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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 3, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello. it's tuesday, it's 9am, i'm joanna gosling, in for victoria. our top story. a man is shot dead in a police operation near the m62 motorway in huddersfield. we'll be live at the scene with the latest details. also today, we return to great yarmouth, one of the towns most in favour of brexit, to find out how people living there feel about the eu, six months after they voted to leave. i haven't got as much faith in it as i did previously, as obviously i voted out. and i just think things are slipping a little bit. and, after 10:30am today. some of the most hotly—tipped films of 2017 are being released over the next few weeks, ahead of the oscar nominations. we'll look at some of the best and ask if the row over racism in hollywood is driving change. hello.
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welcome to the programme, and a happy new year. we're live until iiam. dentists have criticised what they've called the "workplace cake culture", saying the sharing of sweet treats in the office is contributing to health problems. they've called for a change in 2017. so, is this sensible advice or an attack on the little things that make office life a bit more enjoyable? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. a man has been shot dead by police in an operation near the m62 motorway in huddersfield. west yorkshire police say the operation last night was "pre—planned", and that at least one person was arrested, but gave few other details. they say it was not related to terrorism. another two people were arrested in a related stop in bradford. the independent police complaints commission has sent investigators to the scene. it's the fifth fatal
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police shooting in england and wales within nine months. the shooting happened shortly after 6pm yesterday evening on a slip road off the m62 at ainley top, near huddersfield. west yorkshire police say the incident took place during a preplanned policing operation, suggesting officers had acted on intelligence, rather than responding to an unexpected event. the force said a police firearm was discharged and a man died. no—one else is believed to have been injured. the independent police complaints commission was informed, and has sent its own investigators to the scene, which has been cordoned off. photographs from the area appear to indicate that a number of unmarked police vehicles may have stopped a car on the slip road before the shooting, though that hasn't been confirmed. although fatal police shootings are rare, it is the fifth such incident in england and wales in the last nine months, and the first involving west yorkshire police since december 2010. 0ur correspondent phil bodmer is at the scene.
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what more can you tell us? this slip road on the 62, it is the westbound slip road, it has now been closed for 15 hours since the incident last night. more police have arrived this morning, officers behind the green cord and will work and investigate the circumstances. west yorkshire police say this is not terror related, so that theory has now gone away. we understand it was a stop last night, a preplanned operation. police in unmarked vehicles stopped and about of cars. the cars are a white audi, we understand, it has bullet holes on the bonnet and on the front windscreen, and also a silver mercedes e class was involved, and maybe a jaguar.
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silver mercedes e class was involved, and maybe ajaguar. 0n silver mercedes e class was involved, and maybe a jaguar. 0n the outside of those, they are boxed in bya outside of those, they are boxed in by a unmarked police cars. these are very relevant events. the ipcc are taking charge of this investigation. it is the first fatal shooting involving west yorkshire police since 2010, and in the last decade there have been 22 police shootings in england and is, so a very rare event. this road has been cordoned off at least until 10am, but it is causing major disruption for traffic in and around halifax. as long as that continues to be the case, drivers are being advised to try to steer clear of the area for the time being. ben is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the ministry of defence says a british soldier has died in iraq. the soldier, from the 2nd battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment, died near baghdad, following an incident which is now being investigated. the regiment is training iraqi and kurdish security forces. the death wasn't the result
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of enemy activity. the soldier's family has been informed. kurdish militants say a british man has been killed fighting with them against islamic state militants in syria. they've told the bbc that ryan lock, who was 20 and from west sussex, died during an assault on the is stronghold of raqqa just before christmas. it's believed he travelled to syria last august, and joined a kurdish volunteer group called the ypg. it's reported that the authorities in turkey now know the identity of the chief suspect in the mass shooting at a nightclub in istanbul. 39 people were killed and dozens wounded when an attacker opened fire on a new year party inside the crowded reina club. police have carried out raids in the city, but the gunman is still at large. the islamic state militant group has said it was behind the attack. staring directly into the camera, the face of the man turkish officials say is the main suspect
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in the deadly nightclub attack. this footage, released by police, appears to show him filming himself on his phone while walking through taksim square, one of istanbul's most—busy areas. it is not clear when it was recorded. following a tipoff, armed officers carried out a raid on a house in the city monday evening. the suspect was not found, but so far 12 people have been arrested in connection with the attack that the so—called islamic state says it was behind. they say it was revenge for turkey's attacks on syria. the gunman shot his way into the club and then shot 180 bullets in seven minutes, killing 39 people. the club, which sits on the bank of the bosporus river, is one of istanbul's most exclusive. it is now part of a growing list of places in turkey to be hit by deadly attacks in the last 12 months.
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many of the injured remain in hospital, including francois al—asmar from lebanon, who says he owes his life to his passport. the first bullet came from here. it passed from here, and the explosion, something explosion, and it passed by here. and it come here. but the passport, lebanese passport, saved me, saved my heart. now they believe they know what he looks like, turkish authorities say they hope to find the gunman quickly and then establish if anyone helped him. police in greater manchester have been given more time to question four men over a hit and run that killed two girls. 12—year—old helina kotlarova died at the scene in 0ldham on new year's eve. her cousin, 11—year—old zaneeta krokova, died from her injuries in hospital yesterday. the centre—left think tank the fabian society has warned that
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labour is "too weak" to win the next election. the society, which has been developing ideas for labourfor decades, has urged the party to form an alliance with the scottish nationalists and the liberal democrats if it wants to return to power. 0ur political correspondent eleanor garnier is at westminster. not a great new year message for jeremy corbyn. it is not the message that many labour mps wanted to start the year off with, but having said that, i don't think the findings in this report will be a surprise to many politicians in westminster. it isa many politicians in westminster. it is a pretty melancholy message that labour is too weak to win, yet too strong to die, and the fabian society report also says that labour would need to win 3 million more votes tha n would need to win 3 million more votes than the conservatives to win an outright majority at the next
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general election, something this report concludes is unthinkable at the moment. it also points to problems the party has with brexit, with the conservatives and ukip targeting their leave voters and the liberal democrats hunting there remain voters. all the while, this report says labour's message on brexit is muffled and inconsistent. i put these findings to the leader's office, they said thatjeremy corbyn was the only genuine alternative to a failed political establishment. but certainly, labour mps will be hoping for a little more new year cheer when mps get back to westminster next week. thousands of new starter homes have been given the go—ahead to be built on brownfield sites across england. the properties will be available for first—time buyers aged between 23 and 40, at 20% less than the market value. labour says the target of 200,000 starter homes by 2020 isn't possible.
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but the housing minister gavin barwell says it's all part of a wider plan. there are a lot of different things that we need to do to help people in this country find more—affordable housing. we have shared ownership, the help to buy scheme, right to buy, and the fundamental solution to this is to build more homes so that housing becomes more affordable. but it will take time. we cannot do nothing in the meantime, so starter homes are an important contribution. a post—mortem examination is to be held to investigate the unexplained death of a british woman in australia, police say. local media reported stacey tierney, who was 29, was found dead in a strip club in melbourne on 19th december. 0ur correspondent phil mercer is in sydney. this seems something of a mystery at the moment. yes, this body was found
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more than two weeks ago in the gentleman's club in the heart of australia's second city, melbourne. there is a lot we don't know about this woman's death. we don't know the cause of death. the authorities are hoping a postmortem will answer that question. there are reports here that the woman's body lay undiscovered for about 12 hours inside the club, again we don't know why that was the case, if that report is true. also, reports here that this woman was in the company ofa group that this woman was in the company of a group of mystery men, we don't know who they are, but no doubt they will be able to provide investigators with a very important information. we know that she was 29 yea rs information. we know that she was 29 years old, from manchester, a fitness instructor, and apparently in australia for three years, working as a dancer in various clubs around the country. children in england are eating
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half their recommended daily sugar intake before they even get to school. that's the warning from health officials. public health england say sugary cereals, juices and spreads are to blame and, at a time of spiralling obesity levels, have launched a campaign to help us better understand what our children are eating. we know that lots of children are eating a lot of sugar for breakfast. in total, they are eating almost three times the maximum recommended level of sugar over the day. that is contributing to the awful obesity statistics that we have. protests are expected at railway stations this morning, in response to the latest annual fares increase. the average ticket has gone up by 2.3%. many of today's demonstrations are organised by the campaign group action for rail. it says people in the uk spend six times as much on tickets compared to those in europe. and we'll have more on that coming
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up on the programme, where we'll be live at kings cross railway station and hearing from campaigners. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9:30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. we will hear from a paralympic athlete who says she had to wet herself on a train because the disabled toilet was broken and staff failed to help her. she says she does not want anybody else to go through the same thing. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport now with jessica. hgppy happy new year. manchester city manager pep guardiola wasn't a happy man yesterday? journalists received quite a frosty response from him, and his rather unconventional interview has caused a bit of a stir. interestingly, before all that, though, before his side
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had beaten burnley 2—1, guardiola had said he was arriving at the end of his career and that the process of his goodbye from management has already started. he's only 45 at the moment, relatively young in management terms, but he insists he doesn't want to still be in the role when he's 60 or 65. you just wonder if he's feeling the pressure a little bit. here's why guardiola might have been a little tetchy last night. manchester city had to play an hour of the match with ten men, after captain fernandinho was sent off. city improved after the break, a couple of inspired substitutions, then two goals in four minutes gave them the win. no smiles from guardiola, though. we were not able to bring to that
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clip, but it was really frosty. it gets more and more awkward. the sending off, what was your view of the red card for fernandinho? you are the journalist, not me. you're the manager, i'm sure the fans would like to know. ask the referee, not me. you don't seem that happy that you've won? more than you would believe, more than you would believe. you are not showing it. i am so happy. believe me, i'm so happy. ido i do still in the title race? yesterday we were not, why are we today? yes, he really did seem unhappy, didn't he? things getting better forjose mourinho. how the tables have turned.
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he was anything but yesterday, after united beat west ham 2—0. and understandably, mourinho's smiling. that was their sixth straight league win. perhaps united were fortunate to play the majority of the game against ten men, after ferghouli was controversially sent off. united went ahead in the second half. and they benefitted from another controversial officiating decision when ibrahimovic was one of three players offside when he doubled their lead late on. so yes, the red side of manchester looking rosy at present. darts and a high quality final last night. and, it was michael van gerwen who outmanoeuvred reigning champion gary anderson to win his second pdc world darts championship. it wasn't all plain sailing for the dutchman. just watch this. as he was throwing for the match at 6—2 up, he was interrupted. security men quickly dealt with the prankster. but it put van gerwen off, delaying his coronation by another set. it was worth the extra wait, though, as he claimed victory in style. 7—3 he won it, and took
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home the £350,000 prize. so, no hat—trick of titles for anderson. thank you very much, jess. we will see you later. the brexit vote came as a shock to many people in the political establishment. yet many of those who voted to leave the eu could have told them that levels of dissatisfaction with europe, especially over the issue of immigration, meant it should not have come as a surprise. after the vote, we visited great yarmouth in norfolk which delivered the fifth highest leave vote with more than 70% of residents voting out. six months on, as brexit gets closer, our reporter michael cowan has been back to speak to some of those he met at the time, to ask them how they feel about it all now. the government now seem to be very tight—lipped. nothing's discussed with the people. there's no plan of action.
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i like a good plan. i've lost a lot of interest in it now. i really have. though, like, again, i would still vote out. but, yeah, i've lost a lot of interest. it'sjust gone on too long now. it really has. i just went with the flow. i know it's wrong, and i regret doing that, because i still don't understand what i voted no for. does it bother you that mps, for example, might now get a say on triggering article 50? er, if it's how we do it, fairenough. if it's whether we do it or not, they should have no say whatsoever. the public have spoken. we first came here six months ago.
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our country had just voted to leave the eu and it was summer. over 70% of people here voted to leave, and the locals spoke with candour as to why. my biggest fear is that the british people will be taken over by immigration. i would like to see the numbers come down. some of the ones on benefits being shipped back. ukip were high here in places where people are unhappy, really unhappy. and ultimately, i think that's what it boils down to. no one is listening to us. and so the only way you can show your unhappiness is to vote, and that's what we did. i voted because i wanted britain to be british laws. english laws.
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have our laws back and not being told what to do. by other people. it's winter now. but does the promise ofjune 2016 still resonate here? this is king street, home to the portuguese community. it has become a symbol for locals of immigration into the town. between 2014 and 2015, eu citizens living in great yarmouth actually decreased by around 30%. sharon shops here, and she holds daily knitting workshops called a stitch and bitch. it's been six months since we last saw you. are you still excited about brexit? i think it's caused a lot of trouble. yeah, i think it's... a lot of people moved out, round me, that are foreigners. because they've had abuse. and that's awful. that is terrible. that is really bad. really bad. some of them have been born here and they are contributing to the country. they're not coming here and taking, you know, our benefits and things like that. but they've had to move because people won't leave them alone. they are real nasty, putting things
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through doors and everything. how do you think the government has handled brexit so far? the government now seem to be very tight—lipped. with all these other groups. but nothing's discussed with the people. there's no plan of action. i like a good plan. and if they say it's going to happen at the end of march... where's the discussions and the debate programmes? there's nothing. you just, kind of, would like to know what is going to happen. they should have had plans set up before. absolutely. and they say about a hard brexit and a soft brexit and... what is that? it's a hobnob! during the referendum, the country voted on the very simple question of, should we come out of the european union? should we be able to vote on the terms of brexit? yes. definitely. but also, to be able to vote on the terms of brexit, they need to be very open with us.
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not the lies, not the figures they plucked out of the air and go, this is going to lie and how much is going back in the nhs when actually it was never on the table. they have to be open, and they are not being open. they are closed cabinet. completely closed cabinet. so we don't know what's propaganda and what's true. you said brexit was really a way for people who were angry to kick back at the government and that maybe perhaps it wasn't so much about leaving europe but about saying to the government, we are here, you don't represent us, listen to us. yes. has this vote, has the decision to leave the eu given you that voice? no. i think it's scared them. yeah. they said the right things. "0h, we've got to listen to the people, we've got to do that." and then itjust closed up again. it trickled back down. let's not talk about it. yeah. "we're talking about it behind closed doors, we will let you know," sort of thing. maybe we voted illinformed, but we voted from our hearts
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and you can't change that. that's how we felt at the time and we voted the way we felt. i would still vote the same now, definitely. yeah. what do you want to see happen with regards to brexit this year? i want to see clarity and ideas and people going back and forth with a structured idea about how to go about it. deprivation is high in yarmouth with almost 25% of children living in poverty. that's way above the national average. the town has benefited from eu funding in the past and was set to receive even more from the £70 million pot earmarked for the wider region, but that is now in jeopardy. thank you very much. have a good christmas. the daily market is one of the focal points of the community. christine and darren are one of the biggest fishmongers in here and the business has been
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in the family for 70 years. six months ago when we first met you, you said the leave vote would ensure your family's future. yeah, that's correct, i did. for the fishing industry, mainly, and so that we could fish in our own seas again and we could bring the fishing industry back into yarmouth again, mainly. do you think that is on the priority list for the government? probably not. i think that's not top of their list. probably not bottom of the list. but they've got to do something because i think there's a lot of people who rely on it, especially the fishermen. i think a lot of them obviously did vote out. there are a lot of fishing places around here who rely on that. i suppose it is on their list but it's not going to be top of their list. are you still optimistic about brexit? i am and i am not. i haven't got as much faith in it as i did previously, as obviously i voted out. ijust think things are slipping a little bit.
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what do you mean by that? what's slipping? i just think they are moving the goalposts further away, i don't think we're going to truly be out, i really don't, and i think there will be a lot of upset people. have you noticed any changes at a local level? no, nothing at all, really. some people say that trade has gone down and different things, but we are in winter now and trade has always been very quiet in the winter. when my grandad owned the stall, he used to shut in the winter. are you still excited about brexit? i've lost a lot of interest in it now, i really have. again, i would still vote out. yeah, i've lost a lot of interest. it's gone on too long now, it really has. our economy is one of the biggest concerns for the government. after an initial crash that saw trillions of dollars wiped off the global stock market, in the uk, it has since not only rallied but grown. similarly, retailers have also seen a boom in sales, particularly leading up to christmas. interest rates, instead of going up,
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have gone down, which is good news for homeowners, but bad news for savers. and the value of the pound — that means how much £1 will buy us abroad — has decreased, meaning it will be more expensive to go on holiday and products that import ingredients, like marmite and pg tips, already cost us more. two of our leading supermarkets, tesco and sainsbury‘s, have warned of 5% to 10% price rises this year. but are people here still excited about brexit? what is more important to them? is it access to the single market which involves much the same as we've got now? we pay into the eu and in exchange, we get to trade with them, but we have to accept freedom of movement. that means unlimited numbers of eu workers coming to britain to work. or is it this — complete control of our borders? because the only certainty we have here is that we cannot have both. does it concern you when you hear things about the economy?
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for example, going on holiday already costs more money because the value of the pound is low. why not holiday in britain? there's some beautiful holiday destinations. this is one of them. if people were putting more money back into our own economy, rather than feeding everyone else's economy, this country would thrive. come to great yarmouth, go to blackpool, go to liverpool, go to different areas where you've got these beautiful seaside towns that are getting forgotten and ignored and neglected. do you still feel excited about brexit? absolutely. i think it was the best thing we could have done. joining the eu was the worst decision britain ever made. do we want access to the single market or do we want complete control of our borders? because it is one or the other. we cannot have both. i think we've got enough here. 0ur housing situation is atrocious. i understand that they do need to go somewhere and the place is a state and i agree with that, but when is it going to stop?
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are we going to be in tents next? so you voted leave? i voted leave because i went with the flow. if there was another referendum tomorrow, hypothetically... and i knew more about it, possibly could change my mind. definitely. hands up to that one. so that is more important to you? even if it comes at the cost of the economy, controlling the borders, that's the most important thing? that's the most important for me. do you think parliament should have a vote on brexit? yes. without a doubt, they should do. i think they should get back in, put all of their heads together, stop arguing, listen to each other. they might get somewhere. 0ur brexit boards are clear. 5a people went for this, complete conviction, like they had six months ago, to control our borders. 2a people went for single market access. we are not pollsters and our brexit
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boards are not scientific, but they clearly suggest, for people here, immigration and control of our borders is still the major concern. there's your change. have a good christmas. but amongst those we spoke to, there is a waning support for the way in which the government is handling brexit, namely the lack of information. and it's telling that while the vast majority stand by that decision to leave, people here want more input, or even another vote, on the exact terms of how we leave the european union. this could become a reality when the highest court in the land, the supreme court, returns its decision later this month on whether mps should have a vote on triggering article 50 or not. and to watch that film again and share it, you can head to our programme page bbc.co.uk/victoria. and after 10am, we will look ahead to all the political stories likely to dominate 2017. vicky on facebook says, "if there
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was another vote. it would be a closer thing. i know loads of people who wish they voted differently." janet says, "i feel no different to how i felt on 23rd june. i'm upset that the majority voted leave. brexit does mean breaks the and foot dragging by this government mayjust be storing up even more problems. just get on with it and get the best deal you can." i believe those in power are delaying the process as something illegal might turn up to stop britain leaving. anything to stop us leaving. keep on getting in touch. still to come, it's the first day back for many and protests are being held at stations across the uk to highlight the cost of rail travel. we will get people's thoughts in a
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moment. let us know your thoughts as well. and later on, a former paralympic athlete was forced to wet herself on a train because there was no accessible toilet. we'll be speaking to her. here's ben in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. west yorkshire police say a pre—planned operation in which a man was shot dead by an officer was not terrorism—related. the watchdog the ipcc is investigating the incident near the m62 in huddersfield yesterday evening. five people were arrested as part of the operation, including two from a related vehicle stop in bradford at the same time. the ministry of defence says a british soldier has died in iraq. the soldier, from the 2nd battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment, died near baghdad, following an incident which is now being investigated. the regiment is training iraqi and kurdish security forces. the death wasn't the result of enemy activity.
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the soldier's family has been informed. kurdish militants say a british man has been killed fighting with them against the group calling itself islamic state in syria. they've told the bbc that ryan lock, who was 20 and from west sussex, died during an assault on the is stronghold of raqqa just before christmas. it's believed he travelled to syria last august, and joined a kurdish volunteer group called the ypg. it's reported in turkey that the authorities now know the identity of the chief suspect in the mass shooting at a nightclub in istanbul. 39 people were killed and dozens wounded when an attacker opened fire on a new year party inside the crowded reina club. police have carried out raids in the city, but the gunman is still at large. the islamic state militant group has said it was behind the attack. police in greater manchester have been given more time to question four men over a hit and run that killed two girls. 12—year—old helina kotlarova,
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seen here on the left, died at the scene in 0ldham on new year's eve. her cousin, 11—year—old zaneeta krokova, died from her injuries in hospital yesterday morning. the centre—left think tank the fabian society has warned that labour is "too weak" to win the next election. the society, which has been developing ideas for labourfor decades, has urged the party to form an alliance with the scottish nationalists and the liberal democrats if it wants to return to power. children in england are eating half their recommended daily sugar intake before they even get to school. that's the warning from health officials. public health england say sugary cereals, juices and spreads are to blame, and, at a time of spiralling obesity levels, have launched a campaign to help us better understand what our children are eating. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am.
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here's some sport now. manchester city manager pep guardiola says he's "arriving at the end of his career" and that city might be one of his last teams. his side beat burnley 2—1 yesterday but guardiola was visibly upset about the sending—off of one of his players. city are up to third in the table, but seven points adrift of leaders chelsea. british number one johanna konta is through to the quarter—finals of the shenzhen open in china. world number ten konta recovered from losing the first set to beat america's vania king. dutchman michael van gerwen has won his second world darts championship. van gerwen beat the reigning pdc champion, scotland's gary anderson, 7—3 in last night's final at alexandra palace. and, david warner has become the first batsman to score a century in the opening session of a test match, as australia dominated pakistan on the first day of the third test in sydney.
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i will have a full update just after 10am. a man has died after he was shot by police in west yorkshire. it happened on a slip road off the m62 in huddersfield yesterday evening. police say the operation last night was "pre—planned", and that three people were arrested. another two people were arrested in a related vehicle stop in bradford. police say the incident was not related to terrorism. the bbc reporter rahul tandon was driving down the motorway slip road when it happened, and we can talk to him now. what did you see? we just wejust came we just came off the slip road at around 6pm. it is a steep incline as you come down that particular slip road. there was a series of police ca i’s road. there was a series of police cars that were blocking the road, blocking us from turning left towards where the incident took place. we just sat there, another car pulled up alongside us, and
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traffic built up behind us. every few minutes police cars would arrive and officers would very calmly walked towards the scene of the incident. we had no idea what the incident. we had no idea what the incident was. after ten or 15 minutes a couple of ambulances came, and then officers ran up the slope, asking people from the ambulance to get down there as quickly as possible, so it looked as though somebody had been badly injured. after half an hour the police knocked on the window and said, you need to get out of this area as quickly as possible, so all of the ca i’s quickly as possible, so all of the cars that had been backed up were told to reverse onto the motorway, they had blocked all of the traffic, and we were told to leave the area. we could see the two cars that were there, most people issuing it had been an accident, because it is a steep incline, we thought somebody had crashed. the first we knew was
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when i woke up this morning and turned on the radio. as commuters head back to work today, protests are being held at train stations across the uk to highlight the cost of rail travel. it comes the day after new fares were announced, with an average price increase of 2.3%. and passengers in the south of england are still being affected by strikes, with a week—long stoppage on the southern rail network planned for monday. we will speak to a group of commuters in a moment. 0ur reporter daniel boettcher is at kings cross station this morning. there was a protest here this morning, 30 to a0 people, it has now dispersed, and others were planned at stations across the country. this was about the increase in fares. 2.3% average rise. part of that is 1.9% on regulated fares. these are
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tickets that include most commuter season—ticket. that figure was set by the government using last year's rpi inflation figures. the train operating companies said the prices of the other tickets, but the average is 2.3% in england, scotland, and wales. prices have been frozen in northern ireland. the campaignfor been frozen in northern ireland. the campaign for better transport says it isa campaign for better transport says it is a kick in the teeth. it has done a calculation that on some commuter routes the cost per minute of those railjourneys is equivalent to calling a premium rate phone line. action for rail gives as an example a ticket from luton to london, a monthly season—ticket, it costs £387, 1a% of the average monthly salary. it compares it with germany, where it says an equivalent route would cost £85, 3% of a salary. in france, six to £1, 2% of
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a monthly salary. commuters in britain say they are paying more than in other countries. the rail delivery group says that the increases in season tickets set by the government, it says 97% in eve ryo ne the government, it says 97% in everyone pound paid by passengers goes into running and improving services, and the government says it is delivering what it calls the biggest modernisation programme for more than a century. it says it has a lwa ys more than a century. it says it has always fairly balanced the cost between taxpayers and passengers. lots to pick up on. well, let's talk now to kate bell, the head of economics at action for rail, lianna etkind, a public—transport campaigner at campaign for better transport, peter izzard, who commutes to london from burgess hill on southern, spending more than £a,000 on his annual season ticket, and jo rossi, who commutes to london from ashford, paying for a weekly season ticket even though she works part time. some people are spending 1a% of
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their salary, what proportion are you spending? after my pension and childcare costs, it is nearly a third of my take—home pay, and not even on my part—time salary, so it is not affordable. how do you feel that costs are going up? it is incredibly unfair and it is alienating a whole portion of people who want to work flexibly, when so many organisations are welcoming and promoting flexible working. many organisations are welcoming and promoting flexible workinglj many organisations are welcoming and promoting flexible working. i said you spend £a000 on an annual season ticket, you travel on the southern rail network, so you have been affected, so you will be getting a rebate. we get four weeks' refund, allegedly this month. i am yet to see the final details. my fair has gone up1.8%. see the final details. my fair has gone up 1.8%. now i pay £4248 for
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the privilege of travelling on a service that is wholly inadequate. any fare increase is too much. i don't think any commuter would mind paying an increase is a service was delivered. but it is not being delivered. but it is not being delivered. there is no sign of an end to the demarco batter southern rail. what southern rail are charging, they point out they are giving a month's rebate to compensate for the problems on the network, and they say they are freezing some of the fares and any increases are pegged at inflation. clearly, it is shallow words. i think that the rebate is welcome. i would rather have no rebate and they begina would rather have no rebate and they begin a service, a trusted service, which allows me to get home to see my wife and children in the evenings, as opposed to being late everyday. concentrate on the key factors here, which is ending this dispute, and delivering a service
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that our commuters can value and the simple things in life, catch a train oi'i simple things in life, catch a train on time at a scheduled time and arrival. we were hearing from daniel that rail fares here are six times higher than elsewhere in europe, prices have gone up by 56% over the past ten years. do you think passengers are being ripped off? passages are ripped off, and they will find there is another year of rises which are hard to stomach. many passengers have had a year of disruptions and substandard services, and to be asked to pay for more of the same is unacceptable. it shows that the whole system needs an overhaul, and the government needs to take action to make it fairer. overhaul, and the government needs to take action to make it fairenfl is pointed out that 97% of everyone pound that commuters pay for their rail fares pound that commuters pay for their railfares are pound that commuters pay for their rail fares are reinvested, pound that commuters pay for their railfares are reinvested, and pound that commuters pay for their rail fares are reinvested, and the biggest modernisation programme for
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a century is currently being delivered. the cost of running a railway is now largely covered by income from the railways, mostly passenger fares, but we need to see in investment in the railways and in the whole economy. rail is notjust benefit passengers who use it. the benefits everybody, even if you never take a benefits everybody, even if you nevertake a train, benefits everybody, even if you never take a train, you will benefit from clearer roads, so the people who need to drive can get to where they need to be, from cleaner air and better health, and from the mitigating climate change, and rail plays a part in supporting all of our society and economy. the background is that while government subsidies have decreased by £1.1 billion over the past five years, the fares have gone up byjust about the fares have gone up byjust about the same amount, just a little more. absolutely. 0ur the same amount, just a little more. absolutely. our research comparing the cost of travel in the uk with that of other european countries, we are highlighting that we are not
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getting the best bang for our book. we see how much cheaper fares are in other countries, in paris it would cost just £61 to travel other countries, in paris it would costjust £61 to travel the same distance. because of greater government subsidy? and public ownership. it is not an efficient way of running a railway, the fragmented system we have. we think a better way is possible. public transport, which makes such a big difference to lives, is much cheaper and more efficient and you get a much better service. the government says it balances the costs fairly between taxpayer and passenger, how do you see it? we can see the improvements that are allegedly put m, improvements that are allegedly put in, the thames link programme will make a big difference, but we are still years away from seeing those benefits. what we are not seeing is in reality the service is taking a backward step, it is as bad as i
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have ever known it. talk of investment is wonderful, butjust fix the short—term problem, which is theissues fix the short—term problem, which is the issues today. should there be more government subsidy? well, i think action needs to be taken. i'm pushed on to a high—speed rail network because the other main line stations, they have a far longer commute now so some action needs to be taken to benefit the commuters. has it made you think about stopping commuting? well, i love myjob, but it's uneconomical for me to come into work and i know having moved down from london because of the higher house prices, there is lots of people who can't go back to work in london because it is simply unaffordable. it does make one question, especially with lower salaries outside london as well. at what point does it become unviable so you decide that you can't
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continue with it? well, i think you have to think of the longer term goal in terms of career and so on and working your organisation as well because my company is very accommodating in terms of working flexibly so i have to take the financial hit for now because train companies are not moving with the times and kind of stepping up to the mark and kind of helping facilitate flexible working. thank you very much for coming in and do let us know what you think about that as well if you are a commuter and you are affected well if you are a commuter and you a re affected by well if you are a commuter and you are affected by the increase in prices from today. let's go back to the terror attack, the new year terror attack in istanbul. what can you tell us? there are reporting suggesting the that the gunman has been confirmed.
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according to the reports, he is a 28—year—old man from kyrgyzstan called lakhe mashrapov. they were not naming i had country as of yet and the officials had been investigating whether one of their citizens was involved in the attack that took place on the new year's eve. now the reports suggest that we have the name and we have the id of the attacker. 0f have the name and we have the id of the attacker. of course, now the turkish police force will try to investigate whether this person was acting on his own or whether there was a cell behind him. the is group, the islamic state group, has already claimed responsibility for the attack, but was this guy alone? 0r was there a particular cell supporting this man in the attack that he carried out? of course, the
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manhunt is still on. the gunman is still at large. there are 12 people detained including his wife and the investigations are still being carried out. thank you very much. in a moment we'll be speaking to two terror experts and a turkish journalist, but first let's take a look at some of the 39 victims of the attack. i think the whole world should be united against this deadly evil and if the entire world unites, we can crush them. the world can crush these unwanted elements. let's talk now to chris phillips,
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a former head of the national counter terrorism security office. joining us from oxford is ezgi basaran is a turkish journalist based here in the uk. she says she feels frightened to go back to istanbul as seculars like herself are being targeted. jerry smith is a terrorism risk specialist who has worked for the army and government. thank you all very much indeed for joining us. chris, first of all, turkey was on a state of high alert. there were, i think, 17,000 turkey was on a state of high alert. there were, ithink,17,000 police officers on duty in istanbul and yet this still happened. unfortunately,
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there is no such thing as 100% security. turkey know that it is at the fore front of potential terrorist attacks, but of course, an individual like this can go under the radar. it seems to be a slight sea change in the way that the terrorists are operating in that this looks like it is someone that's come from the war zone and maybe has actually returned back to the war zone. so it is an interesting and terrible thing, but unfortunately, we're going to be faced with more terrorist attacks, not dissimilar to this in 2017. when you look at that particular aspect of where it seems the person that did this came from and then went back and to and say it looks like a potential change, how easyis looks like a potential change, how easy is to spot any trends in what we're seeing? there are some similarities between attacks that are happening and othersjust com pletely are happening and othersjust completely different again?|j are happening and othersjust completely different again? i would say we have got three different types of terrorist problems at the moment. we've got a group of people that have been fighting in iraq and syria. and of course, they are used
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to handling weapons and used to dealing with explosives, have been ina warzone. dealing with explosives, have been in a war zone. so we have to face them and they are being encouraged to go back to their own countries to cause terror, but we have got people who are self radicalising within communities and those are very difficult to spot and then we've also got what i call the mad, bad and sad in society who are popping up and sad in society who are popping up out of nowhere with probably very little knowledge of islam, and choosing to go out in a blaze of glory. so it is very difficult for the security services right across europe, right across the west to actually deal with these and don't forget this is notjust a european problem this. is across the world. jerry smith, how concerned should we be here from a wide every security prospective about specifically what happened in turkey? well, i think we have seen similar attacks to what occurred in turkey in other parts of western europe. i think the uk has
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some slight differences obviously being an island and having some particularly gun laws are the sort of things and also we have a proty integrated security set—up. not only with the police, the security services, support from the military where required, but also in a community local authority emergency planners, the way that towns and cities are designed, so all that integration is a pretty good in the uk. this is, i think, the first attack that is has specifically claimed in turkey, but it is not the first attack that there has been in turkey. how do you feel about what is going on in your country? after 2015, turkey shifted its syrian policy. before that, between 2013 and 2015, there was an open border policy which enabled isis recruits, national and foreign, to move freely
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in and out of turkey which helped isis smuggling and recruitment infrastructure, but starting from 2015, turkey's stance against isis changed and by that time, the attacks started. there are three categories of targets in isis mentality in turkey. first, are the kurds because kurds are fighting in syria, the most effective fighting force in syria against isis and second, would be the seculars. the turks and the third is the administration officials and its electorate. now we can see that they had gone up to a level in terms of
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confidence and in terms of targets. this is actually the second attack that isis claimed responsibility through its news agency, but the first major one i can say. chris, i know you've worked in istanbul quite recently helping to train the security services there. what was the work that you were doing? well, obviously they've got big problems. they've got a huge pool of potential terrorists in their country and they've got, they want to be westward leaning to some extent and of course, everywhere needs to be secured, every nightclub needs to be secured, every nightclub needs to be secured, the airports need to be secured. i was trying to train some of the security guards to understand the nature of the threat and what they could do and put in place. we've learned a lot from terrorism in the uk over the years. we've implemented changes. we put in
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defence measures in airports. they need to catch up on this stuff that we have led the world on. a security minister said that isis is prepared to carey out a chemical weapons attack in the uk. being prepared and being ready to do it are two different things. jerry, what's your prospect on the potential for something like that? as you mentioned, when you look about capability and intent, as the ministersaid, capability and intent, as the minister said, the intent is clearly there. this idea of mass casualties, how they're caused, in some ways, is less of an issue. theyjust want to cause mass casualties, mass terror, to impact. capability is slightly different and again with chemical weapons, sometimes the sort of the headline that we see is perhaps not as bad as actually reality. so, making chemical weapons is not easy. it is not impossible. but, it is not easy. perhaps more of a concern is
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the theft of industrial chemicals or the theft of industrial chemicals or the use of those and maybe just some attack on an industrial facility which allowed a leak to occur or the theft of chemicals that are being moved on our highways. thank you very much. thank you. coming up, a british man with no previous experience has been killed fighting alongside kurdish forces in syria. we'll bring you the latest after the news. let's get the latest weather update. it is very frosty again. this morning i was in my car at 3.59am shivering. i wanted to go back to bed. jack frost was painting with a thick paintbrush. this almost looks like some three—dimensional map of i don't know some planet or something!
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i think that's the roof of the car! i saw lots of roofs like that. this person, i think it was, daisy, wa nted person, i think it was, daisy, wanted to get a frosty message across frosty roads, frozen, cold, all of that. tonight, it is not going to be so frosty. we have got milder weather heading our way. after that cold and frosty start as we say, we've got sunshine around, but really the best of the sunshine is going to be across southern areas. look at the clouds in the north. they're starting to invade the uk and that's also less cold air sitting on top of the uk. so let's start with the south first. this is where we're going to be enjoying that sparkling winter sunshine. temperatures around six celsius in plymouth. there could be one or two spots warmer at four or five celsius. notice the further north you go, the thicker the clouds get. you might get brightness to the east of the pennines, but in the north—west, here, certainly western parts of scotland, much milder, not
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far off ten celsius, and there will be some rain on and off during the day as well. notice the winds, north—westerly winds of the atlantic. they keep on dragging the milderair atlantic. they keep on dragging the milder air which is sit k up there, pushing it southwards. the mild air is sitting on top of us. jack frost off he goes. it is more like plus four celsius or plus five celsius. colder further north. four celsius or plus five celsius. colderfurther north. maybe four celsius or plus five celsius. colder further north. maybe a touch of frost in scotland, but generally speaking tomorrow, frost—free in the morning. a bit of cloud across south—western areas and then it looks like the sunshine is out. actually, this is going to be a trend for something colder the middle part of the week. the middle pa rt middle part of the week. the middle part of the week we've got an area of high pressure building on top of us. this equals generally clear skies across the uk. and that means that all the warmth that we will have gathered, will escape again and temperatures will dip away. so
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thursday morning, another very frosty one, but look at that, things warm up significantly by the time we get towards the end of the week. so that means that the end of the week rather than being frosty it is going to be soggy and mild! hello, it's tuesday, i'm joanna gosling. coming up before 11am. a man is shot dead in a police operation near the m62 motorway in huddersfield. police say it is not related to terrorism. we'll be speaking to the former paralympian who was forced to wet herself on a train because there were no disabled toilets. and, after 10:30am today. we'll look at some of the best new film releases and ask if the row over racism in hollywood is driving change. good morning. here's ben in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. west yorkshire police say a pre—planned operation in which a man was shot dead by an officer was not
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terrorism—related. the police watchdog the ipcc is investigating the incident, which took place near the m62 in huddersfield yesterday evening. five people were arrested as part of the operation, including two from a related vehicle stop in bradford at the same time. 0ur reporter was stuck in traffic with his family after police closed the road, he has been talking to us. all the cars that had been backed up on the slip road were told to reverse onto the motorway, they had blocked traffic, and we were told to leave the area. we could see down the bridge because that were there, most able assumed it had been an accident, because it is a steep incline, we thought somebody had crashed into another. the first we knew about it is when i turned on the radio this morning and found out it was a very different incident. it's reported in turkey that the authorities now know
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the identity of the chief suspect in the mass shooting at a nightclub in istanbul. 39 people were killed and dozens wounded when an attacker opened fire on a new year party inside the crowded reina club. the ministry of defence says a british soldier has died in iraq. the soldier, from the 2nd battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment, died near baghdad, following an incident which is now being investigated. the regiment is training iraqi and kurdish security forces. the death wasn't the result of enemy activity. the soldier's family has been informed. kurdish militants say a british man has been killed fighting with them against the group calling itself islamic state in syria. they've told the bbc that ryan lock, who was 20 and from west sussex, died during an assault on the is stronghold of raqqa just before christmas. it's believed he travelled to syria last august, and joined a kurdish volunteer group called the ypg. police in greater manchester have
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been given more time to question four men over a hit and run that killed two girls. 12—year—old helina kotlarova, seen here on the left, died at the scene in 0ldham on new year's eve. her cousin, 11—year—old zaneeta krokova, died from her injuries in hospital yesterday morning. protests have been held at railway stations this morning in response to the latest annual fares increase. the average ticket has gone up by 2.3%. many of today's demonstrations are organised by the campaign group action for rail. it says people in the uk spend six times as much on tickets compared with those in europe. children in england are eating half their recommended daily sugar intake before they even get to school. that's the warning from health officials. public health england say sugary cereals, juices and spreads are to blame and, at a time of spiralling obesity levels, have launched a campaign
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to help us better understand what our children are eating. we know that lots of children are eating a lot of sugar for breakfast. in total, they are eating almost three times the maximum recommended level of sugar over the day. that is contributing to the awful obesity statistics that we have. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10:30am. more on the british man who has died in syria fighting alongside kurdish forces in a moment. we will find out why he chose to go. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with jessica creighton. manchester city are back up to third in the premier league after a 2—1win over burnley. but they had to play for an hour with only ten men after captain
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fernandinho was sent off for a reckless challenge. gael clichy eventually gave them the lead, but pep guardiola was clearly unhappy about the sending off. sergio aguero added a second goal. guardiola was pretty frosty in his post—match interview. he was speaking to our reporter damian johnson. the sending off, what was your view of the red card for fernandinho? you are the journalist, not me. you're the manager, i'm sure the fans would like to know. ask the referee, not me. you don't seem that happy that you've won? more than you would believe, more than you would believe. you are not showing it. i am so happy. believe me, i'm so happy. happy new year. are you still in the title race? yesterday we were not, why are we today? just a little bit awkward. and jurgen klopp wasn't too happy either, after liverpool twice threw away the lead at struggling sunderland.
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sadio mane had put liverpool 2—1 up, butjermain defoe's second penalty of the match saw it end 2—2. liverpool stay second, but are now five points behind the leaders chelsea. west ham's sofiane feghouli was sent off as manchester united won 2—0 at west ham. the goals came from juan mata and zlatan ibrahimovic. world number tenjohanna konta has continued her winning start to the season. she's through to the quarter—finals of the shenzhen open in china. the briton recovered from a set down and being a break down in the second to beat american varnia king. she wrapped up the match injust over an hour she wrapped up the match injust overan hourand a she wrapped up the match injust over an hour and a half. michael van gerwen has won his second world darts championship. he beat reigning pdc champion gary anderson 7—3 at alexandra palace. it wasn't all plain sailing for the dutchman, though, as just as he was throwing for the match at 6—2 up, he was interrupted.
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security men quickly dealt with the prankster. but it put van gerwen off, delaying his coronation by another set. it was worth the extra wait, though, as he claimed victory in style to take the £350,000 pound prize and end anderson's hopes of a hat—trick of titles. david warner blasted his way to a century before lunch on the opening day of the third test against pakistan in sydney. warner tookjust 78 balls to get to three figures. only four other players have managed to score a century in the very first session of a test. warner was eventually out for 113, but matt renshaw rammed home australia's advantage. he's playing in only his fourth test. he was actually born in middlesbrough, but has lived in australia since he was ten. he's 167 not out, with australia on 365—3. that is all the sport, i am back
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with the headlines at 10:30am. a 20—year—old from sussex has been killed fighting so—called islamic state in northern syria. his name is ryan lock, a chef from chichester, who had no military experience whatsoever before travelling to join kurdish forces in syria last august. let's speak to our correspondent emma va rdy. she's in our southampton newsroom. emma, what more do we know? he went to school and haven't, his family are from haven't and chichester, and he was a chef in the uk before travelling out to fight in syria. he travelled in august, and we understand he had told friends and family he was going on holiday to turkey, but later revealed he had travelled to join up with the kurdish militant group the ypg in
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syria. a number of other british volu nteers syria. a number of other british volunteers have done the same, choosing to fight against so—called islamic state of their own accord. the ypg confirmed his death in a letter to his family and said that he had been killed fighting in the battle for the syrian city of fracture, which has been an islamic state stronghold. he had no previous military experience whatsoever, is it clear what it was that made him decide to go off and fight? no, but many who have been out there to fight talk about wanting to be part of the kurdish struggle, wanting to fight against the evil, as they see it, of islamic state. his father has said he had a heart of gold, his family are said to be in absolute grief at the news of his death. i spoke to the father of the first british volunteer to die fighting against islamic state, he went to visit ryan's father and offer his
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condolences and his perspective as a pa rent of condolences and his perspective as a parent of somebody who has chosen to go and do this. ryan is reported to be the third british man to be killed fighting against islamic state, although the numbers are difficult to verify. the foreign 0ffice difficult to verify. the foreign office has warned strongly against travelling to syria and has warned that whichever side somebody may decide to fight on, they could be breaking with this camera laws. many in the kurdish community will see him and others as martyrs. you were an activist who spoke to ryan's family. very difficult, it will be, for them to come to terms with this. yes. incredibly difficult time on sunday. the family are com pletely time on sunday. the family are completely and utterly devastated
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and deep in grief at the moment. not really wanting to think about all of theissues really wanting to think about all of the issues surrounding isis or the kurds or ypg, they are just really... they have found out... ryan really... they have found out... rya n fell really... they have found out... ryan fell on the 21st of december that there has been a process by which the ypg have tried to confirm that it was him, and that confirmation came through to them on friday, and we went to pay our condolences and offer our help in terms of any possible retrieving of the body at a later date. but the whole of the kurdish community all around the world, their hearts are with the family today. do you know when they knew that he was fighting? when he went off in august, he said he was going on holiday. when he went off in august, he said he was going on holidaylj when he went off in august, he said he was going on holiday. i am not too sure exactly when they found out that he was fighting in syria, but i
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believe that when he had arrived in syria, he had posted on his facebook account that he had arrived in syria and he was sorry that he had not been totally honest with them. and he was fighting isis. how many people are doing this from the uk? 0ver people are doing this from the uk? over the past five years there has been quite a number. internationally there has been quite a few hundred. there are even international brigades now fighting with the ypg forces. but in terms of britons, at the moment there are probably about a dozen. why? these are people without previous military experience. it is something that is difficult to get your head around, but essentially... the wanting to say today is that i would never
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encourage anybody to go there. there are other ways to support the kurdish cause, to support the fight against isis. we need campaigners and raising awareness of the issues around this. but what is their motivation? you just have to look at our daily news. you had a piece about the bombing in istanbul by isis. all of the grotesque and morbid videos that we see isis post ona morbid videos that we see isis post on a weekly basis. is there a route? 0ne on a weekly basis. is there a route? one thing being upset about what is happening, but finding your way to a battlefield, that requires help from somewhere. exactly. there are facebook pages and people take themselves off to kurdistan. 0nce they are there, it is quite easy. and the ypg of the most effective
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fighting force against isis, they have been the one force that has consistently fought isis right to the outside of raqqa, they don't need international volunteers, really. but once people are out there... it is a bit like the spanish civil war, the fight against fascism, there were international brigades that fought against fascism, and it is very similar to those times. 0nce fascism, and it is very similar to those times. once they are out there, the ypg will give them training and facilitate them to fight. mostly, they encourage them to stay behind the front lines. but many of these fighters are highly motivated and thoughtful. they have thought this through. even the short time ryan was there, he was bombed ina time ryan was there, he was bombed in a village by turkish airplay is, and he lost many of his colleagues in that bombing, two other
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international volunteers as well. but he changed units and he wanted to fight on the front line against —— in the raqqa operation. we don't wa nt —— in the raqqa operation. we don't want people to go, but when they are they that are doing incredibly brave things in the fight against isis. we have to acknowledge that. a foreign office spokesperson said, "the uk has advised for some time against all travel to syria. anyone who does travel to these areas for whatever reason, is putting themselves in danger." still to come: at10.30am, we'll be speaking to the former paralympian who was forced to wet herself on a train because there were no disabled toilets. brexit will inevitably be top of the political agenda for much of 2017 as the government prepares to trigger the formal exit negotiations. six months after the vote that came as a surprise to many, our reporter michael cowan has returned to great yarmouth in norfolk where the result was never in ever doubt. the town delivered the fifth highest leave vote with more than 70%
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of residents voting out. we showed you the full film earlier. here's a short extract. we first came here six months ago. our country had just voted to leave the eu and it was summer. but are people here still excited about brexit? what is more important to them? is it access to the single market which involves much the same as we've got now? we pay into the eu and in exchange, we get to trade with them, but we have to accept freedom of movement. that means unlimited numbers of eu workers coming to britain to work. or is it this — complete control of our borders? because the only certainty we have here is that we cannot have both. does it concern you when you hear things about the economy? for example, going on holiday already costs more money because the value of
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the pound is low. why not holiday in britain? there's some beautiful holiday destinations. this is one of them. if people were putting more money back into our own economy, rather than feeding everyone else's economy, this country would thrive. come to great yarmouth, go to blackpool, go to liverpool, go to different areas where you've got these beautiful seaside towns that are getting forgotten and ignored and neglected. do you still feel excited about brexit? absolutely. i think it was the best thing we could have done. joining the eu was the worst decision britain ever made. do we want access to the single market or do we want complete control of our borders? because it is one or the other. we cannot have both. i think we've got enough here. 0ur housing situation is atrocious. i understand that they do need to go somewhere and the place is a state and i agree with that, but when is it going to stop? are we going to be in tents next? so you voted leave? i voted leave because i went with the flow. if there was another referendum tomorrow, hypothetically... and i knew more about it, possibly could change my mind. definitely.
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hands up to that one. so that is more important to you? even if it comes at the cost of the economy, controlling the borders, that's the most important thing? that's the most important for me. do you think parliament should have a vote on brexit? yes. without a doubt, they should do. i think they should get back in, put all of their heads together, stop arguing, listen to each other. they might get somewhere. 0ur brexit boards are clear. 54 people went for this, complete conviction, like they had six months ago, to control our borders. 24 people went for single market access. we are not pollsters and our brexit boards are not scientific, but they clearly suggest, for people here, immigration and control of our borders is still the major concern. there's your change. have a good christmas. but amongst those we spoke to, there is a waning support for the way in which the government is handling brexit, namely
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the lack of information. and it's telling that while the vast majority stand by that decision to leave, people here want more input, or even another vote, on the exact terms of how we leave the european union. this could become a reality when the highest court in the land, the supreme court, returns its decision later this month on whether mps should have a vote on triggering article 50 or not. and to watch that film again and share it, you can head to our programme page bbc.co.uk/victoria. let's talk now to racheljohnson, columnist at the mail on sunday. rossalyn warren, a freelance journalist and commentator previously at buzzfeed. stephen bush, special correspondent at the new statesman magazine. who we have predicted so much that
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ended up happening in 2016. i want predictions from you for 2017. do you think we will start to get clarity because the government position is triggering article 50 by the end of march? absolutely. i think, well, eventually after a year of turmoil in 2016, with a lot of things left up in the air and many things left up in the air and many things still left uncertain, too as we have seen in the video clip to the british public, i think the public need clarity now and i think there will be elements to that drawn out this year. in there isn't clarity, rachel, how much of a problem is that for the government? hearing our voters there, there is anger out there that the clarity isn't coming through, isn't there? well, there is something like a timetable which is that article 50 is going to be triggered by the end of march. but i'm wondering whether there is going to be so much uncertainty across national elections in europe, it lies behind some of the prevarication that we have seen this from government
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pronouncements. in a sense, if marie le pen win ins france, she will take france out of the euro which could trigger a reconfiguration of the european project with an inner core and outer core. us leaving is going to look like a teddy bears' picnic. 0ur to look like a teddy bears' picnic. our local matter of leaving the eu, however, hard, soft, red, white or blue will be a sideshow. what do you think will happen with brexit, stephen? i think it will be triggered in march. 0ne stephen? i think it will be triggered in march. one of the odd things about this court case, it is a fight the government didn't need to pick. we know they have got the votes to trigger it in parliament, it will be triggered. the tricky thing for them is we are going to have a lot of election ins europe where this idea the government has and you can keep your brexit stance secret, it might work here, but it will be an issue in the french
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elections and the dutch and the german elections, what's your response to brexit? it will be hard for the government not to give a running commentary on other people's running commentary on other people's running commentaries. elections elsewhere, as you mentioned, what about the prospect por for an early election here? downing street have been firm on why they don't want one. theirargument, been firm on why they don't want one. their argument, they are worried you could end up with a coalition of the remain parties or some other chaotic event and people wa nt some other chaotic event and people want stability, that's broadly true, but her majority is small. and the opposition is very weak. you can see the argument for it. i think she might be forced into one, but i don't think she will do it willingly. what do you think, rachel well, she has been categorical there won't be an election until 2020 and i don't think labour want one, the corbyn labour... if labour are weak is that a good time? there gives her an incentive, but we have the fixed
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term parliaments act, you repeal it orengineera term parliaments act, you repeal it or engineer a collapse of your own government, as far as i understand it, but stephen probably knows more. that's right. it is a poorly written bit of legislation. it is not clear in the collapsing your own government, dhauz mean jeremy in the collapsing your own government, dhauz meanjeremy corbyn would become prime minister and theresa may, or some conservative grandee would become prime minister. it is really difficult to get an early election unless you start losing votes in the house regularly. she does only have a majority of 11 now because she lost one, thanks to zac goldsmith. it is going to get trickierfor her to get zac goldsmith. it is going to get trickier for her to get stuff done. predictions onjeremy corbyn because still questions about his leadership and prediction from one think—tank today that labour could struggle to get 150 seats in the next election, do you think he will survive the year? they won't want an lech any time soon. —— election any time
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soon. i think he will stick it out as we have seen in the last year oar so. he has managed to claw his way through and i don't see that changing any time this year personally. the vultures are circling. we have had len mccluskey and we have had also keir starmer who queried his stance on freedom of movement. and so, ifeel that, you know, nevertheless even if he is a dead man, the dead man will carry on walking. stephen? yes, jeremy corbyn will be leader of the labour party at least until the next election and potentially for sometime. he has ridden so many storms, hasn't he? you must wonder whether the appetite sta rts you must wonder whether the appetite starts to wane after that? jeremy corbyn is's career has been riding storms. that's not going to change. 30 years of behaviour won't change over the next 12 months. in some
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ways, there is an interesting comparison where the labour party membership is on corbyn. they said, "we voted for this. we want you to make a success of it." they are not going to blame the person they voted for, they are going to blame remainers for not making brexit work and labourmps for remainers for not making brexit work and labour mp5 for not making corbyn work. let's turn to european politics. you mentioned it and obviously, rachel throwing up the prospect of what happens if the incumbents lose in france and germany. in germany, 59% according to polls want angela merkel to continue as chancellor after the election in february. how will you call for things at this stage for what you think is likely to happen? well, i mean, it is a mug's game
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being mystic meg. it has been confounded every single time. i want merkel to win because i really believe germany, we need leadership in europe and germany, she has proved a wonderful internationalist. imean, you proved a wonderful internationalist. i mean, you can query what she did on open borders, but i think, that she putting herself down for a fourth term was brave, it was correct. i hope she wins, but if she doesn't win, if this whole immigration thing has really cleared her pitch, i think, europe is in absolute turmoil, that's the end game. as i said earlier, the only solution i see then is you have an outer core and inner core where italy, italy, spain, greece spin off and you have germany, belgium, luxembourg, and a bit of the nordic rim. around the euro and all the other countries reclaim their original currencies. how would you call the french and german elections
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this year, stephen? merkelwill win. she will come first. if she is defeated it will be by the left. i think she will be chancellor again for a long time. france is more difficult to call. but the thing we forget about both brexit and trump although they are very different from le pen particularly brexit, they were both going with the grain of british politics, anti—europeanism. in france, the tradition of voting against the parties of theks trem and the second round of their election is very strong. i think she will find it ha rd strong. i think she will find it hard to win. much harder than brexit would. i think that 2017 will see a continued growth for far—right parties across europe and they have always existed across europe, but brought forward a set of policies across a board as we say a particularly high anti—migrant, anti—refugee sentiment by a lot of these parties will be more evident
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this year. with merkel her biggest criticism has been the open border policy, but i think there is a divide there in what the media depict about her in saying that she has lost a lot of faith, germans lost a lot of faith in her, but the polls have said they continue to support her. so and i think with trump's selection, of course, i don't think, he helped ignite something in europe that sort of ignited the far—right policies here and far—right parties here, but as we say, they have existed for a long time, but he sort of brought that, i forget what was said, but this is ourtime. forget what was said, but this is our time. this is a turning point for us and our parties to take that step forward and to be accepted in our countries. you think that 2017 will be the year of revolution as
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well as 2016. please, will be the year of revolution as wellas 2016. please, no! will be the year of revolution as well as 2016. please, no! it will be interesting. we will have to check—in with you several times. thank you very much indeed. we can show you now some incredible footage from the us now of two year old twins, bowdy and brock. their parents decided to share this video to raise awareness of the dangers of not bolting heavy furniture to the wall. it looks who have rishg. neither of the boys were injured, thank goodness. it is extraordinary, isn't it, to watch it? the little boy who is on top. look, he tries to lift up the chest of drawers to get his brother out. amazingly, the brother who is under the chest of drawers is not injured and look, he manages to get out with the help of his brother, butjust shocking images and the parents have chosen to put the pictures out to let all parents out there knowjust drill furniture to the wall to stop
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anything like that happening. still to come, in a moment, we'll talk to a paralympic athlete was forced to wet herself on a train because there was no accessible toilet. and at 10.45am, we look forward to this month's film releases and we'll be asking if hollywood is taking diversity seriously. here's ben in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. west yorkshire police say a pre—planned operation in which a man was shot dead by an officer was not terrorism—related. the police watchdog the ipcc is investigating the incident, which took place near the m62 in huddersfield yesterday evening. five people were arrested as part of the operation, including two from a related vehicle stop in bradford at the same time. kurdish militants say a british man has been killed fighting with them against the group calling itself
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islamic state in syria. they've told the bbc that ryan lock, who was 20 and from west sussex, died during an assault on the is stronghold of raqqa just before christmas. it's believed he travelled to syria last august, and joined a kurdish volunteer group called the ypg. we have been talking to a kurdish activist who visited his family on sunday to inform them of his death. they are completely and utterly devastated and deep in grief. not really wanting to think about the issues surrounding isis or the kurds or ypg. he fell on the 21st of december but there has been a process by which the ypg try to confirm it was him. that confirmation came through to them on friday. the ministry of defence says a british soldier has died in iraq. the soldier, from the 2nd battalion the duke of lancaster's regiment, died near baghdad,
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following an incident which is now being investigated. the regiment is training iraqi and kurdish security forces. the death wasn't the result of enemy activity. the soldier's family has been informed. it's reported in turkey that the authorities now know the identity of the main suspect in the mass shooting at a nightclub in istanbul. it's understood he's 28—year—old iakhe mashrapov from kyrgyzstan. 39 people were killed and dozens wounded when an attacker opened fire on a new year party inside the crowded reina club. police in greater manchester have been given more time to question four men over a hit and run that killed two girls. 12—year—old helina kotlarova, seen here on the left, died at the scene in 0ldham on new year's eve. her cousin, 11—year—old zaneeta krokova, died from her injuries in hospital yesterday morning. that's a summary of the latest news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. we will be line at the scene of the
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police shooting in west yorkshire. here's some sport now with jessica creighton. manchester city manager pep guardiola says he's "arriving at the end of his career" and that city might be one of his last teams. his side beat burnley 2—1 yesterday, but guardiola was visibly upset about the sending—off of one of his players. city are up to third in the table, but seven points adrift of leaders chelsea. british number one johanna konta is through to the quarter—finals of the shenzhen open in china. world number ten konta recovered from losing the first set to beat america's vania king. dutchman michael van gerwen has won his second world darts championship. van gerwen beat the reigning pdc champion, scotland's gary anderson, 7—3 in last night's final at alexandra palace. and, david warner has become the first batsman to score a century before lunch in a test in australia, as his side dominated pakistan on the first day
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of the third test in sydney. more on the bbc news channel through the day. a paralympic athlete and mbe—awarded disabilities campaigner says she was forced to wet herself on train because it didn't have an accessible toilet. anne wafula strike says that she was left humiliated after the three—hour journey on a crosscountry train with no working disabled toilet. despite her embarrassment, she has decided to go public in the hope it will bring change for disabled people. we can talk to anne wafula strike from her home in harlow in essex. and with us in the studio is sue bott from disability rights uk. tell us what happened, you were on the train and realised there was no working disabled toilet for you to use? i was coming from a very
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inspiring meeting. as you do when you are travelling, you want to relieve yourself. i was appalled that when i went to check, the toilet was boarded up with a big sign, out of order. i asked the ticketmaster is they could help in. she could not do anything, because she was also helpless. she decided they would get me off at the next station to see if i could use the toilet and then get me on board again, but when you go to that station, there was nobody there, so there was not anybody to come up with a ramp and help me. i had some passengers who were willing to get me out, but she realised that even if they took me out, i would still need somebody on the station who would have access to help me get across to the other side to use the toilet and bring me back. the next stop for me was peter. between then
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and peterborough, i could not hold it anymore, i and peterborough, i could not hold itanymore, i had and peterborough, i could not hold it anymore, i had to do it. humiliating, but i had to do it. how did you feel through the whole process , did you feel through the whole process, you were in the hands of others, needing help, and there was nothing that they could do? when you are in that situation, that is when you really feel disabled. i rarely feel disabled, because i like to get about and do things, i like to be in the community, to support others, but when that happened to me, i realised that sometimes when you are different, you are so isolated. the world this qualifies you from having a normal life. when you have a disability, you don't just a normal life. when you have a disability, you don'tjust have to have equal rights in the community. it knocked my confidence. when you we re it knocked my confidence. when you were on the train, you are talking
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about it now, which presumably is not easy, to raise awareness, but when you were on the train you must have felt vulnerable? when you were on the train you must have felt vulnerable ?|j when you were on the train you must have felt vulnerable? i felt very vulnerable. i felt really exposed. have felt vulnerable? i felt very vulnerable. ifelt really exposed. i felt humiliated. i just vulnerable. ifelt really exposed. i felt humiliated. ijust felt like i was in this big world, nobody was taking notice that i existed. i needed to use the toilet. we are talking about a basic need, basic right, that a human being deserves. i don't think this should be happening in this century. when did you decide that you wanted to start to talk about it publicly? when it first happened to me, i could not look at myself in the mirror, because i was so embarrassed that i had wet myself. 0ne
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because i was so embarrassed that i had wet myself. one day i woke up andi had wet myself. one day i woke up and i looked at myself in the mirror and i looked at myself in the mirror andisaid,... i and i looked at myself in the mirror and i said,... i realised i am not the only one who is experiencing this, i know so many other people with disabilities going through different and difficult issues, and i say to myself, i have got to speak. iam i say to myself, i have got to speak. i am just hoping that by me going public, it will end all of these things we go on about, self—censorship, and we should realise that when bad things are happening to us, we need to have a voice and speak, because when that was going on, i did not have a voice, it was all taken away from me. ifeel voice, it was all taken away from me. i feel that voice, it was all taken away from me. ifeel that i now voice, it was all taken away from me. i feel that i now have a voice to speak out against it, i should not just sit and lie to speak out against it, i should notjust sit and lie in the bed and wa nt to notjust sit and lie in the bed and want to have bigotry when it was all taken away during that incident —— wa nt to taken away during that incident —— want to have dignity and allow others to suffer the same. what do you think about this?”
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others to suffer the same. what do you think about this? i am appalled. you are very brave for coming out and explaining what happened to you. i really hope that it does a lot of good. i i really hope that it does a lot of good. lam i really hope that it does a lot of good. i am sure this has happened to disabled people in the past, but they have not felt confident or been able to come and speak publicly about it. unfortunately, we still have a tick box mentality towards disability and access. we tick the box that the toilet is there on the train, we don't think about how we need to consider that it is working all the time. it takes somebody like anne to talk about it to get people
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to understand why it is important that those facilities are there and usable. absolutely. as somebody who does not use a wheelchair, it is fine, you can get off at the next stop if the toilet is not working. but anne does not have that option. that is what i would have done. i would have crawled to get to the next toilet. but unfortunately, as a wheelchair user, you don't have that luxury, of the isles on the train are quite tight. i agree, it is ticking a box. we have a legislation thatis ticking a box. we have a legislation that is supposed to protect disabled people to have equal rights with everybody else, but the problem is that i don't think these legislations are tough enough.
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companies and organisations are getting away with a lot. in the process of ticking a box to say that we have a toilet, we have a ramp. what is the point of having that when it is not functional, when it is not working? one person says, i was on a train yesterday, i am not disabled, but over the loudspeaker the person said the disabled toilets are out of order. i found it outrageous and something that should not have happened. cross—country trains say what happened was clearly unacceptable and they are investigating. what reaction have you had since speaking out? everybody is outraged. we are having so many people coming out and speaking about what they have suffered with the train companies. it is not on. we are talking about a basic right. i have not had any
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apology or any communication from the cross—country trains group. to me, it is not enough if i ask them to give me my big city back. what i would ask them is, what are you going to do about this? what do you wa nt to going to do about this? what do you want to happen now?” going to do about this? what do you want to happen now? i would like to call on change, we need to see change happen. companies and organisations should be fined if they do not appear —— adhere to the legislations, they should be fined when this happens. the sad thing is that when people come out and complain, you are easily send maybe an apology letter and a £10 voucher, and that is not what i am looking for. iam and that is not what i am looking for. i am looking for changes, i am looking for... when people with
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disabilities are travelling, using public transport, we need to be treated as equal members of the community, so the changes need to come in pretty soon, and such companies should pay huge fines. one person has tweeted to say, the train should have been withdrawn, anne has nothing to be ashamed of. there has been a brief statement from the train company, saying what happened to anne was completely unacceptable and they are investigating. they say the circumstances were unacceptable. it is the first time they have been aware of such a situation happening. still to come. at 10:45am we'll be looking ahead to this month's film releases, and asking if hollywood is making progress on diversity. 0ne one of the best movies of the year
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coming out in the run—up to the 0scars nominations. four years ago, a british backpacker was found stabbed to death on a houseboat in srinagar in indian kashmir. sarah groves was 24 years old. two months later, a dutch man, richard de wit, was charged with her murder. he has always maintained he is not guilty. the trial process has been repeatedly interrupted. the last hearing, in december, was the 84th since proceedings began. we're nowjoined in guernsey by vic and kate groves, the parents of sarah groves. why is this case taking so long? that is quite a long story. i suppose you could point the finger ata number of suppose you could point the finger at a number of people. of the 8a hearings you mentioned, 64 have been unproductive. that has been caused by such things as witnesses not showing up, by the accused not being
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brought to court because of civil u nrest brought to court because of civil unrest or strikes, because the accused has fired his lawyer for times, we have lost 25 hearings because he has no legal representation in court. in a way, the tale has been wagging the dog, we have had no witnesses processed since 2015. it must be horrendous for you to be having to go through this on top of your loss already. we have got more used to it now, because we can see it coming. in the old days, when the trial started, we we re old days, when the trial started, we were looking forward to the dates come up because we thought some progress would be made and we were looking forward to hearing what was coming out of court. but as the proceedings have gone along through time, we can almost predict whether or not any progress will be made. but it does not lessen the fact that
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this is something that we can not live with much longer, because it is dragging on in an inexcusable manner. we saw a beautiful picture of sarah. she looks gorgeous. tell us about sarah. sarah, she was the embodiment of every wonderful quality that you would hope for in a child. she was adventurous, kind, caring to the enth degree. just, she wanted to give part of herself to people in the world who were less privileged than she had been and so she decided that she would make a plan to go travelling to areas where she could perhaps help to improve the lives of
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some of the people in those destinations. obviously, just beautiful words from you about your daughter. how important is it that you see justice done? well, i daughter. how important is it that you seejustice done? well, i think it is the definition ofjustice that we're it is the definition ofjustice that we' re interested it is the definition ofjustice that we're interested in. we want to reach a safe conclusion but because of the nature of the trial, we are on the second judge shortly i think to be the third judge. the second public prosecutor and the fourth defence counsel, over time things have changed and the way the court case has been handled, the quality of the examination, cross—examination of witnesses, the quality, the very poor quality of the documentation that's come out, we just want to know that when we get to the end of the trial, whatever that verdict is, and it could be either, we want to believe in it, trust in it, we want it to be a safe verdict to use the legal terminology. right now, i don't
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think we have that level of confidence and really things have got to move up a notch or two or three before we could ever get to the point where we would have confidence. we wish you the very best and we're very sorry for your loss. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. thank you for talking to us. a spokesperson from the foreign office has told us, "our sympathies have been with the groves family since sarah's tragic death and we will continue to help them however we can. we have been providing support to them since her death and are in regular contact, liaising with the indian authorities on their behalf." with all the christmas tv overfor another year — january feels like a good time to go to the cinema and check out all the new films being released just in time for the awards season. the 0scars are next month and this year's top contenders include la la land, lion, manchester by the sea and hacksaw ridge. and with two of the big releases, moonlight and loving,
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tackling race issues and featuring diverse casts, is hollywood finally responding to the criticism of racism? in 2016, for the second year in a row, all of the acting nominees at the academy awards were white, sparking an outcry and the oscars so white movement with some actors boycotting the ceremony. we will discuss that in just a moment but first let's take a look at the ones to watch in 2017. maybe i'm not good enough... yes, you are. maybe i'm not. it's like a pipe dream. this is the dream. it's conflict and it's compromise and it is very, very exciting. where are we going? the orphanage.
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shut up. i can't obey your orders until you unlock the door. whatever you decide, you can always stay with us. if he wants to come up weekends. do you want to be his guardian? well, he doesn't want to be my guardian... we are trying to lose some kids at this point. and you... i believe that the characters that read about on the page end up being more real than the men who stand beside us. by the power invested in me by the district of colombia, i now pronounce you husband and wife. what are you doing in
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bed with that woman? i'm his wife. let's talk now to film critic, ros try—hane, and in the us, film critic noah gittell. thank you forjoining us. i want to run through because a lot of titles we will not be familiar with obviously, but they will become the big names to watch for the oscars. let's start with la la land. it is out on 13th january and there has been so much hype around it. out on 13th january and there has been so much hype around itm out on 13th january and there has been so much hype around it. it was in the venice film festival. it is a feast to the eyes. ryan gosling and emma stone. beautiful, old school glamour hollywood. that's lovely. nocturnal animals, is big.
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glamour hollywood. that's lovely. nocturnalanimals, is big. hackshaw ridge, mel gibson. an amazing story of courage as well as loving which deals with courage and who do you wa nt to deals with courage and who do you want to love, have the power to love in 1950s america. so that's an incredible story and fences which is releva nt to incredible story and fences which is relevant to today with lost children, with the refugee crisis. a little five—year—old boy gets lost in calcutta gets adopted by an australian family. it is one to watch. an extraordinary every day story rather than a by optic or space movie. there is some british interest in the form of rebecca hall playing a news reporter... yes. that's christine. that will be, a difficult film to watch, i think.
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but also it touches on depression and an interesting story. a story that's not told every day. i think that's, at least, it seems like more diverse stories are coming ot of hollywood rather than relying on the tried and tested ever since the 0scars so white campaign came out last year. we mentioned the oscars so white last year. there is interesting themes in some of the movies this year that would sort of presumably make what happened last year at the oscars, a thing of last year at the oscars, a thing of last year and for it to be different this year and for it to be different this year because there are issues of race being looked at in some of the movies. they won't have gone into production so quickly that it is in response to what happened... definitely not. what do you think about it? there is a move away now from just focussing on race, but the diversity argument on discussion stills feel like we are focussing on
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race or sex, diversity for me means also looking at other stories. telling maybe the same story, but in a different way, different experiences. non—white, different cultures as well. so i feel that you know, lion does this well because it is not necessarily just know, lion does this well because it is not necessarilyjust about know, lion does this well because it is not necessarily just about an indian boy being adopted bay white couple in australia. it is about a family. it is about loss. it is about universal things. loving, whilst it is a couple, they trance centre the narrative and they look at universal issues of love. i think that helps. the story of loving is a fascinating one. 1958, they married against the laws. they were convicted. that's an interesting look at american history and the
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race laws noah in that history? absolutely. here in the us it has beena absolutely. here in the us it has been a tumultuous year on screen and off. during the oscars so white campaign earlier in 2016, a movie called birth of the nation was released. many people saw it as a correction to the problem of diversity in hollywood. this was a film about the slave vote led by matt turner two centuries ago and the film was bought for a huge amount of money and kind of primed for oscars season and it has fallen of the map because of allegations against its writer, director and star, but loving is a film that could come in and get a lot of attention here in award season. it isa attention here in award season. it is a really beautiful, slow, sturdy film about two people who happen to make history simply because of their marriage and their love for each other. it is in not an overtly
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political film, but it packs a political film, but it packs a political punch through its human characters all the same. i think a couple of other racial films that could get a lot of attention in the next two months are fences and moonlight. fences is directed and stars denzil washington. it is about a black family in pittsburgh in the 19505 and moonlight is a very personal and emotional film about a young personal and emotional film about a young, 95v personal and emotional film about a young, gay black man growing up in inner city young, gay black man growing up in innercity miami and young, gay black man growing up in inner city miami and we will be hearing more about those over the coming months. so what do you think the impact and fall—out of the oscars so white controversy has been? well, as you said, that happened too recently for it to have any impact on the actual production of these film, but when the academy starts to vote, which they already have, for their nominees, starts to vote, which they already have, fortheir nominees, i starts to vote, which they already have, for their nominees, i think it will be something that they will keep in mind. they don't want the
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embarrassment of nominating one or two african—american actors or film—makers this year. so with a glut of terrific racial films to choose from, i think it is verien lookly that we will behaving the same discussion come awards night next month that we had at this time la st next month that we had at this time last year. they have changed the make up of who can vote, they have got new younger people in to join the voting committee, although, does it actually make a huge difference in terms of the numbers? well, it hasn't yet. this has been an effort that's been going on for several years now to make the academy membership young are and more diverse. academy membership is for life, so yound up with older people making up the bulk of the academy. some called that an ageist argument, but it is something the academy feels it needs to rectify, we will see a different crop of nominees and
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it could be this year. it is great to talk to you. some great movies. if you could see one, which would it be? loving. ok. the nominations for the oscars are out on 24th january. bbc newsroom live is coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. i will see you soon. victoria is here tomorrow. have a lovely afternoon. bye—bye. well, after that frosty start across the south of the uk, the weather is not looking bad. lots of sunshine around and staying crisp, but further north, the clouds are thicker. this is because we have winds coming off the north atlantic. this is moisture and cloud and drizzle. so many of these areas
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having a fairly cloudy sort of day. the best of the sunshine by far along the south coast and to the east of the pennines. through the course of this afternoon, a lot of cloud awe cross the uk. that breeze off the atlantic continues. the temperatures won't be near as low as what they were this morning. look at that frost—free across the majority of the uk. tomorrow, starts off frost—free and then we've got sunshine on the way so it ends up being a nice, crisp afternoon for most of us. temperatures on the chilly side, four celsius in the north and eight celsius in the south and the following night, so wednesday night and into thursday, once again, will be a frosty one. that's it from me. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories
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developing at 11.00am. a man is shot dead by police near the m62 in huddersfield. police say the operation is not linked to terrorism. kurdish forces say 20—year—old briton — ryan lock — has been killed fighting islamic state militants in syria.
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