more often than normal you are not imagining it. this year, beef farmer robert made hay while the sun was shining. and while the
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rain came. and, still, his grass grows. we have seen a good grace throughout the season. a lot of grass on the ground at the moment and we are in the end of december now and we are still grazing outside. everyday i can get my cattle out of the shed i it is better for them. so why the rampant grass growth? a mild and wet winter has been followed by a cold spring and then came more mild wet weather in may and june. ideal conditions for grass to grow. the rate of growth was in many places a third faster than normal according to the agriculture and water cold shoulder vellu m agriculture and water cold shoulder vellum on board. conservationists are assessing the impact. excessive grass grows, why does it matter?l lot of our rarer plants and animals, particularly insects, live in very short turf. if he gets covered over
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by these coarse grasses, populations of those rare insects plummet. and that has been an issue? definitely. this man has analysed the impact of the weather on wildlife or ten yea rs. the weather on wildlife or ten years. a number of species have been hit in 2016. the losers have been the butterflies, beef, beatles and some grasshoppers which actually require very short turf. wasps were hit badly by the despicable summer of 2012. they have not really recovered. we usually get wasps nesting on this bank and i can vouch there are no nests here in all this year. nine. surely that is good? they are an important part of the food chain. they are really quite good at controlling a lot of tests and nasty little insect like greenfly. one of the things that should be properly hibernating had as pillars. when you get a mild
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month like this they are not hibernating properly. they are out and about. that is not good for them because they burn off their energy. as ever there were wildlife winners in 2016. helped in part by wind direction. it has been a fantastic yearfor migrant direction. it has been a fantastic year for migrant birds. a strong wind from the east, that helps a lot of migrating birds. yes. we had over 200 goldcrest arrived on the islands one day. from our point of view of an excellent year. from the point of view of gardeners it was disastrous. you keep getting mild winters and we keep getting short spells of good weather. we have not had a good summer since 2006. we are overdue. think back, there was the odd hot day during some of what he is talking about was a prolonged period of hot weather and the view is we have not really have that for ten yea rs have not really have that for ten years or so. have not really have that for ten years or so. other impact has been
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good for tree seeds. they have been a longer growing season. apples have had a good year. cider producers have had a great time. how they have been negative impacts as well. what will the future hold? we will have to see. we do for another culture? who knows? the 10—year trend has been for milder winters and wetter summers. we will get all the weather for today in the next few days with carol and later on. you are watching brea kfast. carol and later on. you are watching breakfast. still to come here this morning it has emerged that george michael generously gave millions of pounds to most of it in secret. we are so many pounds to most of it in secret. we are so many acts of kindness anonymous? we will find out more. i now get the new travel and weather from where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charley figgis. residents who say their lives have been "turned upside down" since a fire ripped through their west london tower block, are taking legal action.
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the blaze was caused by a faulty whirlpool tumble dryer in august. the home appliance manufacturer says "the safety of consumers is their number one priority" — but a lawyer representing those affected has concerns. the obligation is on manufacturers to get it right the first time. consumers purchasing products and they expect them to be safe that is an obligation that manufacturers can not ignore and we don't see why this should be a different kettle of fish. a 17—year—old boy has died and another has life—threatening injuries after a crash in leigh on sea. the car they were in was being followed by a marked essex police car. the case has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. there's a limited service on the tubes this morning. waterloo & city line is closed as are parts of the circle line district line. that allows for track and drainage replacement. a special train service operates between broadway. let's look at the quick
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look at the roads now. as you can see marylebone road is down to one lane at baker street. that will cause delays later on in the day. let us have a look at the weather. actually start this morning with temperatures as low as minus four degrees overnight. fog we are watching quite carefully this morning for your morning commute. that could affect you if you are out on the roads. high pressure in control
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of our weather over today and the next few days so while will try to settle eventually when the fog lifts it is a fine afternoon. more fog tonight. over the next few days disruption could be an issue from the fog. watch out for it on your local radio station especially. as we go through this morning here is the fog from the frost lifting through the day. brightening up by the end of the day. light winds. as we go through this evening at overnight you see the fog starting to reform again through the night it could be quite an issue. another chilly night with temperatures down to freezing. a very slow start to your day tomorrow. the fog could take a really long time to lift and that could have an impact in some spots it will reach just three or four degrees. that is the scenario for the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and sally.
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bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. more than 80% of men and women in england aged between a0 and 60 are overweight, inactive, or drinking too much. health officials blame fast food, deskjobs and the daily grind for what they're calling a middle aged health crisis. good morning, it's wednesday, 28 december. also this morning: tributes are paid to carrie fisher, who has died at 60. harrison ford says she was one of a kind. the japanese prime minister offers his "everlasting condolences" to those killed in the attack on pearl harbour as he becomes the first to join an american president at the memorial. good morning. more than two million households went to a bargain store for the first time this year, and in total we spent almost £5
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billion at their tills. i've been to meet the boss of one of them to see what's going on. good morning. in sport, swansea city sack bob bradley afterjust 11 games in charge. the swans are second bottom of the premier league. and carol has the weather. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start to the day. there is patchy fog around, some of which will be slow to clear, if at all. we have some sunshine in the forecast and some rain coming in across the north—west. i will have more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. good morning. first, our main story. middle aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80% of a0— to 60—year—olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise. it says modern life is putting middle aged people at a greater risk of developing diseases like diabetes. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. lee parker is running for his life.
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aged a1 and weighing 22 stone, he was told by his seven—year—old son that he loved him even though he was fat. it was the nudge lee needed. since august, when he changed his diet and began to exercise, he has lost 5 stone. it was a case of, with us, should we just order a pizza tonight because we have food in but we could not be bothered cooking it. so i think you just become a bit lazy and a bit drowned out with the daily grind of routine. there are many people in lee's position. almost 80% of women aged a0—60 are either overweight, obese, physically inactive or drinking more than official guidelines. among men, almost 90% fall into the same category. among the potentially devastating outcomes of this accumulation of health risks is diabetes. it has doubled in this age group in the last 20 years and already costs the nhs in england an estimated £1a billion per year.
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we are aging as a population but too many of us are ageing with a number of chronic diseases. the reason why we are seeing these increases in chronic diseases, such as cancers, stroke and heart disease, is in a large part because of behaviours which are adopted during our a0—60—year—old age period. for example, still smoking, or not getting enough physical activity, or perhaps drinking too much alcohol. the big impact, of course, is that this is going to put a huge burden on health services. to get the message across, in march, public health england launched a health quiz as part of its one you campaign. it says more than a million people have now taken the quiz and now have a route map to change their lives. robert pigott, bbc news we'll be speaking to a woman who took the quiz and changed her lifestyle just after 8am. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her one of a kind. the hollywood actress, best known for her role
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as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at her life. clever and confident... what the hell are you doing?! somebody has to save our skins. ..occasionally caustic... will somebody get this big walking carpet out of many i way? —— will somebody get this big walking carpet out of my way? carrie fisher's leia wasn't your typical princess waiting to be rescued. for luck. what appealed to me was that george lucas, who wrote and directed it, didn't want a damsel in distress, didn't want your stereotypical princess, you know. the galactic princess grew up hollywood royalty, the daughter of ‘505 movie legend debbie reynolds. throughout her acting career she battled drug addiction and mental illness. writing about it was a form of therapy for her. people used to ask me, you know, right after i got sober,
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initially they'd say, so, are you happy now? i would say, among other things, happy is one of the many things, the many emotions i will go through in a day. i love you. an instantly recognisable face after star wars, from time to time there were appearances in other films, like when harry met sally. her mother led tributes, saying... per star wars co—star mark hamill tweeted. .. harrison ford said in a statement... in 2015 she reprised to her role as princess leia in star wars: the force awakens, and that's how millions will remember her. at 8:a0am, we'll be speaking to carrie fisher's star wars co—star
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warwick davis. president obama and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, have laid wreaths at the site of the japanese attack of pearl harbor 75 years ago. it's the first visit by leaders of both countries since the attack, in which 2,500 americans died. the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but didn't include an apology. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes has more. it has taken 75 years for ajapanese prime minister and us president to come here to pearl harbor. inscribed on the walls in front of them, the names of the 2,a00 americans killed injapan's surprise attack in december 19a1. outside, they cast flowers into the waters where the wreck of the uss arizona still lies. prime minister abe spoke
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of his sadness at the young american lives cut short, of their hopes and dreams left unfulfilled. translation: when i contemplate that solemn reality, i am rendered entirely speechless. rest in peace, precious soul of the foreign. newsreel: 20 years have passed... for 75 years, americans have been taught to remember pearl harbor, but today president obama called on americans to take a different lesson from this place. even when hatred burns hottest, even when the tug of tribalism is at its most primal, we must resist the urge to turn inward, we must resist the urge to demonise those who are different. it was a directjibe at his successor, donald trump, who has been accused of stoking hatred against everybody from muslims to mexicans. for mr abe, too, there is deep
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concern about what will happen to japan's most important partnership when mr trump enters the white house in 23 days' time. campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group, leave means leave, is hoping for a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. the government says it's working to secure the best possible deal. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised from charging patients, staff and visitors for parking in the last year, up 5% on the year before, and rising year on year. patient groups have criticised rising parking costs but the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers.
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the co—operative group says it will open 100 stores across britain next year. the move would create 1,500 jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70 million in the new shops, which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. almost 300 nail bars have been visited by immigration officials in recent weeks in a renewed bid to crack down on illegal workers in the industry. over 70 shops are likely to face fines, and more than a dozen vulnerable people were identified as being at risk of modern slavery. the overall number of potential slavery victims being trafficked into britain has risen by 2a5% over the last five years, according to official figures. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a real impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording
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dramatic falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity points to a combination of milder winters and wetter summers for dramatic boosting grass growth. which they say has been good news for farmers making hay, but has hurt many british insects. you are watching breakfast on bbc news, it is exactly 7:10am. bypass brussels and persuade businesses in the rest of europe to put pressure on the eu to give us a good brexit deal. that's the idea from the campaign group leave means leave. it's demanding britain leaves the single market within two years. but will this speed up the brexit process and what impact will this have? joining us now isjon tonge, professor of politics at the university of liverpool. morning, john. good morning. so, the idea is they are appealing business to business — is there any point, given the politics that will be
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involved? it shows the message that theresa may's appeal for unity over brexit lasted 72 hours, because here we go again, leave means leave means they want a world of free trading nations without tariffs imposed, and ata nations without tariffs imposed, and at a certain level it makes sense, but politics are much more difficult, because why would the eu give us a deal like this when they wa nt to give us a deal like this when they want to send out a message that there is a punishment to be had for leaving the eu ? there is a punishment to be had for leaving the eu? certain countries in the eu would favour the tariff free deal, the example is germany with 13% of german exports coming to the uk. if you put tariffs on those exports, they will sell less to the uk. one in five cars come to the uk. some countries will be keen on this and angela merkel when she isn't seeking a fourth term next year in germany, may well be sympathetic to the idea. any deal, tariff free deal, would have to be approved by
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the 27 remaining countries in the eu ona the 27 remaining countries in the eu on a qualified majority vote basis and that won't happen. the people behind leave means leave know that. well, yes, but they are exerting the maximum pressure because they fear the current government has its eye ona the current government has its eye on a single eu market, the norway style deal. that costs each norwegian £115 per head to pay it to access the single market, and you don't control immigration, which is such a big issue for many british people, so leave means leave want to create, basically, for us to leave without a deal, we would become part of the world trade organisation and straight on their basis. at world trade organisation rules allow for tariffs. you would have an average of 18% tariff on any goods imported from the eu, and that would cause inflationary pressure. so, in reality, leave means leave believe in what they are saying, but is what
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they are really doing trying to keep they are really doing trying to keep the pressure on? so that it is talked about more, so things cannot be hushed up and go quiet? yes, the debate has moved on to the type of brexit we have. whatever the supreme court decides next month in terms of article 50, house of commons won't d efy article 50, house of commons won't defy the will of the people, we will leave the eu, so what deal will we get? for leave means leave, anything including britain's membership of a single eu market, even associate member, is unacceptable. the point ofa member, is unacceptable. the point of a brexit vote is to be a free trading nation. they represent 70— 100 parliamentarians in the conservative party, which is an awful lot, given that theresa may has a majority of 1a at the moment, so has a majority of 1a at the moment, so you has a majority of 1a at the moment, so you see has a majority of 1a at the moment, so you see the size of the influence. it is the conservatives within leave means leave which matters. we will leave it there for now. thank you very much. for in five in england are putting
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their health at risk because they are overweight, drinking too much for not doing enough exercise. the japanese prime minister offered everlasting condolences to the victims of pearl harbor, but 75 yea rs victims of pearl harbor, but 75 years on his words fell short of an apology for the attack. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it was very chilly getting up for work this morning. absolutely right. locally across parts of england and wales the temperature fell to minus six. you will not be surprised to hear there is frost around. as well is that we also have fog patches, some of which are dense and will be slow to clear up. if they do it all. along the coastline temperatures are a little higher that you do not need to move far inland to reach low temperatures and patchy fog.
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disability in some parts 50 metres in others, 100, in others more than that. in the very far north we have allowed around with some breaks in it and showers across the north—west thailand. through the gate before we had across england and wales will lift. some were lifted all and that will have an adverse impact on the temperatures. across england and the south—west, perhaps in northern ireland in northern england and scotla nd ireland in northern england and scotland here we will see some sunshine although pleasant to the time of the year in the sunshine but windier with more cloud across north—west and some showers as well. through the afternoon you can see where we hang the fog temperatures will struggle to break freezing. it will struggle to break freezing. it will be cold and it will be great. through the evening and overnight more fog will form, especially across england and wales with frost around as well. across northern ireland scotland there will be more
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cloud around. more of the breezes will across the far north—west starting to show its head some rain, into the outer hebrides. tomorrow the rain continues to exams. slowly southwards, not making a huge amount of progress but glad ahead of it will build across the west of scotla nd will build across the west of scotland and parts of northern ireland. the fog that we have, like today, will be slow to clear. some that will not clear at all. again, an adverse impact on temperatures. into the south—west and west wales, parts of north—west england northern ireland, north—east scotland, these are both test areas for sunshine. now he waves in prospect, however. again we look at low temperatures. 11 celsius where we have that weather front. the front wheel make more progress southwards during the course of thursday and friday. but the squeeze here. high—pressure hanging on by the skin of its teeth in the south. any fog that falls in the south will be slow to clear the
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colour will be far milder in the north where we have a combination of cloud, wind and rain. further south some breaks in the cloud, a little sunshine but emphasis on quite a grey day and you may see showers forming in the west. it will get a little milder in the south during the weekend before it turns colder for us all. carol, we are talking about internet connected devices next. your clicker is on a wire, isn't it? and your year pieces. you have groovy earpieces. mine is still the kind attached to a box.|j have groovy earpieces. mine is still the kind attached to a box. i am weighed in as well. thank you very much, carol. i have a wireless earpieces. so can that be hacked, i wonder? that is the thing. many people getting gadgets for christmas and there are wonderful when they work but are they risks attached? virtual assistants and smart tvs,
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connected watchers, all of these things make your life easier. what did you mention, a kettle? there is a remote control cattle that you can turn on from your phone. it would need a password. —— remote—controlled cattle. there are over six billion convective sins by the end of this year. they do not come without risk. we could be sacrificing a privacy and opening hours. to hackers. this family home may look safe and secure. inside there are intruders that claim to make your life easier. in reality they could prove otherwise. ghosts you need to worry about, it is these and hackers know how to control them. the modern household of today has more smart technology than ever before and by the end of 2016 it is estimated that
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there will be 6.a billion connected things in use with 5.5 million new devices going online every day. we have found some smart items, security cameras, lightbulbs. if i'm at work i can get notification iphone about the security cameras. i can see that as a burglar or my husband coming home early. so you feel secure? that is what she thinks. without even having to get out of his car, and that he can gain control of your home security, lighting, music players and your kettle. one of the first in liturgy that catches my eye is this. if any had taken gets access that catches my eye is this. if any had ta ken gets access to that catches my eye is this. if any had taken gets access to that, they are on your home network and once you were there, that is when you can start trying to attack or gain unauthorised access to other devices. of course he is not a real
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hacker, here's a cyber security expert, used by companies to discover security weaknesses. it turns out with the right know—how you can hack pretty much everything. computer, how old are you? this is the tale at all. she has bluetooth capability and if you are within range you can connect to this toyed without any authentication or passwords or anything. we have been able to show how you can start turning the microphone want to —— on to record audio and playthings back. ican to record audio and playthings back. i can say what i like. matters in control. what else is in this room? a smart tv here. depending on the level of access an attacker might have they may be to do certain things like deploying applications, record audio, that hackers can listen in to a record. that is
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terrifying, thinking that somebody may be listening to you from your television. so if you find a smart device under the tree this christmas the advice is to make sure it is secure, you use passwords and check your privacy settings. that way you can ensure there are no ghosts in your machines. tony neate from technology research company ‘get safe online' is here to tell us how we can protect ourselves. good morning. isn't it great? all about technology, i love gadgets. it is like christmas for me every day. many people will of received something like this for christmas. we purchase more and more of these smart gadgets. you make sure you are safe if you have, for example, one of the things that can record voices or perhaps use a camera from a device that you have in your house? the key to it all is passwords. the
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most important place to have a good strong password is on the router because your whole router is the one that controls all this. if they cannot get in there than they can get to what we call the internet of things. anything that is connected. there are some very important bits and pieces that we really need to make sure our secure. that is our camera, security camera and locks. you can now purchase an actual front door lock that is controlled by the internet. will or you do as you turn your phone and it opens the lock as your phone and it opens the lock as you walk in. these are things we need to know. things are lights. if someone monitors need to know. things are lights. if someone monitors when the lights come on and off they can know when you are in. i think the internet is fantastic and there are some simple easy precautions you can take to make sure that none of these things affect you. how easy is it to hack into someone's front door lock? what are the main problems is that people do not change the password that
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comes with it, the default password. if you change the default password, people will always be able to discover what it is. the first thing to do is to look at the instructions and change the password so you have and change the password so you have a different one. i say that for everything we do. we need to make sure we have more than one password. you do not have one key for everything you do and you cannot have one password. if you lose one key, you need to change all your locks, and lose one password, you need to change every access you have. even with a password for your phone and for your computer, perhaps a password for work, remembering just those is tricky enough. are we heading towards a future where we may have ten different passwords for ten different things? right now, if you have not got ten passwords in your life then you are not probably as secure as you could be. one of the things we recognise and is to have a security locker for your passwords. it is called a password
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manager or a password locker, a password safe. you can put all your passwords in their and then have one key password in order to get to it. you just need to accept, look, with the modern day on the way we are going forward there will be restrictions on one of those is that we need different passwords. it is fantastic, all this stuff, one my grandchildren have a robot that you could control move. that is fantastic and it is not really a lot you can do with eight kettle or a robot that there is with other things. we need to ensure that we look at the website, have a look at what we should and shouldn't do and secure ourselves. this is a river life in any way question does anybody actually need a remote—controlled kettle? anybody actually need a remote-controlled kettle? is laziness. we can sit there and watch the television and we know the advertisements are coming up so we can turn of an waiting for advertisements to start. it is just... same argument i used to have with people about windup windows on your cars. putting a buyer is lazy
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but it is also easy to ask someone to push the button. and it is about making life easier for people. we also need to make sure that the manufacturers help us i have been default advice about what we have to do in relation. it can be quite complicated out there, especially for us silver surfers. more passwords. if i understood that correctly, you should have all of your passwords in one place and then have a password to get into your passwords. if someone gets a passwords. if someone gets a password that got all your passwords. that is correct. you whisper a day we would have surrounded by nature of that technology? i don't like right now in fact. surrounded by big insects. look around. a mild wet year weatherwise. it's been a mild and wet year weather—wise and tim muffett's in somerset for us this morning to tell us what that's meant for the uk's wildlife population.
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iamat i am at one with nature this morning on this cold morning. but it has been a mild winter, generally speaking this year as it has been for the last ten years or so. we're here at the national trust property about ten miles west of bristol. each year the national trust assessed their properties across the uk to see what impact the weather of that year has had on the wildlife. a little later on we will find out what that impact has been. if you think back to this year and wonder if you have been mowing the lawn a little more than usual, you are not imagining that. grass is growing faster and we will look at the other impact shortly. all, news from your region. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charley figgis. residents who say their lives have been "turned upside down" since a fire ripped
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through their west london tower block, are taking legal action. the blaze was caused by a faulty whirlpool tumble dryer in august. the home appliance manufacturer says "the safety of consumers is their number one priority" — but a lawyer representing those affected has concerns. the obligation is on manufacturers to get it right the first time. consumers purchasing products and they expect them to be safe that is an obligation that manufacturers can not ignore and we don't see why this should be a different kettle of fish. a 17—year—old boy has died and another has life—threatening injuries after a crash in leigh on sea. the car they were in was being followed by a marked essex police car. the case has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. there's a limited service on the tubes this morning. let's look at the quick
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look at the roads now. as you can see marylebone road is down to one lane at baker street. that will cause delays later on in the day. let us have a look at the weather. a chilly start this morning with temperatures as low as minus four degrees overnight. fog we are watching quite carefully this morning for your morning commute. that could affect you if you are out on the roads. high pressure in control of our weather over
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today and the next few days so while will try to settle eventually when the fog lifts it is a fine afternoon. more fog tonight. over the next few days disruption could be an issue from the fog. watch out for it on your local radio station especially. as we go through this morning here is the fog from the frost lifting through the day. brightening up by the end of the day. light winds. as we go through this evening at overnight you see the fog starting to reform again through the night it could be quite an issue. another chilly night with temperatures down to freezing. a very slow start to your day tomorrow. the fog could take a really long time to lift and that could have an impact in some spots it will reach just three or four degrees. that is the scenario for the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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now, though, it's back to charlie and sally. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. it is exactly 7:30am. middle—aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80% of a0— to 60—year—olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise, putting them at a greater risk of developing diseases like diabetes. they're being urged to take an online quiz to see how healthy they really are. we'll be speaking to a woman who took the quiz and changed her lifestyle just after 8am. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her "one of a kind". the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last
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friday. at 8:a0am we'll be speaking to carrie fisher's star wars co—star warwick davis. japanese prime minister shinzo abe has offered his sincere and everlasting condolences to the victims of his country's attack on the united states at pearl harbour 75 years ago. standing alongside the us president obama, the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but fell short of apologising. campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group, leave means leave, wants a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. the government says it's working to secure the best possible deal. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 health trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised parking fees last year,
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that's up 5% on the year before. patient groups have criticised rising parking charges and the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers. the co—operative group says it will open 100 stores across britain next year. the move would create 1,500 jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70 million in the new shops, which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. dozens of people have been arrested. almost 300 nail bars have been visited by immigration officials in recent weeks in a renewed bid to crack down on illegal workers
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in the industry. 14 1a people were identified as potentially being at risk of modern slavery. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a dramatic impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording dramatic falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity points to a combination of milder winters and wetter summers for dramatic boosting grass growth, which has been good forfarmers making hay, but led to falls in insect numbers. coming up on the program, we have our own weather expert, won't we, carol, telling us what the weather will be like in the next couple of days. right now is 7:33am and time for the sport. tell us about this little fella. bradley had hopes about swansea city, the first american manager in the premier league, he says he is disappointed
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to have lost his job and he says football is a cruel game, just 11 matches in charge, but he did not turn things around with seven defeats after 11 matches. and now there is a significant rumour, isn't there, that they are talking to ryan giggs again, who they spoke to last time when he did in get thejob. giggs again, who they spoke to last time when he did in get the job. he did it get the job in the summer and the difficulty is, do you bring in an experienced man, or do you give ryan giggs his firstjob? we will see. swansea city have sacked manager bob bradley after just 85 days in charge. the swans are currently second bottom of the premier league, having won just two games since bradley's appointment in october. they're now looking for their fourth manager of 2016, with ryan giggs, who missed out on the job last time, and wales manager chris coleman both being linked with the role. swa nsea's next match is against bournemouth on new year's eve. liverpool are up to second in the premier league after a a—1 win over stoke at anfield. they had to come from behind afterjon walters put stoke ahead. adam lallana pulled them back level before roberto firmino put them in frontjust before the interval.
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an own goal pushed liverpool further in front before daniel sturridge added a fourth, which was liverpool's 100th league goal under managerjurgen klopp. they're now six points behind league leaders chelsea. we need all of them, and especially daniel, of course. in four days there is another game. hopefully they all stay healthy and fit. two days later is another game, and then three days later there is another game. we have enough opportunities for everybody who is fit, so hopefully they are all fit. brighton are the new leaders in the championship after a 3—0 win over struggling queens park rangers. the win gives brighton a two point lead over newcastle at the top. sam baldock was among the goalscorers. chris hughton's side are now unbeaten in 17 games. in the day's other championship game, derby beat birmingham 1—0. ian cathro has won his first match in charge of hearts.
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they beat kilmarnock a—0 and stay fourth in the scottish premiership. aberdeen stay a place above them in third, they beat hamilton academical 2—1. in rugby union's premiership, harlequins survived a frantic finish to beat gloucester 28—2a in a thrilling match at twickenham. quins centrejoe marchant scored two tries to put the hosts 28—10 ahead going into the last 20 minutes. gloucester hit back with two late tries but couldn't find another as quins held on to move into the top six. in the pro 12, ospreys beat scarlets 19—9 to move up to second. what a christmas it's been for racing trainer colin tizzard. he's claimed his second major victory in as many days after his horse native river won the welsh grand national. after thistlecrack won the king george chase on boxing day, native river was favourite for this one and hit the front with 13 left to jump. a meet up with thistlecrack at the cheltenham gold cup in march could now be on the cards.
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we spoke about him earlier — there will be no fa investigation into watford mascot harry the hornet after his alleged mocking dive in front of crystal palace's wilfried zaha on boxing day. palace manager sam allardyce had suggested the mascot‘s behaviour should be "looked at" by the fa and the premier league. the incident happened after the final whistle and zaha had to be restrained by staff. harry the hornet is free to carry on his official club duties. so, good news for the msascot. the time now is 7:37am —— mascot. working in a homeless shelter and quietly donating thousands of pounds to people he'd never met are just some of the things we've learnt about george michael's generosity since he died on christmas day. like many others across the country, he'd decided to donate anonymously. so what do people get out of secretly giving time
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or money to charity? we'll discuss that in a moment, first here's what people in salford had to say. wyatt a big deal of it? just give if thatis wyatt a big deal of it? just give if that is the way to feel. —— wyatt abbey deal of it? you don't have to say, look at me, i am giving money to charity, you just don't do that, well, i don't anyway. it isn't about ask on the it is about other people and it isn't about what you get from it, it is about giving, it is a selfless act, isn't it? if you are giving too much or not enough, you don't want to seem overly generous. it isn't all about, if i am giving to charity, someone patting me on the back, ijust want to charity, someone patting me on the back, i just want to to charity, someone patting me on the back, ijust want to donate to a good cause and that is enough, really. i don't feel the need to be patted on the back. it doesn't matter where it comes from, does it? joining us in the studio is mike peacey, who's an economics lecturer at the new college
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of humanities in london. mike tomlinson, whose wife jane raised almost £2 million for charity before her death from cancer, joins us from our leeds newsroom. mike tomlinson, if i can come to you first of all, you have had huge amounts to do with fundraising for charity over the last several years. how common is it for people to give anonymously? it is quite common for people who are well— known to give anonymously and four other people it tends to be larger amounts that are anonymous, but i would say 30% are anonymous. and do you ever get an indication from the people who maybe do give you a significant amount, why they don't want publicity — what is it? icing for people or organisations in the public eye, i
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think to share the fact they are giving money to charity brings a lot of attention to them —— i think for people. it leads to a lot of request for help or donations. it can become a lot for them. and then ultimately they can become unwilling to help because of this significant amount of request for help they get. sometimes people were giving money to individuals. he would see a story, hear about someone's situation, and he would come up with the money. how unusual is that way of going about handing out money to people who need it? with george michael, it was definitely that he felt very connected to various causes and wanted to do great things. and what i found, with some of my students, is that they don't just want to make money or do things, they want to make a
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difference, they want to make the world a re difference, they want to make the world are better place, and making an anonymous donation was what he did to help people. when we spoke with people in the street, the sentiment was, it doesn't matter where the money comes from, but there are people who want it to be known that they have handed over money. of course. there are different reasons why people may or may not choose to make anonymous donations. and in a study that i conducted a couple of years ago on data from the london marathon, i found if people making significantly smaller donations than average, they would like to keep their information on anonymous and maybe the reason for that is a didn't want to be seen to be too tight. equally, on the other side, we found that often donations at were a lot larger were
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ke pt donations at were a lot larger were kept anonymous. and it might be because they didn't want to break the social norm or they didn't want to show up their peers by perhaps being too generous. but on the other hand, what we also found, one of the significant findings was that by choosing to make an anonymous donation it encouraged others to give more, so there was a benefit to forgoing the prestige themselves in terms of signalling just how good the charity was, or how much they believed in the courts. mike tomlinson, is there ever a situation you have come across where you want someone you have come across where you want someone to say publicly that they have perhaps made this donation perhaps without giving more publicity or raise the profile of a particular cause? that would never be the case. i think whoever you are, if you want to give
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anonymously, it should be anonymous. and from a map point of view it is important that people should have some confidence in the charity that they won't, once they have done something, that they won't be asked again to donate or contribute time or effort. there is a lot of pressure on people to help and support charities and i think the fa ct support charities and i think the fact that people have donated, we should be thankful for that, there should be thankful for that, there should be thankful for that, there should be no extra pressure put on them at all. interesting that people, talking about george michael, he didn't just people, talking about george michael, he didn'tjust give money, and mike tomlinson mentioned time, he also gave time, he volunteered. yes, time is great, especially, i know when i was younger, we didn't have money, but we were happy to give time and that is a really valuable thing. we put on our races in summerand you valuable thing. we put on our races in summer and you get between 1000— 2000 volunteers, and that is as
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valuable as money. thank you both for your time this morning. the time is 7:aaam. let's go to carol for the morning's whether. good morning. if you haven't stepped out it is a cold start to the day, especially across england and wales. temperatures have widely fallen below freezing but locally six, so it is frosty. we also have some fog patches, they identify the this is the picture at nine o'clock, you can see patchy fog. along southern counties it isn't as call on the coast and we don't have issues with fog. the fog is dense and some parts have had visibility down to 50 metres. in northern ireland, the north of england and scotland, there is more cloud around, but equally we have some sunshine. for the north—west scotland, thick cloud with showers and the breeze is more noticeable. through the day a lot of the fog will be slow to lift. some of it will be slow to lift. some of it
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will lift into low cloud, some of it will lift into low cloud, some of it will linger through the day, but we expect sunshine to develop along southern counties, through wales, northern ireland, northern england and parts of scotland. those are the values you can expect. in the sunshine for the time of year it will feel pleasant. if you are stuck under the fog for the day, the temperature will be really struggling to break freezing. it is going to feel cold. through the evening and overnight more fog will form for england and wales primarily. it will be a cold night with frost around, so we have freezing fog issues, for northern ireland and scotland it will be a cool night in rural areas but peter bridges won't be as low, there will be more cloud around, windy for the north—west and the rank advancing to the outer hebrides. so, tomorrow, the outer hebrides. so, tomorrow, the rain continues to slowly move southwards, the progress isn't great, but you will notice more cloud building into western scotland and northern ireland, and like today, where we have fog in england
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and wales, it will be slow to clear. some of it into low cloud, some not clearing at all, but there will be sunshine for southern counties into the south—west, parts of wales, northern ireland could see some sunshine, northern england could, and also north—east scotland. quite and also north—east scotland. quite a wide temperature variation, 11 in stornoway, nowhere else is mild like that. from thursday into friday, the weather front here south, there is another in hot pursuit. if you look at the isobars you can see it will be quite a blustery day. so, that rain continues to slowly sink southwards during the course of friday. across scotland, northern ireland, into northern england, a lot of cloud and breezy, so milder. further south we could start with some fog. not as widespread as we are looking at this morning. it will be there nonetheless. some of it will be slow to clear. and again, one or two showers to the west. as the front comes south, cold air filters in behind it and for some,
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by the end of the weekend, the first of january, we are looking at by the end of the weekend, the first ofjanuary, we are looking at some wintry showers, mostly in the north. thank you very much indeed. it does look quite chilly, doesn't it, and foggy. look quite chilly, doesn't it, and foggy, and the sort of day look quite chilly, doesn't it, and fong, and the sort of day you should stay in. the reason we have all these pictures that you can see on the walls around us, it is because the mild conditions are causing problems. they have had an impact on the wildlife of the uk. let's find out more from tim. today it feels rather cold so this may feel misplaced but the general trend over the last decade or so was for milder what winters. september was the second mildest september on record and summer seem second mildest september on record and summer seem to
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second mildest september on record and summer seem to be wetter as well. what impact does it have been having? each year the national trust as those of its properties across the uk to assess the impact of the weather on wildlife. if you think that to last summer and you were mowing the lawn will more often than you were probably not imagining it. this year, beef farmer robert made hay while the sun was shining. and while the rain came. and, still, his grass grows. we have seen a good grace throughout the season. a lot of grass on the ground at the moment and we are in the end of december now and we are still grazing outside. everyday i can get my cattle out of the shed i it is better for them. so why the rampant grass growth? a mild and wet winter has been
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followed by a cold spring and then came more mild wet weather in may and june. ideal conditions for grass to grow. the rate of growth was in many places a third faster than normal according to the agriculture and water cold shoulder —— according to the agriculture horticulture development board. conservationists are assessing the impact. excessive grass grows, why does it matter? a lot of our rarer plants and animals, particularly insects, live in very short turf. if it gets covered over by these coarse grasses, populations of those rare insects plummet. and that has been an issue? definitely. this man has analysed the impact of the weather on wildlife or ten years. a number of species have been hit in 2016. the losers have been the butterflies, bees, beetles and some grasshoppers which actually require very short turf. wasps were hit badly by the despicable summer of 2012. they have not really recovered. we usually get wasps nesting on this bank and i can vouch there are no nests here in all this year.
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none. surely that is good? they are an important part of the food chain. they are really quite good at controlling a lot of pests and nasty little insect like greenfly. one of the things that should be properly hibernating are caterpillars. when you get a mild month like this they are not hibernating properly. they are out and about. that's not good for them because they burn off their energy. as ever there were wildlife winners in 2016. helped in part by wind direction. it has been a fantastic year for migrant birds. a strong wind from the east, that helps a lot of migrating birds. yes. we had over 200 goldcrest arrived on the farne islands one day. from slug's point of view, an excellent year.
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from the point of view of gardeners it was disastrous. you keep getting mild winters and we keep getting short spells of good weather. we have not had a good summer since 2006. we are overdue. and here they have been mowing the lawn here far longer than they normally would do because the growing season seems to be getting longer. good news for tree seeds as well and also apples have had a very good year this year. many orchards and cider producers say they have had a bumper crop. but, yes, there are downsides as well. insects that are downsides as well. insects that are reliant on short turf in many places, that grasses grown readily and it has had an impact on them. we will have to see what happens. will we have another mild winter? that is the trend and we will find out as the trend and we will find out as the new year approaches. it is like a worry in a magic would today. it is getting light but it is still
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dark there. it gets light little bit later, probably, than where you are. it did look beautiful. what will we talk about now? stores and bargains? we're not talking about sales, however. this is all year round. everybody hunting for a bargain often. shopping around. in the stores that have seen a big increase this year are the likes of poundworld, 99p stores, poundstretcher, b&m and home bargains — spending at bargain stores totalled £a.9 billion in the year tojuly, up 17% from the previous year. the stores have had a big rise in first time visitors — more than 2.2 million households shopping there for the first time. almost a third of the increase in spending down to shoppers switching away from mainstream supermarkets and likes of boots, superdrug. nearly four—fifths of households in britain now buy from bargain stores — that makes them more popular than the bigger german discount supermarket chains aldi and lidl,
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which are visited by three—quarters of households. to try and figure out what was going oni to try and figure out what was going on i went along to one of the stores and spoke to the boston. —— boss there are once upon a time in the not so distant past we would have gone to a big supermarket for the weekly shop. their market share has been eaten away. the shoppers continued to change. we have had the rise of the discounters and recently it has been the turn of the bargain store selling groceries like these at the same rate as places like waitrose. it's notjust the groceries in the kitchen that we purchase more. homewares things like cushions and candles and plant pots and, of course, christmas decorations. spending in these stores is up by almost 20% on last year, now totalling more than £5 billion. what has been driving the recent change? ten years ago we were known for groceries and clearance goods. that is not the business today.
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today it is far more about general merchandise. housewares, diy, toys, christmas decoration, gardening. what is it about items you sell here that maybe you would not necessarily have seen ten years ago? the scale. we have 100 buyers travelling around the world going to the very best factories, looking for a particular product. having done so, we get the volume, bring them in and we have a different mindset of competition. so that is how they sell what is on offer. but what sort of shoppers are heading in store? this is about democratising shopping. everyone across the country we shop here, because we all want a bargain and we are not prepared to pay more than we have to for things we buy every day. how do you decide where to shop? it depends on which area you are in because if you are in this area you pick certain things up here.
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and then we will come here for another thing. what sort of price pressures do you have? everything you see here in soft furnishings is made overseas and there are price pressures because of the weakness of sterling. in our favour, however, our business is growing at 20% a year. by reinvesting the benefits of that increased volume, wherever it is managed, we can keep prices steady. the price set to rise next year and the competition for retailer will only get hotter. the big four supermarkets will use their power and the march of the discounters will continue. with four out of every five people now shopping at a discount, the days of putting all their baubles in one basket are now long gone. shopping yesterday, is that for next
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year? were you getting an early? some people do that. if you really wa nt some people do that. if you really want a some people do that. if you really wanta bargain, some people do that. if you really want a bargain, you some people do that. if you really wanta bargain, you get your christmas stuff now. it does goes to show that all these stores, 2017 will be very competitive in all the supermarkets and discount and bargain stores. and you will need to go to more places if you want a bargain. it is not like the old days of going to one supermarket.“ bargain. it is not like the old days of going to one supermarket. if you wa nt of going to one supermarket. if you want the best price... you could probably do a doctorate in it, i reckon. you will need to be that much of an expert. the time now is 756. still to come here this morning, as we'll get more gadgets connected to the internet we will have the top tips on keeping home safe from hackers. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charley figgis. residents who say their lives have been "turned upside down" since a fire ripped
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through their west london tower block, are taking legal action. the blaze was caused by a faulty whirlpool tumble dryer in august. the home appliance manufacturer says "the safety of consumers is their number one priority" — but a lawyer representing those affected has concerns. the obligation is on manufacturers to get it right the first time. consumers purchasing products and they expect them to be safe that is an obligation that manufacturers can not ignore and we don't see why this should be a different kettle of fish. a 17—year—old boy has died and another has life—threatening injuries after a crash in leigh on sea. the car they were in was being followed by a marked essex police car. the case has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. paddington station remains closed with no surfers on heathrow connect and heathrow express. the great western railway services will start
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and terminate at ealing broadway. on the roads, as you can see marylebone road is down to one lane at baker street. that will cause delays later on in the day. let us have a look at the weather. the ferry has been suspended due to heavy fog. time now to find out more about the fog and the rest of the weather. a chilly start this morning with temperatures as low as minus four degrees overnight. fog we are watching quite carefully this morning for your morning commute. that could affect you if you are out on the roads. high pressure in control of our weather over today and the next few days so it will be dry and settled eventually when the fog lifts it is a fine afternoon. more fog tonight. over the next few days disruption could be an issue from the fog. watch out for it on your local radio station especially.
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as we go through this morning here is the fog from the frost lifting through the day. brightening up by the end of the day. light winds. as we go through this evening at overnight you see the fog starting to reform again, through the night it could be quite an issue. another chilly night with temperatures down to freezing. a very slow start to your day tomorrow. the fog could take a really long time to lift and that could have an impact in some spots it will reach just three or four degrees. that is the scenario for the end of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast, with sally nugent and charlie stayt. more than 80% of men and women in england in their forties and fifties are said to be overweight, inactive, or drinking too much. health officials blame fast food, deskjobs and the daily grind for what they're calling a middle aged health crisis. good morning it's
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wednesday 28th december. also this morning: tributes are paid to carrie fisher, who has died at 60. harrison ford says she was "one—of—a—kind". the japanese prime minister offers "everlasting condolences" to those killed at pearl harbour as he becomes the first to join an american president at the memorial. supporters of a quick brexit are asking businesses in europe to pressure their governments for a deal with the uk that has minimal barriers to trade. i'll have more details shortly. good morning. in sport, swansea city sack bob bradley, afterjust 11 games in charge. the swans are second bottom of the premier league. milder winters and wetter summers have caused a drop in numbers of butterflies and bees according to an audit of our wildlife by the national trust. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. cold and frosty start the day, patchy frog around, some of which is dense, will be slow to clear, if at all, there is sunshine in the forecast, and we also have rain across the north west. —— fog. i will have details on all of that and 15 minutes. in 15 minutes. —— in 15 minutes. first, our main story. middle aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80 per cent of a0 to 60 year olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise. it says "modern life" is putting middle aged people at a greater risk of developing diseases like diabetes. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. voiceover: leap parker is running for his life, aged a1, weighing 22 stone, he was told by his seven—year—old son that he loved him even though he was fat. it was the
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nudge he needed. since august, when he changed his diet and began to exercise, he has lost five stone. he changed his diet and began to exercise, he has lost five stonem was a case of, shall we order a pizza, we have food in but can we be bothered to cook it? you become lazy and drawn out with the daily grind of routine. among men, almost 90% fall into the same category. among the potentially devastating outcomes of this accumulation of health risks is diabetes. it has doubled in this age group in the last 20 years and already costs the nhs in england an estimated £1a billion per year. we are ageing as a population but too many of us are ageing with a number of chronic diseases. the reason why we are seeing these increases in chronic diseases, such as cancers, stroke and heart
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disease, is in a large part because of behaviours which are adopted during our a0— to 60—year—old age period. for example, still smoking, or not getting enough physical activity, or perhaps drinking too much alcohol. the big impact, of course, is that this is going to put a huge burden on health services. to get the message across, in march, public health england launched a health quiz as part of its one you campaign. it says more than a million people have now taken the quiz and now have a route map to change their lives. robert pigott, bbc news. studio: we'll be speaking to a woman who took the quiz and changed her lifestyle in just a few minutes' time. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, has died at the age of 60, calling her one—of—a—kind. the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been for her role as princess leia in starwars, had been in for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at her life. voiceover: clever and
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confident... what the hell are you doing? somebody has two save our skins! occasionally caustic... will somebody get this big walking carpet out of my way. carrie fisher's leia wasn't your typical princess waiting to be rescued. what appealed to me was that george lucas, who wrote it and directed it, didn't want a damsel in distress, didn't want your stereotypical princess, you know. the galactic princess grew up hollywood royalty, the daughter of ‘505 movie legend debbie reynolds. throughout her acting career she battled drug addiction and mental illness. writing about it was a form of therapy for her. people used to ask me, you know, right after i got sober, initially they'd say, so, are you happy now? i would say, among other things, happy is one of the many things, the many emotions i will go through in a day. an
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insta ntly will go through in a day. an instantly recognisable face will go through in a day. an insta ntly recog nisa ble face after star wars, from time to time there we re star wars, from time to time there were appearances in other films, like when harry met sally. her mother has led tributes, saying... in 2015 she reprised to her role as princess leia in star wars: the force awa kens, and princess leia in star wars: the force awakens, and that's how millions will remember her. studio: we'll be speaking to carrie fisher's star wars co—star warwick davis in about half an hour's time.
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president obama, and the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, have laid wreaths at the site of the japanese attack of pearl harbor 75 yea rs japanese attack of pearl harbor 75 years ago. it's the first visit by leaders of both countries since the attack, in which two—and—a—half thousand americans died. -- 2500 —— 2500 americans died. the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but didn't include an apology. our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes has more. voiceover: it has taken 75 years for a japanese prime minister and us president to come here to pearl harbor together. inscribed on the walls in front of them, the names of the 2a00 americans killed when japan committed their surprise attack in december 19 a1. outside they cast flowers into the water where the wreck of the uss arizona still lives. —— december 19a1. the prime minister spoke of his sadness of the young american lives cut short, hopes and dreams left unfulfilled. translation: when i contemplate that
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solemn reality, i am rendered entirely speechless. rest in peace, precious soul of the foreign. for 75 yea rs, precious soul of the foreign. for 75 years, americans have been taught to remember pearl harbor, but today president obama called on americans to ta ke president obama called on americans to take a different lesson from this place. even when hatred burns hottest, even when the tug of tribalism is at its most primal, we must resist the urge to turn inward, we must resist the urge to demonise those who are different. it was a directjibe at his successor, donald trump, who has been accused of stoking hatreds against everybody from muslims to mexicans. for mr abe, too, there is deep concern about what will happen to japan's most important partnership when mr trump enters the white house in 23 days' time. studio: campaigners for an early
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brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group leave means leave is hoping for a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. sean's here — what does all this mean? is that really going to happen? well, we will find out in a few years' time, once these negotiations go through, the idea of this, this campaign group want the uk to leave the european union as quickly as possible, within a couple of years, they are going to business groups around europe saying, it is not good for you if you are, if we are having to tax you on anything you want to sell to us and vice versa, if we come to a trade deal where you are taxing us, that is not good for us. it would be a good idea if there was no tariffs either way, that is what we talk about when we have a
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free—trade deal and that is what they want to see, tariffs as close to zero as possible. these business groups can only lobby their governments, and there is 27 countries around the european union who would all need to agree on something like that. also, they will have things that they want as part of this agreement as well, whenever that happens, free movement of people is a big one for those in the european union. if we want no tariffs, it may have to be a compromise somewhere along the way. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking nhs hospitals have made more money than everfrom parking charges nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 health trusts across england suggest £120 million was raised parking fees last year, up five per cent on the year before. patient groups have criticised rising parking charges and the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers. the co—operative group says it will open one—hundred stores across britain next year. the move would
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create fifteen—hundred jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70 m this year. the group said it will invest £70m in the new shops, which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. —— 1500. dozens of people have been arrested on suspicion of immigration offences in a series of raids on nail bars. a total of 97 people were held during the week—long operation, which also saw scores of businesses warned they could face fines. fourteen people were identified as potentially being at risk of modern slavery. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a dramatic impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording huge falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity says a combination of milder winters and wetter summers have boosted grass growth, which has been good for farmers making hay, but led to falls in insect numbers. craig
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"modern life" is being blamed for a major blight on the health of middle aged people. public health england says more than 80% of those aged between a0 and 60 are either overweight, inactive or drinking too much. it says they're putting themselves at risk of diabetes, which already costs the nhs an estimated £1a billion a year. researchers say obesity has gone up by 16% over the last two decades. many who took part in the study didn't even recognise what a healthy body weight looked like. so public health england wants people to take a health quiz, to try get people to change their bad habits. joining us now in the studio is dr ellie cannon, and from our london newsroom is penny henderson who took the online health quiz and turned her life around. good morning. penny henderson took the online health quiz, very
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bravely, you are going public with what you have learned along the way! would you lie to give us a quick snapshot of before and after, what we re snapshot of before and after, what were you doing, what have you change? before, slowly crept up on me how much i was drinking tom and not really exercising. and i think it happened very slowly, over the years. when i took the test, i was not that honest. i kind of light, even though i knew it was only to myself that was going to be looking at the results. i think ijust did not say exactly how much i was drinking. —— how much i was drinking, and not really exercising. that was a wake—up call because i realised if i am lying to myself, it must be bad. i took the test, and even though i lied, it said i needed to look at my exercise and my alcohol intake. that was a real wake—up call. as a result of that, i looked at the recommendations, and
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downloaded the couch to five k, and that was a running app, which gets you off the couch slowly, walking and running, and get you back into fitness, and it was incredible, the results were just huge, for what a small change in my life. —— couch to 5k. what were the results, what changes could you physically feel? after i started running, i then started eating properly, because i had more nutritious foods, for breakfast, so that i could, you know, do a proper run, so as a result of starting to eat better, i also cut down on the alcohol, i cut it out altogether during the week and gave it to myself as a prize at the weekend, if i did well during the weekend, if i did well during the week. as a result, my whole life style the week. as a result, my whole lifestyle became more energetic, i had more time for things, it was an excuse before that i did not have time, it was once you begin making room for exercise you find you have
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more time. and i became less stressed, i could cope with work better, i was not as tired, and family life as well, it was more pleasant. listening to you, in the studio with us, doctor ellie, a lot of people will be nodding along recognising the before or after version, why is it that this age group is not hearing, because there had been plenty of messages. i think we know people between the ages of a0 to 60 are incredibly busy with work and family life, often a sandwich generation of people caught with looking after family. tasty treats are just an arm's length away. i think public health england recognises that and wants to give
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easy ways to change that. what penny says there, she almost didn't recognise it was happening, maybe it just slowly crept up on her that she wasn't doing any exercise and i think we should both come clear and say we've done the quiz this morning, haven't we charlie? i will confess in front of you all, i don't think i was that honest! so i've come out of it really good but i think i've probably made myself sound better than i am. digi give yourself a score out of ten?|j sound better than i am. digi give yourself a score out of ten? i think there are lots of aspects to being healthy and this time of year we concentrate on exercise or alcohol or quitting smoking, but what public health england found is that you —— if you look at the nhs choices website, two of the most commonly searched aspects are how can i sleep better and how can i deal with stress ? better and how can i deal with stress? those two things are also included in the quiz and they are
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steps you can take to improve your health. there are lots of different ways you can look at health, penny spoke well about looking at the drinks tracker and the alcohol or the exercise. for other people it will be the food all the stress. this is about making small changes that can have this really big improvement for your long—term health. we are in that curious time of year, a lot of people will have overindulged and actually may be enjoyed it, and there is a danger sometimes they think, these people are coming in, telling me not to do this or that... are coming in, telling me not to do this or that. .. the campaign was launched in march 2006 the and 1 million people have already taken the quiz. a quarter of a million people downloaded the running. people want this, they want the help. the signposting is very good. it's not encouraging people to take
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on—board anything expensive or complicated. i think it's very doable and i think people want the change, they want the help. penny, what is next for you. will you be able to maintain this or have you got your site '5 debt on longer runs? yeah, each time i try and run a bit further or faster. the point is that it is achievable and you don't have to keep up the long runs, you can keep up short runs as well. the thing is to keep it always achievable and then you can keep it up. thank you very much for your time this morning, penny. do you know what we do this time in the morning, doctor sally? we sit here on the sofa for three hours! that's like being a gp actually, you sit for hours at a time. you have to keep standing up. a cardiologist once said to me you should exercise for as many units as you do live television. or whatever, for as many units as you do live television. orwhatever, if you for as many units as you do live television. or whatever, if you have a job that's busy... good luck with that! you can join me if you like!
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lovely! 18 minutes past eight is the time now and you're watching brea kfast time now and you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... four in every five middle—aged people in england are said to be putting their health at risk because they're overweight, drinking too much or not doing enough exercise. the japanese prime minister has offered everlasting condolences to the victims of pearl harbor. 75 yea rs the victims of pearl harbor. 75 years on, his words fell short of an apology for the attack. so, if you are intending to get outdoors, maybe go for a are intending to get outdoors, maybe go fora run are intending to get outdoors, maybe go for a run or a walk orjust stand there looking for the outdoors, that is good... carol, what have you got for us? some frost around and also some fog. a cold start, temperatures in somerset close to freezing. for many of us, we are looking at frosty start, temperatures have fallen across parts of england and wales
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and locally to —6 and also some fog, patchy fog. those david willetts into low cloud but there will be areas where it will be stubborn. southern england and wales, northern ireland, northern england, we will see some sunshine. into the afternoon through the northwest, more cloud around and spots of rain or some showers. nothing substantial. coming across most of england, watch out for that fog as it lived into low cloud, it will be fairly grey. across southern countries especially close to the coast we will see some sunshine. pleasa nt coast we will see some sunshine. pleasant for the time of year in south england. in wales too and in the west we will see some sunshine. there will be some cloud floating around the rest of wales. northern ireland you've got that mixture of bright and sunny spells. the frost
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will return and we will see some fog forming. some of it will be freezing fog. patchy fog across northern ireland. look at those temperatures, it's going to be a cold night tomorrow. tomorrow very similar to today, any fog that forms will be slow to lift. some of its sticking and impacting on the temperature. we will see some sunshine particularly heading down towards the south—west, parts of wales and northern ireland and parts of north—east england and northern scotland. that front will be making inroads across the outer hebrides and you can see how much milder it is as a result. during friday that slips a little bit further south. for the rest of england and wales, a few showers in the west, largely dry but any fog once again that has formed overnight across central southern england
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could be slow to clear. that leads us into new year's eve or hogmanay, depending on where you are. it looks like we've got a weather front staggering slowly southwards taking windier weather with it. this chart finishes at three b. further south, drier and milder, milder across—the—board actually. drier and milder, milder across—the—boa rd actually. by midnight, we think this front will be across northern england, but that could well change. if you've got any late—night celebrations, keep up—to—date with the forecast. behind that, colder air pulls in and we will see a return to some wintry showers in the north. over the next few days we will keep you up—to—date with what is happening around the midnight hour as well. studio very important, that's what we need to know. thank you very much. around
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the more people are using virtual assista nts the more people are using virtual assistants like smart tvs and watches. kettles as well, you could switch it on from your phone, on your sofa. there could be over 6 billion connected devices being used by the end of this year. but our technological devices don't come without risks. we could be sacrificing our privacy and opening ourselves up to hackers. this suburban family home may look safe and secure but inside there are intruders. that claim to make your life easier. but in reality, they could prove a threat. but it's not ghosts and ghouls you need to worry about, it's these. the hackers know how to control them. today's modern household has more smart technology than ever before. by the end of 2016
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it is estimated there will be 6.a billion connected things induced, with 5 million new devices going online everyday. we have connected light bulbs, samsung smartphones, low security cameras which we use an a schedule. if i'm at work i can get a schedule. if i'm at work i can get a notification and i can see if it isa a notification and i can see if it is a burglar orjust my husband home early. do you feel pretty secure them? with this, yes. that's what she thinks. meet matt. without even getting out of his car, he can gain control of your home security, your lighting and even your cattle. the route would be an attractive target to any hacker. if they can somehow gain unauthorised access to that from this vicinity, they are suddenly on the home network. once you're on the network, that's when you're on the network, that's when you could start trying to gain
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unauthorised access to other systems on the network. but of course matt is in on the network. but of course matt isina on the network. but of course matt is in a real hacker, he's a cyber security expert used by companies to find security weaknesses. it turns out that with the right know how you can drag pretty much everything. how old are you ? can drag pretty much everything. how old are you? i'm seven years old. she has bluetooth capability and if you are within range, maybe 15 metres, you can connect to this toy without any authentication, any passwords. we've been able to show how you can start earning her microphone on to record audio. you can also play audio back through the speaker. i'm kayla, i'm in control, ican speaker. i'm kayla, i'm in control, i can say what i like. this is a smart tv. depending on the level of access smart tv. depending on the level of a ccess a n smart tv. depending on the level of access an attacker might have to your network, he might be able to do certain things like deploy malicious apps. some smart tvs have the capability of recording audio. hackers may be able to listen to
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what people are saying within the household. that's quite terrifying, thinking someone is listening to you from within your tv. so if you find a smart device under the tree this christmas, the advice is to make sure it's secure, use passwords and check your privacy settings. that way you can ensure there are no ghosts in your machines. holly hamilton, bbc news. it is the ever so slightly twitchy i... yes, kayla the doll. she is watching you. she potentially is! if you are worried about what you can do to protect yourselves, we have got a few tips. some of them are pretty basic and fairly obvious, although not so easy to do. change your password! don't rely on the default one given by the manufacturer and make sure you change it on every single device.
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make sure you have a security programme installed on your pcs, laptops and tablets to protect them from cyber attacks. and finally, keep updating the operating systems on your machines. the latest updates often mean the best security measures so don't ignore your devices when they offer one. i'm guilty of that. yes, i put that off all the time. also, don't make your password the most simple one, make it complicated with lots of different numbers and things. but then where do you write it down? in then where do you write it down? in the secret place! yes but then you lose that, don't you! we will have tributes on breakfast from all over the world to the actress carrie fisher. we will be speaking to one of her co—stars. that's coming up in a few minutes' time. now time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. consumers are buying products and
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expect them very good morning to you, very chilly start this morning, even within the m25, as low as minus four degrees, it is fault that we are watching carefully through the morning commute, encountering some patches that could affect you, if you are out on the road, high pressure in control of the weather, through today and the next few days. eventually, the fog lifts, fine afternoon, you can see it begins to reform. could really be an issue. watch out for it on your local radio station. eventually, starting to brighten up by the afternoon, chilly day, light winds. as we go through the evening and overnight, the fog is beginning to reform, and again through the night, it could be quite an issue, another chilly night, temperatures down to freezing, very slow start your day tomorrow, that fog could take a really long time to
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lift, and that could have an impact on temperatures, sunspots, three or 4 on temperatures, sunspots, three or a degrees, that is the scenario into the end of the week, turning a bit milder at the weekend. it is exactly 8:30am. our main story this morning. middle—aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80% of a0 to 60—year—olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise, putting them at a greater risk of developing diseases like diabetes. they're being urged to take an online quiz to see how healthy they really are. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her "one of a kind". the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia in star wars,
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had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. at 8.a0, we'll be speaking to carrie fisher's star wars co—star, warwick davis. the japanese prime minister shinzo abe has offered his sincere and everlasting condolences to the victims of his country's attack on the united states at pearl harbour 75 years ago. standing alongside the us president obama, the japanese leader pledged that the horrors of war must never be repeated, but fell short of apologising. campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group "leave means leave" wants a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. the government says it's working to secure the best possible deal. the co—operative group says it
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will open 100 more stores across britain next year. the move would create 1,500 jobs. it opened a similar number of stores this year. the group said it will invest £70 million in the new shops, which will be spread throughout london, south—east england, yorkshire and scotland. the company is nearing the end of a three—year turnaround programme after a period of turmoil in its banking group. i'm settled weather during the last decade has had a dramatic impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording huge falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity says a combination of milder winters and wetter summers have boosted grass growth, which has been good for farmers making hay, but led to falls in insect numbers. and the next half an hour, we will
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speak to star wars actor, warwick davis, about his memories of former co—star, kari fisher. harry potter actor mark williams will be with us to tell us how he is turning detective once again. who needs drama on the telly when you have got drama on the telly when you have got drama in sport this morning. bad news for bob bradley, good news for swa nsea fa ns news for bob bradley, good news for swansea fans i guess, because their chairman hugh jenkins is swansea fans i guess, because their chairman huthenkins is looking to make a change. he has got rid of bob bradley after just 11 games make a change. he has got rid of bob bradley afterjust 11 games in charge. swansea city, as i say, sacking their manager bob bradley after just 85 days sacking their manager bob bradley afterjust 85 days in charge. the swa ns a re afterjust 85 days in charge. the swans are currently second bottom of the premier league, having wonjust two games since bradley's appointment in october. they are now looking for their fourth manager of 2016, with ryan giggs who missed out
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on thejob last 2016, with ryan giggs who missed out on the job last time and wales manager chris, both being linked with the role. swansea's next match is against bournemouth on new year's eve. liverpool are up to 2nd liverpool are up to second in the premier league after a a—1 win over stoke at anfield. they had to come from behind afterjon walters put stoke ahead adam lallana pulled them back level before roberto firmino put them in front just before the interval. an own goal pushed liverpool further in—front before daniel sturridge added a fourth, which was liverpool's100th league goal under managerjurgen klopp. they're now six points behind league leaders chelsea. it's now 17 league games unbeaten for chris hughton's brighton. they moved to the top of the championship with a 3—0 win over struggling queen's park rangers. their final goal was a poignant moment for french winger antony knockaert. he dedicated it to the memory of his late father by kissing a picture of him. he later tweeted ‘nothing better than scoring for the main man in my life. love you daddy.‘ ian cathro has won his first match in charge of hearts. they beat kilmarnock a—0 and stay fourth in the scottish premiership.
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aberdeen stay a place above them in third, they beat hamilton academical 2—1. russian officials have admitted for the first time the existence of a doping operation which affected some of the world's major competitions. a report earlier this month claimed more than a thousand russians benefited from a doping cover—up between 2011—2015. in interviews with the new york times, officials acknowledged the programme but denied it was state—sponsored. the acting director general of russia's anti—doping agency is quoted as saying it was an "international conspiracy". what a christmas it's been for racing trainer colin tizzard. he's claimed his second major victory in as many days, after his horse native river won the welsh grand national at chepstow yesterday. native river was favourite for the race and hit the front with 13 left to jump. it follows on from tizzard's success with thistlecrack, who won the king george chase on boxing day. the two horses could now go up against each other
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at the cheltenham gold cup in march. my goodness, what a run. what a week for colin tizzard. such a wonderful story as well with thistlecrack. great story, but the big news of the day, swansea looking for a new manager with bob bradley. yeah, and last time they did actually talk to ryan giggs. they did come he was interviewed, overlooked for the job. francesco guidolin kim young, since bob bradley has come in, alan pardew also being linked with the role. kris commons as well. they are looking to make a change with the january transfer window coming up. they will need signings if they are to get out of trouble at the bottom of the premier league. peggy very much. the time now is 8:37am. as we have been hearing this morning from carol, today's whether expected to
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be mostly foggy and cold but the majority of us are yet to see the bitter temperatures you might expect this time of year. in fact, this winter has been pretty mouth so far, which has had a huge impact on the uk's wildlife. let's find out more from breakfast‘s tim muffett, who's at tyntesfield national trust estate, near bristol, for us this morning. inaudible temperatures generally have been pretty mild. hopefully you can hear what i'm saying right now, if you technical issues, but as we have been hearing, the impact weather has had on wildlife is something the national trust assess every year, and what impact has it been having this year? i have finding out. this year beef farmer rob havard made a while the sun shone. and was
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the rain came. and still his grass grows. we have seen a really good grass growth rate throughout the season. there was a lot of grass on the ground at the moment, and we are in end of december now, still grazing outside, so every day i can keep my cattle out of the shed. i think it is better for them. so why the rampant grass growth? well, a mild, wet winter was followed by a cold spring, and then became more mild wet weather in may and june. ideal conditions in which grass can grow. the rate of grass growth was in many places a third faster than normal, according to the agriculture and horticulture at the element board. conservationists are assessing the impact. excessive grass growth, why should anyone care about that? a lot of our rarer plants and animals, particularly the insects, live here in very short
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turf. if it gets covered over by these coarse grasses, populations of those rare insects plummet. and that has been an issue in 2016? threw yes, definitely. matthew dixon has been assess inbee whether‘s impact on wildlife that ten years. the losers have been butterflies, bese, butterflies. now wasps got it very badly by the despicable summer of 2012 and have not really recovered. we usually get a lot of wasps nesting on this huge grassland bank, and we had no wasp nests at all this year, none. surely that is a good thing, people hate wasps. they are actually really important parts of the food chain. they are really quite good at controlling a lot of tests and nasty little insectlike blackfly and greenfly. one of the
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things that should be properly hibernating, butterflies and moths, when you get a mild month, they are not hibernating properly, they are out and about, which is not good for them because they burn off that energy. as ever, there were wildlife winners in 2016, helped in part by wind direction. it has been a fantastic day for migrant birds. strong winds from the east, that helps. yes, we had over 200 goldcrest arrived one day. from a slug's point of view, it was an excellent year. from a garden's point of view, it was disastrous. we keep getting these mild, wet winters and we keep getting short spells of good weather. we have not had a good summersince good weather. we have not had a good summer since 2006. we are overdue for it. here they have been mowing the lawn
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is full they should have been, its under control here but as you saw in the report, that excessive grass growth has had a real impact in other places. a good year for apples, many side mane many factories say they have seen a bumper crop but it's that longer term picture which has lots of people interested, can these mild winters continue over the next ten yea rs ? winters continue over the next ten years? pretty cold this morning, a picture of things to come? we will have to wait and see. what have you got for us? it's a cold and foggy start the day. you can see in sidcup, foggy start, in nottinghamshire, a frosty start, clearer skies. this money, we do have some rocky patches, most of those in england and wales, some
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cloud will be stubborn to lift, we'll get temperature is not really breaking freezing. at the other end of the country, thicker cloud in north—west scotland, but some breaks in the cloud with some sunshine coming through. northern england, some sunshine, as we sink southwards, mixed fortunes. where the forklift, it would be great but in southern counties, some sunshine, particularly so close to the coast. for south—west england, some sunshine and also across wales, especially in the west. if you are stepping up for a walk, but the time of year, it will feel pleasant enough but you will need to wrap up warm. for northern ireland, variable amounts of cloud and also some sunshine. through the evening and overnight, it'll turn frosty code quickly and we will see a return to some fog, especially across england and wales, some of which will be
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dense. we will hang onto the breeze and thicker cloud across the north—west with the rain starting to come in to the outer hebrides. the frog, slow to clear, lingering for some, breaking across southern counties, heading towards consensus, and the parts of wales, some sunshine. parts of north—east scotland, a band of rain slowly advancing. look at the different temperatures. as we head into friday, the front sinks further south, we will see some rain in northern england, northern ireland, but here it is milder. any book could be slow to clear for central and southern england and they will be more cloud around, one or two showers in the west but some breaks as well, not as mild as across scotla nd as well, not as mild as across scotland and northern ireland and northern england. the new year's
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eve, this could all change, but we think at the moment over the front will sink southwards, this chart stops at three in the afternoon, i midnight, and current thinking, we think that front will be sitting across northern england and north wales, that could change, further south we are looking at trier and milder conditions. by the time we get the new year's day, that whips down into the south—east, eventually clearing, colder air streams in behind it and some of the showers we have will be wintry. i will keep you up—to—date with the latest thinking. thanks very much! we the classic english whodunnit,
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starring a crime solving ability priest might not sound like it would have mass appeal in the us but it turns out the americans are big fans of father brown, now in its fifth series. mark plays the title role. good morning! would you say, it is a career space of lovely, watchable tele—? career space of lovely, watchable tele-? it's good storytelling, that's what it's about. also, the scandinavians, russians love it as well. the scandinavians like the dark gloom, what they want is a bit of cotswolds. .. look at your character, clutching something there. when do you feel like you are in character, is it when you put on the robes or the hat?|j in character, is it when you put on the robes or the hat? i remember the moment was when we did the original costu me moment was when we did the original
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costume treating, at the ecclesiastical outfitters in westminster. with giles, the original costume designer. i put it all on and thought, that will do! suddenly you feel like you are father brown. it's not an easy costu m e to father brown. it's not an easy costume to wear, i imagine. you have two zone out a bit because we film in the summer. a couple of seasons ago, i was wearing the hat, the road, the trousers, the shirt underneath and a coat. on the hottest day of the year. all the crew were wearing flip—flops. they we re crew were wearing flip—flops. they were slapping on actor 50. he is not strictly speaking a detective. he is a sleuth! he has that ability to
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hover around situations and listening, watching people closely. yes, he is nosy. chesterton said that he would interested in things that he would interested in things that other people didn't find important, which is kind of the route he finds room. how did you start with this? is it something like 60 episodes now? yes, in five yea rs, like 60 episodes now? yes, in five years, which is kind of american standard! when you first heard about it, did you think, this is the sort of thing i should be doing? or was ita of thing i should be doing? or was it a bit like a change of direction for you? i was offered the part, which is always a really seductive way of changing direction! when we were doing publicity for harry potter in new york, i asked the producer, the presiding genius apart from joe, i said, did you ever think you have made this many films? and
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he said, no. i imagine, for so many people, being in a film like that which turned into something huge, it's not just which turned into something huge, it's notjust a film, is it? its life changing. well, i think it's much more collaborative than you think. and you are in a tribe. once you join the tribe, once you have been initiated, then you are there. so you kind of travel together. you are never on your own. life changes for you, i suppose. are never on your own. life changes foryou, isuppose. is are never on your own. life changes for you, i suppose. is there a moment when you think it changes, or does it happen gradually? i've never felt that. except when i thought, i think i can be an actor! that was
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about it, really? lovely to see you. father brown is on bbc one next monday. "one of a kind... "brilliant, original. "funny and emotionally fearless", the words of harrison ford to describe carrie fisher after her death at the age of 60. it's just one of many tributes from the actress's friends and colleagues. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson is here and we can also speak to warwick davis, who appeared alongside carrie fisher as the ewok, wicket, in the return of thejedi. warwick, if i can come to you first of all, i guess you have known carrie fisher almost all of your life now. that's right. i first met carrie when i was 11 years old,
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working on return of thejedi. on initially meeting carrie, i did not seek carrie fisher, i saw princess leia. as i got to know her more and more i got to understand what a kind and fun person she was to be around. she really guided me through the making of that film, because i was new to the business, i didn't understand anything about how you make movies, and carrie was an integral part of me understanding the business and how to behave onset and all that sort of thing. she was also very concerned for me being in also very concerned for me being in a hot e—book costume and was standing by with chocolate milk and cookies to revive me. -- in a hot ewok costume. she like to be with? she was great fun. you become part of the star wars family when you work on a star wars movie and i was often part of that, i would often see her at first jackets
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often part of that, i would often see her at firstjackets and also at live star wars events. i used to host star wars television events and recently interviewed carrie in london on stage in front of a000 people, and she was just fantastic, very, very sharp. and alsojust relayed great stories about star wars, very frank stories about being on those movies, which the fans loved. you felt like you really knew carrie fisher, the person behind princess leia. what is emerging today as you hear people's tributes, real affection, and people saying how funny she was. allanbridge and was talking about her writing. that isa was talking about her writing. that is a part —— alan ewok talking about her writing. you don't always see the very funny, the very warm
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person. someone very unaffected by the fame. she was hugely recognised wherever she went but at the same time she was a very unaffected person by that fame. she did have mental health issues and what have you but she was a very down—to—earth person, she had no airs and graces. i never saw her wanting to be treated like a celebrity. she was carrie fisher, and what was lovely is that she went with her dog, gary, everywhere. the shared the stage with carrie whenever i interviewed her. warwick was talking about what a character she was weird seeing some of those pictures, the dog in hand. there was a lot going on, wasn't there? she had a colourful life. she managed managed to get gary the french bulldog certified as a therapy dog so that you could ever “ so a therapy dog so that you could ever —— so she could always take him with
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heron —— so she could always take him with her on planes. she would arrive at a premiere just have a handful of glitter and corrupt to the fans and blew the glitter into them, and that just make someone's day or week if they start the something like that to you. and alongside that, a real gift and talent for writing, and for impact on other people, other actors as well. warwick was touching on it, in1990, her as well. warwick was touching on it, in 1990, her semiautobiographical novel postcards from the edge was adapted into a novel, and she wrote “ was adapted into a novel, and she wrote —— was adapted into a movie starring meryl streep, and she wrote the screenplay for that. she became one of the 19905 most successful script doctors. they come in and make films better towards the end. steven spielberg got her intimate look better. whoopi goldberg, sister act. carrie fisher's words in that. she wrote renny rousso's dialogue for
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lethal weapon three, she even had a go lethal weapon three, she even had a go at making our watchword is mega funny in the last action hero.“ there was anyone who could do that, iimagine it there was anyone who could do that, i imagine it was carrie fisher. warwick, one of the things we have seen warwick, one of the things we have seen this morning is carrie fisher's one—liner, and bits of general life advice, so to put you on the spot, but what is the best bit of advice or the best one—liner you have ever heard from her. she didn't necessarily give me any advice, but one of my favourite memories of carrie was actually from the interview i did with her on stage more recently. i put a storm trooper helmet on my head, asked her to close her eyes, and i said when you open your eyes and look at me, so the first thing that comes to mind. i was looking for aren't you a little short for a storm trooper, one of her most famous lines from star wars, at what she did say was those always a bigger fish, which was another line from the star wars movie, wasn't something she said, but was brilliantly funny the time.
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so yes, that brings a smile to my face, that moment. warwick davis, thank you very much forjoining us here this morning. and to you too. the time now is 8:56am. a last quick look at the headlines when you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charley figgis. residents who say their lives have been "turned upside down" since a fire ripped through their west london tower block, are taking legal action. the blaze was caused by a faulty whirlpool tumble dryer in august. the home appliance manufacturer says "the safety of consumers is their number one priority" — but a lawyer representing those affected has concerns. a 17—year—old boy has died, and another has life threatening injuries, after a crash in leigh on sea. the car they were in was being followed by a marked essex police car. the case has been referred to the independent police complaints commission. firstly on the tubes — the circle line is closed
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between aldgate and gloucester road via victoria. and on the district line. no service between gloucester road and acton town. paddington station remains closed with no service on heathrow connect and heathrow express. great western railway services will start and terminate at ealing broadway. on the roads — as you can see there, marylebone road into town is down to one lane at baker street for roadworks. and the woolwich ferry has been suspended due to heavy fog. the fog is also affecting visibility at london city airport, causing delays to some flights. fog and low cloud may linger across some areas, giving a card and dull day. that is it from me, goodbye. that is pretty much it from
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brea kfast that is pretty much it from breakfast this morning, we have been reflecting a bit on the life of carrie fisher this morning, really interesting hearing anecdotes and stories of affection from her collea g u es stories of affection from her colleagues and fellow stars. and she had some of the best one—liners, she saidi had some of the best one—liners, she said i don't think in my brain, i think in my mouth, so i don't like a just come straight out. colin says when she was working the red carpet and speaking to her, she was dynamite in those situations. we will be back tomorrow morning from 6am when we will be joined by the actor and comedian, diane morgan. from now, from everyone here, have a lovely day, goodbye.
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