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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 28, 2016 9:00am-9:31am GMT

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good morning and welcome to bbc news. middle aged people are putting themselves at risk of serious health problems unless they take action to change their lifestyles, according to health officials. public health england says 80 per cent of a0 to 60 year olds are overweight, drinking too much and not getting enough exercise. it says ‘modern life‘ is putting middle aged people at a greater risk of developing diseases like type 2 diabetes. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. it was a case of, you just become a bit lazy with the daily grind of routine. there are many people in his position. almost 80% of women between a0 and 60 are either overweight, obesity are physically inactive or drinking more than official guidelines. among men, almost 90% fall into the same category. among the potentially devastating outcomes of this risks is diabetes. we are ageing as a population
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but too many of us are ageing with a number of chronic diseases. the reason why we are seeing these increases in chronic diseases, such as cancers, stroke and heart disease, is in a large part because of behaviours which are adopted during our a0— to 60—year—old age period. for example, still smoking, or not getting enough physical activity, or perhaps drinking too much alcohol. the big impact, of course, is that this is going to put a huge burden on health services. to get the message across, in march, public health england launched a health quiz as part of its one you campaign. it says more than a million people have now taken the quiz and now have a route map to change their lives. robert pigott, bbc news with us now is penny henderson, who
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took the quiz on that website and she says it turned her life around. what brought your attention to the fa ct what brought your attention to the fact that you thought you had a problem? i didn't think i fact that you thought you had a problem? i didn't thinkl had fact that you thought you had a problem? i didn't think i had a problem? i didn't think i had a problem before, these things sort of creep up on you slowly. i realised when my e—mail popped up with a link to the quiz and i decided not to delete the e—mail but to take the quiz andi delete the e—mail but to take the quiz and i realised i didn't take —— give true answers and i lied to myself! i thought, give true answers and i lied to myself! ithought, if give true answers and i lied to myself! i thought, if you're lying to yourself then you have a problem. just rewind a bit, you say this came up just rewind a bit, you say this came up in an e—mail, so how did you come up up in an e—mail, so how did you come up —— here of the quiz originally? up in an e—mail, so how did you come ' lly?|j had originally registered for one you. i saw a website which said if you want to register and get more information about health, so ijust put my e—mail down. i occasionally got the odd e—mail with some health advice. was that because someone had
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said something to you or you were just feeling unhealthy? why did he do that? just curiosity i think. i just thought i would register and see what advice comes. i thought, i do need to listen to it, i don't have a problem, i willjust see what happens. it was just that point where i got the quiz and lied to myself where i realised something needs to change, i need to do something now. so what were you not being honest about? the amount of alcohol i was drinking. i was not drinking a lot, but i think that when i was coming home from work, i was feeling tired, and the only a nswer was feeling tired, and the only answer is a glass of wine and put your feet answer is a glass of wine and put yourfeet up, and i would automatically start getting into that habit of reaching for a glass of wine. when you add it up at the end of the week and you are truthful about it, it really does add up. you must have heard health messages like this before, and i wonder what it was about this quiz that made the difference? i never thought it referred to me. i didn't think i had
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a problem. i didn't really have a problem, it wasjust a problem. i didn't really have a problem, it was just a gradual creeping up of the amount i was drinking. everything happens very slowly, and before you know it, you don't really think there is anything wrong. these health messages don't apply to you. but i think that when i realised it did, and i had to do something, then that was when the quiz came in. tell me what the benefits have been? first of all, i downloaded an app, couch to 5k, starting new very slowly. a running out, it encourages you to walk, and jog. out, it encourages you to walk, and jog, and then run. you start off walking, you feel better forjust walking, you feel better forjust walking, you feel better forjust walking, you get out there, you walk and you do a little run and then you walk again, it is so easy to do. starting that and progressing through that app, and i started eating better. having more
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nutritious food and less snacks. i stopped drinking in the week because i felt better for that, i would still drink on the weekend, i did not think i was giving up anything, it felt like i was adding to what i was doing. i did not have the sense that i needed to give up or sacrifice anything. they view small changes, really small, but the benefits were enormous. i think my whole lifestyle changed. my whole energy levels increased. 0verall whole lifestyle changed. my whole energy levels increased. overall i felt so much better and i knew that i was healthy. on cue so much for coming in to tell us about your experiences. —— thank you. almost 300 nail bars have been visited by immigration officials in recent weeks in a renewed bid to crack down on illegal workers in the industry. over 70 shops are likely to face fines, and more than a dozen vulnerable people were identified as being at risk of modern slavery,
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as richard lister reports. voiceover: a nail bar in south london, one of 280 across the country raided in recent weeks to tackle the modern—day slave trade. the aim is to find people living underforced the aim is to find people living under forced servitude but also the people that brought them here. three people that brought them here. three people were arrested at this business, all of them were vietnamese. the nail by industry is the latest to be targeted by the home office under operation magnifier. ——. nail baras home office under operation magnifier. ——. nail bar as a home office under operation magnifier. ——. nail baras a result, 68 businesses were warned they could be fined for immigration offences, 97 arrests, and officers identified 14 97 arrests, and officers identified ia potential victims of slavery. —— nail bar. many of them are brought here illegally and forced into servitude to pay off massive debts to the traffickers. rarely do we see people kept in dungeons or anything like that but there is always a control element, they have been deceived to come here, controlled by traffickers, families may be
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threatened, back home, it is those circumstances we have to overcome to encourage people to come forward and tell us about experiences and help bring the traffickers to justice. another raid on another south london nail bar, two were arrested here and will be deported, a third may have been forced to work here and is being investigated. the government says modern slavery is a barbaric crime and it is sending a strong message that it won't be tolerated. studio: campaigners for an early brexit have written to business organisations across europe to try and drum up support for a free trade agreement with the european union after the uk stops being a member. the campaign group leave means leave wants a trade deal with no taxes on goods travelling to and from the continent. the government says it's working to secure the best possible deal. with me is john longworth,
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who's co—chair of leave means leave what is it that you want? businesspeople like myself talking to business people on the continent, to business people on the continent, to put pressure on politicians to be sensible and go for free trade. it is very important for the european union and the eurozone that are not performing well economically and have massive unemployment rates that they are actually able to continue trading freely with the uk, which is one of the biggest export markets. what response have you heard? the letter has only recently been issued, we are expecting responses after the new year. what responses are you expecting? certainly from the sessions we have had with european member states business communities, we have a lot of sympathy, particularly among businesses owned by individuals. private businesses, medium—sized businesses and so on. —— certainly from conversations. next year there will be general elections in the
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netherlands, france and germany, it isa netherlands, france and germany, it is a very good time for business people to make their voices heard in those countries and say, politicians, let's be sensible, let's have free trade. for us in the uk, we want free trade with the rest of the world, so why not the eu. some business leaders think that the european —— the unity of the european —— the unity of the european union is more important. there is always the risk that there will be a political solution, what it demonstrates, sadly, is the european union is not a free trade area at all, it is a protectionist zone that prevents free trade with the rest of the world and actually damages emerging markets, for example, where they are not allowed to trade freely with the year even though they desperately need that. what about those businesses that might benefit from erecting barriers to some uk import? if we do correct barriers, with the european union,
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andi barriers, with the european union, and i would not recommend that is the route we should take, what we will find is simply that uk consumers switch to buying from domestic producers in the uk. in other words, british manufacturers will benefit. and from countries around the world with whom we do free trade deals. actually, given the value of sterling at the moment, european manufacturers will suffer. as well as being co—chair of leave means as well as being co—chair of leave m ea ns leave as well as being co—chair of leave means leave you will also the chairman of the british chamber of commerce, you left after making comments seen as pro—"brexit", were you leaving voluntarily or were you post? what pressure was there from number ten? i took a decision to leave voluntarily in order to speak freely on the issue because i considered the prime minister to be com pletely considered the prime minister to be completely out of order, he was campaigning to remain in the eu, even though he got a very bad deal by his own admission, and launched into "project by his own admission, and launched into " project fea r". by his own admission, and launched into "project fear". certainly, i have a lot of pressure from number
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ten, that was not unusual, number ten, that was not unusual, number ten under david cameron can be quite abusive to business leaders if they we re abusive to business leaders if they were not towing the line. my comments on the european union were not any exception to that. i decided to leave the bcc immediately, and i was able to speak out during the campaign, and lead the business community. a very considerable business community who wanted to leave the european union. when you say that he received abuse from number ten, what do you mean? say that he received abuse from number ten, what do you mean7m say that he received abuse from number ten, what do you mean? it was not an usual for the policy people in numberten to not an usual for the policy people in number ten to issue text messages 0!’ in number ten to issue text messages or telephone calls that were quite fruity, shall we say, in the language, and fairly abusive. they tended to think that they were in the west wing, in the thick of it, and they behaved accordingly! we have got to leave it there, many thanks. nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking nhs hospitals have made more money than everfrom parking charges nhs hospitals have made more money than ever from parking charges and fines. figures from 89 health trusts across england suggest 120 million
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was raised parking fees last year, that's up five per cent on the year before. patient groups have criticised rising parking charges and the department of health said it expects trusts to put concessions in place for disabled people, carers and shift workers. the japanese prime minister, shinzo abe, has offered his sincere and everlasting condolences to the victims of his country's attack on pearl harbour in i9ai. speaking after a visit to the uss arizona memorial, mr abe thanked the united states for its tolerance and said the horrors of war must never be repeated. ourjapan correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. voiceover: it has taken 75 years for ajapanese prime minister and us
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president to come here to pearl harbor together. inscribed on the walls in front of them, the names of the 2,a00 americans killed injapan‘s surprise attack in december i9ai. outside, they cast flowers into the waters where the wreck the battleship exploded under a reign of japanese bombs, the battleship exploded under a reign ofjapanese bombs, taking most of its crew with it. many of their remains still lie in the water below here. prime minister abe spoke of his sadness at the young american lives cut short, of their hopes and dreams left unfulfilled. translation: when i contemplate that solemn reality, i am rendered entirely speechless. rest in peace, precious soul of the foreign. —— rest in peace, precious souls of the fallen. voiceover: for 75 years, americans have been taught to remember pearl harbor,
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but today president obama called on americans to take a different lesson from this place. even when hatred burns hottest, even when the tug of tribalism is at its most primal, we must resist the urge to turn inward, we must resist the urge to demonise those who are different. it was a directjibe at his successor, donald trump, who has been accused of stoking hatreds against everybody from muslims to mexicans. for mr abe, too, there is deep concern about what will happen to japan's most important partnership when mr trump enters the white house in 23 days' time. studio: toshiba shares fell 20% after the firm warned that its us nuclear business may be worth less than previously thought. the slump was large enough for trading in stocks of the japanese industrial giant to be automatically halted. shares had already fallen 12% yesterday, after reports of the
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likely write—down began circulating. with me is bbc economics correspondent andrew walker. what is the problem? it is about this business in the united states that toshiba bought back in 2006, westinghouse, and it already had to make quite large write—downs westinghouse had bought the construction of two nuclear pla nts the construction of two nuclear plants in the united states, substantial to —— subject is essential cost overruns and delays. toshiba, as the ultimate owner, is acknowledging that it will have to make additional provisions in the account to the tune of several billion dollars, they have not given a definite figure, they have not yet worked out a definite figure, but
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thatis worked out a definite figure, but that is the order of magnitude, that comes on top of a major accounting scandal at the firm over the misstatement of previous years profit, which was to the tune of in excess of another billion dollars. it is more bad news built on top of what has already been some bad news in the past. when we think of toshiba wi—fi not necessarily think ofa toshiba wi—fi not necessarily think of a company involved in the nuclear industry. certainly, yes. -- me think of toshiba we do not necessarily think of a company involved in the nuclear industry. sprawling comic yes, it is consumer electronics, it is moving away from that, it still has in important computer memory business, that does not gel with the nuclear, nuclear prom of easing like a good idea when they made yet he acquisition in 2006 because it was part of the solution to climate change, a form of energy which does not presume very much by way of the house gas emissions but since then, in 2011, the fukushima
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nuclear disaster, which affected prospect for selling nuclear technology, and in addition, the cost of wind and solar, other zero emissions technology has come down a lot, so with hindsight, it is not necessarily seem like the good idea that it was ten years ago. the headlines: public—health england warns of a middle age health crisis with eight in ten of those aged a0 to 60 either overweight, drinking too much or not doing enough exercise. campaigners for an early brexit write to business leaders across europe to try to build support for a free trade agreement with the eu. new figures indicate nhs hospitals in england made more money than ever from parking fees last year — collecting five per cent more on the year before. let's catch up with all of the sports news now, and a full round—up. russian officials have
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admitted for the first time, the existence of a doping operation which affected some of the world's major competitions. a report earlier this month claimed more than a thousand russians benefited from a doping cover—up between 2011 and 2015. in interviews with the new york times, officials acknowledged the programme but denied it was state—sponsored. the acting director general of russia's anti doping agency is quoted as saying it was an "international conspiracy". alan pardew, nigel pearson and ryan giggs are all names being linked this morning with the manager's job at swansea city after bob bradley was sacked last night. the swans are currently second bottom of the premier league having won just two games since bradley's appointment in october. they're now looking for their fourth manager of 2016, with ryan giggs, who missed out on the job last time among those being linked with the the role. swansea's next match is against bournemouth on new year's eve. liverpool are up to second in the premier league after a a—i
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win over stoke at anfield. they had to come from behind afterjon walters put stoke ahead but adam lallana pulled them back level before roberto firmino put them in front just before the interval. an own goal pushed liverpool further in—front before daniel sturridge added a fourth, which was liverpool's 100th league goal under managerjurgen klopp. they're now six points behind league leaders chelsea but for the manager, the important thing is keeping his players energised during the busy festive period. we need all of them, and especially daniel, of course. in four days, there is another game, hopefully they will all stay healthy and fit and two days later, another game, a few days later, another game. we have enough at the tune it is for everybody who is fit, so hopefully, they are all fit. —— we have enough opportunities for everybody who is
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fit, so hopefully, they are all fit. tottenham have the chance to keep the pace with the top four, with a win away at southampton this evening. their captain hugo lloris believes the club need to ‘keep the focus' over the busy festive period. at this period of the year it is too early to know what is going to happen, you just need to carry on, we know that the christmas period, boxing day, it is a period where you can lose points, so it is important to stay focused and be ready for the battles that we will have. in rugby union's premiership, harlequins survived a frantic finish to beat gloucester 28—2a in a thrilling match at twickenham. quins ran into a commanding 28—10 lead going into the last 20 minutes. they were helped by two scores from centrejoe marchant in front of over 77,000 fans. two late tries from gloucester set up a tense finish but quins held on to move into the top six. and in the pro 12, ospreys moved up to second as they beat rivals scarlets 19—9. a penalty try for ospreys in the second half proved to be the difference in a scrappy game
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at the liberty stadium, with scarlets having three men sent to the sin bin. wales fly—half dan biggar kicked ia points for the hosts. a century from david warner has helped australia close the gap on pakistan in the second test in melbourne. azhar ali's unbeaten double century moved pakistan to aa3 before they declared. in reply, warner scored a run—a—ball iaa to see the hosts end the third day on 278 for two. usman khawaja is in 95. they trail pakistan by 165 runs.. world no 1 michael van gerwen survived a nervy second round match against the no 32 seed cristo reyes to reach the last 16 of the pdc world darts championship. van gerwen, champion in 201a, eventually came through to beat reyes a—2.
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former champions phil taylor and raymond van barneveld are also through. that's all sport for now. some of the other stories making the news this morning: turkey and russia have agreed on a ceasefire plan for syria, reportedly starting from tonight. the state run turkish news agency says the plan is aimed at expanding the ceasefire in aleppo to the rest of the country, but will exclude terror groups. if successful, it will form the basis of the forthcoming talks between the syrian regime and opposition, which are being overseen by russia and turkey in kazakhstan. plans to issue new building permits for israeli homes in east jerusalem have been cancelled by the jerusalem municipality. hundreds of new homes were planned to for construction in areas that were captured by israel and annexed to the city in the 1960s. israel is still angry over the resolution approved by the united nations security council, demanding an end to settlement
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activity in the occupied west bank and eastjerusalem. unsettled weather during the past decade has had a dramatic impact on the uk's wildlife, according to the national trust, with some of its sites recording huge falls in the number or bees and butterflies. the charity says a combination of milder winters and wetter summers have boosted grass growth, which has been good for farmers making hay, but led to falls in insect numbers. our correspondent tim muffett is in tyntesfield national trust estate, near bristol, for us this morning. good morning, pretty cold morning this morning, we are ten miles to the rest of bristol. —— west. here
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in tyntesfield, talk of the end to the winter has been just that, talk, but over the last ten years we have seen a series of mild winters and generally wet summers, so what impact is this having on wildlife? each year, the national trust surveys properties across the uk, to see what impact the weather is having, this year, if you feel you have been mowing your lawn a little bit more often than you normally do, it is not something you have been imagining, it seems it probably has been true. voiceover: this year, beef farmer rob havard made hay while the sun shone and while the rain came and still, he's grass grows. we have seena still, he's grass grows. we have seen a really good grass grazing through the season, a lot of grass on the ground at the moment and we are in early december and still grazing outside, everyday i can keep my cattle out of the shed i think it
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is better for them. why the rampant grass growth? a mild wet winter was followed by a cold spring. and then came all mild wet weather in may and june, ideal conditions in which grass can grow. the rate of grass growth was in many places a third faster than normal, according to the agriculture and horticulture development board. conservationists are assessing the impact. excessive grass growth, why should anyone care? a lot of our more rare plants and animals, particularly insects, live in very short turf, if it is covered over by these coarse grasses, populations of those rare insects plummet. that has been an issue in 2016? definitely. the wethers impact on wildlife has been measured by matty oakes for years.
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the losers have been butterflies, bees, beatles, some grasshoppers, which require very short turf. -- matthew oates. wasps were hit very badly in 2012 and have not really recovered. we usually get a little wasp nesting on this bank, but i can vouch that we have not had any. surely a good thing, people hate was. they are a really important pa rt was. they are a really important part of the food chain, they are really quite good at controlling a lot of pests and nasty little insects like black fly and greenfly. one thing that should be properly hibernating is caterpillars, butterflies and moths, when you get a mild month like this, they are not hibernating properly, they are out and about, that is not good for them, they burn off energy. as ever, there were wildlife winners in 2016, help in part by wind direction. there were wildlife winners in 2016,
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help in part by wind directionm has been a fantastic year for migrant birds, strong winds from the east, that helps a lot of migrating birds. we have had over 200 gold crests arrived one day, from the point of view of slugs, an excellent year, from a gardener ‘s point of view, it was disastrous! we keep getting these mild wet winters, and we keep getting short spells of good weather. we have not had a good summer since 2006. we are overdue! staff here at tyntesfield say that they have been mowing the lawn for a lot later than they normally expect. another winner this year, apples, very good yearfor apple another winner this year, apples, very good year for apple growth, cider manufacturers say they have seen a bumper crop. will this trend for mild winters and wet summers continue? we will soon find out what january has concern. there is concern that the impact on insects, reliant on short grass, being overta ken reliant on short grass, being ove rta ke n by reliant on short grass, being overtaken by this excessive course ras growth, one of the big features
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of 2016. -- ras growth, one of the big features of 2016. —— excessive course grass growth. news we are getting from the uk coastguard, which says that it is currently coordinating an extensive search and rescue effort after a fishing vessel capsized off the coast of kent last night, one person has been rescued but a number of hugh crewe are still unaccounted for. the search and rescue helicopter, two lifeboats from ramsgate and vehicles from margate have been sent. extensive search and rescue operation currently taking place after a vessel capsized off the kent coast. we will bring you more news when we get it. harrison ford has led tributes to carrie fisher, who has died at the age of 60, calling her "one of a kind". the hollywood actress, best known for her role as princess leia
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in starwars, had been in known for her role as princess leia in star wars, had been in hospital since suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles last friday. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba looks back at her life. clever and
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