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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 5, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. left to fend for themselves online. a new report says more needs to be done to protect children. compulsory internet safety lessons in schools and new privacy laws are being proposed by england's children's commissioner. good morning, it's thursday the fifth of january. also this morning: a new ambassador to the eu. sir tim barrow‘s appointment has been broadly welcomed on both sides of the brexit debate. people who live near major roads may have higher rates of dementia according to research published today. what will the year ahead bring for the economy? stronger exports and
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manufacturing are up thanks to a stronger pound but prizes in the shops are expected to go up and we won't get a pay rise to match. cash prices. —— prices. in sport, chelsea's winning run comes to an end as the league leaders are beaten at tottenham. two goals from delle alli do the damage at white hart lane as they win 2—0 and move up to third. i will be live from las vegas as the world's biggest gadget show gets under way, the big thing this year, intelligent machines, artificial intelligence baked into everything from your car to your toothbrush. and carol has the weather. a cold and frosty start to the day, temperatures in some parts have fallen two —7 but there will be a lot of crisp winter sunshine but in the west there will be a bit more clout —— fallen to. more details in a few minutes. —— bit more clout. —— cloud. good morning. our main story is a warning from the children's commissioner for england that young people are left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone.
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anne longfield says children and often their parents have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves, has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keepin have joined social media sites to keep in touch with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene with a digital world
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ina way and intervene with a digital world in a way that can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet. while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. a spokesperson for the department for education told us there is more to be done and that they will carefully consider the report as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. and at 6:40am, we'll speak to the founder of parent zone who provide support to parents and schools on making children safer online. if you want to talk to us about it this morning then let us know as well. the appointment of sir tim barrow as the uk's new ambassador to the european union has been welcomed by almost
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all the political parties. he replaces sir ivan rogers, who resigned on tuesday after complaining of muddle and confusion in the approach to brexit. our political correspondent, iain watson joins us now. we wa nt we want to know about this man, what can you tell us. first of all the most important thing is he is a career diplomat, something that has beenin career diplomat, something that has been in the foreign office for quite some time, almost 20 years —— someone. some time, almost 20 years —— someone. he worked with junior ministers at the foreign office 20 yea rs ministers at the foreign office 20 years ago. iain, i see your suffering, we will come back to you later. we know that feeling. we've all had moments like that. we will go back to him injust a second. the re st of go back to him injust a second. the rest of the news this morning: immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive, that's what a group of mps are calling for. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control
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the number of visas issued. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. over the past decade, the scale of immigration to britain has been unprecedented. sparking debate about whether the numbers should be reduced and if so how. but this report from mps and peers says there should be more focus on what happens after immigrants arrived. it says many immigrant communities and people already settled here lead parallel lives and it calls on the government to address what it says isa government to address what it says is a lack of integration. the report makes a number of recommendations. it says all immigrants should learn english before coming to the uk or in role in classes but when they're here. it calls for courses to teach immigrants about british culture and the report says the government should give immigrants guidance on the costs and benefits of uk citizenship and consider cutting the fees for naturalisation. a lack of integration for newcomers leads to
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them not having access to the same opportunities. it can lead to an increase in distrust in the community locally, and all the things that make living in england and britain great adonai people. now, you cannot enjoy what this country has to offer if you don't speak the language. another idea in the report is for immigration policy to be devolved to britain's nations and regions. they'd be able to allocate visas according to local need. the report said that might instil confidence among members of the public that the immigration system works for their area. the home office says it's not planning to introduce local bees are arrangements but they have said they have made more funding available for english lessons. danny shaw, bbc news. the father of a man shot dead by west yorkshire police on monday says he feels his son was killed unlawfully. he and his wife joined friends of yassar yaqub last night at a vigil at ainsley top yards from where he was killed. police say it was during
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a pre—planned operation. the police watchdog, the independent police complaints commission, is investigating. my my message is that he's been killed unlawfully. how can you kill someone like this, at a time like this, without giving them the chance to get out or anything, three bullets through the windscreen and that's it. were not in america, we're not ina third it. were not in america, we're not in a third world country. he hasn't got a bad pass because he's not been convicted of anything. president barack obama has urged his fellow democrats to fight for his flagship healthcare bill. it comes as the incoming trump administration began the process of repealing the affordable care act. the republican vice president—elect, mike pence, had promised the process would begin on donald trump's first day in office, the 20th of january. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors.
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dan johnson reports. memory is lost, thoughts confused, personalities gradually fading. —— memories. dementia fx 850,000 people in the uk. now there they claim it could be linked to traffic —— affects. this study from canada shows that people living close to busy roads had higher chances of developing dementia. researchers in ontario followed more than 2 million people over 11 years. the ones who live within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 12% higher risk of dementia than those more than 200 and zoe. so what is it that's actually affecting the brain —— 200 metres away. very fine particles, the very smallest ones, can move along the lungs into the bloodstream and circulate in the body. how those park hill particles work, we can
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speculate, but one hypothesis is non—specific effects on inflammation and oxidisation affects on the body but it is far from proven. experts here have cautiously welcomed the results as important and provocative. they have stressed it shows an association, not a cause. dave pointed out dementia is also affected by age, lifestyle and genetics —— dave pointed out. but they are promoting further research into the impact on traffic and pollution. dan johnson, bbc into the impact on traffic and pollution. danjohnson, bbc news. —— dave pointed out. —— dave pointed out. doubt has been cast on the nhs programme for screening those at high risk of type 2 diabetes. enjoyed man researchers say its unlikely to have much impact according to an oxford university study. it concluded that inaccurate blood tests would give too many people an incorrect diagnosis, while lifestyle changes had a low success rate. the director of the nhs programme said its approach was based on "robust evidence". the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels for a year and a half in december according to the rac.
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both fuels went up by three pence a litre during the month. it now costs around £62.80 to fill up a typical family car with petrol. the increasing cost of crude oil and further falls in the value of the pound are believed to be behind the trend. a mediterranean diet can help older adults maintain bigger brains according to researchers at the university of edinburgh. a study of pensioners in scotland found that those with a diet rich in fresh fruit, vegetables and olive oil had healthier brains than those with different eating habits. they suffered less brain shrinkage than those who regularly ate meat and dairy products. letters written by princess diana are due to be auctioned in cambridge later today. written to a steward at buckingham palace, they reveal that a young prince harry was routinely in trouble at school. the collection also includes a signed christmas card from prince charles and diana and their infant children sitting on a pony. going back to a story that has
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dominated over the last few days. a new uk ambassador to the european union has been appointed and welcomed by both people on both sides of the debate. let's talk about sirtim sides of the debate. let's talk about sir tim barry with iain watson, who has probably had a drink of water. —— sir tim barrow. tell me about tim barrow. i was before my moment struck! he's a career civil servant, he had worked with other foreign office ministers back in the conservative government in the 19905, conservative government in the 1990s, he's a former ambassador to not just russia but 1990s, he's a former ambassador to notjust russia but the ukraine, so he is seen as a tough negotiator and in addition to that he is welcomed by many conservative brexiteers but nigel farage, the ukip formally there has suggested he is simply
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another knighted career civil servant. many civil servants will be delighted, they were worried about impartiality because of calls from people in the leave campaign to get like a businessman or a former politician to negotiate the exit from the eu. this is someone who has worked in the foreign office for some time. most recently very closely with boris johnson, some time. most recently very closely with borisjohnson, so he has the confidence of the foreign secretary and he has been warmly welcomed by david davis as political minister in charge the detailed negotiation getting under way pretty $0011. negotiation getting under way pretty soon. he's been described by downing street as energetic and optimistic, those qualities will be essential during perhaps up to two years of negotiations with people representing 27 other eu countries. i'm not sure i'd ask another question but i'm going to try. go—ahead. question but i'm going to try. go-ahead. -- i'm not sure i'm going to ask you. what about theresa may, what he/she is doing to put herself
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on the front foot again? she hasn't commentated —— what is she going to do. she is giving a major speech on europe this month and the question is whether she is going to take on this key criticism of ivan drago is, that she simply doesn't have any kind of negotiating strategy or objectives in the eu. she's already given us pretty strong hints, she has suggested we want control of our borders and she has suggested also quite significantly that she doesn't wa nt to quite significantly that she doesn't want to be under thejuror of quite significantly that she doesn't want to be under the juror of the european court —— the jurisdiction. what labour are saying is a change of personnel in brussels, tim barrow won't that make up for a lack of strategic vision, so they want government ministers coming to westminster when mps return next week and they want a full statement on europe. iain, thank you very much. i don't know what to recommend because we are all struggling. may
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because we are all struggling. may bea because we are all struggling. may be a hot tea! sometimes it happens, it just be a hot tea! sometimes it happens, itjust happens. flies in the mouth, all sorts. good morning. what have you got for ask wes blew everybody apart from chelsea fans were toasting dele alli —— what have you got for ask wes blew —— what have you got for us? . king jack their incredible winning strea k king jack their incredible winning streak is over. they were beaten 2—0 by tottenham at white hart lane. two goals from dele alli ends chelsea's run of thirteen consecutive wins and moves spurs up to third. everton‘s yannick bolasie could be out until 2018, his manager ronald koeman confirmed last night. bolasie injured his knee last month in the one all draw with manchester united sir andy murray is through to the quarter finals of the qatar open, but was made to work for it by world number 68 gerald melzer. murray came through 7—6, 7—5,
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he's now unbeaten in 26 competitive matches. and paralympic champion kadeena cox has defended her decision to take part in the channel a programme thejump, saying life is a ticking time bomb and having ms has changed her outlook. uk sport have suspended her funding while she takes part in the ski jumping programme. louise hayes has advised the likes of kadeena and others, as they are still going on in their careers. it seems to be getting more popular. fine if your career is over. now for a quick look at the papers. the front page of the daily telegraph. they are talking about
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what we were just talking about with iain watson. theresa may ready to come out of the single market if europe isn't given control of their borders. and parents, leaving children. according to the children's commissioner for england, leaving children at the mercy of the internet. let us know what you think. on the front page of the daily mail. living near a busy road can cause dementia, according to a new study. this is looking at some problems with people live within 50 metres of major routes. sometimes the papers do things almost exactly the same way, the same stories. the times talks about theresa may and the exit of the ambassador. almost the same on the guardian, buta ambassador. almost the same on the guardian, but a different slant. the sun talks about the refugees
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coming from syria. they claim they we re coming from syria. they claim they were allowed into the uk. how did you watch tv over christmas? did you do it on demand? streaming services? a mix. and dvds? yes, i watched quite a lot. still? yes! streaming services are apparently exceeding dvd revenues for the first time. sales fell below £1 billion for the first time and there was a big surge in the popularity of paying for content, things like netflix and amazon. that rose to a market of 1.3 netflix and amazon. that rose to a market of1.3 ue netflix and amazon. that rose to a market of 1.3 ue and pounds. there isa market of 1.3 ue and pounds. there is a suggestion in the guardian that there is only one way for that to grow. —— £1.3 billion. it seems more of us arguing at like that.
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i don't think i watched anything over the holidays, apart from brea kfast over the holidays, apart from breakfast offcourse! it was all on catch up. not live? yes, not live. it is to do with the sleep patterns. sleep is the biggest bane of my life. most of us here on this sofa. every day i work up at 4:30am during the holidays. occasionally i went back to sleep. there is a big article in the mail. is it because i was born at 5am? so my natural cycle is to wake up? i should go to bed early... do you know when you were born? nine o'clock in the morning and i would like to sleep until nine o'clock in the morning! i don't know. the suggestion is that whenever you were born at is when you are most awake.
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i think you are most awake. ithinki you are most awake. i think i was born about 6am, so bang on, but i think this proves it doesn't work. i love this story. it is mentioned inafew i love this story. it is mentioned in a few of the papers. a 105—year—old man who has made cycling history, cycling more than 14 mild cycling history, cycling more than 1a mild around the track in one hour. absolutely staggering. —— 1a mild around the track in one hour. absolutely staggering. "14 mild. he said the 100s category and then beat it to years later. he is inspiration for many! at least if you are feeling rough you don't look like this. this is a waxwork museum in pennsylvania and some of them genuinely i don't know who they are. you probably get the picture. this is michelle obama. a p pa re ntly picture. this is michelle obama. apparently these are life—size waxworks. barack apparently these are life—size waxworks. ba rack obama. this is hillary clinton!
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imean, this is hillary clinton! i mean, some of the ones down here... anyway, if you are interested they are for sale! great! i want them all! it would be a great christmas present. gettysburg, in pennsylvania. cani pennsylvania. can i do this as well? we were talking about this yesterday. the earthquake that happened near scarborough. we did ask if anybody felt it and the resounding answer was no. the people in scarborough have been doing this joke was no. the people in scarborough have been doing thisjoke pictures of the effects of the earthquake. a chair overturned, had —— a bin. love that. thanks. i think it is time to have a quick chat with carol. this morning, if you haven't ventured out, it is
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cold and frosty! but it means for most of us we are looking at some wintry sunshine. to give you an idea of what is happening, high pressure is dominating. a lot of clear skies through the night. where we have the weather front towards the west that where we've got more cloud, the temperature is not as low. if you are stepping out these are the temperatures in towns and cities. these are the values in the countryside. currently —7 in oxfordshire. through the morning you can see a bit more cloud across south—west england. it's the re m na nts of south—west england. it's the remnants of that weather front. elsewhere we've got clear skies. along the east coast of england there is a bit more cloud here and there, thick enough to produce the odd shower. but as we traverse northwards into scotland, clear skies. northern ireland still has a weather front across you, so you will have more cloud this morning. through the day look at this. the blue indicates where we will see sunshine. sunshine coming out nicely through the morning. later in the
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day it may turn hazy towards the north—west. temperature wise, nothing to write home about. it will feel cold. in light reasons it will be pleasant, crisp and sunny, except for in the west. into the evening and overnight once again you can see the blue, frost and patchy fog. freezing fog, especially in east anglia and the south—east, but we could see it west as well. at the other end of the of the country the weather front is coming in, introducing rain across scotland and northern ireland, in the north—west england and fringing in the north—west wales. tomorrow what will happen is the fog in the south—eastern quarter and elsewhere where it forms will take its time to lift. some of it will lift into low cloud, so it will feel cold and bank in the south—east tomorrow. meanwhile rain moves steadily southwards. heavy burst in it. spending time in yorkshire and the
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east midlands. behind it, again we will have brighter weather, but there will be showers around and hill fog. look at the temperatures, 7-10. that's hill fog. look at the temperatures, 7—10. that's not that. quite a difference from what we have as the maximum today. by the time we get to saturday the weather front moves to the south. behind it a lot of dry weather. not that cloudy at times. there will be some sunshine and the odd spit and sport. still fairly mild, especially in the south. as we have a look at sunday a game, some sunshine. —— again. a couple of showers. the richer wise, still pretty good. —— temperature wise. i love crisp winter mornings. thank you. britain is short of budding young scientists. you. —— budding young scientists.
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only 15% of nine to 11—year—olds are considering the subject as part of their future. today, the bbc is launching a two—year campaign to inspire a million children to get involved in science. the results will be published in academicjournals as brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin reports. behold, it's time for some science fun! this is liz and this is a primary school in hackney. she is here to launch the bbc‘s terrific scientific to help more children catch the science blog. what are we doing today? is super exciting experiment to try to save a dinosaur from being buried in quicksand. dinosaurs in the balls! -- bowls! we know children love science up to a certain age and then they become disengaged. this campaign is about looking to really pinpoint what the reasons might be for that and to try
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and change that trend. here they are clearly into the subject. it is working! but the statistics are gloomy. almost 40% of primary schools spend less than an hour a week on science and a 50% of nine to 11 —year—olds want to be a scientist. with 40% of science and technology jobs left vacant scientist. with 40% of science and technologyjobs left vacant each year, this is a real problem. why are so many people afraid of science? i really don't know. we can see how much —— fund the children's are having. these are things lying around the house. flower, buckets. the short answer to your question, i have no idea. but liz has a very clear idea. she said science has an image problem. for some reason science still has a lot of stereotypes attached to it. you've got to be brainy to like science, or you've got to work in a lap, be an
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older gentleman with glasses and be extremely boring and you could be further from the truth. so, today she is kicking off the two year terrific scientific campaign, which will involve more than 1 terrific scientific campaign, which will involve more than1 million children and 40,000 teachers, bringing real experiments into real schools to gather real scientifically significant results and we hope it will inspire. adventurers, creators, dreamers, innovators, climbing mountains, exploring the oceans and everything in between. for me it is clear how exciting and fun science is. they were certainly very excited. and if your school wants to get involved, you can register at this website — bbc. co. uk/terrificscientific. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. patients are being asked to stay away from emergency departments in south west hertfordshire, because they don't have the resources to cope. watford general hospital is so overwhelmed it is asking only people with life threatening conditions to visit a&e. health bosses say they've had to close the urgent care centre in hemel hempstead at night, because of a shortage of doctors. the family of a hemel hempstead teenager being treated for an eating disorder 400 miles away say her condition's become worse, because she's isolated from herfamily. louise was sent to a specialist unit in scotland last year. her family have now written to the health secretary, jeremy hunt to ask for help. her mum, kimberley, described what happens when she says goodbye. she screams. she cries, she holds on
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to me and when i leave the doctors are standing there and the staff are standing there saying, i can't believe how this is for you. i wouldn't drink this on anybody. —— dream this. last—ditch talks aimed at averting a strike by london underground staff will resume later. members of the transport salaried staffs association and the rmt union are due to walk out for 24 hours on sunday night. the long running dispute is overjob losses and ticket office closures. travel now. quite a few problems on the tube, i'm afraid. minor delays on the metropolitan line between wembley park and aldgate. the northern line has cleared up. there were minor delays earlier. but because of works there is no tfl rail service in part until may. industrial action means there's still a reduced service on southern trains. there's no service to and from beckenham junction, guildford or wimbledon. and this is the a1 holloway road. it's still closed for works. diversions are in place via tufnell park. time for the weather
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with georgina burnett. good morning. a cold and frosty start to the day. we've got temperatures widely below freezing. you want to lay up, it is chilly. this picture was taken a couple of days ago. the same sort of conditions this morning. it will feel cold all day. but there will be plenty of sunshine, the night bright start for most of us. some isolated freezing patches around, but they won't last. it will stay dry, but feeling chilly. top temperatures this afternoon between three and five celsius. through the course of this evening and overnight we will have clear skies first. we start to get more cloud coming down from the north as we head into tomorrow morning. another cold night, with freezing fog patches into tomorrow morning. overnight lows of —2 or —3 in rural spots. some of that fog would be slow to clear. cloudy
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through the day and ending tomorrow with outbreaks of rain. but it will bea with outbreaks of rain. but it will be a touch milder as we head into saturday morning. over the weekend with got temperatures back into double figures, so it will feel milder and there will be plenty of cloud around, but we should see a mostly dry weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. we'll look at the curious covenants imposed on residents. it reads like a criminal decathlon. that's him, that's the man i chased. you chased someone? is their cctv? and after 9am, the pathology drama silent witness is back. the show‘s stars will tell us why murky murders have seen it become the world's longest—running crime drama. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: young people are being left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone.
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that's the warning from the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield says children, and often their parents, have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves, has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keep in touch with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no—one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene
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with a digital world in a way that can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet. while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. a spokesperson for the department for education told us there is more to be done and that they will carefully consider the report as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. and in about ten minutes, we'll speak to the founder of parent zone who provide support to parents and schools on making children safer online.
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immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive, that's the call from a group of mps. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control the number of visas issued. the home office says it's made funding available for more english lessons. president barack obama has urged his fellow democrats to fight for his flagship healthcare bill. it comes as the incoming trump administration began the process of repealing the affordable care act. the republican vice president—elect, mike pence, had promised the process would begin on donald trump's first day in office, the 20th of january. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels for a year and a half in december
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according to the rac. both fuels went up by 3p a litre during the month. it now costs around £62.80 to fill up a typical family car with petrol. the increasing cost of crude oil and further falls in the value of the pound are believed to be behind the trend. letters written by princess diana are due to be auctioned in cambridge later today. written to a steward at buckingham palace, they reveal that a young prince harry was routinely in trouble at school. the collection also includes a signed christmas card from prince charles and diana and their infant children sitting on a pony. i'm trying to read some of them as well. the handwriting is curious as well. the handwriting is curious as well. yes. mike is here with the sport right now. good morning. chelsea, losing! a strange feeling
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for them, losing for the first time since september, that was arsenal so they don't like north london that much! but for the rest of the league it's important someone worked out how to beat them, especially this man, dele alli, the england man. chelsea's impressive winning streak is over after they were beaten by spurs 2—0 at white hart lane last night. after 13 straight victories chelsea needed just one more to equal the all—time record. but two goals from spurs' dele alli ended any hope of that. chelsea remain five points clear at the top, but the win for spurs moves them up to third. very, very proud of them. i think that we showed character and we were competitive in a tough game like today. it is good for the team and for that it is important now to keep going and believe because football is about belief. it's a pity but it's important to
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know that this can happen. it's important now to start and continue to work very hard and to try to improve everyday. everton's yannick bolasie could be out with injury until 2018, his manager ronald koeman confirmed last night. bolasie injured his knee last month in the 1—1 draw with manchester united. koeman says it could be up to 12 months before he's back playing. sir andy murray has extended his career—best winning streak to 26 competitive matches by making it through to the quarter finals of the qatar open but he was made to work for it against the world number 68 gerald melzer. the austrian took murray to a tie—break in the first set but the world number one eventually came through 7—6, 7—5. he will face spain's nicolas almagro next. england and leicester centre manu tuilagi has been ruled out of the 6 nations and next summer's lions tour with a knee injury and it's another blow
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for the player who has suffered a string of injuries over the last three seasons. he's appeared just 23 times for leicester since 2013 and just once for england under eddie jones. paralympic champion kadeena cox has defended her decision to take part in the channel 4 programme the jump, describing life as a ticking time bomb. uk sport have suspended her funding while she takes part in the programme, in which participants learn to ski jump. on social media, cox said her diagnosis of ms had changed her outlook on life, so she was going to enjoy skiing. and ski jumping it seems. ms dhoni has stepped down as india's one day captain ahead of the od! series against england, which begins later this month. and england's odi captain eoin morgan will be hoping in that series to replicate his big hitting in the big big bash league in australia. his sydney thunder side needed a six off the final ball of the match to win against melbourne thunder, and under pressure,
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he smashed it into the stands. it was morgan's final appearance in the big bash before hejoins england in india. now, we all know as we get older, keeping fit takes a bit more effort which makes the achievements of frenchman robert marchand even more impressive. at the age of 105, he's set a new record for the furthest distance cycled in one hourfor riders of his age. he managed 22 kilometres in 60 minutes, all down to six months of training. he already held the record for those aged over 100, which he set in 2012. afterwards he said he could have done better and while his legs didn't hurt, his arms did. ijust think he's brilliant. i'm not in anyway belittling what he did but he beat the record for somebody his age, how many 105 —year—olds chris
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white he has still got to beat himself. just amazing —— 105 —year—olds? himself. just amazing —— 105 -year-olds? just to put it into context, he was bornjust before the first world war. he would probably beat both of us! fantastic, thank you. whether it's on their tablets orsmartphones, children are using social media sites more than ever before. but a new study by the children's commissioner for england says that they are ill—prepared to deal with problems they commonly find online, such as cyber—bulling and issues surrounding privacy. vicki shotbolt is the founder of parent zone, an organisation that provides advice and information to families and schools. good morning and thanks very much. it's interesting, we talk about this on breakfast a lot but it seems worrying what she is saying about children being left on their own to cope with an adult space. it's not true to say they are just left on
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their own, parents are working hard to do their bit to keep kids safe online and schools are doing a lot but children are struggling and that is worrying. where are the dangers lying? it is absolutely right she has picked up on the issue of privacy and understanding the terms and conditions. do that one by one, prove as the first of all, what is the risk? we are all used to it, not just children, adults do the same thing, you go on social media and you don't look at the terms and conditions, 17 pages some of them, they are interminable but you do it anyway. what is the risk with young people? all that data is going somewhere, young people are telling services a great deal about themselves and i was listening to themselves and i was listening to the news this morning talking about the news this morning talking about the internet of things, we will be sharing even more. we are telling our friends where they are and what
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they do and where they go to school but you're building up this history for yourself... at the moment if you fill ina for yourself... at the moment if you fill in a university application, in five years you might not need to because everything people need to know is online and very findable. that might not be a bad thing but it is something that young people should understand and be thinking about. what are the parents most concerned about, when something has gone wrong? that's when it becomes a problem. absolutely, they are concerned when their kids have had a bad issue and any experience online thatis bad issue and any experience online that is miserable but the other thing they worry about is what kids see online and they see lots of upsetting stuff that you would never be exposed to a few years ago. sometimes young people think... it is dangerous to stereotype but sometimes young people think they understand it and their parents don't but they are ok, it is a hard conversation to have. it is and it won't get any easier because young
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people will always use tech differently to pa rents. people will always use tech differently to parents. parents should put aside the tech because it's not really about that, it's about social skills and being savvy, all the lessons you teach your kids about being off—line, do it online as well. one of the ideas is that of an ombudsman. sometimes people don't have much faith in those individuals or organisations, what do you think? it's really interesting because who is looking after children's rights and interests online? it's not pa rents and interests online? it's not parents because the online world treat children as adults when they're over 13. they would be very busy, though, they would be inundated. thanks for much, we will be talking about this later. three to four —year—olds online are spending over eight hours a week over the last year, which is an extraordinary figure. we will be talking about that with anne longfield later and a victim of
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cyber bullying. the department for education told us that there is more work to do and that they will carefully consider this report's recommendations as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. carol has the weather for us. good morning. good morning. a cold start if you haven't gone out start, these are the current temperatures, benson in oxfordshire is —8, the lowest temperature in england this winter. in london it is —4 but where we have more cloud in the west, temperatures not that low. a frost east, there will be a lot of winter sunshine under those clear skies and for most of us it's going to be a dry day. high pressure is firmly in charge of our weather and this is the weather front, remnants from yesterday in the west is producing thick cloud and keeping the temperatures that bit higher. maybe the odd spot
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coming out of but nothing significant. across southern counties, a lot of blue sky day when the sun gets up and the same in midlands, the east wales and the west coast of england. cloud and the odd shower but hit and miss. northern ireland under the same weather front as south—west england, more cloud for you and into scotland, a cold and frosty start with the temperature in glasgow at the moment —5, —3 in edinburgh. through the morning the sun will come out and it will be a beautiful crisp winter's day with light breezes. the sunshine turning hazier in the north—west later ahead of a weather front and for most it will turn cold, seven degrees but it won't be too bad if you're in belfast. through the evening and overnight, you can see the blue on the chart, cold and frosty, cloud building ahead of the weather front. that will lift some of that but we will see patchy fog forming and some will see patchy fog forming and some will be freezing, especially in east anglia and the south—east but you
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can see fog patches forming further west. meanwhile our band of rain moving across scotland and northern ireland, getting into north—west england and north—west wales, breezy around that. tomorrow morning our weather front continues going south. default in the south—eastern quarter and further west will take its time to lift, some will lift into low cloud —— the fog. low cloud and at times it will feel quite dank. this is the weather front bringing rain across much of northern england, into northern england, wales and the southwest. behind it they will be hill fog around, look at the temperatures, higher than today so we have ten in stornoway, seven towards cardiff and ten in plymouth but if you're under the cloud with the fog in the south—east it will feel cold. then the weather front clears altogether on saturday, leaving a dry and brighter day with variable cloud and sunshine. still high—temperature is for the time of
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year and sunday is very similar, but later on sunday a new weather front from the west —— still high—temperature is. still mild for this stage in january. the start of a new year, but what does it have in store for business? ben's looking at what we know about the year ahead. iam i am having a look at what's in store for this year. good morning. businesses and all of us hoping for a bit of optimism after a rather unpredictable end to last year. the vote to leave the eu had a big effect on business here. donald trump's victory in the us has raced big questions for the global economy. what happens next? the british chamber of commerce has spoken to over 7000 businesses up and down the country and the results show a mixed bag for the year ahead. let's have a look at the details. at the end of last year it was good for manufacturing and exports, and that
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was thanks to a boost from the week pound. the study also showed more optimism in the all—important service set. but sadly it isn't all good news. any firm say they will have to raise prices because of higher costs of imports, due to the slump in the sterling since the brexit vote. and petrol prices are atan18 brexit vote. and petrol prices are at an 18 month high and they will rise even further this year. one thing to warn you about, you will hear a lot about inflation over the next year or so. it will be a big issue and it will affect wages, jobs and economic growth. let's delve into the numbers. andrew mcphillips, chief economist at yorkshire building society, is with me. we've listed the good and bad. i suppose my first question is, does the good outweigh the bad? the important thing to know is the manufacturing, we've seen in pact of
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the pound helping manufacturers, and a lot of the bad, the rising cost of living, there is quite a lot of speculation on how inflation could rise, probably about 2.5% — 3%. probably likely to be a bit higher than wages. these are the things that are still the unknown is to a large extent, because yesterday we heard next would have to put up their prices and others say they will have to raise prices due to the rising cost of imports and we won't get a pay increase. so the money in our pocket will get tighter. and in pa rt our pocket will get tighter. and in part that's what has kept the economy going. consumer spending on the high street has been part of the economy. that picture if we get the rising cost of living will mean people will feel that in their pockets and that's the risk to the year ahead. that will lead to economic growth slowing. and that
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clearly has an effect on other stuff. to look at the good stuff, manufacturing which has been a surprising success story towards the end of last year, especially exports. it was stronger than people expected. people forecast that we would have a sharp slowdown in the uk economy and that hasn't come through and manufacturers are feeling the benefit of the falling pound. not as good for people going on holiday. we should try to rebalance the economy back towards manufacturing rather than services. that's a good story that came out of last year. and one we will follow this year. i suppose the question is, what does this year have in store ? is, what does this year have in store? there are so many questions. what do you think will be the underlying theme? the issue of inflation? yes, regardless of which side of the referendum you were wrong, brexit will have a big impact. donald trump, we have no
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idea what he will do in terms of whether he pulls through with the campaign pledges and that's likely to bea campaign pledges and that's likely to be a longer term picture. so i think the story of the year is whether inflation turns out to be as bad as people fear, or whether the forecasters who are inherently uncertain... it might not be as severe as some people predicted. we will watch closely, because who knows how these things turn out. thanks very much. that's all from me. more later. let's talk about technology. the latest driverless car, headphones that can translate languages instantly and the latest smart gadgets for the home. including bears that can stop people snoring! i don't know why you look concerned! these are just some of the things we can expect from this year's international consumer electronics show. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is in las vegas ahead of one of the biggest events in the tech industry.
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rory, what new technology is going to wow us in 2017? yes, the big thing this year is fountains. iam not yes, the big thing this year is fountains. i am not being serious, of course. not many people will have smart fountains. at all of the gadgets this year as talking about artificial intelligence, artificial intelligence which is the radical and researched out of laboratories is coming out of the laboratories and coming to all sorts of products, making everything smarter, from your car all sorts of products around your home. audio devices will now be smart. ina in a penthouse suite at a ritzy las vegas hotel, smart home exhibits are on show. there is a smart speaker for children, each toy is a playlist. kung fu fighting... a
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voice activated door lock. and upstairs... there's even nora, described as a smart snoring solution. it is paired with a pad under the pillow which detects the snoring and moves just enough to stop me without waking me up. the big scene this year is turning the advancesin big scene this year is turning the advances in artificial intelligence into products. —— big theme. there are robots of course. this one is meant to be a shop assistant, while this one is designed as a companion for children or elderly people. a! seems to get everywhere, even into this toothbrush, which learns how you brush your teeth. artificial intelligence is not just you brush your teeth. artificial intelligence is notjust gathering the data, it is being able to use it. then you learn where your wea knesses it. then you learn where your weaknesses are, where your strengths are and the person —— purpose is to become better at taking care of your oral health. this walking stick is
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also smarter than it looks. an inbuilt mobile phone sim card means it can help if there is an accident. it will detect the fall of the user and when it detects it it will alert the family or the neighbour, so they can come and help these people. and this clever mirror helps anyone to try out make—up. this clever mirror helps anyone to try out make-up. we have a new las vegas! out on the las vegas strip, this young entrepreneur from manchester has just flown in. welcome to las vegas. his instant translation headphones aren't quite ready. they will eventually be tiny earbuds, that he is still looking forward to ces. this is important because we will be able to showcase what we've been working on to the world, to show this is something we started yea rs world, to show this is something we started years ago as a small team, asa started years ago as a small team, as a small start—up, with dedication and passion. the odds are against danny, a 1—man bands taking on giants like apple and google, but he
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is betting that he has the product that can change the world. now, danny is quite a rare breed because he is one of the few british companies actually exhibiting here. he has come under his own steam, has cost a lot of money and haven't had any government health. there's been some controversy about how few british ones there are here compared to other countries. there are loads of french companies, all sorts of french government institutions supporting their companies. there are 1300 chinese firms. but the british government says it does support people coming to this show, it gives them moral support at least, at the question is whether or money should have been spent on making the british voice heard a bit louder this week in vegas. if you could bring on home, what would be the piece of technology? the piece of technology that i love at the moment is a robot that can be controlled by voice. the alexis system has been put into a robot and
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that robot, i've seen it doing yoga lessons this morning. i want that robot to come home and take me to a few yoga exercises. i would rather it did the ironing! i would quite like to see that. you probably will later! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. patients are being asked to stay away from emergency departments in south west hertfordshire, because they don't have the resources to cope. watford general hospital is so overwhelmed it is asking only people with life threatening conditions to visit a&e. health bosses say they've had to close the urgent care centre in hemel hempstead at night, because of a shortage of doctors. the family of a teenager being treated for an eating
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disorder 400 miles away say her condition's become worse, because she's isolated from herfamily. louise was sent to a specialist unit in scotland last year. she has written to the health secretaryjeremy she has written to the health secretary jeremy hunt to she has written to the health secretaryjeremy hunt to ask for help. she described what happens when she says goodbye. she screams. she cries, she holds on to me and when i leave the doctors are standing there and the staff are standing there saying, we can't imagine what this is for you. i say, i wouldn't dream this on anybody. last ditch talks aimed at averting a strike by london underground staff will resume later. members of the transport salaried staffs association and the rmt union are due to walk out for 24 hours on sunday night. the long running dispute is overjob losses and ticket office closures. travel now. quite a few problems on the tube. minor delays of the district line in part. also on the metropolitan line
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between baker street and aldgate. and because of work is no tfl rail service between brentwood and shenfield until may. industrial action means there's still a reduced service on southern trains. there's no service to and from beckenham junction, guildford or wimbledon. and here's how it looks heading towards ilford on the a406 north circular. southbound traffic slow. there's been an accidentjust after the ilford flyover. time for the weather with georgina burnett. good morning. a cold and frosty start to the day. we've got temperatures widely below freezing. you want to layer up this morning, it's mighty chilly. this picture was taken a couple of days ago. the same sort of conditions this morning. it will feel cold all day. but there will be plenty of sunshine around, so a nice, bright start for most of us. some isolated freezing fog patches around, but they won't last. it will stay dry, but feeling chilly. top temperatures this afternoon between three and five celsius
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as a high. through the course of this evening and overnight we will have clear skies first. we start to get more cloud coming down from the north as we head into tomorrow morning. again, a cold night, with freezing fog patches into tomorrow morning. overnight lows of —2 or —3 in more rural spots. some of that freezing fog could be slow to clear. cloudy through the day and ending tomorrow with outbreaks of rain. but it will be a touch milder as we head into saturday morning. so over the weekend we've got temperatures back into double figures, so it will feel milder and there will be plenty of cloud around, but we should see a mostly dry weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. left to "fend for themselves" online — a new report says more needs to be done to protect children. compulsory internet safety lessons in schools and new privacy laws are being proposed by england's children's commissioner. good morning, it's
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thursday january 5. also this morning: a new ambassador to the eu — sir tim barrow‘s appointment has been broadly welcomed on both sides of the brexit debate. people who live near major roads may have higher rates of dementia according to research published today. we bought a record number of new cars in the uk this year according to industry figures out this morning. but with ownership predicted to fall next year and the rise of uber and driverless cars, will owning a car outright become a thing of the past? in sport — chelsea's winning run comes to an end as the league leaders are beaten at tottenham. two goals from delle alli do the damage at white hart lane as they win 2—0 and move up to third. we'll hear about plans to find the next generation
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of budding young scientists. we are going to do a super experiment to hear about a dinosaur varied. —— buried. and carol has the weather. according to the start in that england has had the lowest temp richer recorded. a lot of sunshine up richer recorded. a lot of sunshine up and down the loud, —— the land. i will let more details in 15 minutes. good morning. our main story is a warning from the children's commissioner for england that young people are left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone. anne longfield says children and often their parents have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keep in touch
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with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no—one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene with a digital world in a way that can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet. while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend
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that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. a spokesperson for the department for education told us there is more to be done and that they will carefully consider the report as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. the appointment of sir tim barrow as the uk's new ambassador to the european union has been welcomed by almost all the political parties. he replaces sir ivan rogers, who resigned on tuesday after complaining of muddle and confusion in the approach to brexit. our political correspondent, iain watson joins us now. iain — what is theresa may doing to get back on the front foot? let's go through some of the basic. what we need to know about sir tim barrow? downing street say here that seasoned and a tough negotiator. he has experience in brussels. he was
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an ambassador to moscow relatively recently when relations with russia we re recently when relations with russia were not so good. for that, ambassador to ukraine. also it has been welcomed from people across the political spectrum, not from nigel farage of ukip. he wanted a brexit true believer in their. —— there. he has also worked closely with boris johnson as a political director in the foreign office and johnson spoke warmly of him. partly, he ended himself to the conservative party is because during the previous state in brussels he was in charge of security policy and arguing against an eu army during difficult times in europe. moving forward, sir arjun rogers told about the model and confusion over brexit. —— sir ivan
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rogers. theresa may hoping to change the sentiment around that. she might make a statement relating to her attitude and the steps ahead now, some papers are saying. she kept silent on sir ivan rogers' key charge that she didn't have any negotiating object is just before triggering article 50 but now she has to answer the key criticisms. she will be taking to the airwaves herself this weekend. we are expecting a major speech on europe this month. the question really is whether she goes beyond some of the strong hints we have had from her before including at the conservative conference last year when she said we wa nt conference last year when she said we want to control our borders and be outside the jurisdiction of the eu court. ishiguro to be more explicit about access to the single market? before she makes the speech, she will be under some pressure from labour. they will be pressing
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ministers, possibly david davies rather than theresa may, to make a statement here at westminster. immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive. that's what a group of mps are calling for. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control the number of visas issued. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. over the past decade, the scale of immigration to britain has been unprecedented. sparking debate about whether the numbers should be reduced and if so, how. but this report from mps and peers says there should be more focus on what happens after immigrants arrives. it says many immigrant communities and people already settles here lead parallel lives and it calls on the government to address what it says is our lack of integration. the report makes a number of recommendations. it says all immigrants should learn english before coming to the uk
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or enrol in classes when they are here. it calls for courses to teach immigrants about british culture and the report says that government should give immigrants guidance on the costs and benefits of uk citizenship and consider cutting the fees for naturalisation. a lack of integration for newcomers leads to them not having access to the same opportunities and can lead to an increase in distrust in the communities locally. all the things that make living in england and britain great are denied people. you cannot enjoy what this country has to offer if you don't speak the language. another idea in the report is for immigration policy to be devolved to britain's nations and regions. they'd be able to allocate visas according to local need. the report says that might instil confidence among members of the public that the immigration system works for their area. the home office says it is not planning to introduce local visa arrangements but the department says
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it has made funding available for more english lessons. danny shaw, bbc news. president barack obama has urged his fellow democrats to fight for his flagship healthcare bill. it comes as the incoming trump administration began the process of repealing the affordable care act. the republican vice—president—elect, mike pence, had promised the process would begin on donald trump's first day in office — the 20th of january. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. dan johnson reports. memories lost, thoughts confused, personalities gradually fading. dementia affects 850,000 people in the uk. now there's a claim it could be linked to traffic. this study from canada shows that people living close to busy roads
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had higher chances of developing dementia. researchers in ontario followed more than 2 million people over 11 years. the ones who lived within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 12% higher risk of dementia than those more than 200 metres away. so what is it that's actually affecting the brain? ultra—fine particles, the very smallest ones, can actually move across the lungs into the bloodstream and circulate in the body. how those particles work, a bit speculative, but one hypothesis is fairly non—specific effects on inflammation and oxididative stress on the body. so we have a potential mechanism but it's far from proven. experts here have cautiously welcomed the results as important and provocative. they've stressed it shows an association, not a cause. they've pointed out dementia is also affected by age, lifestyle and genetics. but they are encouraging further research into the impact
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of traffic and pollution. dan johnson, bbc news. doubt has been cast on the nhs programme for screening those at high risk of type 2 diabetes. researchers at oxford university say its unlikely to have much impact. it concluded that inaccurate blood tests would give too many people an incorrect diagnosis, while lifestyle changes had a low success rate. the director of the nhs programme said its approach was based on "robust evidence". the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels for 1.5 years in december according to the rac. both fuels went up by three pence a litre during the month. it now costs around £62.80 to fill up a typical family car with petrol. the increasing cost of crude oil and further falls in the value of the pound are believed to be behind the trend. a figure of a soldier from the first world war has been
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created entirely from scrap metal. it's nearly six metres tall and took a blacksmith three months to make the war—weary looking tommy. martin galbavy used items including spanners, brake discs and horse shoes to create the impressive work. it's a stunning, isn't it? when it you see it next to the building, you get a sense of the scale. being able to speak english is ‘key‘ to integrating into british life. that's according to mps who want immigrants to learn the language before coming to the country. they also want the government to consider giving regions more immigration powers. labour's chuka umunna chairs the all party parliamentary group on social integration. hejoins us from our london newsroom. good morning. you are saying
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immigrants should be fitted to learn english before coming to britain. how would prove that that's what they have done? to set this report in context, we have spent time in this country talking about the numbers of people committed the uk and of course that is important but widow and spent time talking about what happens when they get here. —— we don't spend time. an important pa rt we don't spend time. an important part of being integrated into uk society when you come and work and settle here is being able to speak english. we believe that because of that, either you should be required to have a certain level of english before you come here or certainly if you do come here and you don't have sufficient proficiency in english, you should be in rolled on compulsory english language classes so you can be part of our community —— enrolled. it denies you opportunities, health outcomes are worse, you do —— don't get a chance
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to be part of the community. really importantly, integration is a 2—way street. of course, there is a role in certain obligations and people who come here to integrate and that is why we say learning english be an expectation that also, there's an obligation on the host community as well. we need to properly fund english language learning classes and employers need to give people sufficient space. can you answer the first question i asked you. you made your point. how can you prove they have that level of english? in australia, they carry out certain tests. this is an interim report. in terms of the exact detail, we are going to produce more detail on how exactly that might work in the final report of this enquiry. the other suggestion is that a regional
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authorities could allocate visas. this is something i know you are looking at. would be able to allocate visas in accordance to local need. how would that work? how could you ensure that somebody goes toa could you ensure that somebody goes to a particular region? we know people care about numbers but actually they care about the numbers of people coming here far less than they do about control. one way of instilling more confidence in the system and maintaining the consensus in our country from an —— for managed migration is to set need to the niche in —— regions of the uk much as they do in canada. different provinces in canada set out their needs according to their sectors and different labour markets. for example, on our committee, people from scotland and snp members, they wa nt to from scotland and snp members, they want to see immigrants go up but in other parts of the uk and parts of england, people would like to see
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that reduced. what we are saying is let's give the power to set need to local areas and regions. that way i think we can detoxify this debate because then it won't be seen as westminster imposing immigration on you and saying look, and except all these people for... does that mean for example a region can say, right, we don't want any immigrants, is that what you are saying? you could feasibly do that. in canada they have all the different provinces there and they want more migrants. generally in our countries you look at the attitudes of people towards eu citizens currently living in the uk there is no desire to reject those citizens. i went to box in which recorded the largest leave vote. very few people there want to
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get rid of their eastern europeans. and that was a question of having more control. different areas will wa nt more control. different areas will want more less but the question, the issue here is to give them the power to set that. local businesses, for example, and the need of the economy dictate that most parts of the uk will need more immigrants but let them be the determinants of that. that way i think we do get to detoxify what has become a very toxic and polarised debate between those who want to shut the borders and others who say they want open borders. in the end, the british people are in the middle. they want more control and i think that is how we can maintain the consensus we have always had in this country for managed migration. thank you for your time. and looking at the statement from the home office it is not planning to introduce local visa arrangements at a holiday has made funding available for more english
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lessons. if you have not been out and about this morning i will give you a heads up. it is cold. carol has the details. good morning to you both. louise is correct. the lowest temperature of this winter so far in england. it was —8 celsius in oxfordshire. manchester —5, glasgow —5, cardiff minus two. we have the remnants of yesterday ‘s weather front. that will help maintain the temperature level. it is a cold and frosty start the day but there will be a lot of winter sunshine at and down the land with light and a few exceptions. one of them is this where the frontier. this is what is maintaining the temperature level across parts of wales and south—west england and northern ireland with more cloud. you can see a splash of rain coming
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out but nothing too significant. across the southern counties there will be blue skies from the word go. that extends all the way up into scotland. on the east coast of england you may just scotland. on the east coast of england you mayjust find clouds again for england you mayjust find clouds againfora england you mayjust find clouds again for a couple of showers here and there and we have thick cloud across and there and we have thick cloud a cross m ost and there and we have thick cloud across most of northern ireland as the temperatures are above freezing. there is always an exception and there is one place well below freezing. through the course of the morning and hang on to blue skies and eventually we lose the showers from the east of england but most of us from the east of england but most of us will mist them anyway. art was the worst you will find a bit more cloud building ahead of a weather front so the sunshine will turn hazy. the maximum temperature is 2—5 inland. seven and eight out west. john wardrop rabidly and you can see the blue so an early frost for some and others will hang on to it. as weather front brings its and others will hang on to it. as weatherfront brings its rain and others will hang on to it. as weather front brings its rain and the front will build. we will also see some patchy fog forming across
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east anglia and the south—east. a possibility we could see a drift further west. meanwhile rain comes in across scotland and northern ireland, getting into south—west england and north—west bust before the end of the night. we start tomorrow with the exact scenario. rain continuing its lotus and moving south eastwards. in the south—east and wales we have fog and we find it will slowly lift. some of it into low cloud. if you are in the south—east under that cloud it will be cold and dank. heavy at times and it will be prolonged across parts of yorkshire in east midlands. behind it, brighter skies, hills yorkshire in east midlands. behind it, brighterskies, hills fog yorkshire in east midlands. behind it, brighter skies, hills fog and showers. check out those temperatures. they are an eu we are exceptin temperatures. they are an eu we are except in the south—east. saturday, there goes the rain and foremost it will be dry. a few showers here and there. again we are in the mild category to the stage injanuary. as
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we head into sunday a little more of the same. most of the uk will be dry. a couple of showers but temperatures of between eight and ten. that is not bad at all for the seventh of january. thank you very much, carol. she did not say one of her favourite phrases "not quite shabby." so, ben, you will look at that. you are talking about how we spend and how much we owe. yes. and it is all to do with the debt hangover from christmas because the credit card bills will start lending on doormats and people realise how much they have spent. figures say they have been record amounts. new figures show that we racked up more debt in the run—up to christmas and we racked it up the rate since 2005. altogether we borrowed £1.9 billion. that is up10.8%
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altogether we borrowed £1.9 billion. that is up 10.8% on the same time as last year. economists warn that that rise reflects a similar boom before the 2008 financial crisis. they also say our total debts on credit cards and in loans is now a staggering 100 and in loans is now a staggering 100 and 92 billion pounds. elsewhere it seems the discount retailers did well this christmas with the latest figures. bn dems say revenues were up figures. bn dems say revenues were up to £741 million. the number of shoppers in its stores were up by 20% on last year and they snapped up 6 million christmas crackers amongst other things. and streaming services for watching television and films has overtaken dvds for the first time. the market is now worth £1.93 billion, up nearly a quarter on the same time as last year. it comes as out of physical disks fell below £1
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billion for the first time. cd southward down as well by 13%. that has been blamed on a rise in other music streaming services. it reflects a big change in the market, buying fewer dvds and cds. i watch television on a mixture of everything. but then don't you find it is difficult to keep track because you have a dvd in one place that can only be seen upstairs... vinyl sales are going up, of course. they are still rather niche. they are going up. they are going up from are going up. they are going up from a low level so it seems like a lot. bring back the b he just hate! i still have my star wars ones! had to keepa still have my star wars ones! had to keep a television, a special television so i can play them. today we are talking about online, children online. a new report from the children's commissioner saying that children are being left out on
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their own in that children are being left out on theirown in an that children are being left out on their own in an adult environment. many of you are getting in touch. ian has an easy answer, do not give the kids are smart phone until they can pay for it themselves. clare says that when her son started making youtube videos she set up the account with her details so that she gets all of the notifications and message alerts. she can watch and delete what she needs to. she can also see the videos he is watching. people have quite informative a nswe rs. people have quite informative answers. peter has been in touch as well. he wants to know why any child under ten has unsupervised access to a mobile phone or any part of the internet. his suggests that you just use the word no. using peer pressure as an excuse abdicates responsibility. some people believe that that the worry is that if you say no, the children willjust find a way at their their friends house or whatever. rachel is talking about her 12—year—old. says she knows all of his password and get notified when he logs into a different
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computer. there is absolutely no social media allowed and he —— she can check up on his friends. britain is short of budding young scientists. only 15% of nine to eleven—year—olds are considering the subject as part of their future. today, the bbc is launching a two—year campaign to inspire a million children to get involved in science. the results will be published in academicjournals. brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin is at a primary school in liverpool for us this morning. behold, it's the science bus and it's time for some science fun! this is liz bonnin and this is a primary school in hackney. she's here to launch the bbc‘s terrific scientific program to help more children catch the science bug. what are we doing today? a super exciting experiment to try to save a dinosaur from being buried in quicksand! dinosaurs in the bowls! we know children love science up to a certain age and then they become disengaged.
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this campaign is about looking to really pinpoint what the reasons might be for that and to try and change that trend. here they are clearly into the subject. it's working! but the statistics are gloomy. almost 40% of primary schools spend less than an hour a week on science only 15% of nine to 11—year—olds want to be a scientist. with 40,000 science and technology jobs left vacant each year, this is a real problem. why are so many people afraid of science? i really don't know. we can see how much fun the children are having. these are things lying around the house. flour, buckets. the short answer to your question, i have no idea. but liz has a very clear idea. she says science has
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an image problem. for some reason science still has a lot of stereotypes attached to it. you've got to be brainy to like science, or you've got to work in a lab, be an older gentleman with glasses and be extremely boring and you couldn't be further from the truth. so, today she's kicking off the two year terrific scientific campaign, which will involve more than 1 million children and 40,000 teachers, bringing real experiments into real schools to gather real scientifically significant results, and we hope it will inspire. adventurers, creators, dreamers, innovators, climbing mountains, exploring the oceans and everything in between. for me it is clear how exciting and fun science is. that was breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin reporting.
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and if your school wants to get involved you can register at this website — bbc. co. uk/terrificscientific. you're watching breakfast. we will be back with the headlines ina we will be back with the headlines in a couple of minutes. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. patients are being asked to stay away from emergency departments in south west hertfordshire, because they don't have the resources to cope. watford general hospital is so overwhelmed it is asking only people with life threatening conditions to visit a&e. health bosses say they've had to close the urgent care centre in hemel hempstead at night, because of a shortage of doctors. the family of a hartfordshire teenager being treated for an eating disorder 400 miles away say her condition's become worse, because she's isolated
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from herfamily. kimberley‘s daughter louise was sent to a specialist unit in scotland last year. her family have now written to the health secretary, jeremy hunt to ask for help. kimberley described what happens when she says goodbye. she screams. she cries, she holds on to me and when i leave, the doctors are standing there and the staff are standing there saying, ican't imagine what this is for you. i say, i wouldn't dream this on anybody. last—ditch talks aimed at averting a strike by london underground staff will resume later. members of the transport salaried staffs association and the rmt union are due to walk out for 24 hours on sunday night. the long running dispute is overjob losses and ticket office closures. i have good news for the tube because the problems on the district
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and metropolitan lines have cleared. but because of works there is no tfl rail service in part until may. there is a signalling problem on south west trains. and this is what it looks like on the roads. southbound traffic queueing from the emmy leven. good morning. a cold and frosty start to the day. we've got temperatures widely below freezing. you really want to layer up, it is chilly. this picture was taken a couple of days ago. but the same sort of conditions this morning. it will feel cold all day. but there will be plenty of sunshine, the nice bright start for most of us. some isolated freezing patches around, but they won't last. it will stay dry, but feeling chilly. top temperatures this afternoon between three and five celsius. through the course of this evening and overnight we will have clear skies at first.
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we start to get more cloud coming down from the north as we head into tomorrow morning. another cold night, with freezing fog patches into tomorrow morning. overnight lows of —2 or —3 in rural spots. some of that fog would be slow to clear. cloudier through the day and ending tomorrow with outbreaks of rain. but it will be a touch milder as we head into saturday morning. over the weekend with got temperatures back into double figures, so it will feel milder and there will be plenty of cloud around, but we should see a mostly dry weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin. young people are being left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone. that's the warning from the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield says children
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and often their parents have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. a spokesperson for the department for education told us there is more to be done and that they will carefully consider the report as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. the appointment of sir tim barrow as the uk's new ambassador to the european union has been welcomed by almost all the political parties. he replaces sir ivan rogers, who resigned on tuesday after complaining of muddle and confusion in the approach to brexit. the government says the uk's new ambassador in brussels is a "seasoned and tough negotiator. immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive, that's the call from a group of mps. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control
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the number of visas issued. the home office says it's made funding available for more english lessons. integration is a 2—way street. there is an obligation on the host country as well. we need to properly fund english language learning classes and also employers need to give people sufficient space and time off to go and learn english as well. president barack obama has urged his fellow democrats to fight for his flagship healthcare bill. it comes as the incoming trump administration began the process of repealing the affordable care act. the republican vice—president—elect, mike pence, had promised the process would begin on donald trump's first day in office — the 20th of january. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada.
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the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. a figure of a soldier from the first world war has been the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels for a year and a half in december according to the rac. both fuels went up by three pence a litre during the month. it now costs around £62.80 to fill up a typical family car with petrol. the increasing cost of crude oil and further falls in the value of the pound are believed to be behind the trend. letters written by princess diana are due to be auctioned in cambridge later today. the collection will have approximately 40 lots with estimates ranging from £80 to £900. written to a steward at buckingham palace, they reveal that a young prince harry was routinely in trouble at school. coming up on the programme, carol has the weather.
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she is warning of cold, icy temperatures at head. —— ahead. cases of bird flu have been rising in europe for several weeks, and there have been outbreaks in the uk since the beginning of december. the latest was announced in camarthenshire, just yesterday. the chief veterinary officer has now declared that a prevention zone will be extended until the end of next month in order to protect poultry and captive birds from avian flu. professor christianne glossop who is the chief veterinary officer for walesjoins us now from cardiff. bank for your time this morning. —— thank you. can you explain what the zone is? delly prevention zone cove rs zone is? delly prevention zone covers the whole of great britain. it is aimed at at reducing or limiting the contact between wild birds that we believe are carrying
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this infection and domestic poultry. we are requiring people to keep their birds indoors and keep them separate from wild birds as far as possible. what is the scale of the problem at the moment? if you look mainland europe, they have had big problems over the past year or so but within great britain, there was the case in lincolnshire in turkeys before christmas and more recently just this week, i have confirmed 8518 infection in a small backyard flock. —— h518. we have also found that in wild birds in different parts of great britain. h518 is the strain. people hearing you talk about it may be worried about the implications on human health. are a
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different strains on flu virus and it is constipated and difficult to understand that this particular strain h518 has never been reported ina human strain h518 has never been reported in a human being. there are no human cases. although this is worrying for our poultry industry, it should not be of concern to the general public. said there are no issues eight production or any of these issues. —— egg. production or any of these issues. -- egg. we have movement restrictions in place for poultry and poultry products, particularly focusing on areas of high risks that would be for wales, around and an outbreak in caernarfonshire. hence the zoning we have in place. it is to ensure the industry can keep running while we fight the disease. you mentioned the most recent outbreak in caernarfonshire, where
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did that come from? that is the first question we ask. this is within ten miles or so within the finding ofa within ten miles or so within the finding of a wild bird, within ten miles or so within the finding ofa wild bird, i within ten miles or so within the finding of a wild bird, i wild duck, with infection just before christmas. the working hypothesis is that these were probably infected by a wild bird that we are still investigating, it's early days. thank you for your this morning. my my kitty to talk about chelsea. the winning streak! —— mike is here. chelsea still have a 5—point lead. chelsea's impressive winning streak, is over, after they were beaten by spurs 2—0 at white hart lane last night. after 13 straight victories, chelsea needed just one more to equal the all—time record. but two goals from spurs' dele alli ended any hope of that. chelsea remain five points clear
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at the top, but the win for spurs, moves them up to third. all the boys, there is no need to talk before the game. we knew this was not just for the talk before the game. we knew this was notjust for the players but the fa ns was notjust for the players but the fans as well. you could see that from the first whistle. the fans wa nted from the first whistle. the fans wanted you to win as well. it is with nice to score but it is more important to get the win today. it is important to know that this can happen. it is important now for the start to continue to work very hard, to try to improve everyday. the january transfer window's open of course so expect some comings and goings over the next few weeks. and west ham are expected to increase their offer for sunderland striker jermain defoe after having an initial offer of six million turned down. defoe began his career at the hammers as a 16—year—old before leaving in 2003. he's scored more than half of all sunderland's goals in the premier league this season and appears crucial to their chances of staying in the top flight.
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sir, andy murray, has extended his career—best winning streak, to 26 competitive matches, by making it through to the quarter finals, of the qatar open, but he was, made to work for it against, the world number 68 gerald melzer. the austrian took murray to a tie—break, in the first set, but the world number one eventually came through 7—6, 7—5. he'll face spain's nicolas almagro next. the england and leicester centre manu tu—langi, has been ruled out of the six nations and next summer's lions tour with a knee injury. it's another blow for the player, who has suffered a string of injuries, over the last three seasons. he's appeared just 23 times for leicester since 2013 — and just once for england, under eddie jones. paralympic champion kadeena cox, has defended her decision, to take part in the channel 4 programme, thejump, describing life as a ‘ticking time bomb'. uk sport have suspended her funding while she takes part
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in the programme — in which participants learn to ski jump. on social media, cox said her diagnosis, of ms, had changed her outlook on life, so she was going to enjoy ski—ing. ms dhoni has stepped down, as india's one day captain, ahead of the, od! series against england, which begins later this month. and, england's one day captain eoin morgan, will be hoping in that series, to replicate his big hits, that he's been managing, in the big big bash league in australia. his sydney thunder side, needed a six off the final ball of the match to win against melbourne thunder, and under pressure, he smashed it into the stands. it was morgan's final appearance in the big bash, before hejoins england in india. now we all know, as we get older, keeping fit takes a bit more effort — which makes the achievements of frenchman, robert marchand even more impressive. at the age of 105, he's set a new record for the furthest distance cycled,
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in one hour, for riders of his age. he managed 22 kilometres in 60 minutes — all down to six months of training. he already held the record for those aged over 100, which he set in 2012. afterwards he said he could have done better, and while his legs didn't hurt, his arms did. he is my hero of the day. amazing to beat his own record. 105, still going strong. he was a firefighter in the 19405 in paris and then he went to be a lumberjack in canada. could living near busy roads be a factor in higher rates of dementia? canadian scientists followed 2 million people over 11 years and their results suggest there may be a link. british experts have described the findings as important and provocative. dr david reynolds is the chief scientific officer at alzheimer's research uk and joins us now.
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iam sure i am sure you have looked at the study. what do you make of it? i am sure you have looked at the study. what do you make of mm i am sure you have looked at the study. what do you make of it? it is interesting in that it suggests there is a link between living near busy roads such as a motorway or major a road and the having a small but increased risk of developing dementia later in life. it is difficult to tell with these studies because they can show an association but they can't show a cause. there is an effect widodo the cause. —— we don't know. we need to look at it more closely. what factors about living near a busy road important for increasing your risk of dementia? is that the noise caused by the traffic that might affect your sleep? is it breathing in air pollution, the gases, the small
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particles, what? what suggests we need to look at it more closely to look at the important factors and then sit there something we can do about it. what they are saying is there is a decline in deaths of further people lived people —— away from traffic. what you are saying is exercise caution or what would your message be? with these kinds of studies, it is always important to make sure there are repeated and you see the same findings. you can see some effect, you can't understand the cause and if you look at them again in england or elsewhere in europe, for example, you might not find the same association. for the moment, i might not necessarily do anything associated with where you live near a major road. there are a number of things you can do to beat chris your risk of developing dementia, living a healthy lifestyle —— decrease your risk, not smoking,
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a healthy diet, drinking in moderation, these are well—known to three the risk of developing dementia. what we need to know more about for this study is what is it about for this study is what is it about living near a major road that could increase your risk and then in the future, we can perhaps give out advice on what to do. and looking the future because this is the frustrating thing, we know quite a lot more about dementia and alzheimer's but still, give her, trying to find the cause. how far away are we from finding what it might be? because of a disease like alzheimer's or other types of dementia is likely to be quite collocated and different from person—to—person —— the cause. we note lifestyle factors and genetics all play a role. there is a lot of research at the moment trying to understand exactly what causes these different types of dementia. in fa ct, different types of dementia. in fact, just before christmas it was announced that a new dementia research institute will be established in the uk which will
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really bring a lot of resources in types —— terms of different types of research in the laboratory or doing studies in the clinic, to really understand the cause. doctor david reynolds, thank you for your time. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. carol will tell us it has gotten a little cold in some places but, carol, when we were all children wasn't a cold? it certainly seemed like the. we had snow in the winter and the summer was longer.m like the. we had snow in the winter and the summer was longer. it is certainly a lot colder than it has been. we have just certainly a lot colder than it has been. we havejust had certainly a lot colder than it has been. we have just had the lowest temperature this winter so far. i thought it would show you some of the towns and cities. it is quite quickly. —7s, —6s and minus fives.
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but which is a bit higher out west because we have a weather front. that is producing cloud and the odd spot of rain here and there. although it is cold and frosty to start we're looking at a lot of crisp winter sunshine, again with a light breeze. in the east and there will be more cloud and an odd shower while. towards the west where we have our weather front the cloud is thicker. as a result, in the afternoon in the north—west the sunshine will turn hazy. that will come our way later on. over here we get a mixture of some sunny spells most of england has good to richer and the extreme west has a bit of cloud. the same for cornwall and devon. nothing significant apart from an odd splash of rain. you can see from the blue in the chart that
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it will be an early frost. the frost will lift for some but a continual crust east anglia and the south—east. here as well we are looking at some fog around which could take time to lift. meanwhile a weather front tomorrow things south across all of scotland and northern ireland into north—west england and also parts of wales. the fog that lifts may just lift into also parts of wales. the fog that lifts mayjust lift into low cloud and it will be much later on that we will see it being pushed down into the south—east where it will still feel cold. behind the rain, hill fog and a few showers. as we head into saturday the rain will clear all together and behind it are lot of dry weather with sunshine. variable cloud and a few showers the rain there. into sunday it is a similar story in that it will be a cloudy day with bright breaks and mild with a couple of showers. all in all this weekend is not too shabby, charlie.
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mild conditions with cloudy conditions at times. i would just like to show you these temperatures. if you step out, these are the values that will greet you right now. i love carol. you listen to charlie very carefully. did you hear that? not too shabby. charlie very carefully. did you hear that? not too shabbylj charlie very carefully. did you hear that? not too shabby. i put it in just for you, charlie. we bought a record number of cars in the uk last year — ben's taking a look. we may have hit peak car ownership. more of us splashed out on a new car last year it seems, with record numbers being sold. with nearly 2.7 million new cars taking to the roads. a lot of that is because the way we're buying cars is changing. in 2015 nearly three quarters of cars were bought using something called a personal contract purchase — or pcp. that's when you pay a deposit, make monthly payments for three
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orfour years, and at the end of that you have a choice to buy the car outright or give the car back to the dealer and upgrade. but could we have reached the peak of new car sales? the stats out this morning predict a 5% fall in new car sales this year. so what's going on? iam speaking i am speaking with amanda stratton. a former race driver and now a motoring industry expert. let us talk, first of all, about pig ownership. it is the way that we buy ca rs ownership. it is the way that we buy cars and used cars is changing. it is no longer about having something sitting on the driveway, it is essentially renting. the number you mentioned was correct. what we are seeing is that something like over 90% of cars are actually being
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purchased on a finance option. the way we are purchasing our cars is different. it is no longer something that you save up for and own a physical car. it is now more like mobile phones where you look at paying monthly instalment for servicing and such things like that. you are paying slightly more for it but it is something you roll over as soon as the newest latest and greatest model comes out you can roll your dear over. what does that mean for car manufacturers? more new ca rs mean for car manufacturers? more new cars coming off the production line and more being sold. are we able to upgrade more quickly? is that why this is happening? that is absolutely correct. where the motor industry is going. looking at some of the stories you have handled this morning already, we know that the car industry and the way we use our ca rs car industry and the way we use our cars and roads and pollution, space, all of these things are emerging so i think the industry will change
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dramatically over the next few yea rs. dramatically over the next few years. this year they predict a 596 fall in car sales. some element of nervousness over the state of the economy but it is also about things like uberand economy but it is also about things like uber and being able to car share and possibly even driverless ca rs share and possibly even driverless cars further down the line? yes. there are very low interest rates which give as chief financial deals and exchange rates have had a big pa rt and exchange rates have had a big part to play up until now. but as you said there is a lot of uncertainty. and that next year and, you are right. things like car share. these things will have a big impact on the way we purchased our ca rs impact on the way we purchased our cars and the way we use our cars and people coming into the car market. many people are not looking at owning cars themselves but getting into a owning cars themselves but getting intoa car owning cars themselves but getting into a car scheme. it is quite interesting how it is changing. thank you very much for your time, amanda. i would like to hear more
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about that as well. thank you very much. ben must have known we will talk about driverless cars. the latest driverless car, headphones that can translate languages instantly and the latest smart gadgets for the home. these are just some of the things we can expect from this year's international consumer electronics show. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is in las vegas ahead of one of the biggest events in the tech industry. rory, what new technology is going to wow us in 2017? good morning. these fountains, behind the way, only come on when you come to me and i paid a lot of money to get them queued up and on display at this precise moment. i hope you appreciate it. the big scene here this year is intelligence. intelligent machines with artificial intelligence built in. everything from more and more
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d riverless in. everything from more and more driverless cars, something of a motor show here today. i was in one where i was allowed to take my hands off the wheel and look around. a little scary for those riding with me. all sorts of household devices as well becoming more and more intelligent. absorbing data and doing clever things. this year it seems to be the year when you are devices, all of them, will be smart devices. in a penthouse suite at a ritzy las vegas hotel, smart home exhibits are on show. there is a smart speaker for children, each toy is a playlist. # kung fu fighting...# a voice activated door lock. and upstairs... ..there's even nora, described as a smart snoring solution. it's paired with a pad under the pillow which detects the snoring and moves just enough to stop me, without waking me up. the big theme this year is turning the advances in artificial intelligence into products.
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there are robots of course. this one is meant to be a shop assistant, while this one is designed as a companion for children or elderly people. ai seems to get everywhere, even into this toothbrush, which learns how you brush your teeth. artificial intelligence is not just gathering the data, it's being able to use it. then you learn where your weaknesses are, where your strengths are and the purpose is to become better at taking care of your oral health. this walking stick is also smarter than it looks. an inbuilt mobile phone sim card means it can help if there is an accident. it will detect the fall of the user and when it detects it it will alert the family or the neighbour, so they can come and help these people. and this clever mirror helps anyone to try out make—up. bienvenue las vegas! out on the las vegas strip,
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this young entrepreneur from manchester has just flown in. welcome to la s vegas. his instant translation headphones aren't quite ready. they will eventually be tiny earbuds, that he is still looking forward to ces. this is important because we will be able to showcase what we've been working on to the world, to show this is something we started years ago as a small team, as a small start—up, with dedication and passion. the odds are against danny, a one—man band taking on giants like apple and google, but he's betting that he has the product that can change the world. and danny is a rarity in that he is one of the few rhodesian exhibitors who made it over here. only 50 or 60 of them. many more french exhibitors and over 1000 from china. 1000 out
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of just and over 1000 from china. 1000 out ofjust under 4000. britain is not exactly punching above its weight but people like danny with big dreams of making innovations that will really wow las vegas and let them on the path to future riches. are you controlling the fountains?‘ few fountains. it is done by a little app that i have in my back pocket but i cannot tell you more than that. well, there you go. i don't know. i think it probably is controlled by him. technology is clever but big sweaty water things are also impressive. time now for your local news and weather. good morning, from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. patients are being asked to stay away from emergency departments in south west hertfordshire, because they don't have the resources to cope. watford general hospital is so overwhelmed it is asking only people with life threatening conditions to visit a&e.
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health bosses say they've had to close the urgent care centre in hemel hempstead at night, because of a shortage of doctors. the family of a hartfordshire teenager being treated for an eating disorder 400 miles away say her condition's become worse, because she's isolated from herfamily. kimberley‘s daughter louise was sent to a specialist unit in scotland last year. her family have now written to the health secretary, jeremy hunt to ask for help. kimberley described what happens when she says goodbye. she screams. she cries, she holds on to me and when i leave, the doctors are standing there and the staff are standing there saying, ican't imagine what this is for you. i say, i wouldn't dream this on anybody. last—ditch talks aimed at averting a strike by london underground staff will resume later. members of the transport salaried staffs association and the rmt union are due to walk out for 24 hours on sunday night. the long running dispute is overjob losses and ticket office closures.
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everything losses and ticket office closures. running well on ti apart everything running well on the tube apart from the tfl. southwest trains are running again. there are delays and cancellations after a signalling problem. and this is what the roads looks like. the southbound traffic there is queueing. and accidentjust after the ilford flyover. an accident as well on regent street. time now for the weather. a cold and frosty start to the day. we've got temperatures widely below freezing. you really want to layer up, it is chilly. this picture was taken a couple of days ago. but the same sort of conditions this morning. it will feel cold all day. but there will be plenty of sunshine, the nice bright start for most of us.
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some isolated freezing patches around, but they won't last. it will stay dry, but feeling chilly. top temperatures this afternoon between three and five celsius. through the course of this evening and overnight we will have clear skies at first. we start to get more cloud coming down from the north as we head into tomorrow morning. another cold night, with freezing fog patches into tomorrow morning. overnight lows of —2 or —3 in rural spots. some of that fog would be slow to clear. cloudier through the day and ending tomorrow with outbreaks of rain. but it will be a touch milder as we head into saturday morning. over the weekend with got temperatures back into double figures, so it will feel milder and there will be plenty of cloud around, but we should see a mostly dry weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and louise minchin.
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left to "fend for themselves" online — a new report says more needs to be done to protect children. england's children's commissioner joins us to tell us why she wants compulsory internet safety lessons in schools and new privacy laws. good morning, it's thursday the 5th of january. also this morning... a new ambassador to the eu — sir tim barrow‘s appointment has been broadly welcomed on both sides of the brexit debate. people who live near major roads may have higher rates of dementia, according to research published today. car sales hit a record in the uk this year but with the rise of cab sharing and driverless cars,
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will owning a car soon become a thing of the past? in sport — chelsea's winning run comes to an end as the league leaders are beaten at tottenham. two goals from delle alli do the damage at white hart lane as they win 2—0 and move up to third. this reads like a criminal decathlon. that is the man that i chased? you chased somebody? is there cctv? 20 years of murder and intrigue — the show‘s stars will be telling us how silent witness has become the world's longest running crime drama. and carol has the weather... and carol has the weathermm and carol has the weather... it is a cold and frosty start to the day, england has had its coldest winter nights so far this winter but for most of the uk, it will be sunny, cold with light breezes, cloud in the west and some showers in the east. more details in 15 minutes... thank you. good morning. our main story is a warning
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from the children's commissioner for england that young people are left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone. anne longfield says children — and often their parents — have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. our education correspondent gillian hargreaves has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keep in touch with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no—one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene with a digital world in a way that
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can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet. while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. thank you for getting in touch about that... a spokesperson for the department for education told us there is more to be done and that they will carefully consider the report as part of their ongoing work to make the internet a safer place for children. we'll be speaking to the children's commissioner and a victim of cyber—bullying in about ten minutes. the appointment of sir tim barrow as the uk's new ambassador to the european union has been welcomed by almost all the political parties.
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he replaces sir ivan rogers, who resigned on tuesday after complaining of muddle and confusion in the approach to brexit. our political correspondent iain watson joins us now. sirtim sir tim barrow is going to be an important player in the coming months, tell us more about him? he will, and certainly downing street said that he will be a tough negotiator, he is seasoned and someone with experience in brussels as an ambassador, she has been an ambassador in moscow when relations in russia were not at their best and an ambassador to the ukraine. he is staunchly opposed to the creation of an eu army and he has served junior ministers at the foreign office 20 years ago when john major was in power and there
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we re john major was in power and there were divisions in europe. he knows the territory well and he says himself he wants to get the best possible outcome for british negotiations, you would not expect him to say anything else but nigel farage from ukip says that he is just another career diplomat committee wants to see things shaken up committee wants to see things shaken up and a true believer in brexit, perhaps someone from outside of the political establishment. and so drive and rogers is leaving that cloud, the model and confusion surrounding brexit, theresa may, has she been stung into action by that sentiment? —— sir ivan rogers. actually, i think that is overstating it slightly, she responded yesterday and we are told that she will take to the airwaves at the weekend, she was always planning a speech on europe and we expect that to take place this month, under pressure to take on this argument that she does not have this argument that she does not have this negotiation strategy in place and objectives set a few months
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before triggering the process of leaving the eu, she has given strong hints of why she wants to go before, including the conservative party speech, she does not want the european to interrupt, but she wants to clarify this point and make explicit what has been implicit but they do not want to wait for her speech, they want ministers to come to the house of commons and tell them what the strategy in europe really years. thank you. —— really is. immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive. that's what a group of mps are calling for. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control the number of visas issued. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. over the past decade, the scale of immigration to britain has been unprecedented, sparking debate about whether the numbers should be reduced and if so, how?
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but this report from mps and peers says there should be more focus on what happens after immigrants arrive. it says many immigrant communities and people already settled here lead parallel lives and it calls on the government to address what it says is a lack of integration. the report makes a number of recommendations. it says all immigrants should learn english before coming to the uk or enrol in classes when they're here. it calls for courses to teach immigrants about british culture and the report says that government should give immigrants guidance on the costs and benefits of uk citizenship and consider cutting the fees for naturalisation. a lack of integration for newcomers leads to them not having access to the same opportunities, it can lead to an increase in distrust in the communities locally. all the things that make living in england and britain great are denied people.
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you cannot enjoy what this country has to offer if you don't speak the language. another idea in the report is for immigration policy to be devolved to britain's nations and regions. they'd be able to allocate visas according to local need. the report says that might instil confidence among members of the public that the immigration system works for their area. the home office says it is not planning to introduce local visa arrangements but the department says it has made funding available for more english lessons. danny shaw, bbc news. president barack obama has urged his fellow democrats to fight for his flagship health care bill. it comes as the incoming trump administration began the process of repealing the affordable care act. the republican vice—president—elect, mike pence, had promised the process would begin on donald trump's first day in office — the 20th of january. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia — according to a decade—long study
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by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. dan johnson reports. memories lost, thoughts confused, personalities gradually fading. dementia affects 850,000 people in the uk. now there's a claim it could be linked to traffic. this study from canada shows that people living close to busy roads had higher chances of developing dementia. researchers in ontario followed more than two million people over 11 years. the ones who lived within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 12% higher risk of dementia than those more than 200 metres away. so what is it that's actually affecting the brain? ultra—fine particles, the very smallest ones, can actually move across the lungs into the bloodstream and circulate in the body.
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how those particles work, a bit speculative, but one hypothesis is fairly nonspecific effects on inflammation and oxididative stress on the body. so we have a potential mechanism but it's far from proven. experts here have cautiously welcomed the results as important and provocative. they've stressed it shows an association, not a cause. they've pointed out dementia is also affected by age, lifestyle and genetics. but they are encouraging further research into the impact of traffic and pollution. dan johnson, bbc news. doubt has been cast on the nhs programme for screening those at high risk of type two diabetes. researchers at oxford university say its unlikely to have much impact. it concluded that inaccurate blood tests would give too many people an incorrect diagnosis, while lifestyle changes had a low success rate. the director of the nhs programme said its approach was based on "robust evidence".
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you have probably noticed... the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels for a year and a half in december according to the rac. both fuels went up by three pence a litre during the month. it now costs around £62 to £80 to fill up a typical family car. the increasing cost of crude oil and further falls in the value of the pound are believed to be behind the trend. a figure of a soldier from the first world war has been created entirely from scrap metal. it's nearly six metres tall and took a blacksmith three months to make the war—weary looking tommy. as you can see, it is pretty impressive. martin galbavy used items including spanners, brake discs and horse shoes to create the impressive work. when you see it against those buildings you really get a sense of
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the incredible scale of it as well. all of the sport and the weather coming upfor all of the sport and the weather coming up for you a little later... whether it's on their tablets orsmartphones, children are using social media sites more than ever before. but a new study by the children's commissioner for england says that they are ill—prepared to deal with problems they commonly find online, such as cyber—bulling and issues surrounding privacy. joining us from the london newsroom is the author of the report, anne longfield. and in the studio we have ella, who has been a victim of cyber—bullying. good morning to both of you, let's talk to you first of all, ella, what kind of problems did you have at what age? i have had three occasions where i have encountered this. at my youngest i was 13 years old. i had recently only just joined youngest i was 13 years old. i had recently onlyjustjoined social media. and, i did sufferfrom cyber bullying and problems within my school, and then it went online as well. then, i faced
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school, and then it went online as well. then, ifaced other issues around 16 and recently in the last couple of weeks. and that really was quite difficult, emotionally, to deal with. i have got quite a good support system at home, i could talk to my parents. however, when i tried to my parents. however, when i tried to report these things online, i did not really have a lot of support there, and i felt like not really have a lot of support there, and ifelt like i was talking toa there, and ifelt like i was talking to a brick wall, there was not really that much contact. when it started, what was your attitude to the messages you were getting? did you think that was just part of what happens on social media? or, did you feel like it should not be happening, what was your instinct?|j happening, what was your instinct?” did feel that something was definitely wrong. i did not feel like this was what they were created for. i thought that something ought to have been changed, and it was not really right for people to be targeting others online. and i did
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suffer from it within the school environment, and outside of school. then for it to come online, it felt like there was no escape from it. i really wanted it to stop but at that age i did not know how, nothing was told in school on how to reported or anything like that. was told in school on how to reported or anything like thatm some ways, things will change because sometimes children get lessons in school. so many issues highlighted. when someone comes up with a problem, with a parent trying to support a child, or a child, is communication between them and the company running these kinds of websites, is it getting better? can people take down photographs more often than before? that is not what i'm told by young people, there are incremental increases and i hear the stories all the time with young people saying they have little faith in the
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company is taking them seriously, and if they try to get something taken down and if they try to get something ta ken down about and if they try to get something taken down about half of them say they are dissatisfied. win over half of children's leisure time among teenagers is spent online services a new area of their life and it's important they get the lessons in school that can help build their resilience, that they get honestly informed through the terms and conditions, but then they have recourse to some independent means to help them deal with difficulties when they arise. so that's why i'm recommending that we introduce a new digital commissioner, a new digital ombudsman for young people that will be on their side and be able to mediate. that's interesting, i don't know what you think about that, the idea of an ombudsman. sometimes people feel those figures seem too distant, too far away from what is happening on your device. what do you make of it? i would definitely agree somebody should be there that you can contact because when i have personally tried to report things i
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haven't had any reaction to things that have been taken down. to have that have been taken down. to have that human contact with someone who is fighting your battles with you because i felt very alone and i was talking to these big companies and no one was listening. anne longfield, i'm thinking if you think about right now, how many people will be suffering because of some kind of cyber bullying, every day with so many incidents, how can one person start to make an impact? this is about changing the relationship between the companies and children themselves. the internet was not designed for children but they are one of the biggest users actually. would need to change that relationship and help children to become more informed us customers and demand more, if you like, from the companies themselves. i also wa nt the companies themselves. i also want government to extend my powers soi want government to extend my powers so i can find out from the companies themselves what complaints children are put into them, the nature of those complaints, what happens to them and big scale command again, to start to get grips to this issue. it
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is something which is very practical, something that has been in australia and something which could be permitted quickly. but certainly this is something that young people report to me all the time and they want the companies to rip -- time and they want the companies to rip —— respond. time and they want the companies to rip -- respond. you have looked at privacy laws, do you want to get the laws extended that far? what do you wa nt to laws extended that far? what do you want to change? new laws around privacy are being brought in in 2018 and in america new laws have been introduced which protect children's privacy online so i suggest they should be brought forward and they should be brought forward and they should be brought forward and they should be protected as we enter the brexit period. this is all about ensuring that children's data online is protected as much as it can be. what we know is with pages and pages of terms and conditions that children can't possibly stand a
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chance of understanding. they are signing away without realising important privacy and data that could be shared and even sold. one last thought, at the beginning you mentioned recently you have still been a victim. have you changed what you do online and social media? my privacy settings are very high but some of my friends' maybe aren't as much, so someone took a photo of me and my friends and posted it on a group that we didn't even know about until someone came across it. they effectively stole your image? yes, and then we got quite a lot of negative comments and it was quite offensive. i then tried to report the post and take it down and nothing happened, it is still there. it's very interesting. thank you for talking to us today. and anne longfield, children's commissioner, thank you. thank you for getting in touch, all of you, we will look at your comments later. it is cold again this morning. it certainly is, there
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isa this morning. it certainly is, there is a widespread frost but it means we will have cold winter sunshine. in benson it is minus 8.1 celsius, the coldest night so far this winter in england. in edinburgh, —4, kew gardens —4, cardiff —2, but belfast and plymouth have temperatures a little higher and the reason is we have a weather front to the west, the remnants of yesterday's weather front still producing a fair bit of cloud and the odd spot of rain. elsewhere, might breezes and a lot of sunshine. so you can see sunshine from the top to the bottom of the land, towards the east of in the in particular there are bits and pieces of cloud floating around. this morning could produce a few showers that will tend to fade after a pembrokeshire, into south—west england, northern ireland and north—west scotland there is more cloud, so the sunshine will turn has hazier through the west of scotland in the afternoon, with a weather front in the wings. in northern
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ireland, some bright skies and quite a bit of cloud. in the extreme west, the south—west also. for the rest of england, a fine afternoon, cold, light breezes and lots of sunshine, and as we head down to west devon and as we head down to west devon and cornwall, we still have the influence of weather fronts, more cloud and spots of rain. you can see the blue hue on the charts this evening and overnight indicating it is cold enough for some frost. as the cloud comes south some of it will lift but not in the south—east, and here we are looking at fog in east anglia down to kent, maybe a little further west and that could prove to be freezing fog. meanwhile, the weather front will bring rain across scotland, northern ireland, north—west england and also north—west england and also north—west wales. we picked that up tomorrow as it continues its descent south—eastwards. the fog we have will be slow to lift and some will just lift into low cloud. in the south—east corner it will be quite a cold day ahead, and quite great, and at times it will be dank. meanwhile
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the rain is heading southwards, some of it heavy and persistent across parts of yorkshire and the east midlands. behind it some brighter skies, hill fog and a few showers that look at the temperatures come away from the south—east the temperature start to pick up. on saturday, the rain goes away, behind it dry weather and one or two showers here and there but most of us showers here and there but most of us will miss them all together and we will see some sunshine. the overriding thing is how mild it will feel for this stage in january, overriding thing is how mild it will feel for this stage injanuary, and it's a similar story on sunday in terms of mildness. lots of dry weather, the little bits of brightness, but look at the temperatures, 9—11, you don't hear that often at this stage injanuary. so cold and then much warmer, thank you, carol. we were all paying attention, even ben on the other side of the room. we absolutely were. what have you got a credit card debt? yes, i will be talking about debt. we racked up more debt
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in the run up to christmas at the fastest rate since 2005. we borrowed £1.9 billion in november, that's up 10.8% on the same time last year. economists warn the rise reflects a similar boom before the 2008 financial crisis. our total debts on credit cards and in loans is now a staggering £192 billion. 2.7 million new cars hit the roads last year, a record number. a lot of that is because the way we're buying cars is changing. three quarters of cars were bought using something called a personal contract purchase — or pcp, when you pay a deposit, make monthly payments and at the end of the contract you can either buy it or upgrade to a new car. but with the rise of car sharing and the likes of uber, experts are forecasting a 5% fall in car sales this year. and streaming services to watch tv and films has overtaken dvds for the first time.
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the market for services like netflix and amazon video is now worth £1.3 billion — up 23% on last year. it comes as sales of physical discs fell below £1 billion for the first time. cd sales were down too — by 13%, blamed on the rise in music streaming services like spotify. those streaming services are convenient but you don't get the satisfaction of holding the dvd or the video in your hand, vhs, remember that? i do, i still remember that? i do, i still remember them. do you still have them? i don't still have them. so satisfying to rewind them! do you eat plenty of fruit, vegetables and beans? if you don't, you might want to start. new research shows that following the mediterranean diet leads to a healthier brain. it found that those who followed the diet had greater brain volume after three years than those who didn't.
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the study, was carried out by scientists at the university of edinburgh. let's speak now to the lead researcher, michelle luciano. thank you forjoining us. you were specifically looking at an older generation. tell us what you found. what we did was we measured people's diet when they were 70 years of age and that 73 and at 76 they came into the laboratory to get their brains scanned. and what we then showed was that the mediterranean diet was protective of brain loss over that three—year interval. those who adhere to motou a mediterranean diet showed less brain loss —— endeared to. you talk about a mediterranean dietand we to. you talk about a mediterranean diet and we have our own point of view of what that means. what sort of things were they eating?‘ mediterranean diet is characterised bya high mediterranean diet is characterised by a high consumption of fruit, vegetables, legumes, cereals, a
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moderate intake of fish, low to moderate intake of fish, low to moderate intake of dairy, a high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fats, mostly obtained through olive oil consumption, and a moderate alcohol intake as well. could you tell us a little bit about it? you found a difference in brain size, would that have a big impact possibly on people's life chances and how they are able to live? so, the association we found was specifically with brain loss over time, so over that three—year period. and studies have shown, so other studies have shown, that brain loss can be a signal of dementia, for instance, and there is also associations with brain loss and cognitive functions like memory and processing speed. so this could be some kind of link between the
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protective effects that have already been shown between mediterranean dietand been shown between mediterranean diet and the onset of dementia, alzheimer's, disease. as we said, you were looking specifically at older adults. could it make a difference to young people as well? this is what further research needs to show. so, we focused only on people in their 70s. to show. so, we focused only on people in their 705. and we also had one limitation in the study, we don't know how long people had been adhering to the mediterranean diet, so something for future research would be to monitor whether people have been following this diet all their life, or whether a short—term kind of change to a mediterranean diet might actually show any protective effects against cognitive function and loss, for instance, during the ageing process.” michelle luciano, thank you very
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much. i say beetroot. actually, i love beetroot. it is not proven by the way, scientifically! time to get the news travel and weather where you are. good morning, after that very frosty start, it's not going to get terribly warm out there today but with a lot of sunshine and some layers it will field a light for! it is dry today, just about everywhere. —— delightful. this picture shows the extent of clear skies, cloud in
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the extent of clear skies, cloud in the atlantic ocean, that will bring about change in the next 24 hours, over the afternoon some of that cloud will turn up across northern ireland and west scotland but for a lot of us, more lovely sunshine to come! some sunshine on the east coast, and near the tip of cornwall but these are the exceptions to the rule, otherwise crisp and sunny, but cold. it will stay frosty throughout the day, this is at 3pm, temperatures 3—5d, briefly through the early to mid part of the afternoon. more mild in northern ireland as cloud comes in, in western scotland a fresh breeze, but here it is bright and sunny in the afternoon. as we head into tonight, cloud continues to thicken in the west and we see rain coming in, across ireland and scotland, spelling further south and east, and into the fringes of england and wales, as it falls onto cold surfaces, the risk of some eyes first thing in eastern scotland, keep an eye on that. a frosty night with areas of fog
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around —— ice. that lifts up into low cloud, some limited sunshine and rain coming from the northwest, southeast as we go through the day. eventually, some rain could turn out to be heavy. temperatures are slow to be heavy. temperatures are slow to rise but it will turn more mild in most places through the day. and it will be a more mild weekend as well, limited brightness, the odd bit of drizzle, especially in the west. this is business live from bbc news, with sally bundock and aaron heslehurst. smart homes, voice recognition and driverless cars! we'll take a look at the rise of the robots at the world's biggest tech event. live from london, that's our top
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story on thursday 5th january. in need of a recharge. we are not talking about me! the trillion dollar tech industry gathers in las vegas — in search of the gadgets that will get it growing again. our top tech team is there, trying and testing out the latest stuff. also in the programme — upsetting the apple cart! chinese authorities force the silicon valley giant to withdraw its new york times app.
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