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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  December 31, 2016 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. more than 100 stars of the olympics and paralympics are recognised in the new year's honours list at the end of a glittering year in sport mo farah, jessica ennis—hill and andy murray are among more than a hundred athletes honoured. nearly 1200 people are on this year's list, from entertainers to community workers, we'll be hearing some of their stories. it has been astonishing really. i don't think it will until i go to the palace and get the words. good morning, it's saturday 31st december. warnings of travel disruption on the roads and at airports as foggy conditions continue to affect parts of the country. security plans for new year's eve celebrations are modified in response to this year's terror attacks in berlin and nice. hull city are off the bottom of the
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premier league after a 2—2 draw with everton. and matt has weather forecast. still some fog this morning across southern areas but nowhere near as bad as yesterday. i have the details on that and details of the weather conditions as we finish this year and head on to the next. good morning. first, our main story. more than 100 olympic and paralympic stars have been recognised in the new year honours list, with knighthoods for andy murray and mo farah. jessica ennis—hill and the rower, katherine grainger, have received damehoods, while the gold medal—winning paralympian, lee pearson, has also been knighted. 0ur correspondent, andy swiss, has the details. at the end of a glittering year for
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british sport, for five of its greatest stars, the greatest honours. first, a noted for the man who spent 2016 skilling dizzying new heights. wimbledon champion again. after winning a second wimbledon, a second 0lympics after winning a second wimbledon, a second olympics and world number one spot, it is no sir andy murray, fitting finish to a remarkable season. fitting finish to a remarkable season. there is also a new title for mo farah‘s season. there is also a new title for mo fa rah‘s collection. season. there is also a new title for mo farah's collection. the double double. he described his noted as a dream come true, having come to britain as an 18—year—old from somalia, he could never have imagined it. another athletic star meanwhile becomes a game. jessica ennis hill, she retired this year. there is also a game had fought katherine grainger after five medals at five consecutive 0lympics, katherine grainger after five medals at five consecutive olympics, the perfect ending for her career.m
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at five consecutive olympics, the perfect ending for her career. it is not something i ever thought i would great, but what a great time together. it is the end of a 20 year career. it is a lovely way to bring the curtain down. there is a noted for one of the top parliamentarians, lee pearson, the dressage rider, who w011 lee pearson, the dressage rider, who won his 11th gold medal in rio. two sporting couples, cbes forjason and laura kenning won hockey gold medallist kate and helen richardson walsh become an 0be and mba respectively. after their impressive run at euro 2016, the welsh football manager, chris coleman, becomes an 0be and michael 0'neill becomes an mbe, justa 0be and michael 0'neill becomes an mbe, just a few of more than 100 sporting figures honoured for a memorable 12 months. stars of the stage and screen, have also been included in the new year's honours list. ken dodd said he was ‘tickled' to have been knighted at the age of 89, and joked that he would wear his medal in bed. patricia routledge, the star of keeping up appearances has been made a dame,
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an announcement that would make hyacinth bucket proud. ray davies, frontman of the kinks, said he felt humility and joy at hearing of his knighthood. he's been recognised for services to the arts. and he picked up the best—supporting actor award at the oscars earlier this year, now mark rylance, star of the film bridge of spies and bbc two's wolf hall, has been made a sir. around three quarters of those who received the words were recognised for their services to the community. 0ne for their services to the community. one of those said it was a marvellous surprise. it has been astonishing really. it would sink in until april to the palace and get the awards. it still doesn't feel real for the awards. it still doesn't feel realfor me yet. the awards. it still doesn't feel real for me yet. ijust want the awards. it still doesn't feel real for me yet. i just want to the awards. it still doesn't feel real for me yet. ijust want to get rid of the stigma and the fear attached to mental health. that is what i haven't been doing the work i have been doing and focusing on
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young people. we launched a mental health workshop in schools. there's a warning that heavy fog could cause further travel disruption today. yesterday the uk's biggest airports, heathrow and gatwick cancelled more than 150 flights. the met office says driving conditions will be difficult in many areas of central, eastern and south—east england. 0ur reporter, simonjones, is at heathrow airport this morning. i know you are keeping a close eye on conditions. what is the latest? we have the strange situation this morning where you can hear the planes coming and going, but it is difficult to make them out because the fog is quite dense and if you look at the departure boards it is a pretty grim picture. we have a lot of flights delayed for several hours. 0ne of flights delayed for several hours. one for 16 hours. that is if ito hours. one for 16 hours. that is if i to frankfurt. we have had flights cancelled. ba have cancelled more than 50 flights coming and going from the uk. that could affect
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around seven and a half thousand passengers. yesterday some 30,000 passengers. yesterday some 30,000 passengers had flights to and from the uk cancelled. we have a yellow weather warning in place forforward for the south—east, for southern england, central england and the midlands and also yorkshire, meaning people should be prepared. it is not just a problem at the airports. there are also issues on the roads we re there are also issues on the roads were driving conditions are extremely bad. visibility less than 100 metres. the advice is jacobi travel situation before you decide to head out. around 3,000 police officers will be on duty across central london tonight as crowds gather to celebrate the new year. greater manchester police and other forces say they've also stepped up crowd protection measures. scotland yard says extra resources have been brought in to keep people safe following the terror attacks in berlin and nice earlier this year. we spent a long time carefully
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planning this operation with our partners including the mayor ‘s office, westminster city council and others to make sure people can into central london and fantastic time. there will be a search regime in place. something like 3000 police officers on duty in central london alone and there will be stewards as well. meanwhile, the german chancellor angela merkel has said that islamist terrorism is the biggest challenge facing her country. in her new year message, mrs merkel referred to the deadly truck attack in berlin earlier this month by a tunisian asylum seeker. damian mcguiness joins us from berlin. we know that security has been stepped up there. what is the atmosphere like that? everyone is preparing to party because the whole country is determined not to feel cowed by the recent terror attacks in germany. that doesn't mean police
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are taking it lightly. there is unprecedented levels of security and surveillance around the brandenburg gate here where the main party is expected. about 1 gate here where the main party is expected. about1 million people are expected. about1 million people are expected to come to a two kilometre stretch around the brandenburg gate. that would stretch is fenced off. there are concrete barriers up and, unusually for germany, cctv cameras. that is to prevent a repeat of the attack we saw before christmas when attack we saw before christmas when a truck ran into a christmas market, killing 12 people. also in cologne, we have got other levels of unprecedented security. that is to avoid a repeat of the incident last year and new receive 100s of women assaulted on the night of neuroses itself. that area will be lit up and there are hundreds of police officers just around the station and thousands in the city centre. security officials are really taking
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it extremely seriously because the last thing they want is a repeat of what happened last new year's eve in cologne. thank you very much. two bomb explosions at a busy market in the iraqi capital, baghdad, have killed at least 21 people. dozens more were wounded in the blasts which happened at a market. the motives are not known and no one has admitted carrying out the attacks. donald trump has praised russia's president putin for his decision not to engage in a row about the expulsion of diplomats. in a tweet, the us president—elect said he always knew the russian leader was ‘very smart‘. president 0bama has ordered 35 russian diplomats to leave the country after accusing moscow of interfering in november's presidential election. 40% of councils in england have no procedures in place to prosecute people who misuse disabled parking permits. new analysis of official figures found that in 61 local authorities blue badges could be used fraudulently without fear of being fined. the finding has been described as ‘staggering'
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by a disability charity. 0ur our main story is the new years honours. the recent reintroduction of the british empire medal has put service in the community at the heart of list. this year, the bdm has been ordered to more than 320 people and two of those recipients are with us now. good morning to you both. big smiles today from you. i know when we talk to people who get their owners, they said we didn't do it for the honours, we were doing the work because we love what we do. have you been able to talk to your
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family get about it? since putting the message online last night the phone has been crazy. to the point where i have not been able to respond. the response has been amazing. it gives me a nice feeling. tell us about the work that you do? in 2007i tell us about the work that you do? in 2007 i began to do some community work because that was the year when the gun and knife crime rate was very high, so i started working with police and local councils to put on under dating events to put on projects to get young people working with the elderly, to give them an opportunity to do something and to be in opportunity to do something and to beina opportunity to do something and to be in a safe environment. 0ne opportunity to do something and to be in a safe environment. one thing that i began to train to work with children tojoin the that i began to train to work with children to join the teaching field. i started working that their old primary school as a teaching assistant. i have been there for six yea rs assistant. i have been there for six years so i have been eating cold
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listings from home to try to get young people ready tojoin listings from home to try to get young people ready to join work. listings from home to try to get young people ready tojoin work. i have been acting cv workshops and a job application workshops from home on weekends, because i am strong in the sort of food. i have been wanting to help young people to prepare to become adults so that is what i have been doing. it has not been easy, but it is finding the time to do so. that has not been an issue for me because ijust enjoy it and it is just about helping each other to grow. such important work. jackie, for you, really important as well. you have been helping veterans with addiction. also congratulations. i work for a charity, the only charity of its kind in the uk, perpetrates addiction in veterans. what we know about veterans, their problematic
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trekking is much higher than the mention population, you'd think there would be as centres around the country, but we were founded three years ago and we have had incredible results. we are full at the moment. we have 12 beds in our centre and we are completely flew over christmas and new year. what we are doing is working and much needed. influencing the ministry of defence because you have worked with them. the ministry of defence because you have worked with themlj the ministry of defence because you have worked with them. i have got to hang out in whitehall quite a bit and go to see the minister. just to make sure that they are taking us seriously because if you are wounded, injured or six, it is taken seriously but when it comes to addiction it is very much the last to be about how we can help people. what was the thing that made you wa nt to what was the thing that made you want to do something? 0ften what was the thing that made you want to do something? often we say it would be easy not to and there area it would be easy not to and there are a lot of people who step out of the ordinary life and help. what was
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your inspiration? my inspiration was definitely my parents because i feel that are growing up i have had the support from my mum and dad and from people in local community that have supported me to be worked out and today and when i look at young people today, many are from single pa rents, people today, many are from single parents, some have only a mum or a dad, soi parents, some have only a mum or a dad, so i have looked at that and realised that there is not support out their four young people. realised that there is not support out theirfour young people. myself and other us workers in manchester, being on the streets supporting young people, that has given them someone to come for advice and that has just given them someone to speak to. you had loads of people knocking on your door saying could you help with jobs on your door saying could you help withjobs and on your door saying could you help with jobs and the things. as a part of the city council, they made me an
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ambassadorfor where of the city council, they made me an ambassador for where i live of the city council, they made me an ambassadorfor where i live in the local area and as the role of an ambassador you are supposed to be the first point of call for your community, so if they need someone to speak to or if they want to report a letter issue they come and speak to you. i think some quite a bit mixed up with what the road was. people were knocking on the door and saying i am looking for a job. i am the type of person if i can help i can help. i was looking forjobs for people. it got so popular. 20 people would be at the doorstep on a saturday and how can i make this manageable for myself so that is when i need a facebook group called manchester job opportunities and when i need a facebook group called manchesterjob opportunities and we have 17,000 members, over 200 manchesterjob opportunities and we have 17,000 members, over200 are getting a full timejob have 17,000 members, over200 are getting a full time job and i have linked with over 200 businesses. getting a full time job and i have linked with over 200 businesseslj don't linked with over 200 businesses.” don't know if in your line of work
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there is something corresponding. where people try to get involved? now, addiction isn't always the cinderella charity that it was. i used to work for a charity with the duchess of cambridge was the patron, so duchess of cambridge was the patron, so she raised the profile of recovery and addiction for us and now, with the charity work for now being related to veterans, people are beginning to take it seriously and say there is a correlation between high levels of trekking and military service and so it is myjob to keep getting out there and winning an award like this is leveraged to do this. for me, that is what the word does, it is below average to get this out. the key for taking time to talk to us this morning and thank you for doing what you are doing for your community. it is foggy out there, is it going to get any better? good morning.
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ford is not as widespread as dense as yesterday but it is causing an issue and some roads this morning, across parts of east anglia and the south and causing delays at airports in the south—east of england and in parts of north—west europe. pretty misty around the channel islands but fog free here. they could suck. that's it is forced —— frost free. the fog will lift and shift. the brea ks the fog will lift and shift. the breaks in the cold in north—east wales and northern england, into eastern scotland. some brighter moments to the east of northern ireland. largely dry here through the morning. the wettest area is the highlands of scotland. we have seen more than 100 millimetres of rain. there is a risk of minor flooding through the day. strong and gusty winds but this afternoon the rain band will shift further south, introducing clearer conditions to the far north of scotland. most of
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us the far north of scotland. most of us will be dry through the day. temperatures around eight to 12 degrees. 0ne temperatures around eight to 12 degrees. one or two spots will be cooler than that with the mist and fog linger. if you have plans of this evening, if you are heading outdoors, you might need an umbrella. early on across scotland and northern ireland would be a speu and northern ireland would be a spell of brain working south but by the time the bells rain in 2017, much of scotland and northern ireland would be cold and clear. some winter showers in the north. a little bit of snow even. the rain pushes into northern england by the time we get to midnight and it will bea time we get to midnight and it will be a wet start to 2017. one or two spots of rain and drizzle. much of england and wales will be dry and quite a mild start to the new year with temperatures staying around seven or 8 degrees. scotland and northern ireland, the frost will set in away from the coast. much cruder airto see in in away from the coast. much cruder air to see in the new year. a good day for blowing the cobwebs away if tonight is a bit too much for you.
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the study did it with some rain and snow across northern england. reading, sleep and still continues across parts of wales, the midlands, east anglia and the south into the afternoon with some white snow over higher ground. we will get some snow in northern scotland and in parts of the north—east of england on higher ground. much in the north will be dry and sunny. more sunshine to come through monday and tuesday nights will be particularly chilly. childhood memories of growing up with an alcoholic father have prompted the shadow health secretary to call for greater recognition of the damage done by excessive drinking. labour's jonathan ashworth chairs an all—party parliamentary group dedicated to the children of alcoholics. the group, which is publishing research in the new year, says millions of young people are ‘suffering in silence‘. jonathan ashworth joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning and thank you for
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joining us. we werejust good morning and thank you for joining us. we were just talking to jackie who helps to run the thomas harrison foundation which helps vetera ns harrison foundation which helps veterans addicted to alcohol and you are looking into the issue of children whose parents are alcoholics. how much of a problem is it? a huge problem. it is my parliamentary colleague, liam byrne, who runs the parliamentary group on this, but i am shadow health secretary. my job is this, but i am shadow health secretary. myjob is to come on tv every day and complain about what the conservatives are doing to the nhs, cutting funding and so on, but i grew nhs, cutting funding and so on, but igrew up nhs, cutting funding and so on, but i grew up with a father who was an alcoholic. that coloured my childhood and one thing i wanted to do as the health spokesperson for labour is make a difference for the millions, perhaps even 2 million, who grew up with a parent who is an alcoholic, because if you grew up with an alcoholic parent, it has a huge impact on you. it can lead to issues to do with mental health, to
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do with addiction as well. i want to make a difference on those issues and makea make a difference on those issues and make a difference for the children. it could be up to 2 million children living with an alcoholic parent. they talk about the impact. what impact did it have on your life, having an alcoholic father? my parents were divorced and when i stayed with my father at weekends, grow up i was almost looking after him. i was about 11 or 12, my father drank so much that he locked himself in the bathroom and couldn‘t open the door. i had to bash at the door down as an 11—year—old. i would often go home or go to my dad at the weekend and there was nothing in the fridge except big bottles of white wine and i would have to go to the shop and get some food and and for me, i had to grow up very quickly. it also made me very determined. i love reading, soi made me very determined. i love reading, so i threw myself into
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reading. it sounds like a cliche, but i did my best at school. when i was 15 i threw myself into the labour party and that is why i am here today. i know there are hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions of children, who deeply, deeply affected by grow up with an alcoholic parent. my dad was very loving. he was a lovely man. alcohol took his life in the end, but he was a loving parent. there will be thousands of children who have an alcoholic parent who live in fear because that parent is violent, that pa rent because that parent is violent, that parent is abusive. i never had that with my father, ijust had somebody who was basically drunk whenever i was with them. we just saw some pictures of yourself with your dad. what would have made a difference to you? what should you have got? my
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dad andi you? what should you have got? my dad and i saw lots of people will recognise this, he didn‘t recognise you had a problem. i tried to talk to him, he refused to engage. i don‘t think that is only support more generally. i wouldn‘t have known who to turn to. that is what i have talked about having a national phone line. there is a charity who runa phone line. there is a charity who run a full—blown. i am not sure where children would put it in schools or in the public service system, but there is a big road for the community nurses in sherston censors “— the community nurses in sherston censors —— centres. 1 million people go going to a&e because of alcohol related incidents. those hospitals treat those people, but perhaps should we be asking whether there are children at home? we need a broader understanding of the issues of how alcohol is notjust affects the individual, but affects the
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broaderfamily. that the individual, but affects the broader family. that is what we are calling for. we are calling for the government and public services to put in place a broader strategy to support all those children who grew up support all those children who grew up with an alcoholic parent. thank you very much for your time. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. anne longfield, the children‘s commissioner for england, is here to tell us what‘s caught her eye. we‘ll speak to her in a minute. so many things obviously affected children. 0ur guest in month ago who was awarded a new year honours talking about the young people he is helping and the problems they are facing. that was very moving, the peace there and i think what was being asked for most of was recognition that this was a problem for as parents and the fantastic work that was being done and reward
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it was just inspirational. it makes us it was just inspirational. it makes us all pause for thought. you have lived through the papers. where will we start? we will start on the unsung heroes with the honours. there is lots and lots of coverage across the papers today around the honours, but there are sections in most of the papers about people who are the celebrity names, they are not the people everyone knows. they have been doing important things for the community. we have a lady who has been selling poppies since 1952, we have the first samaritan who has been doing that for 57 years. we have two young people who were 17, one who is looking and doing work around campaigning around street crime and won a round of bullying as
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well. really important things. it is important to recognise and say as a society we want people to do more. we were just saying they are pivotal to communities. when you look at the other names here, the pensioner who is 70 and for 50 years she has been volunteering at didcot railway centre. there are people who have given most of their lives to help other people. they don't did for the reward with the glamour, but it is what we all value in opportunities, people doing the things that are the glue around us. other important people in society, head teachers. we have a piece in the times today which talks of a shortage of head teachers. they are highlighting the fa ct teachers. they are highlighting the fact that they say headteachers are leaving the profession, they point
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to salaries are too low and we are not rewarding head teachers enough, but there is increased pressure on headteachers. government says that isa headteachers. government says that is a lower turnover of head teachers than ever. it highlights the fact how pivotal these jobs are. we want schools to be the place where children can find the chance to change their lives, especially those with complicated home backgrounds, but we need the special set of skills which is fantastic leaders, inspirational, brilliant organisers and the like. we want more people to come in and to these importantjobs. we hear a lot about stress to teachers generally, you can‘t help but wonder if that has quite a big bearing? certainly. i can be one of those who set lots of things needed to happen around schools because thatis to happen around schools because that is where all children go. if
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you want to know the people who know most about children‘s lives, it is the teachers in schools. really, we need to recognise that and support them in their important role. another story he picked out here, it is about the family courts. this is the president of the family division of the high courts who is pointing to fa ct of the high courts who is pointing to fact that there is a situation in the family courts, not so in the criminal courts, but in family courts where it is possible for alleged abusers to still be able to cross examine their victims. it is one that women‘s aid have been highlighting the sub the guardian have been highlighting and sirjames mundy saying that needs to change. i get a lot of people telling me how stressful courts can be and,
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especially for children. there is a crossover here too many children as well who find terrible trauma when they have to go to court and are cross—examined. they have to go to court and are cross-examined. being in court is a stressful situation that is led them there. secondly, domestic violence has been an issue that has been raised throughout the year. the five—day high—profile archers trial, although fiction has touched a lot of people, it has brought home the seriousness of this to people. important at the end of the year. 0urtime is up important at the end of the year. our time is up for now. you will be backin our time is up for now. you will be back in an hour. we will go for something slightly more cheerful. a list of reasons to be cheerful in 2016, so we will look at those. we will see a little bit later on. still to come and breakfast, your new year‘s eve party will be longer tonight by exactly one second. we
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will find out what with the help of the top astrophysicist. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming upjust before nine, matt will have your full weather forecast. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. more than a hundred 0lympic and paralympic stars have been recognised in the new year honours list, with knighthoods for andy murray and mo farah. murray‘s spectacular 2016
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saw him win the wimbledon title, an olympic gold medal, and bbc sports personality of the year. but the biggest honour of all was saved for last, although the 29—year—old said he felt he was too young to be a sir. four—time olympic gold medallist mo farah said that being awarded a knighthood was a "dream come true" for a boy who arrived in london from somalia unable to speak any english. jessica ennis—hill has been made a dame for her services to athletics. on her twitter account, she said that she was "truly, truly honoured". rower katherine grainger is britain‘s most decorated female 0lympian. she‘s won five medals at five successive games and is now dame katherine. and gold—medal winning para—equestrian lee pearson is no stranger to meeting the queen. he‘s been knighted for services to his sport. stars of the stage and screen, including ken dodd and patricia routledge, have also been included in the new year‘s honours list.
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they‘re among more than a thousand people to have been recognised, as our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba reports. # happiness... # he‘s been one of britain‘s favourite entertainers for more than half a century. now ken dodd has received a knighthood. the best day ever, you can‘t get better than this. i‘ve played lots of big theatres, i‘ve worked abroad, but this is it. this is the day, yes. i‘m very, very proud. the "bouquet" residence! the lady of the house speaking. actress patricia routledge, she‘s been made a dame. # yeah, you really got me going # you got me so i don‘t know what i‘m doing... # kinks frontman ray davies said he felt "humility and joy" to become sir ray. lady anne. a knighthood too for award—winning actor mark rylance. bond actress naomi harris becomes an 0be. wow. figures from fashion and design
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have also been recognised. american vogue editor anna wintour said she was touched to be made a dame. designer victoria beckham becomes an 0be. the hillsborough independent panel was chaired by the former bishop of liverpool, james jones. he‘s now been knighted. 0bviously great pride, but mixed with sadness, because of that enduring sadness of the families who have continued to feel the loss of their loved ones. he is one of hundreds being recognised for their contribution across the uk. lizo mzimba, bbc news. there‘s a warning that heavy fog could cause further travel disruption today. yesterday the uk‘s biggest airports, heathrow and gatwick, cancelled more than 150 flights. the met office says driving conditions will be difficult in many areas of central, eastern and south—east england. simon calder, travel editor of the independent, is at heathrow this morning.
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morning to you, simon, quite a few problems there today, how was it looking at the moment? it is looking better than it was earlier, you can actually see the runway behind me. earlier on this morning, it was really eerie, you could hear the aircraft but you could not see them. what happens when there is fog, of course there was lots of high technology that allows aircraft to land and take off without much visibility, but the air traffic controllers have to slow the arrivals. heathrow is europe‘s busiest airport, and that means things start to unravel ready quickly. yesterday, as you say, about 150 flights were cancelled, about 150 flights were cancelled, about 30,000 people are waking up this morning not where they wanted to be. today so far british airways has cancelled another 50 flights, mostly has cancelled another 50 flights, m ostly fro m has cancelled another 50 flights, mostly from heathrow to places such
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as barcelona, munich and milan, from london city to amsterdam, geneva and dublin. not too much chaos in the terminals, because most people have been told about it, but lots of unhappy people who have spent the night at a hotel in this area rather than where they wanted to be. night at a hotel in this area rather than where they wanted to hem night at a hotel in this area rather than where they wanted to be. it is an awkward time of year, often people want to be with family or are trying to get back after their breaks. almagro, most certainly, and once your flight has been cancelled, you go straight to the back of the queue, you are not put on the next flight. all queue, you are not put on the next flight. all the people going on flights and they take precedence, and very few seats at this time of year are going spare. about sta nsted, year are going spare. about stansted, where year are going spare. about sta nsted, where rya nair cancelled about 20 flights yesterday, that is 3000 people out of position with very few options to get to where they need to be by midnight and night. simon, thanks very much, simon calderfrom the independent. around 3,000 police officers will be on duty across central london tonight as crowds gather
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to celebrate the new year. greater manchester police and other forces say they‘ve also stepped up crowd protection measures. scotland yard says extra resources have been brought in to keep people safe following the terror attacks in berlin and nice earlier this year. two bomb explosions at a busy market in the iraqi capital, baghdad, have killed at least 21 people. dozens more were wounded in the blasts which happened at a market. the motives are not known, and no—one has admitted carrying out the attacks. donald trump has praised russia‘s president putin for his decision not to engage in a row about the expulsion of diplomats. in a tweet, the us president—elect said he always knew the russian leader was " president 0bama has ordered 35 russian diplomats to leave the country after accusing moscow of interfering in november‘s presidential election. from midnight tonight, anyone who owns an air gun in scotland will need a licence. the legislation was introduced after a toddler was killed by an air—gun pellet in glasgow in 2005.
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people in england and wales can own the weapons without any kind of documentation. it‘s the time of year for charts and lists and best—ofs, so we thought we‘d take this opportunity to share our most popular clip from the bbc breakfast social—media accounts over the last 12 months. is it a hard—hitting piece ofjournalism or a stunning expose? no. it‘s this footage of giant panda da mao battling a snowman at toronto zoo. thousands of you liked and shared these pictures when they went online a couple of weeks ago. he does manage to demolish the whole thing in the end! we can stay with it for a moment if it is the most popular thing that has been on brea kfast! popular thing that has been on breakfast! you can see why! come on, he is going to get back on again.
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you cannot get enough panda as far asiam you cannot get enough panda as far as i am concerned. it is agony watching! is eager to roll over again? how would you describe that technique? is that a highjump technique? don‘t bring me in as the panda expert! that was a forward roll. just thinking about how the moralising it is, all the hard work from the producers and editors for a whole year, and all the viewers want to watch is a funny video of a panda. give them what they want, thatis panda. give them what they want, that is what i say! we are having a chat around the new year‘s honours list, i know you have been leading the programme on the sporting superstars like andy murray, mo farah, damejessica ennis—hill, all getting the top honours. loads of other stars, 100 0lympic honours. loads of other stars, 100 olympic and paralympic stars, kate richardson—walsh has been given an
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0be, chris coleman mccombs cbe after that amazing run to the semifinals of the euros. —— becomes. and the entire hockey team, captained —— captain kate richardson—walsh is cbe, but the whole team are 0be. and sam quek is coming in later. i will skip through the latest action in sport this morning. hull city are off the bottom of the premier league, but they missed out on a first league win in nearly two months after a late everton equaliser at the kcom. the tigers went ahead but were pegged back then robert snodgrass scored this brilliant free kick in the second half. they couldn‘t hang on for victory, though. ross barkley nodded in the everton equaliser late on. it finished 2—2. i‘m really pleased, because over the past three or four weeks, we put in a shift and got nothing. today we put in a shift and got a point.
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we could be greedy and ask for more, but i‘m really proud of the players for their efforts and we have to go again in two, three days‘ time. lam i am really pleased tonight about our performance. i wasn't happy about our slow start, 1—0 down, but we showed twice, really, in the result a really good attitude and a good reaction. and i think we played good reaction. and i think we played good football. there was one game in the scottish premiership last night with aberdeen winning1—0 at hearts. the goal came from jonny hayes in the 66th minute. the third placed dons are now six points ahead of hearts, who are fourth. so plenty of football. dan is presenting football focus this lunchtime, and he is here now. welcome back. happy christmas?” managed to do that thing when you stop work for a bit, i got a cold
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immediately, i am throwing it off. what have you got today?” immediately, i am throwing it off. what have you got today? i know there is a busy... 0h! what have you got today? i know there is a busy... oh! i was waiting for you there! that was fascinating to watch! that has thrown me! great panda news! we have a big fixture list in the premier league particularly, and we have available interview with two brazilian twins who you might remember, they both used to play at manchester united, fabio is now at middlesbrough, and they played manchester united this weekend, so we got them both together for christmas, they clearly enjoy each other‘s company, and we ask them, what will it be like to go back and play manchester united? have a listen. i don't think i had what it is going to be, 1000 things, like are they going to react? i think it is going to be nice. like are they going to react? i think it is going to be nicem
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like are they going to react? i think it is going to be nice. it is incredible, because i can watch the game, the first game he comes back, andi game, the first game he comes back, and i will be there to watch, it will be very nice. you have to decide who you are going to support! well, i love manchester united! but... i will support my brother, i wa nt but... i will support my brother, i want him to win. so i think i will be supporting middlesbrough! there you go, that is what you wa nted there you go, that is what you wanted to hear! i will be at that match later, pleased to hear that! dele alli, the second part of his interview, back in the goals again, spurs looking good. john motson is at sta mford spurs looking good. john motson is at stamford bridge, where chelsea look unstoppable this season. a lovely piece with kenny dalglish as liverpool play manchester city, looking at klopp‘s rain, what he thinks about him. a nice piece on ba rnsley thinks about him. a nice piece on barnsley over christmas, we will be looking back at the year, as eve ryo ne looking back at the year, as everyone does at this time, and all the goals from this week, and we will wedge it all in from midday on bbc one. lie excellent, we will be
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watching that. dan thank you very much. to rugby union, and george north will return for northampton saints in their premiership match at gloucester tomorrow. it will be the welshman‘s first game since suffering a head injury against leicester on december 3rd. that was north‘s fifth concussion in two years, including two in the match on your screen now between england and wales in february 2015. a review board said north shouldn‘t have continued to play against leicester, but they didn‘t sanction northampton. wasps are top of rugby union‘s premiership after a topsy—turvy bonus—point victory over newcastle. wasps found themselves 12—0 down afterfive minutes, but danny cipriani‘s superb individual effort was the first of their four tries in a 34—30 victory. second—place saracens play on sunday. as we‘ve been hearing, andy murray has been knighted in the new year‘s honours list. he‘ll play in the third—place playoff within the next hour, after a surprise defeat yesterday to david goffin in the semifinals of the world tennis championship
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in abu dhabi. the world number one had won all five of his previous meetings with goffin but lost the first set on a tie break. murray went 11—2 up in the second, but goffin fought back to win the set and take the match 2—0. goffin will play rafael nadal in the final after he beat milos raonic in three sets. nadal‘s making his comeback from a wrist injury which has troubled him throughout the year. good to see the veil nadal back on top form. —— rafael nadal. mike bushell will be making a comeback in the new year. in his absence, we have put together a compilation of all the things he has been up to. he‘s been flattened by rhinos. i missed that one! walked under water,
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pommel—horsed with max whitlock and played in goalfor team gb‘s 0lympic—winning hockey squad. they‘re just some of the highlights of mike bushell‘s year. every week, bbc breakfast‘s own action man gets stuck into a different sporting challenge to encourage you to get off the sofa and try something new. here are his best bits from 2016. that is what he says, anyway! what the hell is that? it's mike bushell. music plays it‘s so fast! this is insane! you‘ve still got it as well,
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haven‘t you? pretty slow, mate! it‘s great to see the kids play. it's always thought about, we've trained for it, we've live it, we've breathed it. we will all do all we can do for our cause! what was that? if you fall off, carry on. i still can‘t catch you running!
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stop, stop! 9.5. i‘ve brought some protection. come on, then, come on!
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i bet that still hurt! he survived it all, though, he will be back for more in 2017. he must have done absolutely everything by now! time to find out what is happening with the weather with matt, that looks for the air than the last picture you rabiot when a! this was taken in south—east wales, fog not as widespread as yesterday but still causing problems on the roads, and if you are on the move over the next few hours, take it gingerly across southern england and east anglia in particular. fairly cloudy across wales, away from the fog, the north—east will see the best of the sunshine. the cloud in northern ireland will break about
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times to the east, at least for a while. we have had over 100 millimetres in the last 2a hours in the north of scotland, gradually edging away from the hebrides, 0rkney and shetland. it will push to the north of northern ireland by the end of the afternoon and into southern scotland. away from that, a dry new year‘s eve, where you get sunshine, 12 celsius is possible. where the fog lingers, five or six at the very best. some of you may be spending your evening outdoors, building up to the big midnight hour. if you are in scotland, take some waterproofs, rain in the early evening does clear by the time the bells ring in 2017, only one or two showers, mostly dry, fairly clear but cold. the rain edges into northern england by the time we had midnight, and it will also push into the north—west of wales too. much of
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central and southern england and wales will be dry as we see in 2017. fairly mild too, but the temperatures at midnight dropping away quite rapidly in scotland and northern ireland. colder air set to work southwards, a slow process during new year‘s day, colder but brighter conditions in the northern half of the country. a slight covering of showers to lower levels in northern scotland. rain initially in northern scotland. rain initially in northern england with some sleet over the hills, a bit of a damp start to the new year in much of wales, the midlands and southern england. some heavy outbreaks of rain, wet snow over high ground mixed in for good measure. temperatures in double figures here, colder further north. that takes overfor colder further north. that takes over for the first few days of 2017, sunshine by day but chilly by night. just before i go, it is less than four hours away from 2017 in sydney, this is the scene from the famous bridgejust a short this is the scene from the famous bridge just a short while ago,
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currently 2a degrees with a south—east wind. thanks for that(!) security‘s being stepped up ahead of tonight‘s new year‘s eve celebrations in london, following the terror attacks in berlin and nice. the police federation says that while there‘s no specific intelligence about an attack in the capital, more officers will be on duty than in previous years, and more roads will be closed. greater manchester police and other forces say they‘re also putting on extra crowd protection measures. peter bleksley is a former scotland yard detective and joins us now. a very good morning to you, the message here is about reassurance, isn‘t it? message here is about reassurance, isn't it? it is, reassurance and vigilance, although of course be policing that members of the will see tonight, the overt side of policing, some of the cops with firearms, the other security measures, is only the tip of a very unseen iceberg. there are so much other work going on by the security
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services and the police behind—the—scenes, completely unseen and often heroic, but night we see the overt, the open side of it. so there will be more officers with guns, what else will people notice? well, there will be roadblocks set up, because of berlin and nice, both of those attackers used heavy articulated vehicles, so there will be roadblocks set up. anybody driving around tonight near a city centre in a truck or lorry will invariably questioned before they are allowed to go on their way. so there will be roadblocks, there will bea there will be roadblocks, there will be a lot of security staff supporting police, and they will be doing thejobs which supporting police, and they will be doing the jobs which not the police‘s role, checking armbands and tickets, more of the stewarding of people while police will be doing more of the protecting our people. yes, ina more of the protecting our people. yes, in a way, what we are seeing is more of some of what we have seen in the past. we are used to it now in
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airports, people in london will remember the ring of steel in the city of london. various parts of the security measures are being seen more often and more frequently. yeah, absolutely, and part of that is to serve as a deterrent, to put people off doing what they might be thinking of plotting and planning to do, and that is only right, and we will see more of it, unfortunately, this very clear and present threat and danger that exists to us all is not going to go away any time soon — if in fact ever. we will, as unpalatable as it may seem to some people to seek heavily armed cops patrolling the streets, we have got to get used to it. they are there plans for our benefit. for people celebrating new year‘s eve, they don‘t need to behave differently, do they? no, but there is a slight responsibility upon all of us to remain vigilant in our everyday lives, you know, we are part of the collective effort here to try to stop these people, so if you see
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something that you are not quite happy about, that raises suspicions, then pick up the phone, ring the cops, ring the anti—terror hotline. but yes, tonight is largely about going out and enjoying ourselves, andi going out and enjoying ourselves, and i would urge people to do exactly that. do not be cowed, to not be terrorised, drink, dance, party, whatever you like, but stay a little bit vigilant. peter, thank you for your time this morning. 0n the subject of time, it has thrown up a bit of an anomaly this new year‘s eve. if you were watching yesterday, you may remember we brought you news of the leap second — an extra moment of time which will be added to the final minute of 2016. it‘s fair to say we found the entire concept pretty baffling, so this morning we‘ve brought in an expert to set us straight. we‘ll chat to professor tim 0‘brien in a moment, but first here‘s our science correspondent rebecca morelle. big ben tolls
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this new year‘s eve, you have a tiny bit longer to enjoy the celebrations. an extra second is being added to the world‘s time. and it‘s all because of a very slight wobble in the earth‘s rotation. 0ur planet speeds up and slows down as it spins. so while a single rotation equates to one day, some days end up being a tiny fraction longer or shorter than others. and gradually the earth‘s time drifts out of sync with our clocks. right now, that difference has grown too large, so just before the clocks strike midnight, an extra second is being added to bring everything back into phase. it‘s the 27th leap second since they were introduced in the 19705, but there have been calls to abolish them. communications networks, financial markets and computer software all rely on extremely precise timekeeping. some say that having to reprogram an extra second puts them at risk. 0thers warn that without leap seconds, over thousands of years,
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the earth‘s time and our clocks will grow more and more off—kilter — so much so that one day your watch might say it‘s midnight as the sun is starting to rise. rebecca morelle, bbc news. so what we need now is a professor, and we have got, talk us through, when is the leap second? well, officially it will be the end of today, this day would last one second longer, but it sort of depends how people are adjusting for it. some people are taking the time to slow the clock down, big ben is slowed down by adding or removing an old penny as a weight from the pendulum. that slows down over a period of a day or a few days, to get it to the right time. but
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officially the end of the day. get it to the right time. but officially the end of the daym get it to the right time. but officially the end of the day. it is only a second, why does it matter so much? people have been debating whether we should keep doing this or not, but the reason is because it is to keep our clock time, which is determined by very accurate atomic clocks, in step with astronomical time, which is determined by how the earth spins. if we didn‘t include them, gradually we would get out of step, and in quite a long time admittedly, something like 4000 yea rs, admittedly, something like 4000 yea rs , we admittedly, something like 4000 years, we would end up with 12 noon on your watch happening at midnight, rather than at midday, because you would be out of step with where the sun is in the sky. whose decision is it? there is an international body based in paris that keeps an eye on this, the bravery regular atomic clock time that stays steady, but the spin of the earth is constantly changing due to weather, the motion of stuff inside the earth, earthquakes, and it is gradually slowing down because of the tides.
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they keep an eye on these things all the time, they will make an announcement that we need to add a lea p announcement that we need to add a leap second. and everyone agrees that we all stick to this? yes, we all stick to the rules. they sometimes call these people be time lord yeah! obviously it is over a long period of time that it would make a difference, but there have been 27 changes since the 19705, so our year is 27 seconds longer than it was then? yeah, well, each day is basically two millie 5econd5 longer than 24 hours, and so as you go, the next day, you will be two out, then four, so it is the out of step that changes, rather than the length of the day changing. when will be an extra day? i could really do without! it would be quite a while?
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ye5, quite a while! without! it would be quite a while? yes, quite a while! on the issue of time, thank you, we will have the headlines at exactly nine o‘clock. that is coming. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. more than 100 stars of the olympics and paralympics are recognised in the new year‘s honours li5t at the end of a glittering year in sport mo farah, jessica ennis—hill and andy murray are among more than 100 athletes honoured. nearly 1200 people are on this year‘5 list, from entertainers to community worker5, we‘ll be hearing some of their stories. it has not been easy. it is finding the time to do so. that has not been an issue for me because i have enjoyed it and it is about helping each other to grow. good morning, it‘5 saturday 31st december.
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