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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 29, 2016 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the veteran hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died just a day after her daughter, carrie fisher. she was 84 and had been rushed to hospital with a suspected stroke. her son said the stress of his sister's death was too much for her. good morning. it's thursday, the 29th of december. also this morning: patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor because of winter pressures. that's the stark warning from the uk's leading gp. in sport, sir bradley wiggins has announced his retirement from cycling, after a career during which he won five olympic golds and the tour de france. lawyers for a group of children who lived in the calaisjungle refuge camp launch a legal challenge accusing the british government of breaking its promise to take a fair share of the most vulnerable.
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interest rates, the prices in our shops and the strength of the pound will all be closely watched next year. i'll be taking a look at the big stories for our finances in 2017. and carol has our weather forecast. very similar to what we had yesterday. starting on a frosty note, with patchy fog, some of which is dense and will be slow to clear. but there is sunshine in the forecast and some rain coming in the north—west. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just one day after the death of her daughter, the film star carrie fisher. she was 84 and is believed to have suffered a stroke. her career spanned seven decades, but she was best known for her role in the 1952 musical, singin‘ in the rain, opposite gene kelly. our los angeles correspondent david willis reports. good morning, good morning, it's
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great to stay up late. good morning, good morning to you. debbie reynolds, 19 years old, singing and dancing on film for the very first time. it was her performance alongside gene kelly in singin‘ in the rain that set her on the path to fame. born in texas, she moved with herfamily to fame. born in texas, she moved with her family to california and landed a contract with warner brothers after winning a local beauty contest at the age of 16. she married the popular crooner eddie fisher and together they had two children, carrie and todd. he later left her for elizabeth taylor, a friend of hers at the time. two subsequent marriages also ended in divorce. a popular choice for movie musicals in the 1950s and 60, debbie reynolds got a the 1950s and 60, debbie reynolds gota —— the 1950s and 60, debbie reynolds got a —— earned an oscar nomination for her depiction of a titanic survivor in the unthinkable bobby
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brown. she opened her on hotel, filling it with movie memorabilia she had accumulated, but she was forced to auction it. i seem to marry very poorly, i have no taste in men. lucky for me what was good andi in men. lucky for me what was good and i have two lovely children and my son helps me run my hotel in vegas. good morning, good morning... she went on to play grace's mother in willand she went on to play grace's mother in will and grace and played liberace's mother of in behind the candelabra. she suffered a terrible loss when her daughter died after suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles on christmas eve. she herself was taken ill while discussing the arrangements for her funeral.
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singer, dancer, hollywood icon. debbie reynolds was 8a. we will be talking to our los angeles correspondent about debbie reynolds a little bit later. patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor this winter, according to the uk's leading gp. helen stokes—lampard, who chairs the royal college of gps, says that longer waiting times could pose a "serious risk" to patients. sophie long reports. every winter and increasing workload puts pressure on nhs because more people are sick. some patients are already waiting to — three weeks to get a seat in the agp's waiting—room. get a seat in the agp's waiting-room. come on in and have a seat. now the chair of the royal couege seat. now the chair of the royal college of gps says that's likely to climb to over a month in some areas and she is profoundly concerned about how general practice will cope. firstly, there just aren't enough gps out there. we don't have enough gps out there. we don't have enough conditions in the workforce,
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and we haven't got enough nurses and other healthcare professionals. secondly, there's been a serious underinvestment in practitioners for up underinvestment in practitioners for up to underinvestment in practitioners for uptoa underinvestment in practitioners for up to a decade. we have some promises of good news coming, more money and people coming through the system, but they've yet to get to the front line, so the problem this winter is as bad as it has ever been and that's a real worry. she says she is particularly worried about the impact on preventative care and chronic disease management, while the knock—on consequences could take yea rs the knock—on consequences could take years to manifest. the people who suffer are those with long—term conditions, because we have to prioritise those who are sick today. if however we are ignoring those with longer term conditions then we are storing up albums for the future and increasing their risks in the long—term. and increasing their risks in the long-term. nhs england says gp services are on track to receive an extra 2.5 million by 2020, and will expand access to appointments throughout the week. we'll speak to the chair of the royal college of gps
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later this morning. going back to our top story, the death of hollywood actress debbie reynolds. david willisjoins death of hollywood actress debbie reynolds. david willis joins us now from los angeles. after the death of carrie fisher two days ago, this is, just on a personal level, a very tragic story for the family. absolutely. poigna nt and tragic story for the family. absolutely. poignant and ironic as well, bearing in mind that debbie reynolds had been at her son, todd fisher, his house in beverly hills and apparently they were discussing plans for carrie fisher's funeral. she developed reading difficulties, was taken to hospital and a couple of hours later was said to have died. it appears of a stroke. toured fisher has said that her final words
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were, ijust fisher has said that her final words were, i just want to be with fisher has said that her final words were, ijust want to be with carrie. he says for his part he is heartbroken and this truly is a family tragedy, because spare a thought if you will for carrie fisher's daughter, also an actress. she revealed to the press that carrie fisher had died on tuesday and she in the last 2a hours had lost both her mother and a grandmother. just a thought for us. debbie reynolds was very much a star from a different era of hollywood. very much so. a hollywood icon, if you like. a starfrom very much so. a hollywood icon, if you like. a star from the golden age of hollywood. this is somebody who got their big break at the age of 19 inafilm got their big break at the age of 19 in a film with a veteran called gene kelly, who was by all accounts not terribly impressed with the selection of this young lady as the lead female in that film, she blew
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eve ryo ne lead female in that film, she blew everyone away, despite never having some 01’ everyone away, despite never having some or danced on camera before. she went on to make a series of films in the 1950s and 60s, before transferring the television and the stage. david, for the moment, thank you. dozens of children who lived in the calaisjungle camp have launched a legal challenge against the home office over its handling of asylum applications. lawyers representing 36 children say the government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees, and claim hundreds have had their applications turned down without good reason. let's speak to our political correspondent, eleanor garnier. what can you tell us about the legal challenge? these lawyers, as you say, representing some of the children who lived in the calais jungle camp, before it was taken down in october, they are accusing the government of failing to bring some of the most vulnerable child refugees to the uk. these lawyers represent 28 children who have
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already had their asylum applications rejected, a further eight are applications rejected, a further eightarea applications rejected, a further eight are a waiting decision. these lawyers say some applications were dismissed without good reason and so they have launched a legal challenge. we asked the home office for their response and they said it would be inappropriate to comment while legal proceedings were ongoing. we do know that about 900 children have been brought to the uk this year, about 750 at accompanied children have been bought from france. what we know now is the current transfer of children from france has now ended, but we do expect more eligible children from across europe, including from countries like greece and italy. we expect them to be brought to the uk in the coming months. thank you. rebel groups expected to meet russian negotiators in turkey today as part of a fresh push for a ceasefire in syria. one key group says it's already been in talks with turkish officials about ways to end the fighting, but that it's too early to say
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whether there could be a truce. it's believed one key point of contention is the exclusion of a key rebel—held area on the outskirts of damascus from the deal. an automatic braking system prevented a tunisian man from killing many more people when he drove a lorry into a berlin christmas market, according to german media reports. the system kicked in when the lorry hit the first market stalls. 12 people died in the attack which took place earlier this month. barcodes are to be printed on medicines and medical equipment such as replacement hips and surgical tools in an effort to reduce the rate of avoidable deaths in english hospitals. they say the idea could also save the nhs up to £1 billion over seven yea rs. a p pa re ntly
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apparently migrating birds are arriving at their breeding grounds of earlier, as global temperatures rise. the research conducted by scientists at the university of adelaide say some species are missing out on vital resources like food and nesting places as a result. up, up and away. at least 4000 different species of birds, with some flying many thousands of mild from one continent to another, any moving to where they breed in the winter. scientists say the changing climate is having an effect on somehow plants and animals behave and now scientists at the university of edinburgh as a some are reaching their summer grounds earlier, on average one day soon for every one average one day soon for every one degree in greece in temperature. they see reaching these grounds at the wrong time even by a few days could mean birds miss out on food and nesting places. those with
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further to go may miss out most at which may affect those born and their chances of survival. researchers hope scientists will be able to improve their research into how animals respond to current and future environmental change. keepers at chester zoo are celebrating the arrival of a very rare and very big baby. this six—foot—tall youngster, who is yet to be named, arrived on boxing day. the rothschild giraffe is said to be one of the most endangered species of the animal, with fewer than 1600 left in the wild. it is very, very cute. you know the great giraffe that i've got? they spend 16— 20 hours everyday eating. is that unusual for an animal? it is quite a lot of time. what about a cow? they spend all
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day! i'm not impressed with those stats. 0n the whole, most animals that are roaming... i'm going to get a better giraffe sacked for next time, 0k? anyway, bradley wiggins, we're talking about the retirement of written's most decorated 0lympian. there will be a massive hole on the british sporting landscape in 2017 without sir bradley wiggins. he has been a talisman for british sport. how many years? 16 years he has been an 0lympian and he has risen through the ranks of cycling and to become a sporting superpower, really. 0ften sporting superpower, really. often we complain about characters in sport and how there aren't enough of them, it delivered on both accounts. amazing sporting success, in terms of medals and achievements, but also a really unusual character.
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he was a rock star. i remember when he was the sports personality in 20 yea rs. everyone was a little bit nervous about how his speech was going to go. he is that sort of person. he changes the atmosphere in a room. he does. and when he brings his a game, personality wise he is a superstar. sir bradley wiggins said he had achieved his childhood dreams, following his retirement from cycling. wiggins was the first british cyclist to win the tour de france, and he is the most decorated british 0lympian, with eight medals in total, five of them gold. tottenham beat southampton 4—1, to move within a point of north london rivals arsenal. dele alli scored the first and last goals for spurs at st mary's last night. in the scottish premiership, second—placed rangers were held 1-1 at stjohnstone. they're now 16 points behind celtic, who beat ross county. and defending champion gary anderson is through to the quarter—finals of the pdc world darts championship. he beat the dutchman benito van de pass 4—2 at alexandra palace. you know it is christmas when there
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is darts on the television. yes! charlie spent quite a bit of time invested in the darts yesterday. it is quite a spectacle. have you got a giraffe fact? charlie is not happy with my giraffe fa ct. totally unprepared. you never know what you will get. i was impressed because they spend almost all of their daily eating, about 16— 20 hours. that is an amazing fact. charlie says it is rubbish. all who animals spend hours eating grass. but 20 hours, i am with sally. we are divided. ask your average cowl, they won't be impressed. charlie says my next fact should be that giraffes have long neck.
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this is the front page of the daily telegraph. sir bradley wiggins who announced his retirement yesterday. that sums him up. as we said a moment ago, quite rock and roll, a bit of a rock star. the main story is saying there was a move to theresa may to reconsider reforms. two stories on the front of the daily mail. we can't confirm this. there are suggestions that victoria beckham have been given an 0be. we don't know anything about that at this stage. millions of tons of wrapping paper and christmas cards and up in landfill because it can't be recycled if it has glitter on them. you can't recycle...? apparently. freezing fog causing
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terrible trouble on the road yesterday. we will be talking to carol soon. also a record high as well. sometimes around christmas, these things jump to well. sometimes around christmas, these thingsjump to new heights. more importantly, cereals suffer in the morning bash. the traditional bowl of cereal is being ditched as we rush to work or school eating on the go. sales of cereal are down? sales of cereal usually it with milk are down. basically, people aren't eating breakfast. on what they are eating breakfast. on what they are eating is changed. companies are becoming more innovative and eating bars on the go. there are questions about whether they are good for you. bit of fluff in the daily mail. the paper is finding it difficult to block their pages. they have got to the bottom of why perhaps bradley lost hisjob at the bottom of why perhaps bradley lost his job at swansea. was it
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before christmas? it was, wasn't it. he hasn't spent and up on his watch. he hasn't spent and up on his watch. he only spent 40 quid which meant he is bottom of the league. that makes me like him more. how much the premier league managers spent on their watch. burnley, premier league managers spent on theirwatch. burnley, £45,000.“ you were the chairman, you would be thinking that you are paying him a bit... i wonder how many of them actually bought their own watches. some quite prominent snaps. have you seen managers in press conferences do this? lim they do it. they come off court and put them on straightaway. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. if you are travelling once again, watch out for patchy fog. particularly across england. in places it is dense. sometimes it
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will take its time to clear if indeed at all. it will lead to destruction. you can find out what is happening where you are on your bbc local radio station and the bbc travel pages. it is cold, it is frosty. you might find ice on some untreated surfaces but further north, look at the squeeze on the isobars. too much wind to have any problems with frost fog. there in mind, it is patchy fog. it is not a blanket so you will run in and out of it which of course makes it treacherous plus the slippery element because of the low temperatures. it is —6 in england and parts of wales. as we push into northern ireland and scotland, a bit more cloud around. there are some breaks. thicker cloud around the north—west producing stronger showers. and we have winds bringing rain later. a windy day in the north—west. some of the cloud will break and some of the fog will lift.
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some of the parts of the midlands, east wales and east anglia, not clear at all. there will be sunshine today in a forecast. it will still feel cold if you are stepping out and if you are in the fog, it will feel cold. through the evening and overnight, the weather front in the north—west advances in south ringing rain. it will also be windy. a breezy night, variable amount of cloud. as it moves eastward, it will list but some in the south, around the midlands, east anglia, some of the midlands, east anglia, some of the fog will be slow to clear. some of it may not clear. east anglia is prone. tomorrow as well some breaks in the cloud. a bit of sunshine here and there. in the south—west, parts of north—east england, the weather front continuing to seek a southwards and are still very breezy and around it. look how mild it is for the bulk of the uk. as we head
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into the new year's eve, we have an active weather front slipping southwards. the timing of this could change. it goes up to three pm. we think at the moment it will clear scotla nd think at the moment it will clear scotland and by the time we get to new years, it might not. behind it, a return of colder conditions so the mild weather that we will enjoy will disappear. it won't be for long, it will be back next week. in new year's day, there goes the weather front, thinking southwards. behind it, dry and bright. some sunshine. the showers by then will be wintry by nature in the north. you can see the difference in the temperatures, looking 9— ten. 0nce the difference in the temperatures, looking 9— ten. once again, a lot going on with the weather. thank you carol. could paintings teach us more about early on—set dementia? an analysis of more than 2,000 works by seven famous artists has shone new light on the development of diseases like alzheimer's and parkinsons. the research shows that neurological conditions could be detected by subtle changes in composition and brush strokes, long before any symptoms become obvious.
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0ur health correspondent dominic hughes has more. who is this painting by? can you remember what the painting is called? the girl with the pearl earring. it is one of my favourites. living with dementia, joyce cope still enjoys painting. but today, her work is very different from the highly detailed pictures she used to produce before the disease took hold. there is this really good copy of the masters, and very detailed. it is not as detailed now. she can remember things from years ago, but generally if you ask what she had for breakfast this morning, she can't remember. but can art, and more specifically the way artists work, tell us something about the development of dementia and other degenerative brain diseases? much of the research into dementia has obviously been very medical. but now, a new approach combines both maths and art,
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and offers an intriguing insight into what might be going on in the brains of those artists who develop dementia, long before any symptoms become obvious. there is some fractal content in this, which is what we call very low—level fractal dementia... fractal analysis is a complex, mathematical method of looking at recurring patterns. the recurring patterns of our brainwaves and heart means fractals. the same applies to the individual brushstrokes of artists, it is a bit like their handwriting. now, an analysis of more than 2,000 works by 17 artists has revealed tiny changes in those patterns. artists who went on to develop dementia or parkinson's disease, the fractal pattern started to change, in an unusual way. so what we find is, up to 20 years before they had a diagnosis of a neurological disorder, the fractal content within their paintings had
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started to decrease. so anything that helps us understand more about how the brain operates is a useful way to inform future directions for research. artist willem de kooning was diagnosed with alzheimer's disease after his death in 1997. the brushstroke patterns seen in his earlier work were different when compared to later paintings. but in the work of picasso, who died free of any known neurological disease, the pattern remained constant throughout his life, regardless of what he was painting. this won't help diagnosed dementia, or similar diseases, so is it easy to use oils or watercolour? but it does give a valuable insight into changes that are taking place in the brain, years before the illness appears, and so could help answer questions about these devastating conditions. with just three days of the year left, your thoughts may be turning to what the next 12 months might bring, and what you'd like to leave firmly behind in 2016.
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for the last decade, new yorkers have been taking this seriously by gathering in times square at the end of each december, to symbolically destroy their bad memories of the previous year. good riddance day is based on a latin american tradition which sees people burn dolls stuffed with objects representing the past 12 months. was that a pie? they look like they we re was that a pie? they look like they were smashing pies. so, what did the people of manchester and new york want to bid farewell to as we head towards 2017? are few extra christmas pounds. of the weather. too cold. ad like to see places with them off the streets, the homeless. working long
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hours. working far too much. the memory of david bowie's death. it still hurt by it a year later.|j wa nt still hurt by it a year later.|j want to shed the stress and the anger. sometimes i have it. i don't wa nt anger. sometimes i have it. i don't want it any more. i love this idea. it's kind of like a new year ‘s revolution but in reverse. —— resolution. so, what will you be saying "good riddance" to ahead of 2017? let us know. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. i'm going to say good read and to this cold. definitely! been lingering? oh, yes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alex bushill. the coastguard says it is unlikely
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to search for a missing crew member who went into the water after a fishing boat capsized off the kent coast. 0ne fishing boat capsized off the kent coast. one person was winched to safety after it got into difficulty several miles of ramsgate yesterday. a second crew member was also rescued but later died. a third man is unaccounted for. a coastguard said it is unlikely to resume the coast —— search. police are appealing for witnesses. a group of people called out homophobic remarks and kicked him to be floor. people are being warned about the dangers of using christmas candles after two fires in lewis
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over the past few days. firefighters we re over the past few days. firefighters were called to a blaze by a candle left on a mantelpiece. candles caught alight in a flat. cctv images are being released of a man wanted in connection of the theft of a wallet from an 83—year—old man in eastbourne. a bank card from the wallet was used to steal money from the man's bank account. two orangutans who are kept in cages for years have been returned to the wild in indonesia via sussex animal charity. the animal rescue company spent four yea rs animal rescue company spent four years preparing the male and female survey released in borneo. they were
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sent back to a forrester school where they could learn to climb trees again. a team is monitoring the pair. it is cold out there this morning. let's get the forecast. a chilly start for some of us with temperatures as low as —3, minus four degrees. we also have some patches of fog around. we have met 0ffice weather warning across the region until midday. it is patchy which means you couldn't counter it fairly unexpectedly —— you could and counter it. the low cloud could be that but it could be a bright afternoon. rather on the chilly side with temperatures typically 4— six celsius. we see the mist and fog reforming the banner to see through the second half of the night, we have more cloud of dancing from the west. that could start to push some of it away but watch out for it
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again tomorrow morning. tomorrow, and other dry day, cloudier than of late. it will be cloud into the weekend as well. you can get your latest travel news from your local radio and forget, we will be back for another update in half an hour's time. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: britain's most decorated 0lympian is calling it a day. as sir bradley wiggins announces his retirement, we'll look back at his career highs and lows, with his former team—mate, rob hayles. could a roll—out of barcodes on medicines and surgical equipment help reduce the number of avoidable deaths in hospital? we'll find out why nhs england believes the idea could save more than £1 billion. we'll find out how rising global temperatures are affecting they way birds migrate, meaning they're missing out on vital resources like food and nesting places. all that still to come.
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but now a summary of this morning's main news. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just one day after the death of her daughter, the film star carrie fisher. the 84—year—old had been at her daughter's bedside since the star wars star suffered a heart attack on christmas eve. reynold's son, todd fisher, said the stress of his sister's death had been too much for their mother and that her last words had been that she wanted to be with carrie. stars have been paying their tributes to debbie reynolds. william shatner, who played james t kirk in the star trek franchise described her as "one of the last of the hollywood royalty". damejoan collins hailed her as "a wonderfully warm friend and colleague". the singer gloria gaynor called her "an american icon and a hollywood legend". fans in hollywood paid tributes to debbie reynolds. debbie reynolds, the girl next door,
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i remember when she was in the unsinkable molly brown. unbelievable, this is the worst year for hollywood, i'm telling you. unbelievable, this is the worst year for hollywood, i'm telling youm was so for hollywood, i'm telling youm was so sad. it was a shocker. what we re was so sad. it was a shocker. what were the odds of this happening? incredible. sad. in shock. it is so surprising that it happened. to hear iti surprising that it happened. to hear it i think it may be caused her to be so distraught that it brought on a stroke. debbie reynolds' career spanned seven decades, but she was best known for her role in the 1952 musical singin' in the rain, opposite gene kelly. 0ur los angeles correspondent david willis looks back on her life. # good morning, good morning, it's great to stay up late # good morning, good morning to you...# debbie reynolds, 19—years—old, singing and dancing on film for the very first time. it was her performance alongside gene kelly in singin' in the rain
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that set her on the path to fame. born in texas, she moved with her family to california and landed a contract with warner brothers after winning a local beauty contest at the age of 16. she married the popular crooner eddie fisher and together they had two children, carrie and todd. he later left herfor elizabeth taylor, a friend of hers at the time. two subsequent marriages also ended in divorce. a popular choice for movie musicals in the 1950s and ‘60s, debbie reynolds earnt an oscar nomination for her depiction of titanic survivor margaret brown in the unsinkable molly brown. she opened her own hotel in las vegas in 1992, filling it with movie memorabilia she had accumulated over the years, but the business folded and she was eventually forced to auction off the artefacts. my personal life is always sort of like that choo choo train that
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says "i think i can, i think i can, i think i can". i seem to marry very poorly, i have no taste in men. luckily for me, god is good and i have two lovely children and my son helps me run my little hotel, here in vegas. # good morning, good morning...# come on, girls, jump in! she went on to play grace's mother in the hit sitcom will and grace and returned to the big screen to play liberace's mother in the 2013 biopic behind the candelabra. she suffered a terrible loss when her daughter died after suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles on christmas eve. she herself was taken ill while discussing the arrangements for herfuneral. singer, dancer, hollywood icon. debbie reynolds was 84. patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor this winter, according to the uk's leading gp. helen stokes—lampard,
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who chairs the royal college of gps, says longer waiting times could pose a "serious risk" to patients. nhs england says surgeries have been promised more funding. dozens of children who lived in the calaisjungle camp have launched a legal challenge against the home office over its handling of asylum applications. lawyers representing 36 children say the government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees. they say hundreds have had their applications turned down without good reason. the home office says it will not comment on ongoing legal proceedings. birds could be missing out on food and nesting spots because they're migrating to their breeding grounds earlier. researchers from the university of edinburgh found that some species are reaching their summer breeding grounds about a day sooner for every one degree increase in global temperature. it's hope the findings will help scientists improve predictions of how different species respond to future environmental changes. it doesn't come at the lot, one day,
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but apparently it makes a big difference because there's a lack of when they get there. 0ver when they get there. over to the sport now. the big story on the front and back of the pages is bradley wiggins announcing his retirement from cycling, and therefore disappearing from our sporting landscape. will he really? no, he used to much ofa will he really? no, he used to much of a superstar to really disappear, but it will be ashamed to not see compete. the first edition tour de france winner. an amazing achievement. —— british. sir bradley announced his retirement by saying "kids from kilburn don't win 0lympic golds and the tour de france. they do now." wiggins is the most decorated british 0lympian, with five gold medals in his total of eight medals. the most recent coming in the team pursuit in rio. the spotlight over recent months has been on his use of theraputic—use
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exemption medication. in august, he spoke of his plan following his retirement. to remain riding my bike, involved in cycling. i have children's bikes, so in cycling. i have children's bikes, so very much cycling has been a huge pa rt so very much cycling has been a huge part of my life and it will continue to be. i don't expect too much to change, other than i would be in 0lympic finals any more. sir bradley's former olympic team mate rob hayles will be on the sofa with us in the next few minutes. he will tell us exactly what it has been like riding with him. there has been another high—profile retirement in the world of sport, with tennis player ana ivanovic ending her career at 29. the serbian won the french open in 2008 and, after struggling to repeat that success, she mounted a comeback last year and reached the semi—final at roland garros again. she married manchester united's bastian schweinsteiger this summer. andy murray says he will plan differently at the australian open next month, to do all he can to win the first grand slam of the season. murray has reached the final in melbourne five times, but this time he'll go
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into the event as world number one. i played really well there in the past and it hasn't happened for me, so past and it hasn't happened for me, soi past and it hasn't happened for me, so i need to do something a little bit different this year. but i love the conditions there, i enjoy the tournament a lot. i'll be going in hopefully playing well with a lot of confidence, because of the way i finished 2016. tottenham are just a point behind their north london rivals arsenal in the premier league table, after winning 4—1 at southampton. harry kane had gone three league matches without a goal, but he put an end to that last night. and dele alli scored twice, as southampton finished the game with ten men. spurs stay fifth. they're ten points behind leaders chelsea. ahead of the old firm derby on new year's eve, celtic have stretched their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to 16 points. they beat ross county 2—0 last night, while second—placed rangers were held to a 1—1 draw at st johnstone.
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a defensive blunder allowed steven maclean to score the equaliser for the home side. there were also wins for motherwell and partick thistle. in darts, defending champion gary anderson was the first man through to the quarter finals of the pdc world championship. the scotsman averaged 107.68, the highest in the tournament so far, as he beat the dutchman benito van de pass 4—2 at alexandra palace. anderson is joined in the last eight by raymond van barneveld. let's return to the retirement of sir bradley wiggins, who has decided to hang up his cleats after almost 20 years at the top. when it comes to cycling he's won just about all there is to win. here are just a few of his career highlights. he does write an incredible amount of maturity, this young fellow. —— ride with. this is a virtuoso performance by
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bradley wiggins! he is turning on the style! he will be the 4000 metres olympic champion! bradley wiggins is a gold—medal winner and olympic champion! bradley wiggins is the master of the time trial and the master of this tour de france. he will become written's first—ever winner! this is going to be a golden moment for bradley wiggins and the crowd a re moment for bradley wiggins and the crowd are already going ballistic. here comes bradley wiggins up to the line and into the lead! it's coming down to the last lap! it is great britain! sir bradley wiggins wins olympic gold for the fifth time in history. we're joined by former olympic and world track cyclist rob hayles, who was team mates
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with sir bradley. i know you said as a cyclist you argues the getting up in the early of the morning? i don't know how you do it. well thank you for making the effort. we saw so many brilliant moments in his career. what do you think it will be best remembered for? all of the results, there are so for? all of the results, there are so many and so broad, from the track to the tour de france and back to the track. that has never happened before. but his character, i think, is the big thing. he is larger than life. he is the centre of attention so life. he is the centre of attention so often, especially after a couple of drinks. i'm sure he will be looking forward to more often than not. just the union flag, the union jack, the way he has been so proud to wear that and whenever he commits to wear that and whenever he commits to an event, whether it is on the track over four minutes or whether it is over three and a bit weeks in
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france, if he commits to the chances are will come away with a gold medal. you can see him after the time trial tour de france victory. that was quite a special summer in 2012. i think that's the big thing. in all of the years as a professional, 20 years full—time, we go back to 1998 when he was a junior and had just come back from the junior world championships. 2012 was quite a special yearfor junior world championships. 2012 was quite a special year for brad and for british cycling in general. the way that cycling has come on over the years to where it is now, from where it was when brad started, and he has been kind of one of the key protagonists in that change, i feel. one of the great things, we saw him pokies tongue out as he got the medal, it is so reverent and seems to have no respect for authority at
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all. that's really unusual. has that helped him? all. that's really unusual. has that helped him ? it all. that's really unusual. has that helped him? it has been part of that. like i said, if he committed to it, but chances are he would be at his best and if he was at his best that would be good enough. but it was all or nothing. he would either win the race or he wouldn't finish. but no one will tell him to finish. but no one will tell him to finish the race. it is his decision. it is all under his steam. this is one of the things that has made him so one of the things that has made him so good. he was a very quotable and trainable rider. —— coachable. but it was on his terms. he wasn't daft... well, he wasn't stupid. he was daft at times. that helped him through. he is quite a shy character and to get over that he went to the line and often kicked the door down and went beyond it. can ijust ask you, from the outside looking in,
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you, from the outside looking in, you are an insider, for outsiders looking in, and we have all met him, we character and unbelievable achievements, but as he retires there is this little cloud hanging over. there is the issue of broken the rules, but. can you help us with inside cycling howl iu thinking about the issues that seem to be a little bit outstanding? —— how are you. you know what i am talking about. it is a shame this has come at the end of his career and it's a cloud and it is understandable. in terms of the rules of the sport he has broken them. the world governing body have said there is nothing to answer. but there is still obviously answer. but there is still obviously a question of whether it has been ethical and i think that's a separate issue. but in terms of the rules that have been broken or not, there are none. but it is certainly not the ideal way that bradley wiggins would have wanted to retire.
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has that been potentially a little bit of a push to him making this decision now? potentially. will we see him back in six months racing? who knows? he has hinted, earlier this year, that he wouldn't stop, and here he is. and what does he do, where does he go from here? he will certainly be within sport. like most of us he is probably only employable within cycling. he has been in it that long. what hopefully he will remain and continue in the sport and help with the younger riders, it is one of the things he has done in the past. people might have thought they wa nt to past. people might have thought they want to share with you. i know you will be coming back later. thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. watch out for fog this morning. particularly some of it is dense.
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we're not looking in a blanket but in some ways, patchy fog is more dangerous because there no warning. you can find out what is happening where you are in your bbc local radio station. it is a cold start across england and wales will stop temperatures falling to almost minus seven. temperatures falling to almost minus seven. there is the risk of ice. you can see further north, looking at the spacing of the isobars, too much ofa the spacing of the isobars, too much of a breeze to be any issues with fog or frost. southern of a breeze to be any issues with fog orfrost. southern counties of a breeze to be any issues with fog or frost. southern counties of england, there is an patchy fog around this morning, some of which is dense. it is the same across the midlands, it wales, east anglia. do ta ke midlands, it wales, east anglia. do take extra care. some patchy fog up to the vale of york. as the go up to northern ireland and scotland, more cloud and more of a breeze some parts will see a touch of frost and rural sheltered glens. you will sunshine first thing. the cloud building through the day but in some parts of ireland, rain coming in at
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sunshine. some fog will slowly lift but some will stick. east midlands, vale of york, east of wales, some will struggle to break free them. —— freezing. there will be sunny spells. overnight, the weatherfront faces south. breezy in the north and we will see more cloud push across us as we will see more cloud push across us as well. the early fog we have will start to live. in some parts of the midlands and into east anglia, the midlands and into east anglia, the far south—east, we will see some fog by this time tomorrow morning. some of it could be dense and slow to clear. as we go through tomorrow for the rest of the uk, there will bea for the rest of the uk, there will be a fairly cloudy day. one of two hole here and there but we will see some glimmers of sunshine. the weather front continuing to push slowly southwards across scotland. the and it will be a windy day but temperature wise, also quite a mild day unless you are stuck under some of the fog which will pull down the cabbage. on new year's eve, the
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weather front continuing to sink southwards, it is an active one and will bring heavy rain. gusty winds around it as well. this front keeps changing its times. what is going to happen is it as it pushes it southwards, cold air will feed in bihardid and as southwards, cold air will feed in bihar did and as we head into new year's day, eventually we see that front, behind each dry and sunshine and the showers in the call the air will be wintry but mild in this far south. it has called for a softer couple of days and then mild arad about tuesday wednesday next week. it's all very complex and changing, carol, thank you. complex and changing, that could apply to 2016, sean? i have a few predictions for you. good morning.
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well, the big story for british business in 2016 has of course been that vote to leave the european union, but while we wait for the details of what that will look like for the country, there will be some more short term impacts in 2017. the fall in the pound after we voted to leave affected everybody. holidaymakers found it more expensive, british—made goods looked cheaper, and it's had a knock on effect on prices in our shops — more on that in a minute. so can we expect to see it recover in 2017? so, as michelle says, experts think the pound is going to remain unpredictable, but if it stays around the levels it's at now, that will have a big effect on prices next year. remember marmitegate back in october — when retailers and suppliers fell out about increasing costs and who should pay them? well in the coming months, economists and the retailers themselves expect some of those rises to be passed on to us shoppers. remember marmitegate back in october — when retailers and suppliers fell out about increasing costs and who should pay them? the sterling is important for us but not the others. it will be whipsawed around. well in the coming months,
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economists and the retailers themselves expect some of those rises to be passed on to us shoppers. so what about the money that we save and that we owe? 76% of us think prices are going up next year as a result of brexit and will be concerned about our own economy and how we can save money. what we can expect to see is loads of cost saving measures coming back. vouchers and value in everything we buy. so what about the money that we save and that we owe? it's been another bad year for savers after rates were cut to a record low back in august. but mortgage holders have had it good with low rates. but last month, this woman, janet yellen, who is in charge of america's central bank, raised interest rates in the usa — and experts here in the uk have told us they are expecting mortgage rates to edge back upwards next year. it was the interest rate rise in the
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uk sometime. the bank of england have said they want to see the impact of brexit first so let's wait and see how they play it out but they will probably try and react slower and faster. —— slower than the faster. with interest rates potentially increasing, prices expected to rise and the pound continuing its uncertain path, there should be more than enough to keep steph, ben and i busy in 2017. so we still have a job. you have plenty of work, sean, don't worry. now, you may remember little harry, who ran amok in the breakfast studio when he was here with his mum 12 months ago. despite his high energy levels then, harry was facing an anxious wait for a life—saving liver transplant. in march, with no other donor available — his dad simon volunteered to have the operation. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to catch up with the maceachen family and some of the people helping make hospital
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a slightly friendlier place for families like them. for the maceachen family, 2016 was life changing. one event was lifesaving. with no other donor available, simon donated part of his liver to his son, harry. was born with a condition which means a blockage in the bowel ducts. we had occasions where harry would go to bed at night fit and healthy and then at 6am he would wake up with a roaring temperature, vomiting and we would end up in hospital for ten days to a fortnight. harry's first appearance on breakfast last december was memorable. in march, we filmed as the family prepared for surgery. live liver transplants are risky and rare and only possible because the liver is the one internal organ that can be
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generated. ash regenerate. 2016, what a year. how are you feeling now? —— regenerate. what a year. how are you feeling now? -- regenerate. no competition. it took a while to recover from the surgery. harry bounced back quicker than me. i love you. i love you too. i love you, mummy. i love you, daddy. are you have daddies live in now? —— daddy. are you have daddies live in now? — — liver. daddy. are you have daddies live in now? -- liver. thank you, daddy. you're welcome. what can you do now that you couldn't before? what really fast. what other medals? how much better do you feel now than before? a lot better. hospitals can before? a lot better. hospitals can be unfamiliarand i'm before? a lot better. hospitals can be unfamiliar and i'm settling especially for children. for their operations, harry and simon wong
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matching downs, specially made by volu nteers matching downs, specially made by volunteers known as the bout pyjama sam it —— varies. —— faeries. they have had an incredible 12 months. the market is been an incredible year. —— it has been an incredible year. —— it has been an incredible year. it stops people from wearing boring scrubs in theatre. we distribute about a thousand garment a month. i had breakfast telly on that morning and i was interested in learning more about the charity and becoming involved. and here a today. a couple of 100 garments later, yes. the latest batch is bound for the hospital. who have you brought
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before? the little ones. in the hospital, they away from their family, active and environment. we have to make it a more homely environment. the pyjamas give us something to talk about, something to choose. every garment comes with a pole and written by the fairies. it is aimed to reassure children at a difficult time. at no time while we are “— a difficult time. at no time while we are —— at night time while you are sleeping, we bring ourfairy dust. we hope this will make you smile. that is my favourite thing i have seen that is my favourite thing i have seen all day. very moving, isn't it? can you imagine how fast he could run around the studio now? what a brilliant thing for children in hospital now. a little note saying
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do you believe in magic? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. still to come on breakfast this morning: are you suffering from sales fatigue? as high street shops see a drop in customers, we'll ask if shoppers are sick of being bombarded by constant deals and discounts. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from the news team in the south east. welcome to view was in london. —— viewers. the coastguard says it is unlikely to search for a missing crew member who went into the water after a fishing boat capsized off the kent coast. one person was winched to safety from the belgian—registered vessel after it got into difficulty several miles off ramsgate yesterday. a second crew member was also rescued but later died. a third man is still unaccounted for. the coastguard said it is unlikely to resume the search this morning unless there is further information. a second crew member was also rescued but later died. a third man is still
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unaccounted for. the coastguard said it is unlikely to resume the search this morning unless there is further information. firefighters have been battling a fire in tenterden. people have been evacuated and a refuge has been started after a fire started after seven started after a fire started after seven bed last night. police are appealing for witnesses on an assault of a man he has been treated bya assault of a man he has been treated by a hate crime. a man had been coming home from a fancy dress party ata pub. coming home from a fancy dress party at a pub. sussex police say when he was at the footbridge near coronation green, a group of people culled out from homophobic remarks and punched and kicked him to the ground. he needed hospital treatment for cuts to his head. cctv images have been released for a man wanted for theft of a wallet for an 83—year—old man. a bank card was used to steal almost £2000 from the victims bank account last month. it is believed the man pictured here they have been working alongside another man and a woman. police are searching for a man who went missing from saint leonards. terry carpenter
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who is 55 was last seen on tuesday afternoon on chapel park road. he is known to have links to the hastings and eastbourne areas and police are asking anyone who has seen him to get in touch. two orangutans who we re get in touch. two orangutans who were kept in cages for years have been returned to the wild in indonesia by sussex animal charity. international animal rescue based in parkfield has four years preparing a male orangutan, johnny, and the female for their release in borneo last month. the team is monitoring the pairand last month. the team is monitoring the pair and they are reported to be doing well. it is cold and frosty up there this morning. let's get the forecast with sara thornton. a chilly start for some of us with temperatures as low as —3, minus four degrees. we also have some patches of fog around. we have a met office weather warning across the region until midday. it is fairly patchy which means you couldn't counter it fairly unexpectedly —— you could and counter it. —— encounter it.
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the low cloud could be that but it could be a bright afternoon. staying dry as well. rather on the chilly side with temperatures typically 4— six celsius. we see the mist and fog reforming the banner to see through the second half of the night, we have more cloud of dancing from the west. that could start to push some of it away but watch out for it again tomorrow morning. tomorrow, and other dry day, cloudier than of late. it will be cloudy into the weekend as well. it is icy on the roads this morning. you can get your latest travel news from your local radio and forget, we will be back for another update in half an hour's time. hello.
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this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the veteran hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died just a day after her daughter, carrie fisher. she was 84 and had been rushed to hospital with a suspected stroke. her son said the stress of his sister's death was too much for her. good morning. it's thursday, the 29th of december. also this morning: patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor because of winter pressures. that's the stark warning from the uk's leading gp. in sport, sir bradley wiggins has announced his retirement from cycling, after a career during which he won five olympic golds and the tour de france. lawyers for a group of children who lived in the calaisjungle
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refuge camp launch a legal challenge accusing the british government of breaking its promise to take a fair share of the most vulnerable. interest rates, the prices in our shops and the strength of the pound will all be closely watched next year. i'll be taking a look at the big stories for our finances in 2017. and carol has the weather. once again today for england and wales it's a cold and frosty start, with patchy fog. some of it is dense, some of it will lift but some will stick. in northern ireland a bit more cloud, sunny spells and rain coming from the south—west. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. good morning. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just one day after the death of her daughter, carrie fisher. debbie reynolds was 84 and is believed to have suffered a stroke. she had been at her daughter's bedside since the star wars actress had a heart attack on christmas eve. earlier we spoke to our la
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correspondent david willis, who told us that debbie reynolds had been struggling to deal with her daughter's death. debbie reynolds had been at her son todd fisher's house in beverly hills when she was taken ill. apparently they had been discussing plans for carrie fisher‘s feudal and she developed breathing difficulties, was taken to hospital and a couple of hours later was said to have died. it appears of a stroke. now, todd fisher has said that her final words were" i just want to be with carrie". he says for his part he is heartbroken and this truly is a family tragedy, it was spare a thought if you will for carrie fisher's daughter. she is also an actress. it was she who revealed to the press that carrie fisher had died on tuesday and she in the last 24 hours has lost both a mother and
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grandmother. debbie reynolds' career spanned seven decades, but she was best known for her role in the 1952 musical singin' in the rain, opposite gene kelly. our los angeles correspondent david willis looks back at her life. # good morning, good morning, it's great to stay up late # good morning, good morning to you...# debbie reynolds, 19—years—old, singing and dancing on film for the very first time. it was her performance alongside gene kelly in singin' in the rain that set her on the path to fame. born in texas, she moved with her family to california and landed a contract with warner brothers after winning a local beauty contest at the age of 16. she married the popular crooner eddie fisher and together they had two children, carrie and todd. he later left herfor elizabeth taylor, a friend of hers at the time. two subsequent marriages also ended in divorce. a popular choice for movie musicals
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in the 1950s and ‘60s, debbie reynolds earnt an oscar nomination for her depiction of titanic survivor margaret brown in the unsinkable molly brown. she opened her own hotel in las vegas in 1992, filling it with movie memorabilia she had accumulated over the years, but the business folded and she was eventually forced to auction off the artefacts. my personal life is always sort of like that choo choo train that says "i think i can, i think i can, i think i can". i seem to marry very poorly, i have no taste in men. luckily for me, god is good and i have two lovely children and my son helps me run my little hotel, here in vegas. # good morning, good morning...# come on, girls, jump in! she went on to play grace's mother in the hit sitcom will and grace and returned to the big screen to play liberace's mother in the 2013 biopic behind the candelabra. she suffered a terrible loss when her daughter, carrie fisher, died
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after suffering a heart attack on a flight from london to los angeles on christmas eve. she herself was taken ill whilst discussing the arrangements for herfuneral. singer, dancer, hollywood icon. debbie reynolds was 84. patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor this winter, according to the uk's leading gp. helen stokes—lampard, who chairs the royal college of gps, says that longer waiting times could pose a "serious risk" to patients. sophie long reports. every winter an increasing workload puts pressure on nhs because more people are sick. some patients are already waiting 2—3 weeks to get a seat in the gp's waiting—room. come on in and have a seat... now the chair of the royal college of gps says that's likely to climb to over a month in some areas and she is profoundly concerned
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about how her general practice will cope. firstly, there just aren't enough gps out there. we don't have enough clinicians in the workforce, but also we haven't got enough nurses and other healthcare professionals. secondly, there's been a serious underinvestment in gp practices for up to a decade. we have some promises of good news coming, more money and people coming through the system, but they've yet to get to the front line, so the problem this winter is as bad as it has ever been and that's a real worry. she says she is particularly worried about the impact on preventative care and chronic disease management, while the knock—on consequences could take years to manifest. the people who suffer are those with long—term conditions, because we have to prioritise those who are sick today. if however we are ignoring those with longer term conditions then we are storing up problems for the future and increasing their risks in the long—term. nhs england says gp services are on track to receive an extra £2.5 billion by 2020,
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which will expand access to convenient appointments throughout the week. we'll speak to the chair of the royal college of gps at about 8:10am this morning. dozens of children who lived in the calaisjungle camp have launched a legal challenge against the home office over its handling of asylum applications. lawyers representing 36 children say the government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees, and claim hundreds have had their applications turned down without good reason. let's speak to our political correspondent, eleanor garnier. what can you tell us about the legal challenge? these lawyers are representing 28 children who have already had their applications rejected and then a further 82 are still waiting for a decision. the lawyers say that some applications have been rejected without reason and so for that reason they are launching a further
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legal enquiry, if you like. they are launching a legal challenge. these children have been living in the jungle, before it was pulled apart in october. their lawyers say the government has broken its promise and is failing to bring some of the most vulnerable children who are unaccompanied to the uk. for its pa rt unaccompanied to the uk. for its part of the home office says it can't comment on ongoing legal proceedings, but it has said that 900 children have been brought to the uk so far this year and of those 750 were unaccompanied children from france. as for the current transfer of children, those coming from france, that has now stopped, but we do expect children from across europe, from countries like rees and italy, who are eligible, they will continue to come to the uk. —— greece and italy. thank you. sir bradley wiggins says he has achieved his childhood dreams, following his retirement from cycling.
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he was the first british cyclist to win the tour de france, and he is the most decorated british olympian, with eight medals in total, five of them gold. birds could be missing out on food and nesting spots because they are arriving at their breeding grounds earlier. researchers from the university of edinburgh said some species are reaching their breeding grounds about one day earlier for every degree increase in temperatures. they are hoping scientists will discover ways to combat the changes in environmental conditions. "one of the last of hollywood royalty". that's how william shatner has paid tribute to the actress debbie reynolds, who's died at the age of 84. her death comesjust one day after her daughter, the star wars star carrie fisher, passed away following a heart attack. the entertainmentjournalist
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jeanne wolfjoins us now from la. it was just 24 hours ago we were talking about carrie fisher and now we are talking about her mother. shocking and terrible news. i understand when you say you don't know how to start talking about it, because it is almost impossible to think about. we just heard that her last words were that she wanted to be with carrie. i can understand that. we have to feel for her, because her daughter never gained consciousness after that heart attack and when she was in the hospital, so for days debbie had to soldier on, watching her daughter lying there, knowing that she would die soon and in effect she was really no longer there. that's too much for a mother to bear. the
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emotion and shock of that. let's also remember that debbie for the last few years was very frail and in bad health. so all the dreams she had of taking it easy didn't come through and when she was awarded the screen actress to she couldn't show up. debbie wanted to be there in sequence up. debbie wanted to be there in sequence and feathers and singing to the crowd and instead carrie had to accept her award. we have been saying this morning that she was almost the last of that hollywood royalty. what was she like? she was very ladylike. she had a very sweet voice and always had a smile on her face. she had a greater sense of humour. she said, other people to the lemon into lemonade, i turn tragedy into jokes and performance. she had a great sense of humour and read wit about the world and everything that happened to her and
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about herself, which was part of what made her entertaining. ifound out later when i saw her nightclub act in las vegas is the sweet girl next door debbie reynolds could be quite all —— outrageous. you can imagine how the audience adored it. people appreciated her here. they appreciated her dignity, they appreciated her dignity, they appreciated all of the charity work she did, how much a part of the community she was and the fact that they could really call her the unthinkable debbie reynolds. which is of course the reference to the fantastic film she won an oscar for. at her big rake was singing in the rain. is it true that she wasn't the first choice for that role because she wasn't seen as the best dancer?
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—— big break singin' in the rain.|j heard gene kelly saw the tape and said she was perfect. the casting director said, i'm not said she was perfect. the casting directorsaid, i'm not sure said she was perfect. the casting director said, i'm not sure she can dance, and gene kelly said, no problem, i can teach her! she is perfect! and she did turn out to be perfect. but the movie is perfect. instead of a memorial we should all watch singin' in the rain.|j couldn't agree more. that's what i'm going to try to do over the next couple of days. we have to mention that the relationship with her daughter wasn't always the best. i know that she spoke about it being a kind of typical mother— daughter relationship, where sometimes she was brutally honest with carrie and carrie didn't want to hear it.|j think it was a typical at all. typical in the sense that mothers and daughters often potheads, but debbie was really frightened that her daughter would die from a drug
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overdose and there were years... it is unbelievable to think about, knowing how close they were, when they didn't speak. eventually they moved into houses next door to each other and debbie's great—grandmother was a great—grandmother to carry‘s daughter, who is 24 now and beginning to be an actress. all of us beginning to be an actress. all of us should remember that not only did she lose a mother, but she lost her grandmother, who i am told used to play cards with her and sing and dance with her. so she is somebody we will watch and, you know, debbie was unthinkable, but this was really too much and you can understand it would be too much for anybody. thank you so much for your time this morning, talking to us live from hollywood this morning. that is an incredible point. for debbie reynolds' granddaughter, she has lost her mum and granny in the space of 24 hours. it isa of 24 hours.
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it is a family tragedy. time for us to have a look at the weather forecast. winter brings all sorts of things. fog is one of the things which can be horrible, especially if you have to travel. we have fog and the forecast again today, especially across england and wales. it is patchy fog, some of it is dense, some of it will linger for much if not all of the day. it could lead to some travel disruption, so keep up—to—date with what is going on on your bbc local radio station. the other thing is we have got very low temperatures. in parts of wales fell to —7 and across parts of england two minus six. not everywhere, obviously, but there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces this morning so we have a double whammy of risks. you can see across southern england there will be some bright skies first thing, but equally we have got that patchy fog, cold, frosty, and the risk of
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ice. let's have a look in northern ireland and scotland. there is more ofa ireland and scotland. there is more of a breeze this morning and a bit more cloud. you may encounter those problems and in sheltered cleanser touch of frost. the thicker cloud producing spots of rain but we have a weather front waiting in the winds which will bring heavy rain much later. the wind will strengthen in the north—east through the course of the north—east through the course of the day. the fog will tend to slowly lift, some into low cloud. some will stick, for east midlands and of york, and we will see some sunshine come through. if you are stuck in an area which hangs on to the fog for much of the day then temperatures will really struggle even to break freezing. it is going to feel cold. we will see some early frost and fog as we go through the evening and overnight, a weather front coming south scotland accompanied by gusty winds and a bit more cloud pushing eastwards. as that cloud pushes eastwards. as that cloud pushes eastwards it will lift some of that fog. however, we still expect to it
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at this time tomorrow morning across parts of east anglia and the south—eastern corner and that could be slow to clear as we go through the course of tomorrow. tomorrow quite a lot of cloud around, some brighter breaks. a band of rain slowly moving southwards across scotland. gusty winds across the northern half of the country that temperature—wise, unless you are in the fog, we are in pretty good shape. it is going to feel quite mild. as we had from friday into new year's eve, we have the weather front across scotland slowly slipping southwards. the timing of this keeps changing. this chart finishes at 3pm in the afternoon. on current timings, by the midnight hour we expect the rain to be across the borders and northern england and north wales, and parts of northern ireland. so for midnight in scotland at the moment, fingers crossed but that could change. as we head on through the course of the new year's weekend, the front does sink south, and behind it much colder air streams in. the effect that will have on the forecast is the rain moves have on the forecast is the rain m oves a cross have on the forecast is the rain moves across england and wales, pushing down in the southern counties. behind it, bright skies, some sunshine and showers but in the
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colder temperatures you will find that we will see increasingly wintry showers. so it is all to play for four new year's eve or hogmanay, depending on what area of the country you are in. i am delighted you said hogmanay at last, i have been waiting for you to say it. she a lwa ys been waiting for you to say it. she always has a marvellous hogmanay! barcodes are to be printed on medicines and medical equipment such as replacement hips and surgical tools, in an effort to reduce the rate of avoidable deaths in english hospitals. ministers say the scheme, which is being piloted in six areas, could also save the nhs up to £1 billion over seven years, as our health correspondent robert pigott reports. an angiogram, designed to reveal the condition of patients' blood vessels, is carried out in salisbury. as part of the piloting of the scan4 safety scheme, barcodes on medication and equipment record the materials used to treat
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patients, the time and place of the procedure, and the name of the medical staff taking part. we can trace that patient very quickly. we scan all the equipment, so there should be no drug errors. some drugs look very similar. and it's to the correct patient, so we scan the patient, making sure the right drug or the right blood product, et cetera, goes to the right patient. and if they're going to roll it out to orthopaedics and other type equipment, we can then trace those back in the future against those patients. barcoding will reduce the average of an hour that nurses spend collecting medicines, and alert staff to those nearing their use by date. everything from screws used in knee operations to breast implants will be barcoded, so their quality can be monitored. about once a week, tragically, someone dies in the nhs because they're given the wrong medicine. we also have a number of operations where the wrong implant is put into someone's body, and that then has to be changed at a later date. and if we use modern bar—code technology,
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we can deal with a lot of these problems. one of the biggest advantages of scan4 safety could be in tracing patients when faulty products have to be recalled. nearly 50,000 british women had the breast implants made by the french company pip, when they were revealed to be at risk of rupturing, but patchy record—keeping made it difficult to trace the patients. robert pigott, bbc news. we are joined now by chris slater. he is in charge of procurement at leeds teaching hospitals nhs trust, one of six places piloting the scheme. good morning to you. what an interesting idea. listening to what was said in the piece that, one of the medical staff said that some drugs look very similar. barcodes will help to ensure that the right drugs go to the right people. correct. there is a bit of me that if thinking we are reliant on technology rather than the expertise of medical staff. i understand that. it is really a check and balance. it
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is so we are able to recall not only what the stuffer scene but the actual information from the product, so actual information from the product, so that we've got record all the way through the patientjourney, covering obviously medicines but also devices as well. if there is a recall and devices, we have recorded the information into the patient notes. we have the lot, the serial numberand notes. we have the lot, the serial number and the expiry date and we are able to track and trace products to patient level. i am holding up what looks like a little piece of card, which has a very important ba rco, card, which has a very important barco, andi card, which has a very important barco, and i am holding at the wrong way. you are indeed. good job i am not putting this in because it is for a not putting this in because it is fora mid— not putting this in because it is for a mid— phase not putting this in because it is fora mid— phase1.5 not putting this in because it is for a mid— phase 1.5 millimetres screw. correct, so we use that in trauma, in terms of missing bones together with plates, et cetera. what we are trying to do is get effectively retail technology on the product, so that we are able to track and trace those products right the way through from receipt in the hospital right the way through the implant in those into the patient.
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don't we do that already? we don't u nfortu nately. don't we do that already? we don't unfortunately. you would think we do. one of the issues has been the lack of standards around products. so the nhs is now deploying standards to all its product and what asking all of its products to deploy a gs1 barcode. up what asking all of its products to deploy a gs1barcode. up until what asking all of its products to deploy a gs1 barcode. up until now manufacturers have applied whatever ba rco manufacturers have applied whatever barco they want so we have not been able to track products. trace it through for me. so the product you are talking about is what? that is screw. help me with the cost saving. you are not going to use any less screws, so you are not going to use any less screws, so knowing where they are going does not make a difference to how much money is being spent, does it? what it does do, it allows us to track wastage through the system, and variation through the system. but different clinicians will use different products and different volumes. by tracking the product to the patient, identifying the
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clinician at point of use, we can make sure we are using standard processes throughout the whole of healthcare. from a supply chain point of view what we are also doing is ensuring that we have the right amount of product is on the shelf, we have not got excess stock in the system. also, if you take a device we are talking about here, it costs about £12,500. it is an implantable device. that is worth £12,500? that is worth £12,500. it is a pain stimulator, a super tens machine, implantable within the body. we want to make sure it is still in date, the shelflife is less than 12 months from receipt in hospital so we need to make sure we have visibility of that from receipt in hospital right the way through to the patient. bit like supermarkets track what is going out. or motor manufacturers. when your car is recalled they know exactly who has a car, where it is and what is being replaced. from
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this point of view we have the serial number, the lot number, the batch number, and we know the patient. so what we have managed to do is get the barcode on the patient as well, so we are also occurred in the patient and making that link using the nhs number, linking the patient all the way through the journey. it is early stages. and trial stages, so we will find out in the future just what devices there are. thank you for your time. could paintings teach us more about ea rly—onset dementia ? an analysis of more than 2,000 works by seven famous artists has shone new light on the development of diseases like alzheimer's and parkinson's. the research shows that neurological conditions could be detected by subtle changes in composition and brushstrokes, long before any symptoms become obvious. our health correspondent dominic hughes has more. who's this painting by? vermeer. can you remember what the painting is called? the girl with the pearl earring.
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it is one of my favourites that he did. living with dementia, joyce cope still enjoys painting. but today, her work is very different from the highly detailed pictures she used to produce before the disease took hold. there was these really good copies of the masters, and very detailed. she's not as detailed now. she can remember things from years ago, but generally if you ask what she had for breakfast this morning, she can't remember. but can art, and more specifically the way artists work, tell us something about the development of dementia and other degenerative brain diseases? much of the research into dementia has obviously been very medical. but now, a new approach combines both maths and art, and offers an intriguing insight into what might be going on in the brains of those artists who develop dementia, long before any symptoms become obvious.
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there is some fractal content in this, which is what we call very low—level fractal dementia... fractal analysis is a complex, mathematical method of looking at recurring patterns. the recurring patterns of our brainwaves and heart beats are fractal. the same applies to the individual brushstrokes of artists, it is a bit like their handwriting. now, an analysis of more than 2,000 works by 17 artists has revealed tiny changes in those patterns. artists who went on to develop dementia or parkinson's disease, the fractal patterns started to change, in an unusual way. so what we find is, up to 20 years before they had a diagnosis of a neurological disorder, the fractal content within their paintings had started to decrease. so anything that helps us understand more about how the brain operates is a useful way to inform future directions for research. artist willem de kooning was diagnosed with alzheimer's
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disease after his death in 1997. the brushstroke patterns seen in his earlier work were different when compared to later paintings. but in the work of picasso, who died free of any known neurological disease, the patterns remain constant throughout his life, regardless of what he was painting. so is it easier to use oils than it is to use watercolours? yes, yes. this won't help diagnosed dementia, or similar diseases, but it does give a valuable insight into changes that are taking place in the brain, years before the illness appears, and so could help answer questions about these devastating conditions. we have had some great guests on the programme. little harry made quite an impression when he visited us here a year ago. he was facing an anxious wait for a life—saving liver transplant. you can see he was in good form when he came to visit, and then in march, with no other donor
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available, his father simon volunteered to share his liver. we have been to catch up with him. i love you. i love you too. but yes, no publications. i have daddy's liver now. it is yours now, you can keep it! —— no complications. liver now. it is yours now, you can keep it! —— no complicationslj think keep it! —— no complications.” think that was very nice of daddy to do. you are welcome. i love you, harry, is all i have to say about that. here's a bit special, he caused mayhem when he was here. we will look at hospitals and the work they are doing to help families in similar situations. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from the news team in the south—east. welcome to viewers in london. the coastguard says it is unlikely to continue the search for a missing crew member who went into the water after a fishing boat capsized off
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the kent coast. one person was winched to safety from the belgian—registered vessel after it got into difficulty several miles off ramsgate yesterday. a second crew member was also rescued but later died. a third man is still unaccounted for. the coastguard said it is unlikely to resume the search this morning unless there is further information. 35 firefighters have been battling a fire in a 3—storey building in tenterden. several properties in the town have been evacuated and a refuge has been set up for residents after the fire started just before 7:30 last night. police are appealing for witnesses to an assault on a man in shoreham—by—sea which is being treated as a hate crime. in the early hours of friday, a 22—year—old man was coming home from a fancy dress party at a pub. sussex police say when he was near the footbridge near coronation green, a group of young people called out homophobic remarks and punched and kicked him to the ground.
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the victim needed hospital treatment for cuts to his head. cctv images have been released for a man wanted in connection with a theft of a wallet from an 83—year—old man in eastbourne. almost £2000 was taken from the victim's bank account last month. it is believed the man pictured here may have been working alongside another man and a woman. police are searching for a man who's gone missing from saint leonards. terry carpenter, who is 55, was last seen on tuesday afternoon on chapel park road. he is known to have links to the hastings and eastbourne areas, and police are asking anyone who has seen him to get in touch. two orangutans who were kept in cages for years have been returned to the wild in indonesia by a sussex animal charity. international animal rescue, based in uckfield, has spent four yea rs preparing the male orangutan, johnny, and the female, desi,
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for their release in borneo last month. a team is monitoring the pair and they are reported to be doing well. it is cold and frosty out there this morning. let's get the forecast with sara thornton. good morning. another very chilly start for some of us with temperatures as low as —3, —4 degrees. we also have some patches of fog around. and to that end, a met office weather warning in force right across the region until midday. it is, though, fairly patchy which means you could encounter it fairly unexpectedly. as we go through the morning, the fog lifts up into low cloud and eventually the low cloud starts to thin and break as well. it should be another very nice afternoon, bright, sunny spells and staying dry. rather on the chilly side, though, with temperatures typically 4—6 celsius. now, through the evening and overnight, we see the mist and fog reforming but as we go through the second half of the night, we have more cloud advancing from the west. so that should start to push some of it away, but i think watch out for it again tomorrow morning. tomorrow, another dry day,
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cloudier than of late. it will be cloudy into the weekend as well. your local radio station will have the latest travel news and we will be back with another date in half an hour. goodbye. —— another update. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just one day after the death of her daughter, the film star carrie fisher. the 84—year—old had been at her daughter's bedside since the star wars star suffered a heart attack on christmas eve. reynold's son, todd fisher, said the stress of his sister's death had been too much for their mother and that her last words had been that she wanted to be with carrie. stars have been paying their tributes to debbie reynolds. william shatner, who played james t kirk in the star trek franchise described her as "one of the last of the hollywood royalty". damejoan collins hailed her as "a wonderfully warm friend and colleague".
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the singer gloria gaynor called her "an american icon and a hollywood legend". in the last half—hour entertainment righted jeanie wolf said her mother had found it difficult to come to terms with her daughter's death. we moved into houses next door to each other. she was a great—grandmother to carry‘s daughter, who is now 24 and beginning to be an actress, all of us should remember that not only did she lose her mother, but she lost her grandmother, who i am told used to play cards with her and sing and stands with her. the billie lourd is someone we will watch and debbie was unthinkable, but this was really too much and you can understand it would be too much. patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor this winter, according to the uk's leading gp. helen stokes—lampard, who chairs the royal college of gps, says longer waiting times could pose
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a "serious risk" to patients. nhs england says surgeries have been promised more funding. dozens of children who lived in the calaisjungle camp have launched a legal challenge against the home office over its handling of asylum applications. lawyers representing 36 children say the government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees. they say hundreds have had their applications turned down without good reason. the home office says it will not comment on ongoing legal proceedings. rebel groups are expected to meet russian negotiators in turkey today as part of a fresh push for a ceasefire in syria. one key group says it's already been in talks with turkish officials about ways to end the fighting, but that it's too early to say whether there could be a truce. it's believed one key point of contention is the exclusion of a key rebel—held area on the outskirts of damascus from the deal. keepers at testers who are
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celebrating the arrival of a very rare and very deep baby. the 6—foot tall youngster who is yet to be named arrived on boxing day. the rothschild giraffe is said to be one of the most endangered species of the animal, with less than 1600 left in the wild. very cute. looking around at the world, to see what it looks like. earlier you were a little bit dismissive of my giraffe fact. remind us. isaid remind us. i said one hour ago that giraffe eat for about 20 hours a day. charlie wasn't impressed, so i've got another one. this is from nick. thank you very much. apparently giraffes have the highest blood pressure of any animal. well, that is quite interesting. and it makes logical sense, because they have to have enough pressure to
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get it up to their brain. because their neck is very long. i like the fact. g i raffes have like the fact. giraffes have long necks! you are going to talk to us about bradley wiggins. one of the most recognisable haircuts in sport, of course. and one of the most brilliant athletes we have ever had. it was interesting talking to rob hayles who wrote in the olympic team in syd ney who wrote in the olympic team in sydney with him. he will be coming back later to talk to us about bradley and his achievements, but will he retire? he has hinted that he will, but he says he is doing ok, he will, but he says he is doing ok, he doesn't think he will, but now he says he will and i think this time it will stick. he says this is it. it is a moment to reflect on.
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it is incredible. let's take a minute to reflect on that incredible career. sir bradley announced his retirement by saying "kids from kilburn don't win olympic golds and the tour de france. they do now." wiggins is the most decorated british olympian, with five gold medals in his total of eight medals. the most recent coming in the team pursuit in rio. he spoke of what he might do when it came to his retirement. to remain riding my bike, involved in cycling. have my own team. i have children's bikes, so very much cycling has been a huge part of my life and it will continue to be. i don't expect too much to change, other than i won't be in olympic finals any more. sir bradley's former olympic team mate rob hayles will be on the sofa with us in the next few minutes. totte n ha m tottenham are just behind arsenal after winning at southampton.
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harry kane had gone three league matches without a goal, but he put an end to that last night. and dele alli scored twice, as southampton finished the game with ten men. spurs stay fifth. they're ten points behind leaders chelsea. ahead of the old firm derby on new year's eve, celtic have stretched their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to 16 points. they beat ross county 2—0 last night, while second—placed rangers were held to a 1—1 draw at st johnstone. a defensive blunder allowed steven maclean to score the equaliser for the home side. there were also wins for motherwell and partick thistle. there has been another high—profile retirement in the world of sport, with tennis player ana ivanovic ending her career at 29. the serbian won the french open in 2008 and, after struggling to repeat that success, she mounted a comeback last year and reached the semi—final at roland garros again. she married manchester united's bastian schweinsteiger this summer. she was of course the former world number one as well and a semifinalist at three grand slams. i wonder, is there something about
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the turn of the year that makes people make decisions? well, she has been injured since august as well. it must be tough trying to get back into things after the winter. on that theme, of things changing, have a think about this one. three days left, thoughts turning to what the next 12 months might bring and what you would like to leave behind you in 2016. for the last decade, new yorkers have been taking this seriously by gathering in times square at the end of each december, to symbolically destroy their bad memories of the previous year. that was something in a bag! good riddance day is based on a latin american tradition which sees people burn dolls stuffed with objects representing the past 12 months. so, what did the people of manchester and new york want to bid farewell to as we head towards 2017? good riddance day few extra christmas pounds. the weather here.
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too cold! homelessness, shocking. i've never seen it so bad. i would like to see places for them off the streets more than anything. working long hours. the memory of david bowie's death. i want to shred the stress and anger that sometimes i have. i don't want it any more. i love the idea of saying goodbye to stop. stress, that would be good! one person who will definitely be wanting to say "good riddance" to 2016 is the tv presenter charlie webster. good morning. iam good morning. i am going to read this. you were in a coma after contracting malaria. we're also joined by psychological therapist emma kenny. good morning to both of you. how are you? good morning to both of you. how are o good morning to both of you. how are you? i'm doing really well. i love this time of the morning. no, i am
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doing well. i am so lucky. quite a few people know the story about 1.0 was given 24 hours to live. my brother flew over, i was on life support. four months ago i was still on life support and to be here now i just feel very grateful. it has been extremely tough and i think people see the physical side. i had com plete see the physical side. i had complete organ failure and i went through a huge trauma mentally. i was told i was dying and i remember what happened in a coma. so i would like to say goodbye to 2016. we've seen like to say goodbye to 2016. we've seen the pictures of you in your hospital bed. is it that easy? are you capable of doing that, compartmentalising things and saying, it is then, he ran now? just to confirm, those pictures were from before i got ill. it was when i went to hospital dehydrated. when i went
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to hospital dehydrated. when i went to hospital dehydrated. when i went to hospital i was about 14 stone, i was extremely blown up, i couldn't see through my eyes. that was very traumatic for my family. but i don't think you can do that and i wouldn't advise anybody to do that, who is going to any trauma, no matter whether it is physical or mental or a loss of somebody. it was as soon as you do that, which i can be like that, i will put on a front and try to put it behind me, but it comes out. i ensure you agree that i get quite a lot. there are certain things, a loud noise also is in environments, that trigger any. the other day i was lying in a bed and it brought back so many memories of me not being able to move. i was strapped down as well in restraints. soa strapped down as well in restraints. so a lot of things flashed back to me. the most important thing is to work through them and be kind to yourself. that's interesting. this
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idea of good riddance to certain things, it isn't that you are pretending it didn't happen, a difference between those two places. absolutely. avoidance and denial are not the way forward. you can't imagine you can pop something in it all and set fire to it and everything is all right. the most important part of any situation is progress. the thing that works in this circumstance is the fact that you are actually taking power over the scenario, so you recognise when something has affected you, but you aren't willing to have that affect you any more. so you create agency. but what we wouldn't want to do is to avoid going through the process, because actually it is often the awful times that we recognise our resilience and forge new opportunities and we harness our self power. so i think the most important part is not to deny it, but certainly to let go once you've worked through it. we talked a moment ago about the ceremony of
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letting go. you have obviously survived a huge trauma. what can you do? is there a physical thing you can do? burn at all! to say goodbye to all of it. —— burn a doll. can do? burn at all! to say goodbye to all of it. -- burn a doll. i completely agree. i've learnt not to do that. i possibly have a habit of doing that, because like to be seen as strong and inspiring and achieved all these things, but for me it was ha rd all these things, but for me it was hard to show and the vulnerable, which i am and i am still very much at the moment and i've had to process and the people, care specialists and psychologists, to process the feelings i went through. for me, the scariest thing was thinking that i would never be here, but on a positive i had such a love of life and i desperately fought for my life and i believe i made a decision to stay alive because i wanted to be here. you can't go through that and be the same person. for me, it is like, i want to 2017
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to come because then i can feel i can put it behind me and start making small goals which then accumulate to a big one to get over it. it seems to me, a bit of amateur psychology, but it has —— that we've got better at acknowledging that something bad has happened, say it out loud, whatever it might be. we realise that strength. the whole idea of the stiff upper lip worked for a time. we've recognised that emotional intelligence and being able to speak your feelings and recognise your pain is the first step in settling it and i think the post trauma that you've called through, undoubtedly the first step is to realise you can't go it alone and that is power and strength. you can't be the same person he were one year ago, but actually what you've recognised is the fight you have in you and this deal you have a new and the recognition that things can get in your way. once you do that,
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that's how powerful acknowledging pain can be at acknowledging trauma. it can change you, are changing for the better. and maybe not comparing yourself. one thing i started to do is, i could do this six months ago, but then i've gone, 0k, is, i could do this six months ago, but then i've gone, ok, i can't do that, i but then i've gone, ok, i can't do that, lam but then i've gone, ok, i can't do that, i am a new person, the but then i've gone, ok, i can't do that, lam a new person, the bubbly a better person. 2016 has been the worst year of my life but it has shaped me for the better. and now you've achieved getting up early in the morning! you can't believe it, four months ago. it is interesting how actually letting go of bad stuff is quite similarto making a letting go of bad stuff is quite similar to making a new year's resolution. what i was going to say was, i wonder if our carol maybe has a new year's resolution or something she wants to let go of over the last year. i think we need to let go of that freezing fog, don't we? we certainly do, there is some freezing fog around, as you rightly say. some
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of it dance, especially across east wales and england and it could lead to travel disruption. some of it will slowly lift, some will not lift at all but there is sunshine into their‘s forecast as well, after a cold start. luckily across parts of england and wales temperatures have fallen as low as —6 —7 so watch out for on untreated surfaces. watch out for on untreated surfaces. watch out for patchy fog as well. it is not everywhere but there are dance pockets of it and for northern ireland in scotland we don't have the same problems, because here there is more cloud and more of a breeze. pockets of frost in sheltered glens, and that is about it. the thicker cloud across north—west scotland is introducing spots of rain, that will turn more persistent later and also much windier. meanwhile for england and for wales we are looking at the fog slowly lifting, sunshine coming through, but the fault is likely to stick across the part a mac parts of east wales, midlands and the vale of
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york. it is going to feel cold. this evening and overnight the breeze picks up, the weather front moving across northern scotland, bringing some rain. we will also see some more cloud on the forecast, although we will start off with some fog, we will see that clear across east anglia and the south—east and here it will drag its heels in terms of clea ra nce. it will drag its heels in terms of clearance. here the temperatures will be that bit lower. now tomorrow is essentially going to be quite a great day. there will be a lot of cloud around, some brighter breaks, but we also have a weather front straddle across the far north of scotland, accompanied by gusty winds. temperature—wise, unless you are stuck under the fog will feel quite mild to the stage in december. in new year's eve, the same weather front is going to be slowly slipping southwards. we see around it, the timing on this keeps changing. this chart finishes at 3pm in the afternoon, so you can see it is
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going to be wet across scotland and northern ireland. by midnight we expect the rain to have slipped into northern england, north wales and northern ireland, but as i said the timing keeps changing, so do keep in touch with the forecast if you have midnight plans. further south, touch with the forecast if you have midnight plans. furthersouth, quite a bit of cloud around with the odd spot of rain or drizzle, especially in the coast sandhills. as this weather front sinks away, we see cold are coming in behind and we will see a return to wintry showers. here is our weather front moving will see a return to wintry showers. here is our weatherfront moving on new year's day across england and wales, breezy around it. kind of cold air filters wales, breezy around it. kind of cold airfilters in, with wales, breezy around it. kind of cold air filters in, with the showers increasingly wintry. we will talk to you again very soon. let's get the latest from the world of business now, and as the new year approaches, sean is here with a few predictions for what 2017 could mean for our money. good morning. well, the big story for british business in 2016 has of course been that vote to leave the european union. but while we wait for the details of what that will look like for the country, there will be some more short—term
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impacts in 2017. the fall in the pound after we voted to leave affected everybody. holidaymakers found it more expensive, british—made goods looked cheaper, and it has had a knock—on effect on prices in our shops. more on that in a minute. so can we expect to see it recover in 2017? so, as michelle says, experts think the pound is going to remain unpredictable. but if it stays around the levels it is at now, that will have a big effect on prices next year. the sterling is most important than most currencies, increasingly the chinese currency, the yen, and the sterling is going to be whipsawed around. experts think it will remain unpredictable. remember marmitegate, back in october, when retailers and suppliers fell out about increasing costs and who should pay them? well, in the coming months, economists and the retailers themselves expect some of those rises to be passed
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on to us shoppers. prices are going to be bigger than shoppers' agenda. 70% of us think that prices will go up next year as a result of brexit and we are all going to be very concerned about our own economy and how we will save money. what we can expect to see is loads of cost saving measures coming back, coupons, vouchers, and we will be seeking value in everything we buy. so what about the money that we save, and that we owe? it has been another bad year for savers, after rates were cut to a record low back in august. but mortgage—holders have had it good, with low rates. but last month, this woman, janet yellen, who is in charge of america's central bank, raised interest rates in the usa, and experts here in the uk have told us they are expecting mortgage rates to edge back upwards next year. we will see interest rates start to rise in the uk sometime. the bank of england have said they want to see the impact of brexit first. so let's
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just wait and see how they play it out. but they are going to probably try and react slower than faster. with interest rates potentially increasing, prices expected to rise, and the pound continuing its uncertain path, there should be more than enough to keep steph, ben and i busy in 2017. there is plenty more work, do not worry about that. now, you may remember little harry, who ran amok in the breakfast studio when he was here with his mum 12 months ago. despite his high energy levels then, harry was facing an anxious wait for a life—saving liver transplant. in march, with no other donor available, his dad simon volunteered to have the operation. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to catch up with the maceachen family, and some of the people helping make hospital a slightly friendlier place for families like them. for the maceachen family, 2016 was life changing.
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one event was lifesaving. with no other donor available, simon donated part of his liver to his son, harry. he was born with a condition called biliary atresia, so he's got a blockage in the bowel ducts. we had occasions where harry would go to bed at night fit and healthy and then at 6am he would wake up with a roaring temperature, vomiting and we would end up in hospital for ten days to a fortnight. harry's first appearance on breakfast last december was memorable. in march, we filmed as the family prepared for surgery. live liver transplants are risky and rare and only possible because the liver is the one internal organ that can regenerate. 2016, what a year. how are you feeling now? no complications, no problems at all, really.
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it took a little while to recover from the surgery. harry bounced back quicker than me. i love you. i love you too. he's a bit younger than me so he was a bit quicker than me. i love you, mummy. yes, so no complications. i love you, daddy. i have daddy's liver now. well, it's yours now, you can keep it. yeah. and i thought that was really nice of daddy. laughs you're welcome. what can you do now that you couldn't before? run really fast. so you've been taking part in the transplant games, have you ? and these other medals you got? how much better do you feel now than before? super better. hospitals can be unfamiliar, unsettling places, especially for children. for their operations, harry and simon wore matching gowns, specially made by volunteers known as the wrap pyjama fairies. harry's such a poppet. he's got such a big personality.
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an extraordinary 12 months. it has been an incredible year. there's hospitals up and down the country getting in touch, their children want something that is friendly and brings a smile to the kid's faces instead of wearing boring scrubs in theatre. before, we distributed about 200 garments a month, we probably distribute around 1,000 garments every month now. i saw your report back in march. i had breakfast telly on that morning and i was so interested in learning more about the charity and becoming involved. and here you are today. a couple of 100 garments later, yeah. the latest batch is bound for the princess royal hospital in telford. it will be a special delivery. we spent a lot of time there. he knows everyone there. who have you brought these for? the little ones. the little ones? do you want to find some little ones? when they're in hospital, it's very scary, they're away
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from their parents, they're in a different environment. we have to make it a more homely environment. the pyjamas give us something for them to talk about, something to choose. every garment comes with a poem written by the wrap pyjama faries. do you believe in magic? we certainly hope you do. it's aimed to reassure children at a difficult time. so, at night time while you are sleeping, we bring ourfairy dust along to help you to get better and to make you strong. harry knows how comforting it can be. from us to you, we hope this will make you smile. what a brilliant idea. it is a great idea. thank you to harry and his family for letting us fill. and those medical staff who will be working all through christmas and new year. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm alex bushill. after a year of rail strikes, delays and cancellations, a new poll suggests the majority of londoners believe transport for london should have more control of commuter lines into the capital. a yougov poll found 58% of respondents want tfl to have greater control of london's rail services. figures released last week showed govia thameslink, which runs southern and other commuter services, had the worst performance of any rail operator in more than a decade. why not the mayor of london, i guess? we can definitely wait and see. if he does take it over, we will see if he can do a good job of it. the strikes have been going on for months now. it is notjust one strike where we have got over it and carried on. do you think could have a shot? it can't be any worse than it already is. well, in response, the department for transport say they are determined to improve journeys for rail passengers
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across london and the south—east. organisers of the swim serpentine event, which took place for the first time in hyde park this year, have confirmed it will be returning to the capital in 2017. thousands of swimmers took part in the two—day open water swimming festival in september. the hope is it will become a regular fixture on the london sporting calendar, similar to the london marathon and ride london events. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tube you can see a few problems. no circle line between aldgate and gloucester road. part closure between wimbledon, kensington, olympia and acting. no overground service kensington, olympia and acting. no overg round service between kensington, olympia and acting. no overground service between uptown and rochester. on the roads, while marla burn road is down to one lane eastbound at the junction with baker street, delays back to the old marla burn road. that is the travel. remember there is a lot of freezing
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fog on the road as well. —— marylebone. let's have a check on the weather now, with sara thornton. a frosty start, a bit of a spread in the temperatures but at our lowest overnight we have down to minus five celsius. notjust of boss to watch out for. some scraping on the cars certainly. some patches of fog and met office weather warning right across the london area. that runs until midday today. as i say it has patches of fog so you may well encounter them unexpectedly. as we go through the morning we will see these fog patches lifting into low cloud and there will be largely dry conditions for the rest of the day. a bit of cloud here and there but rather chilly after the chilly start, with highs ofjust three to six celsius. tomorrow morning, still the best involved was the south—east especially, but it will be cloudy on the whole and that is how we stay for the rest of the day. maybe a little bit drizzly at times towards the east as well. high pressure
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dominating our weather at the moment, that continues into new year's eve as well. dry and settled into new year's eve, fairly cloudy but watch this weather front as it sinks its way off towards the south as we go through the latter part of new year's day. that will introduce some colder airfor the new year's day. that will introduce some colder air for the start of the new working week. in the meantime temperatures back into double figures temporarily on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the veteran hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died just a day after her daughter, carrie fisher. she was 84 and had been rushed to hospital with a suspected stroke — her son said the stress of his sister's death was too much for her. good morning, it's thursday the 29th of december. also this morning: patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see
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their family doctor because of winter pressures — a stark warning from the uk's leading gp. in sport, sir bradley wiggins has announced his retirement from cycling after a career during which he won five olympic golds and the tour de france. lawyers for a group of children who lived in the calais jungle refugee camp launch a legal challenge accusing the british government of breaking its promise to take a fair share of the most vulnerable. good morning. stock markets in the uk have hit record highs as the ftse 100 continued its strong run in december. i will have more shortly. and carol has the weather. good morning, it is a frosty start across england and wales with freezing fog patches. there will be more sunshine than yesterday. for northern ireland and scotland, cloudy and breezy with some sunny spells. i will have more
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details in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died, just one day after the death of her daughter, the film star carrie fisher. she was 84 and is believed to have suffered a stroke. reynolds' career spanned seven decades, but she was best known for her role in the 1952 musical, singin' in the rain, opposite gene kelly. our los angeles correspondent david willis reports. debbie reynolds had been at her son todd fisher's house in beverly hills when she was taken ill. apparently they had been discussing plans for carrie's funeral # good morning, good morning, it's great to stay up late # good morning, good morning to you...# debbie reynolds, 19—years—old,
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singing and dancing on film for the very first time. it was her performance alongside gene kelly in singin' in the rain that set her on the path to fame. born in texas, she moved with her family to california and landed a contract with warner brothers after winning a local beauty contest at the age of 16. she married the popular crooner eddie fisher and together they had two children, carrie and todd. he later left herfor elizabeth taylor, a friend of hers at the time. two subsequent marriages also ended in divorce. a popular choice for movie musicals in the 1950s and ‘60s, debbie reynolds earnt an oscar nomination for her depiction of titanic survivor margaret brown in the unsinkable molly brown. she opened her own hotel in las vegas in 1992, filling it with movie memorabilia she had accumulated over the years, but the business folded and she was eventually forced to auction off the artefacts. my personal life is always sort of like that choo choo train that says "i think i can, i think i can, i think i can". i seem to marry very poorly, i have no taste in men.
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luckily for me, god is good and i have two lovely children and my son helps me run my little hotel, here in vegas. # good morning, good morning...# come on, girls, jump in! she went on to play grace's mother in the hit sitcom will and grace and returned to the big screen to play liberace's mother in the 2013 biopic behind the candelabra. she was taken ill whilst discussing the arrangements for carrie's funeral. it was so sad, it was a shocker. what are the odds of that happening? it is very sad. singer, dancer, hollywood icon. debbie reynolds was 84. and we will be sharing more stories
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about debbie reynolds this morning. patients could be forced to wait up to a month to see their family doctor this winter, according to the uk's leading gp. helen stokes—lampard, who chairs the royal college of gps, says that longer waiting times could pose a "serious risk" to patients. sophie long reports. every winter an increasing workload puts pressure on the nhs because more people are sick. some patients are already waiting 2—3 weeks to get a seat in their gp's waiting—room. come on in and have a seat... now the chair of the royal college of gps says that's likely to climb to over a month in some areas and she is profoundly concerned about how her general practice will cope. firstly, there just aren't enough gps out there. we don't have enough clinicians in the workforce, but also we haven't got enough nurses and other healthcare professionals too. secondly, there's been a serious underinvestment in general practices
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for up to a decade. we have some promises of good news coming, more money and people coming through the system, but they've yet to get to the front line, so the problem this winter is as bad as it has ever been and that's a real worry. she says she is particularly worried about the impact on preventative care and chronic disease management, while the knock—on consequences could take years to manifest. the people who suffer are those with long—term conditions, because we have to prioritise those who are sick today. if however, we are ignoring those with longer term conditions then we are storing up problems for the future and increasing their risks in the long—term. nhs england says gp services are on track to receive an extra £2.5 billion by 2020, which will expand access to convenient appointments throughout the week. we'll speak to the chair of the royal college of gps in around five minutes' time. dozens of children who lived in the calais "jungle" camp have launched a legal challenge against the home office over its handling of asylum applications.
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lawyers representing 36 children say the government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees, and claim hundreds have had their applications turned down without good reason. let's speak to our political correspondent, eleanor garnier. eleanor, what can you tell us about this legal challenge? well, these lawyers are representing 28 children who have had their applications rejected and then a further eight who are still waiting for a decision. the lawyers say some applications have been rejected without reason, and for that reason they are going to be appealing and they are going to be appealing and they are going to be appealing and they are launching a legal challenge. these children have been living in the jungle, challenge. these children have been living in thejungle, the challenge. these children have been living in the jungle, the calle camp when it was dismantled back in october, and these lawyers are accusing the government of failing to ta ke accusing the government of failing to take some of the most vulnerable children and the camp into the uk. the home office said it would not be appropriate to comment on the
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ongoing legal proceedings but we do know around 800 child refugees were brought to the uk this year, and that includes 750 from france. as for what is going on at the moment, the current transfer of child refugees from france to the uk has now ended but we understand there will be children from across europe, who, if they are eligible will be brought to the uk over the next few months. thank you. rebel groups are expected to meet russian negotiators in turkey today as part of a fresh push for a ceasefire in syria. one key group says it's already been in talks with turkish officials about ways to end the fighting, but that it's too early to say whether there could be a truce. it's believed one key point of contention is the exclusion of a key rebel—held area on the outskirts of damascus from the deal. barcodes are to be printed on medicines and medical equipment such as replacement hips and surgical tools. ministers say the scheme, which is being piloted
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in six areas in england, will help reduce the rate of avoidable deaths in hospitals. they claim the idea could also save the nhs up to one billion pounds over seven years. an angiogram, designed to reveal the condition of patients' blood vessels, is carried out in salisbury. as part of the piloting of the scan4 safety scheme, barcodes on medication and equipment record the materials used to treat patients, the time and place of the procedure, and the name of the medical staff taking part. we can trace that patient very quickly. we scan all the equipment, so there should be no drug errors. some drugs look very similar. and it's to the correct patient, so we scan the patient, making sure the right drug or the right blood product, et cetera, goes to the right patient. and if they're going to roll it out to orthopaedics and other type of equipment, we can then trace those back in the future against those patients. barcoding will reduce the average of an hour a day that nurses spend
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collecting medicines, and alert staff to those nearing their use—by dates. everything from screws used in knee operations to breast implants will be barcoded, so their quality can be monitored. about once a week, tragically, someone dies in the nhs because they're given the wrong medicine. we also have a number of operations where the wrong implant is put into someone's body, and that then has to be changed at a later date. and if we use modern bar—code technology, we can deal with a lot of these problems. one of the biggest advantages of scan4 safety could be in tracing patients when faulty products have to be recalled. nearly 50,000 british women had the breast implants made by the french company pip, when they were revealed to be at risk of rupturing, but patchy record—keeping made it difficult to trace the patients. migrating birds are arriving at their breeding grounds earlier as global temperatures rise, a study has found. the research, conducted
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by scientists at the university of edinburgh, says some species are missing out on vital resources like food and nesting places as a result. it is hoped the findings of research will help scientists improve the way that different species respond to future environmental changes. we have the weather coming up for you and warnings about the fog. and in the sport we are talking about bradley wiggins announcing his retirement. this time of year is always busy for gp surgeries, but there are concerns this morning that some will struggle to cope with the extra demand. the chair of the royal college of gps, dr helen stokes—lampard, says the situation poses a serious risk to patients and she joins us now from tamworth in staffordshire. good morning. thank you for your time this morning. give us a sense of the scale of the problem. well,
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this is a problem which is rapidly expanding. we have seen a series of disinvestment in general practice. the consequences we have gp surgeries closing. many are finding it difficult to recruit gps and many people will find it hard to get a routine appointment to see their gp. we are all pushing and firefighting to make sure urgent cases are being seen to make sure urgent cases are being seen but the inevitable consequence is that the patients who have less urgent problems are being pushed to the back of the queue. you have many yea rs of the back of the queue. you have many years of experience, would you say it is worse now than it has been before or is this something we see every winter? well, we do see this every winter? well, we do see this every winter, but it has got to the stage now in the nhs where this is a year—round problem which gets worse in the winter. we are seeing the flu season starting now and that is only going to get worse throughjanuary.
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we also see a lot more other infectious illness as well as slips and trips in the icy weather so the workload increases across general practice in the winter every year, but it is particularly bad because we have fewer health care professional seeing people and the demand will go up. 1.6 million patients will see a gp in the uk and we are seeing 60 million more patients every year than we used to a few years ago. demand is rising, we have fewer health care professionals and resources are shrinking so it is at crisis point. so, one part of this is the big picture, you have talked about the lack of staff and funding issues which people will be familiar with. ona which people will be familiar with. on a practical level, often seeing the gp is the first call for someone who has medical conditions, you run a practice, you are a gp, if someone is calling your practice this morning, what is their reality, what
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will happen? the reality is, if they need to be seen today, they will be seen. need to be seen today, they will be seen. we are really doing everything we can to keep that part of the service going because that is the really urgent stuff but what we are having to do is cut back on routine appointments. people who want to see me with something less urgent, people who need their blood pressure monitored or their diabetes care reviewed, that is being delayed and it could be three weeks to get a routine appointment and and that is not good enough. if we are missing out on these things, things will slip through the net and my theory is that things will be missed. no health care professional wants to be missing serious conditions. we are there to look after our patients but we are all stretched so then working such long hours, we cannot work more than we are. it is a real worry. gps are going off with stress and exhaustion and they are leaving the profession because they cannot do a
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safe enoughjob. profession because they cannot do a safe enough job. that is a tragedy for everybody. that is the experience that many people face now. gp services are on track to receive an extra £2.4 billion by 2020, is that sum of money... i think we havejust 2020, is that sum of money... i think we have just lost helen stokes—lampa rd. think we have just lost helen stokes—lampard. for the think we have just lost helen stokes—lampa rd. for the record, think we have just lost helen stokes—lampard. for the record, the statement from nhs england in relation to the funding issues is gp services are on track to receive more investment by 2020 but as you heard from the royal college of gps, they say that is not making any practical difference on the ground if you are seeking an appointment today will stop you are watching brea kfast today will stop you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died aged 84, just one day after the death of her daughter
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carrie fisher. the uk's leading gp is warning winter pressure in some patients could face a month long wait to see theirfamily doctor. it has been very, very cold for a lot of people waking up this morning. i don't know if we can show you a view of outside our studio here, it has gone a bit foggy. it was beautiful 30 seconds ago. it was a beautiful sunrise. let's go to beautiful carol instead. the fog that we have is patchy and it is dense in places. it could lead to some travel disruption. you can find out what's happening where you are on your bbc local radio station. temperatures have fallen widely,
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around freezing or below across england and wales and locally —6 or seven, but around the coasts it is much higher than that. by ten o'clock we have got the sun coming out but there are still these stubborn areas of fog. across the midlands and the vale of york it could lingerfor much of midlands and the vale of york it could linger for much of the day. brightening up in the far north of england and for northern ireland and scotla nd england and for northern ireland and scotland it is a very cloudy start for you. we will see some sunshine. when we find the breaks in the cloud this morning there are pockets of frost. through the day the fog continues to lift. i'm mentioned areas it is likely to stick and we will see increasing amounts of clout with the wind strengthening and more persistent rain coming through the midwest. it will be a cold day for england and wales but more sunshine than yesterday. especially so if you are stuck under one of the areas where the fog persist, temperatures
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will struggle to break freezing. through this evening and overnight, some of the cloud will lift the frost and fog. at the same time the weather front is making slow progress heading south across northern scotland. into friday the progress of that weather front, it is still quite windy. move away from that and we're looking at some cloud, one or two breaks here and there. the temperature will be depressed. for much of the uk, these temperatures are pretty high for this stage in december. a mild day tomorrow. as we head into new year's eve or hogmanay, the weather front still slow moving as it pushes across scotland and northern ireland. this is what we expect on current thinking the rain to be at 3pm. the rest of the uk, england and wales, looking at variable amounts
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of cloud. the timing of this front could change. by the time we get to midnight it looks as though the front will be across england and wales but that could change. what we know will happen is that as the front goes backwards, the mild air will be pushed away and we will have a cold or north—easterly winds. there will be some sunshine and the rain will continue its journey south eventually into the south—east. thanks. very changeable in the next few days. let's talk about the markets now. a break. yes. after they opened yesterday they hit some new highs. let's start with an update on the stock markets this morning. they are down a little, after the record highs yesterday. the index of our 100 biggest listed companies the ftse100 hit a record
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7,106 yesterday after what is often called a santa rally, when shares rise in the last few weeks of the year. toshiba has seen a big fall in the value of the company in the last few days, but it's nothing to do with the electronics side of the business we're more familiar with. the company is now worth just over half of what it was before christmas, after it warned its us nuclear business is worth less than previously thought. you might have been treating yourself to a bitter chocolate for brea kfast yourself to a bitter chocolate for breakfast around christmas and all kinds of things, i know i have. on the whole, the more traditional bowl of is falling out of favour. figures from the grocer showed that sales of cornfla kes and others from the grocer showed that sales of cornflakes and others were down around £80 million this year, consumers were tending to choose more on the go. i'm eating less chocolate at the
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moment for breakfast! i'm definitely eating more! but charlie is very good with his breakfast. this morning you had porridge companies said it was very good. the time is a 21 am. for the last five weeks it seems we've been bombarded by retailers offering us deals and discounts, from black friday to cyber monday, pre—christmas discounts and now into the boxing day sales. but new figures out this week revealed a 2% drop in high street shoppers in december. does the decline mean we're suffering from "sales fatigue"? we asked some bargain hunters in manchester what they thought. it used to just be that people look forward to the boxing day sales or the summer sales but now there are pre—sales, it's not such a big deal any more i think. i enjoy it more than normal shopping to be honest.
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you see stuff that you wouldn't normally see but it is half price all the time. i feel sorry for these people who work in these shops that work until ex—pm christmas eve, i think it's wrong. the shops shouldn't be open on boxing day.” got some shirts and jackets. i think you can get some relief or bargains. we're copying america, just copying that model and doing what they do. black friday is not a british thing as faras black friday is not a british thing as far as i know. it'sjust good to have a sale so you can get the bargains rather than being bombarded with it all the time. diane wehrle is from springboard, a company that analyses retail performance. what is changing? we are definitely changing our habits a bit. we are and they love that that is driven by the retailers. a few years ago black friday didn't exist and then three yea rs friday didn't exist and then three years ago it came on the same and that has really created the beginning of retail trading performance, i guess, beginning of retail trading performance, iguess, but beginning of retail trading performance, i guess, but it had this little philip at the beginning
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or the end of november and then paying out. at this point is eve ryo ne paying out. at this point is everyone sick of the shops? can i just ask on the black friday thing, has anyone checked whether those reductions you see on black friday are reductions you see on black friday a re really reductions you see on black friday are really on that day? do the prices go up on a monday? some do but some don't, it does vary from retailer to retailer. i find myself cynical about that, if you are bigging it up and saying this is your chance to go shopping and get a discount, it has to be that otherwise next year i will think, what is the point? because it wasn't a genuine reduction. that's the problem that shoppers are having because whether or not we believe that those discounts are true will influence our shopping habits. that will influence how many people buy on the high street and how many buy online. they have to have trust in the retailers. interesting the point
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you make about being cynical. don't retailers rely on those of us who are not cynical, whojust retailers rely on those of us who are not cynical, who just blindly think, that is definitely cheaper, it looks like it might be 30% off. most people panic a bit, don't they, and then buy on whatever black friday or cyber monday, whatever it is? the problem that all the retailers have, if you buy when it is cheap and next week you go back and the price is the same committee gets cynical. then next year you're not so ready to buy an black friday. it's a the gated process. it's something retailers really have to get their head around, rather than just chase a discount. —— it's a complicated process. the first start for retailers is often just to go to a sale. this came from the recession in 2009 or 2010 when retail was really on its knees and retailers were struggling. before that you didn't really get any pre—christmas discounting a boxing day was the day. then that only in 2009, 2010,
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we had pre—christmas sales for the first time, people lapped it up and they thought we will do it again and this pandora's box has been opened. we make much of online shopping but actually are we spending more money? less of us on the high street, we understand that, but overall? the ims has identified that overall 85% of spending is still in store. while we have been seeing big gains in online shopping, the majority of our shopping is still in store. sales over the christmas period in stores have dropped by about 4.5% this year. if that is accounting for over 85% of total sales then no, total sales have gone down this year. you bought anything in the sales?” bought anything in the sales?” bought anything in the sales?” bought a jacket. bought anything in the sales?” bought ajacket. nice. have you? no. have you? yes, i bought a code. it's
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clothing. -- i bought a code. the boys yesterday bought suits. now, i don't know if you remember one little special guest we had last year, harry. he made quite an impression when he visited us in the studio. he was facing an anxious wait for a life—saving liver transplant. that was in march, with no other donor available. his dad simon volunteered to share his live and we have been to catch up with them. i love you. i love you too. we love you, harry, that's all we need to say. it's an insight into the medical teams who have been helping out that family and many other families as well. that's coming up a little bit later on. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning. after year of strikes, delays and cancellations, new poll says that transport for london should have more control over transport in the capital. recent figures showed govia thameslink had the worst performance of any rail operator in a decade. why not the mayor of london, i guess? you have to wait and see. if he does take it over, we will see if he will do a good job with it. the strikes have been going on for months. they are just dragging it out now. he could have a go. can't be any worse than it is.
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organisers say the serpentine swim will be returning to the capital in 2017. lots of problems on the roads and rail, let's have a quick look at the travel situation. this is a view of marylebone road. delays are now back to the old marylebone road. finally, london city airport is reporting possible delays to flights following earlier foggy weather. let's have a quick chat on the weather now. good morning. anotherfrosty start.
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we have been down to minus five celsius. notjust a frost we have been down to minus five celsius. not just a frost to watch out for, also some patches of fog. we have a met office weather warning in force. but runs until midday today. it is patches of fog. as we go through this morning we will see the fog patches lifting up into low crowd and then we will be largely dry for the rest of the day with some good sunny spells coming through. it is rather chilly with highs of three to six celsius. there is still some mist and fog out towards the south and east. it will be cloudier on the whole. this is how we stay for the rest of the day. we have high pressure dominating our weather at the moment. that continues to new year's eve as well. watch this weather front. it will think it's way off towards the south
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as we go through the latter part of new year's day and that will introduce and colder air for the start of the new working week. temperatures back into double figures temporarily on saturday. iam back i am back in half an hour. now back to sally and charlie. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and sally nugent. the hollywood actress debbie reynolds has died one day after the death of her daughter carrie fisher. the 84—year—old his acting career spanned seven decades had been at her daughter's bedside since the star wars star suffered a heart attack on christmas eve. todd fisher said the death of his sister had been too much for her mother and that her last words had been she wanted to be with carrie. many hollywood stars have been
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paying tribute to debbie reynolds. william shatner described her as one of the last of the hollywood royalty. damejones royalty. dame jones collins royalty. damejones collins hailed her as a wonderfully warm friend and colleague. singer gloria gaynor called her an american icon and a hollywood legend. in the last hour, the entertainment journalistjeannie wolf said debbie reynolds had struggled to come to terms with the death of her daughter. they moved into houses next door to each other and debbie was a great—grandmother to carry‘s daughter who is 24 now and beginning to be an actress. all of us should remember that not only did she lose her mother, but she lost her grandmother who i am told you is to play cards with her and dance with her so she is someone we will watch. debbie was unsent kabul but this was really too much and you could understand it would be too much for
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anybody —— she was on sing kabul. patients could wait up to a month to see their gp. helen stokes—lampard says longer waiting times could pose a serious risk to patients. nhs surgeries have been promised more funding. dozens of children who live in the —— lived in the calaisjungle camp have launched a legal challenge to the home office. lawyers say the government broke its promise to take in its fairshare government broke its promise to take in its fair share of child refugees. they say hundreds have their application turned down without good reason. the home office says it will not comment on ongoing legal proceedings. bar codes are to be printed on medical equipment such as replacement hips. the scheme will help reduce the rate of avoidable
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deaths in hospital and could save the nhs up to £1 billion over and seven yea rs. keepers at chester zoo are celebrating the arrival of a very rare and very big baby. the rothschild giraffe is said to be one of the most endangered species of the animal. it has the highest blood pressure of any animal. why are you laughing? coming up here this morning.
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britain's most decorated olympian has called it a day as sir bradley wiggins has announced his retirement. we look at his career highs and lows along with his former team—mate. the pagans worshipped nature like crisp packet. —— chris pack. the pagans worshipped nature like crisp packet. -- chris pack. she is the clueless commentator on charlie brougham's christmas white. and we will find out how birds migrate. all of that is coming up later. first of all we will talk about an amazing success story which is bradley wiggins. yes, the tattoos, the reverent
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attitude, the paul weller haircut, he was the man who put rock and roll into cycling. and also rock ‘n' roll into cycling. and also rock ‘n' roll into british sport. you have seen the phenomenal rise in the level of success from the moment he started cycling to the moment in 2016 when he won the team pursuit in rio, we have become a world superpower and he is one of the athletes who lifted our sporting profile around the world and say we have a lot to thank bradley wiggins four. he has decided to hang up his cleats after nearly 20 years. he has wonjust to hang up his cleats after nearly 20 years. he has won just all there is to win. here are a few of his career highlights. he rides with an incredible amount of material tea, this young fellow. —— acuity. this is a virtuoso performance by
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wiggins. he will be the 4000 meter olympic champion. bradley wiggins is a gold medal winner and olympic champion! wiggins is the master of the time trial. he is the master of the time trial. he is the master of the tour de france. he will become britain's first ever winner. this will be a golden ride for wiggins. the crowd are going ballistic. he comes up the crowd are going ballistic. he comes up to the line and goes into the lead! it is coming down to the last lap here. it will be great britain! sir bradley wiggins wins and olympic gold for the fifth time in his career. some amazing memories there from the career of bradley wiggins and we are joined by his team—mate rob hayles.
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you know the man better than any other people. because of the personality he has, because the profile he has, one of the questions iam profile he has, one of the questions i am always asked about bradley wiggins is what is he actually like? what is he actually like? it depends on what day of the week you are talking! brad is quite shy which is one of the reasons why, when he comes out of his shell, he is truly out there. he is one of those riders you want him alongside you. you know that as long as he is on his game, then the shore he will help you attain his best performance. he is an incredible bike rider and athlete. 2012 was absolutely phenomenal and certainly helped
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increase the profile of cycling as a sport. people love lists, the greats. in any sport they love to know who is the greatest. where does he sit, do you think? it is a difficult one. you look at the greatest bike rider of them all, eddie mair works, brad greatest bike rider of them all, eddie mairworks, brad is greatest bike rider of them all, eddie mair works, brad is on a different list. his performance on the track to the road, the biggest performance on the track to the biggest performance on the road, back to where it all started, it has never been done before by anybody. it is hard to see many riders who would be able to do that in the future. what is it about him that made him so determined? he is obviously a fantastic athlete. he is one of those guys, once he set himself a task, he will follow that. he lives like a monk in that
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respect. but obviously, when he is off the ball, when he is off his game, that is it, it is out there for everybody to see. the needle kind of goes from the green writing into the red and back again, in terms of his personality, but i think that is what makes him so great. that is the way he needed to do it, put it that way. thank you. thank you for sharing that with us. now, pagan festivals, the nativity story and santa claus are some of the yuletide rituals the clueless commentator philomena cunk is pondering for her new mock you mention ray. she is back trying to track down christmas in her own style. centuries before jesus
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arrived, late december was a time of celebration for the pagans who existed so long ago there are not any youtubes of them. we have to make do with this picture. i spoke to an expert. were there pagans before there were humans? no, you have got to be a human to do anything. pagans lived in europe before christianity arrived. how difficult was it for them to get around on all fours? they walked upright like we do. they worshipped nature like chris packham. one of these events that they celebrated took part in late december and was known as the winter solstices. that is a tricky thing to say! known as the winter solstices. that is a tricky thing to sawm took me ages to learn. the tricky
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play on words was so well done. that spoofed role, little things like that are funny. they are always going on a journey. let's go on a journey to find out about christmas. and you go on your own journey.” generally spoofed anything brian cox does. you find comedy, funny moments in those little ordinary things which sometimes if you are not paying attention can pass you by. are you paying huge amount of attention to the commentators on tv all the time? i suppose i must be. everyone copies everyone else. when you notice things like that, i like to latch on with them and make people feel bad about it. there is quite a lot of nonsense in the world that we inhabit and when someone comes in and pointed out, it can be quite painful in a way. yes, i'm
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surprised more people don't do it! there are some priceless moments in this. you interview serious experts in your persona and just help me with this one, without wanting to spoil any of the magic, do they know you are in it to take the mickey? no, iam you are in it to take the mickey? no, i am not in it to take on because i am the idiot. but do they think you are a serious journalist? it is their reaction to my idiocy which is funny. a lot of the earlier interviews we did, the people had no idea but now the cat is pretty much out of the bag and people are happy to play along. i think they are great. that must make it harder because as the character is more well—known and your face is insta ntly well—known and your face is instantly recognisable, people are more clued up about it, i guess. one of my favourite things, i loved
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motherland. it was a pilot you were infora motherland. it was a pilot you were in for a series which has now been commissioned. it was bleakly funny and scary and it is all about motherhood and fatherhood and times it was very cutting. let's have a look at this. here we are, down to now be. —— downturn abbey. they? have you got any herbal? fennel, jasmine or mint. i will have jasmine. you are joking, i have not got any herbal tea, only yorkshire. do you know anyone like this? no, i am nota do you know anyone like this? no, i am not a mother, it is basically me! i have had so mini mothers come up to me in the street and say, i am so
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pleased you made this because people need to know how awful it is! kind of competitive motherhood. where will philomena cast her gaze next? cunk on punk has been mentioned but i thinkjust because it rhymes. she could do anything. what about cooking or baking? yes will stop it is beautifully observed and i recommend it to anyone. cunk on christmas is on bbc two at ten o'clock tonight. let's have a word with carroll. we we re let's have a word with carroll. we were talking about things which go wrong and they go wrong hole the time, don't they? they certainly do. once on my chart i had —99 and it
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was not anywhere near as cold obviously. we have had some beautiful weather watcher pictures a cute one here from staffordshire, look at that dog. you can sell the weather quite nicely from those pictures, so thank you for sending them in. quite a lot of fog around this morning particularly around east wales and parts of england. some of it is dense, a lot is patchy. even by the time we get to ten o'clock there will still be some fog around. today there will be more than there was yesterday. freezing fog, temperatures widely below freezing. northern ireland and scotla nd freezing. northern ireland and scotland it is a different story. figure crowd —— figure crowd across the north west of scotland. later the north west of scotland. later the rain will turn more persistent
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and a wind will strengthen. for england and wales most of the fog will lift but areas where it's going to stick will be across east wales, the midlands and the vale of york. here is the weather does linger, temperatures will tend to struggle to break freezing. temperatures will tend to struggle to breakfreezing. so it is going temperatures will tend to struggle to break freezing. so it is going to be cold. through the evening and overnight we will see some frost and fog returned. the cloud will lift the fog but we will still have some across the southeast and east anglia first thing in the morning. meanwhile our weather front is pushing slowly southwards across the north of scotland. tomorrow the progress of that front will continue to be slow as it comes a little further south. the eastern parts of northern ireland and scotland are seeing lighter skies. if you're stuck under the fog in the
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south—east, that will depress the temperature as well. temperatures still quite high for this stage in december. as we had to new year's eve or hogmanay, it is slowly coming southwards. the timing has changed although it is starting to level out now. this chart finishes at 3pm, this is where we expect the rain to be then. by the time we get to midnight the rain should be across—the—board as midnight the rain should be across—the—boa rd as into midnight the rain should be across—the—board as into northern england and north wales. in daytime hours we are looking at quite a clouded day with drizzle and showers particularly in the west, particularly in the west, particularly on the hills and coasts. as the weather front sinks south it won't go that quickly but behind it we will some —— we will see some cooler air. here is the weather front across england and wales on new year's day, pushing down towards the south—east. behind it, some sunshine, some showers, feeling colder, the showers will be
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wintry in nature. we've been talking quite a lot this morning about not new year ‘s resolutions but things that you really wa nt resolutions but things that you really want to see the back of from 2016, good to say goodbye to stuff. i'm dying to know, what would you like to say goodbye to this year? chocolate, actually! i've got to say goodbye to chocolate! but 2016, i've had a good year, but there were lots of things that happen like all these deaths, it seems to have been a particularly sad year from that point of view. but you've had a good 2016 yourself, which is great to hear. thanks, carol. 8:48am the time now. you may remember little harry who ran amok in the breakfastjudeo when he was here with his mum 12 months ago. despite his really high energy levels there, he was actually
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facing a long wait for a liver transplant. with no donor available, his dad simon volunteered to have the operation. breakfast has been to catch up with his family and some of the people helping to make hospital a slightly friendlier place for families. for this family, 2016 was life changing. one event was life—saving. with no other donor available, simon donated part of his liver to his son harry. he was born with a condition with blockage in the bile ducts. we had so many occasions when harry would go to bed at night perfectly fit and healthy and then at 6am he would wake up with a roaring temperature and vomiting and we would end up in hospital for ten days to a fortnight. harry's first appearance on' breakfast last december was memorable. in march we filmed as the
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family prepared for surgery. live liver trance plants are risky and rare, only possible because the liver is the one internal organ that can regenerate. 2016, what is a difficult year this has been for you, how are you feeling now? good, no come occasions. it took a long time to bounce back from the surgery. i love you. i love you too. i love you, mummy. i have daddy's liver now. it's yours now, you can keep it! you're welcome. what can he do now that you couldn't do before? run really fast. you been taking pa rt run really fast. you been taking part in the transplant games and these are the medals you've got. how much better do you feel now than
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before the operation? much better. hospitals can be unsettling places especially for children. for their operations, harry and simon wore matching gowns specially made by volunteers. harry has got such a big personality. they too have had an extraordinary 12 months. it's been an incredible year really. there are hospitals up and down the country getting touch, their children's's wards, stuff that is friendly and brings a smile to the children's faces instead of wearing boring scraps when they are in theatre. we probably distribute around 1000 garments a month now.” probably distribute around 1000 garments a month now. i had brea kfast telly garments a month now. i had breakfast telly on back in march, i was so breakfast telly on back in march, i was so interested in learning more about the charity and becoming involved. and here i am today, probably a couple of hundred garments later. their latest batch is destined for the princess royal hospital in telford. it will be a
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special delivery. we spent a lot of time there, he knows everyone there. who are these for? the little ones. do you want to find some little ones? when they are in hospital, it's a completely different environment and they are away from their parents, it can be scary. the pyjamas give them something to talk about, something to choose. every garment comes with a poem written by the wrap pyjama fairies. aimed to reassure children at a difficult time. harry knows how comforting it can be. we hope this will make you smile. well done harry. that's lovely. a thought for all those people at work
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or in hospital or you have family in hospital at the moment, it can be such a difficult time. birds are migrating to their breeding grounds earlier as temperatures around the world rise and this could in turn affect their access to food and nesting spots, according to research from the university of edinburgh. it can help scientists learn more about how they respond to changes in their environment. good morning. i use seeing evidence of this? joining us now is tom clare, from the martin mere wetland centre in lancashire. take the swallow, a lot of people know they are migrating birds. what has changed ? know they are migrating birds. what has changed? a lot of birds are migrating from africa to the uk and they are coming across the african continent and the first big challenge facing climate change now is the sahara desert is getting
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bigger, so that is a big journey for them to try to get over and it causes a lot of problems for the birds. and they get to southern europe, the temperature indicates if they're going to move further north. what we've got to try and hope for with climate change is these birds arriving on the breeding ground when the food supply is really good because they've just finished migration and they've lost a lot of energy, they need to feed up and make sure they are in good condition for the breeding season ahead. make sure they are in good condition for the breeding season aheadm the challenge that the food isn't there when they get there?m the challenge that the food isn't there when they get there? it can be. there's a lot of problems, if they arrive and start breeding early and the food supply is not there that will have an on chick survival at young to fledgling stage. the warmer it gets further north, the more snowfall there is actually, it might sound strange, a lot of birds
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migrating to green siberia, they are finding a lot more snowfall on the ground and it's taking longerfor that to melt away and there are not getting the change they need. life changes but human beings can adapt to their surroundings. i miss you mean the same supplies to birds, they can presumably adapt to changes in climate? some birds can adapt and adapt quickly and those are the ones that will succeed with climate change. which ones? swallows are adapting quite well to it. they are having more broods in the summer and the breeding season is longer. they are hoping —— we're hoping that the more broods, they should be to hopefully succeed. does this mean people should be able to see different types of birds arriving to this country may be now? we will see some birds from the continent moving further south, spoonbills which are really interesting birds. they might start to colonise. but there's a
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problem with that in that birds at the really southern border, things like snow buntings which breed in northern scotland, they might get pushed out of the uk because they are having to follow their habitat further north. really interesting. are you back at work today?” haven't, i got some time off over christmas but back in the new year. thank you. it's just coming up to nine o'clock, let's take another last brief look at the headlines where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alex bushell. a new poll suggests the majority of londoners believe transport for london should have more control over commuter lines into the capital. a yugo poll felt 58% of respondents want tear fell to have greater control. tefl are determined to improve conditions
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for passengers but recent figures showed thames link had the worst figures in more than a decade. park closures on the district line between high street kensington and wimbledon, high —— kensington olympia and acton town. no tefl rail service between chadwell heath and shenfield. on the trains, services in and out of fenchurch street running but with some cancellations. no service between paddington and ealing broadway. marylebone road is down to one lane eastbound. in the city, cannon street is closed between queen vic tory street and down gate hill. a quick look at the weather. the freezing fog will clear leaving a largely dry day and a temperature of around six celsius. that's it for
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this morning, i'm back at 1pm with the lunchtime news. goodbye. and that is in fact it from us on brea kfast and that is in fact it from us on breakfast this morning. but we are back tomorrow from 6am. we will be hearing from benedict cumberbatch, a lot of excitement ahead of the new theresa sherlock. it's very exciting, it really has been fa ntastically exciting, it really has been fantastically rich and challenging and new and that is the thing that keeps us coming back for more. the demons beneath... yours have been waiting for a very long time. it looks like it's just getting better and better than ever.l little darker as well! scary at times! see you tomorrow, enjoy the rest of your day. goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at 09.00am: the actress debbie reynolds has died —
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just a day after the death of her daughter, carrie fisher. her daughter dying yesterday, and today, it is unbelievable. what are the odds of this happening? it was incredible. sad. gps' leaders warn that patients could be forced to wait more than a month to see their doctor this winter. australian police say they've made the biggest cocaine seizure in the country's history — 15 men are arrested. also: the birds migrating earlier as global temperatures rise. a study finds some species are missing out on vital resources like food and nesting places as a result. and, as the international olympic committee creates a new team of refugees we've been following some of the hopefuls. that's in half an hour on bbc news.
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