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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 5, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am. new car sales reach an all—time high but there are signs of a slow—down — last month sales fell. the price of petrol and diesel reach their highest levels for a year and a half. a warning children are being left to fend for themselves in the digital world — against dangers like bullying and grooming. people who live near major roads may be more prone to dementia, according to new research. four black teenagers arrested in chicago overfootage four black teenagers arrested in chicago over footage streamed live on facebook in which a white man with special needs was bound, gagged, and assaulted. also, a collection of personal letters written by princess diana are up for sale. one of them reveals prince harry was "constantly in trouble" while at boarding school. and we travel to las vegas for the world's biggest consumer electronics show and sample some of the more unusual gadgets on offer.
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this little device is paired with a pad under the pillow which detects me snoring and moves just enough to stop me without waking me up. good morning, it's thursday, january five, welcome to bbc newsroom live. a record number of cars were registered in the uk last year but as more of us than ever before splashed out on a brand new vehicle, the industry is warning that this could be the peak of sales. there were nearly 2.7 million new cars on the roads in 2016. this is largely because the way we're buying cars is changing with more affordable
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finance deals on offer. in 2015 nearly three—quarters of cars were bought using something called a personal contract purchase — or pcp. that's when you pay a deposit, make monthly payments for three orfour years, and at the end of that you have a choice to buy the car outright or give the car back to the dealer and upgrade. manufacturers are also predicting a 5% fall in new car sales this year — with the weaker pound pushing up prices. one more detail, there were more new diesel cars registered in 2016 than in any previous year, almost 1.3 million. that's despite concerns about the effect of diesel emissions on health. the motoring editor at confused.com, amanda stretton, who is also a former racing driver, said the way we're buying our cars has changed. it's no longer a purchase that you save up for and you owned a physical
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carand save up for and you owned a physical car and drive why, it's now more like mobile phones or you are looking at paying a monthly instalment, maybe you're servicing and other car running costs included in that price, you know what you will pay, you are paying slightly more for it but it is something you roll over and then as soon as the latest model comes out and you want to upgrade you can just roll that deal over. to discuss this further i'm joined by the motoring journalist journalist steve berry, who's in salford, and joining me in the studio to talk about the impact of those record sales in diesel cars is fiona godlee, the editor—in—chief at the british medicaljournal. i think we are trying to connect with steve in salford, we will begin by talking to fiona. thank you for joining us. . that statistic about more new diesel cars registered in 2016jumps more new diesel cars registered in 2016 jumps out, given the diesel emissions scandal and concerns about the impact on health and the environment, is that surprising? it's very worrying. it is a result
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of the government encouraging private people to buy diesel with tax breaks on the basis that they we re tax breaks on the basis that they were considered more environmentally friendly because they produce less carbon dioxide emissions. although we have known for sometime and it is becoming more apparent that they are more damaging to health, diesel fumes emitted by taxes, lorries, buses and cars damage children's health in particular and health right across the age range. tell us more about what we know about the impact of these diesel vehicles on the environment. diesel is a fossil fuel, its damages the through gases it emits but also it is a pollutant, mainly due to nitrogen dioxide and black carbon and things like that so these gases are damaging adults, we know that they are linked to heart disease, strokes, obesity, lung cancer and perhaps more worrying, from conception onwards because
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these small particulates cross the placenta into the foetus, also they cfoss placenta into the foetus, also they cross the blood— the brain barrier into the brain, we know that high levels of exposure are linked to mental illness in and developmental delay, to reduced iq and lung damage, too restricted lung growth, all of these things are long term time bombs, we are feeling up for ourselves in the next ten years. this has been going on since the 19705 this has been going on since the 1970s onwards. do you feel that not enough time has elapsed for car—buying habits to change? for a long time people vote buying diesel was the better option, it was less polluting, and perhaps that message has not had an impact yet —— for a long time people thought this. has not had an impact yet —— for a long time people thought thism has not had an impact yet —— for a long time people thought this. it is sad for people, i myself had diesel cars, we were encouraged to buy them, the real impact is no use in urban areas. that's what we need to
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look at, a fading out of diesel over a specific period of time, to move them from urban areas, that is what cities around the world are doing and we need to call for a ban on diesel in london in particular and in all major uk cities. we will pause for a moment, fiona, we can bring in steve, who is in salford. good morning. let's talk about that stats, more new diesel cars registered in 2016 than any year before. i'm surprised. i'm not going to defend diesel cars. what i am going to do is ask why we were told for so long that diesel cars were better because they got better mileage, that meant that they were better for the environment, and we'll be sure the same criticism of people who buy petrol, electric hybrids, or electric cars? will we be told later on because they are not environmentally friendly because
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all they do is separate the relation between the vehicle and the power station where the electricity is generated? it does take some time for car—buying habits to catch up with what doctors and scientists and government are saying. it is harsh that on a day that we are celebrating not just the that on a day that we are celebrating notjust the highest ever yearly sale of cars in the uk but also last year more cars made in the uk than at any other time in the history of the motorcar. you want to know how important that is, remember the fuss about nissan is staying in the fuss about nissan is staying in the uk and how much time people like the uk and how much time people like the bbc spent discussing that. absolutely, that was my next question, there is another angle, a good news economic angle to this story. how important do you think these figures are, in the sense of showing us a thriving car industry, 01’ showing us a thriving car industry, or do you have concerns that this is a peak and there may be a drop of
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hereafter? they will be a drop of next because of brexit. right or wrong, there will be a drop off because people's confidence has been shaken by brexit. so there will be a drop off. yet it is a great reflection of how well we do in this country. we are the best maker of low volume specialist cars in the world, rolls—royce, aston martin, jensen revived, lotus, tvr, we are the best at that. we are also incredibly good at building every day five door family cars. that is why manufacturers want to build in the uk and make engines. instead of knocking the car industry which employs thousands of people we should celebrate these stats today. that figure about diesel is disappointing but the public were told diesel was better and it will ta ke told diesel was better and it will take some time for people's perception and their car—buying habits to catch up with what is
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being said to them by scientists and doctors. fiona, are you knocking the car industry? not in the least, it's an important part of the economy. yet we must think about putting public health above those sort of concerns. we have an estimate of 40,000, 50,000 excess premature deaths in the uk, at a cost of £20 billion to the nhs each year. so we have real economic cost not only affecting lives but the economy. i think we need to look at a gradual phase out. we must be realistic, we ban smoking in public and air pollution is the second—biggest cause of premature death after smoking. we have to act on this. you are talking about phasing out diesel specifically? athens, paris, mexico city and madrid have announced a phase out of diesel in city centres by 2025 so that gives time to get
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there. i appreciate that car—buying habits take time, but we are damaging peoples health and we are laying up large health problems the future. would you support a phasing out of diesel, steve? absolutely, these are the dying days of fossil fuel in motocross, i have enjoyed it while it has lasted but what i have been glad to see in these stats is the increasing number of electric hybrids and pure electric cars. in a motoring journalist long enough to have driven the early full electric ca i’s have driven the early full electric cars and they were dreadful. the current breed of electric cars from nissan, vauxhall and ford are fantastic. i can't wait for the day that every car on sale in the uk is an electric car. i think it is safe to say that you both agree on that point. steve, fiona, thank you both very much. let's stay with the theme. the cost of driving your car
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is going up. 0il theme. the cost of driving your car is going up. oil prices are again rising on world markets. the price of petrol and diesel rose to the highest levels in a year and a half in december. the rac says both fuels went up by three pence a litre during the month. joining me from a service station in west london is our correspondent, oui’ west london is our correspondent, our people noticing the difference? they are. just moments ago i was speaking to some guys who came to fill up their car. they said they we re fill up their car. they said they were frustrated, these figures being released by the rac for december, it's the most expensive model of the year anyway, so people are very frustrated. —— the most expensive month of the year. the rac are predicting that prices will continue to rise. the average cost of unleaded petrol in december rose and
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four diesel rise was 119. they expect in the next weeks for these numbers to rise. but this particular petrol station, unleaded is £1.18 and diesel £1.20. these prices are going to be filed by families. december was expensive, we know that people are quite hard—pressed anyway so people are quite hard—pressed anyway so these prices will make a difference to people, don't you think? i think so, difference to people, don't you think? ithink so, if difference to people, don't you think? i think so, if you compare it to this time last year, filling up the average car, they are easy compared with this time last year was more expensive for unleaded and four diesel. i think that will add up. there's a lot of uncertainty as we start the year politically, we still have a weak pound against the dollar, and of course oil is sold by
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the dollar. so we rate to see to what extent the election of donald trump will make a difference as he begins to introduce his policies on january 20, and of course brexit, the negotiations might have continued effect on fuel prices if the value of the pound continues to fall. thank you. the children's commissioner for england has warned that young people are being left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone. anne longfield says children — and often their parents — have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. 0ur education correspondent, gillian hargreaves has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keep in touch with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea
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of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no—one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene with a digital world in a way that can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet. while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account.
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gillian hargreaves, bbc news. let's get more reaction to this story. professor sonia livingstone is from the london school of economics, she was involved in the study and joins me from north london via webcam. thank you forjoining us. via webcam. thank you forjoining us. it sounds as if a lot of parents are crossing their fingers and hoping for the best when their children go online, that they will not be exposed to anything that they shouldn't be. i think that's absolutely right. i think parents are absolutely right. i think parents a re often absolutely right. i think parents are often quite alert to what the risks are but don't really know where to get advice on what the best things are to do and how to keep their children safe. parents may know that they need to set up safeguards on the computer but beyond that, is that not enough, what else do they need to do? digital media is changing really
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fast. i think many parents have understood putting privacy settings isa understood putting privacy settings is a good idea but they don't necessarily know which social media their children are using and i think that many are not understanding, none of us really understand the ways in which different services connect, the way in which one company might share data with another, so they don't exactly understand how best to make sure that their children's images don't get shared. it sounds as if pa rents don't get shared. it sounds as if parents need to understand things as well. if we do have the commissioner recommended that would be one clear source of information for both children and parents. i also think
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that if children were getting the chance to discuss questions of privacy and safety in school from a young age they should also be encouraged to discuss it with their pa rents encouraged to discuss it with their parents and that would be the best way of parents knowing what their children are doing, what level of understanding they have and where the gaps are that they need support with. do you think some schools do better than others on this but perhaps it is not uniform provision? absolutely not uniform provision. some schools are trying hard. there is no question that when you talk to children about internet safety they will roll their eyes and say, yes, we did that last year. what they are not getting is the updating that recognises the way in which social media gets more complex or privacy settings change or new risks arise. i think that the other thing is that they are not always getting it young enough. so we have lots of toddlers,
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aged two, three, four, five online, and there's a kind of challenge in reaching them but we definitely would want digital safety, digital citizenship taught from the start of primary school. so the position we are in now is that we know there is an information vacuum and we need to do something about it but we have not decided what that something is 01’ not decided what that something is or how to go about it. it is not quite that there is no information, ina way quite that there is no information, in a way that is a lot of information there, the problem is that parents don't know where to get it and children are not always getting it just it and children are not always getting itjust in time and at the right age. that is why, if there we re right age. that is why, if there were a digital ombudsman and a good digital curriculum for children, those would be the place is to bring everything together. but i think to add one further point there is a limit to how much one can place the burden of a complex social media
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environment and parents, teachers, media and children. it is also down to the companies to make their provision more straightforward, to explain better at the privacy settings work, to make the terms and conditions more child friendly, and to be responsive when something goes wrong, one of the other thing is that the children's commissioner found is that when children say, i tried to complain about it or get something taken down from my social media provider, i didn't get a response. and they feel they are using these services, these services are important to them that they are not getting a service which respects their needs and rights. professor sonia livingstone, thank you very much. if you're worried about how safe your children are when they go online, you can put your questions to two experts on the bbc
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news channel at 12.30. we'll bejoined by eleanor levy, editor at parent zone, a company which provides information to families and schools about their online use. and liam hackett, who runs the anti bullying charity ditch the label. you can get in touch using the hashtag bbc ask this, text on 61124, or email your question to askthis@bbc.co.uk. please do get in touch. we will try to get through as many of those questions as we can. it is 1120 oh. the headlines. a record number of new cars were sold in the uk last year, up 12% on the previous 12 months. the number of new diesel cars registered rose to their highest level in the year and a half. children are thought to be left to themselves to do with online grooming. and tottenham ended the longest winning streak in premier
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league history, chelsea, when they beat them last night. 2—0. alexis sanchezis beat them last night. 2—0. alexis sanchez is said to be fine despite appearing frustrated with arsenal's 3-3 appearing frustrated with arsenal's 3—3 draw with bournemouth, rumours haveit 3—3 draw with bournemouth, rumours have it that he could be considering his future of the club, and john konta's good form continues, one win from reaching the final after winning in china. andy murray the quarterfinals and the qatar open. i will be more on those stories dashed back i will be more with more on most of those stories later. —— i will be back with more on those stories later. some breaking news. the norwegian prime minister has been talking about brexit and saying that the uk lacks the international negotiating experience required. he says "this is going to slow down
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talks." interesting that he made that comment after the resignation of sir ivan rogers, who spoke about britain's position being in a muddled state. the norwegian prime minister saying that the uk lacks international negotiating experience, which will lead to a slowing of talks on brexit. some other news reaching us about an assault in austria on new year's eve, police in austria say that in the province of tyrol they are looking for a group of five or six men suspected of sexually assaulting 18 women on new year's eve in innsbruck. this is according to reports in the austria press agency. the head of the investigation said the men were believed to come from asia orfrom north africa the men were believed to come from asia or from north africa and they are including refugee shelters in their search. police in the austrian
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province of tyrol looking for a group of five or six men suspected of sexually assaulting 18 women on new year's eve in innsbruck. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia according toa greater risk of dementia according to a decade long study by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. dan johnson reports. memories lost, thoughts confused, personalities gradually fading. dementia affects 850,000 people in the uk. now there's a claim it could be linked to traffic. this study from canada shows that people living close to busy roads had higher chances of developing dementia. researchers in ontario followed more than two million people over 11 years. the ones who lived within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 12% higher risk of dementia than those more than 200 metres away. so what is it that's actually
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affecting the brain? ultra—fine particles, the very smallest ones, can actually move across the lungs into the bloodstream and circulate in the body. how those particles work, a bit speculative, but one hypothesis is through fairly nonspecific effects on inflammation and oxididative stress on the body. so we have a potential mechanism but it's far from proven. experts here have cautiously welcomed the results as important and provocative. they've stressed it shows an association, not a cause. they've pointed out dementia is also affected by age, lifestyle and genetics. but they are encouraging further research into the impact of traffic and pollution. dan johnson, bbc news. with me is our health correspondent james gallagher. so some people will be asking should they move, on the basis of this
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substantial study conducted over a long period of time. what is the impact of it? we air pollution is bad for you, the world health organisation says 3 million people die every year because of outdoor air pollution. so if you are already asking if you should flee to the country there is already justification in terms of heart disease, respiratory disease, lung cancer and things like that. does this study add much to what we know the dangers? and an observational study were scientists look at the world and look for patterns. they have seen a pattern that links proximity to major roads and alzheimer's disease and dementia. what they have not shown is the problem it is causing, that is what the next study needs to do. so i would not use this report as a justification for moving somewhere green, it is not that significant at this stage. it will be future
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studies that will confirm the link. 0ne commentator has said, at an individual level this should not cause anyone to move house but at a public health level it does present some interesting information for governments to look at when they are considering how to tackle pollution. this is one interesting thing about statistics because if i were to say increase your risk by a tiny amount of something that doesn't make a big difference to your life. but in a world where so many people live in cities, massive urbanisation around the planet, talking about billions living in those environments and those small risks add up to a big public health problem which is why it will be important that scientists establish how big a risk, if any at allair establish how big a risk, if any at all air pollution noise from traffic is in terms of neurodegenerative diseases. are those follow-up studies underway? not directly as a result of this study but there is
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this constant field of research trying to understand the causes of dementia because it is not com pletely dementia because it is not completely understood. there are conflicting reports, some say obesity in midlife is bad for dementia risk but in later life and is protective. there is confusion about the causes of dementia. a massive field of research still taking place, dementia happens over a long period, you have to study people for a long time to get it and that his why answers are so long in forthcoming. thank you very much. immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain or attend language classes when they arrive. that's what a group of mps are calling for. the all party parliamentary group on social integration also wants the government to consider giving the uk's nations and regions the power to control the number of visas issued. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. over the past decade, the scale of immigration to britain has been unprecedented, sparking debate about
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whether the numbers should be reduced and if so, how? but this report from mps and peers says there should be more focus on what happens after immigrants arrive. it says many immigrant communities and people already settled here lead parallel lives and it calls on the government to address what it says is a lack of integration. the report makes a number of recommendations. it says all immigrants should learn english before coming to the uk or enrol in classes when they're here. it calls for courses to teach immigrants about british culture and the report says that government should give immigrants guidance on the costs and benefits of uk citizenship and consider cutting the fees for naturalisation. a lack of integration for newcomers leads to them not having access to the same opportunities, it can lead to an increase in distrust in the communities locally.
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all the things that make living in england and britain great are denied people. you cannot enjoy what this country has to offer if you don't speak the language. another idea in the report is for immigration policy to be devolved to britain's nations and regions. they'd be able to allocate visas according to local need. the report says that might instil confidence among members of the public that the immigration system works for their area. the home office says it is not planning to introduce local visa arrangements but the department says it has made funding available for more english lessons. danny shaw, bbc news. it's time for the weather forecast withjohn it's time for the weather forecast with john hammond. cold although a beautiful start to the day if you wear layers. even over london we saw a white covering to the ground and that frost is not shifting it will stay all day long and despite the sunshine it will never be warm. cloudy across devon and cornwall and production and
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northern ireland but for most areas, no more than 2—5d before temperatures fall again in the evening especially in england and wales, ha rd frost evening especially in england and wales, hard frost and freezing fog. for northern ireland and scotland, wet with strong winds. some of that rain edging into the far north—west of england and wales, potentially modish year, in places a foggy start, that will turn into low cloud, limited sunshine tomorrow, that rain spreading from northern ireland and scotland through england and wales, it will take all day to arrive across east anglia and the south east, temperatures slow to rise, eventually turning milder further north and west. back in half an hour. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.30am: the number of new cars sold in the uk hit an all time high in 2016, up 2% on the previous year. the increase was due to more demand from customers and the launch
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of several new models. the price of petrol and diesel rose by 3p a litre during december, meaning the price of fuel is now at its highest level since july 2015. the fall in the value of the pound is partly to blame. new research warns that children are being left to fend for themselves on the internet and were not prepared to deal with dangers such as bullying and grooming. a new study suggests people who live near busy roads may be more prone to dementia. researchers say air pollution or noisy traffic could contribute to the brain's decline. let's get the latest sport news now with john watson. good morning. a former crewe alexandra coach who has been suspended by the football association's safeguarding panel has
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denied any wrongdoing. paul mccann worked with young players at the clu b worked with young players at the club in the 1980s and 1990s. the fa have not confirmed the interim suspension or given any reason for it. he left the club in 1991. he volunteered as a youth coach at non—league club bevington on merseyside. chelsea manager antonio conte expects tottenham to challenge for the premier league title this season as they ended his side's 13 game run. two dele alli headers sealed the victory, which opens up the title race. spurs are up to third after their fifth straight win. chelsea remain top, five points clear, despite slipping to their first defeat since september. there was no need to talk before the game, everybody knew how big the game, everybody knew how big the game was, notjust game, everybody knew how big the game was, not just for the game, everybody knew how big the game was, notjust for the players but for the fans as well. you could
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see that from the first whistle. it was important we got the win today. it isa was important we got the win today. it is a pity but it is important to note that this can happen and it is important now to restart, to continue to work very hard, to continue to work very hard, to continue to work very hard, to continue to try to improve everyday. arsen wenger insists alexis sanchez is fine despite the player appearing angry and frustrated with his side's 3-3 angry and frustrated with his side's 3—3 draw with bournemouth on tuesday. arsenal came from 3—0 down to draw but sanchez threw his gloves on the ground in frustration before heading down the tunnel. he is yet to signa heading down the tunnel. he is yet to sign a contract with the club amid rumours he is considering his future. arsen wenger says his reaction is normalfor a player wa nts to reaction is normalfor a player wants to win matches. andy murray's winning run continues after he won to reach the quarterfinals of the qatar 0pen. he was made to work hard though. he was
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taken to a tie—break in the first set. a real work—out in the end as he continues his preparation for the australian open. he has reached the final five times previously but has never won the title. johanna konta is one win away from her third title after winning in the semifinals of the shen zen open in china. the british runner laura muir has broken the record previously held by liz mccolgan over 5000 metres at a meeting in glasgow last night. her time was 14 seconds faster than the previous record. she is in impressive form. she broke her own british 1500 metre record last summer british 1500 metre record last summerand british 1500 metre record last summer and reached the olympic final in rio. she will captain the great
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britain team competing in this weekend's international cross—country race in edinburgh. the former swimmer rebecca adlington has defended katina cox's decision to appear on the channel 4 show, v jump. she has had herfunding suspended while she appears on the show but rebecca adlington believes it is only fair that she profits from the recent successes in rio. we don't get footballers' paid. i think a lot of people have this perception that we are earning so much money and actually it isn't the case. she is probably getting more money from the jump than case. she is probably getting more money from thejump than she is the whole funding so you have got to ta ke whole funding so you have got to take those chances when there was not much money from sponsorship and then nowadays. and that is all the sport for now. a bit of an update now for you on
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the situation in northern ireland regarding the first minister arlene foster and the controversy over failures ina foster and the controversy over failures in a green energy scheme. we have heard from the sinn fein leader gerry adams, who has said northern ireland's political institutions have reached what he calls a defining point of this controversy and over arlene foster's refusal to stand aside. mrs foster has been asked to temporarily stepped down from herjob while an investigation is held into a £490 million overspend on what was called the renewable heat incentive prospect —— project. she has said she will not do that. gerry adams has said the reality is that the political institutions have reached what he calls a defining point. that just in from our island correspondent. —— ireland.
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more now on our top story, that the number of new cars on the roads has reached record levels at almost 2.7 million. joining me now is tamzen isacsson from the society of motor manufacturers and traders. good morning. this seems to suggest the industry is in very good health indeed. indeed. a bumper year for new car registrations. 0ver indeed. indeed. a bumper year for new car registrations. over 400 different models available, an historic low interest rates right now and many affordable finance packages which enable consumers to spread out the cost of purchasing a car over a period of time. but without that bumper sale in the last year, is it inevitable that a drop—off will follow, given brexit, rising prices at the pumps? you are right, we are at a turning point. we are at very peak demand so we are a lwa ys are at very peak demand so we are always going to have some kind of
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stabilisation. we are predicting this year that there will be a slight decline in registrations of around 5% and that is down to number of factors. peak level, we are also seeing some car prices increase due to the depreciation of sterling and there is likely to be some more announcements this year on that. there is a degree of political uncertainty with brexit, obviously, but we have yet to see the true impact of brexit. we haven't left europe, we still have many of the benefits of europe, free trade with europe, and that is why we import 86% of new cars into the uk and none of those are currently affected by any tariffs. one of the lines we have been picking out of the report this morning is the fact that with regard to diesel cars, we have had the highest number ever of diesel ca rs the highest number ever of diesel cars registered in 2016. is that a trend that will also fall away,
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given the emissions scandal, given the reports into the impact of diesel particulates on health and the environment? no, consumer demand for diesel vehicles is still very strong. there is a big difference between the diesels produce today and on sale, which are the cleanest ever. there is also most zero particulars emitted and extremely low levels of nitrogen oxide so the difference between old diesel vehicles and new vehicles on sale todayis vehicles and new vehicles on sale today is significant. but if i may interrupt, some cities are moving towards banning diesels and certainly calls from the mayor of london to greatly reduce the amount of diesel traffic on the road. are you trying to encourage the car industry to move away from diesel vehicles as well? absolutely not. there is a different field type for all different consumers. diesel
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plays a big part in reducing carbon dioxide levels. we would never meet the carbon dioxide targets without it. inside city centres, it may well be that some of the new alternatively fuelled vehicles are more preferable, but for cost reasons diesel remains a preferable option for many consumers. there is no ban suggested for the uk at the moment. in fact, no ban suggested for the uk at the moment. infact, quite no ban suggested for the uk at the moment. in fact, quite the reverse. in london there is a place for diesels because the facts are there, the science is there, these vehicles are cleaner than they have ever been before. thank you very much. the two sides of the long—running southern rail dispute are a universe apart according to the leader of aslef. the drivers are due to work out —— walk out on three more days next week. any resolution is a long
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way off. richard wescott is with me now. no sign of cheer her for long—suffering commuters. now. no sign of cheer her for long-suffering commuters. afraid not. very drastic language, talking about universes apart. i have never known anything like it, talking about southern being dishonourable and reneging on deals. all bad news because the drivers' union, aslef, actually entered this strike process relatively recently, at the start of december, when they had the first strike and that basically brought all southern services to a standstill. the other union involved, which represents the guards and the conductors, the rmt, they have been involved for 12 months. until these two sides agree there is going to be no resolution to this. there is an overtime ban going on at the moment. around 25%
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of their services rely on overtime so you talk to anyone catching those trains coming in from sussex to london, they will say the service is abysmal all the time at the moment. there are direct services being cancelled all the time. mick whelan is pretty angry today, pretty cross about it all, and using language like universes apart. it doesn't bode well for any deal. downing street is promising a major speech on brexit by theresa may later this month. her words will be scrutinised even more closely following the charge of muddled thinking over brexit, levelled by britain's outgoing ambassador to the eu, sir ivan rogers. he was replaced yesterday by sir tim barrow, a former ambassador to moscow, who downing street described as a seasoned and tough negotiator. let's go live to westminster now. we have
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been hearing from the norwegian prime minister this morning, saying the uk lacks international negotiating experience and this will slow brexit talks. an interesting comment, given everything that's happened in the last couple of days. very much echoes some of the criticism in the resignation e—mail. sir ivan rogers said experienced negotiators in whitehall were in very short supply and she seems to be echoing back, saying that because the uk has been part of the eu for so long, we simply don't do the kind of negotiating for ourselves, it is all done as part of the eu. she thinks that will be a problem. she also says she hopes they won't be a ha rd also says she hopes they won't be a hard brexit but she things that might be what happens, which some are suggesting would be a very severe cutting off of ties with the eu. she wants the uk does a very close with the eu. norway is an
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interesting model. they are not members of the eu but they are part of the single market, they pay into the eu budget subject to freedom of movement. that's not what many conservatives want and there is a lot of speculation about what theresa may might say in this speech, possibly this month, laying out more of her negotiating position, particularly over immigration and the single market. we have heard from theresa may and she has made it pretty clear that immigration, the end of freedom of movement, controlling our borders, is the most important thing for her. that's what she believes people voted for when they voted for brexit in the referendum. we also know that people in the eu have said, we are sorry but freedom of movement is one of the fundamental principles of the european union and you would have to accept that if you want to stay in the single market. the inevitable consequence of that would be, if we
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are going to control our own borders, we leave the single market. an awful lot of speculation about that. but downing street really trying to get on the front foot here. the resignation was a shock to them. with this appointment of the new ambassador, they are trying to get on the front foot when it comes to brexit. fresh doubt has been thrown on the theory that there has been a slowdown in global warming in the first years of this century. a new study has found that ocean temperatures had in fact risen at twice the rate previously estimated. it concluded that the old data, which suggested a slowdown in rises, was based on a faulty interpretation of temperature readings from ships and buoys floating in the ocean. with me is our environment correspondent matt mcgrath. perhaps begin by telling us about the theory that there was a slowdown at the beginning of the century. climate sceptics and site sceptics
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who believe in climate warning —— warming... they believed they had been a pause, not a decrease but they had levelled off. and it was greeted with a lot of cheer as well. it was seen by many sceptics as climate change not being a serious problem but other studies have questioned this idea of a pause and last year a report by one of the big federal organisations look at the question of temperature data in the ocea ns question of temperature data in the oceans and concluded that actually, we had been misreading the temperature data. the temperature data from the boys was a little colder than it should have been so when they corrected that data, when you look at that data now, there has been no pause. the study that came out today confirms that perspective. so what are the two sides of this argument going to do, the sceptics and those who are arguing for greater protection of the
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environment? it is unlikely to change too many minds. people are pretty divided on this issue. but the scientists ran into an awful lot of trouble. it was a very controversial report. the e—mails we re eve n controversial report. the e—mails were even requisitions by members of the house of representatives. they wa nted the house of representatives. they wanted to know whether they were cooking the books. but they found the same effect when they look that different independent data. it strengthens the scientific argument about the fact that there was no pause and it reopens the question about political action, with president trump coming into power in a week or so. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour. first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. a record number of new cars were sold last year in the uk after —— up over to % on the previous two months. petrol and diesel costs rose last month for their highest level ina yearand last month for their highest level in a year and a half. the children's
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commissionerfor in a year and a half. the children's commissioner for england says children are being left to fend for themselves against online grooming. let's ta ke let's take a look at the business headlines. sports direct chairman keith hellawell is set to face a shareholder revolt later over his proposed reappointment. independent investors are being urged to vote against his re—election because of a "catalogue "of governance and operational failures" under his watch. the company has been under fire during the past 18 months over conditions for its workers and governance issues. activity in the uk service sector grew at its fastest pace for 17 months in december. that's according to a closely watched survey from markit/cips. but the survey also said the sector continued to experience inflationary pressures, with prices charged rising at the strongest rate since april 2011. as you've been hearing, new car registrations hit a fresh record in 2016. but the number of private sales actually fell. the car industry body also predicts that this year is unlikely to prove
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another record breaker, with new registrations expected to fall by 5% to 6%. let's get more on that sports direct story. shareholders in the retailer are voting today on the reappointment of chairman keith hellawell. mr hellawell says he offered to resign earlier in the year while the company was facing criticism for how it treated staff. he reportedly asked to stay on by the company's founder, mike ashley. now, some are calling for his removal. paul lee, head of corporate governance at aberdeen asset management. for those who have not been following the story, sports direct had its agm last september. the majority of independent shareholders said, we don't want you any more, but mike ashley said he is staying. under certain rules, they have got
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to have today's vote. and this is likely to be a rubber—stamp to seriously get rid of that chairman, isn't it? we absolutely already know the result of the meeting although it has not been announced, that keith hellawell will have been re—elected. he has the support of mike ashley and mike has more than 50% of the votes and therefore he will have been re—elected. but it's not really so much about the re—election, it is about delivering the change that the company has promised over the next eight months before the next agm. so you are going to say mike ashley is going to going to say mike ashley is going to go against the majority of his independent shareholders? you don't think after the last agm he will go, we have had a 45% vote of the independent shareholders saying they wa nt to independent shareholders saying they want to get rid of the chairman. he will continue to reappoint him? keith hellawell is there, he wouldn't be there still if mike
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ashley had lost trust with him. therefore, he will be voted in favour of his re—election today. therefore, he will be voted in favour of his re-election today. the company has made some progress. you know that. what sort of progress has it made over the last few months? 0ver it made over the last few months? over the past four months they have made very good progress. they have produced a very honest, slightly defensive report about working practices and made various commitments to change and develop. they parted company with the old chief executive and interim finance director. we think those were good steps. we voted against both of their re—election at the agm because we have lost faith in there ability to run the business. the company has added a new non—exempt director and promised to add a working represented director to the board as well, which is quite a controversial move but actually if any company could do with such an individual, it is sports direct. but that's mostly promises at this stage. we need to
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see more delivery over the next eight months. we appreciate your time. thank you. good news for staff at the discounter retailer aldi. from february, aldi will pay store employees £8.53 an hour, with those in london getting £9.75. the german supermarket says that will make its staff the best paid in the sector. about 3,350 uk workers will benefit from the increase. younger generations are going to inherit much more money than their predecessors but the amount is going to be very unequal. the wealth of the older generation has grown by 45% over ten years. as a result, more of that money than ever before will be passed on. a quick look at the markets and another record high for the top 100 companies. we saw a cracking end to
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2016 and that optimism continues early in the new year. the ftse100 has hit record highs in three of the past four sessions. persimmon is the top builder. in the last six months, sales grew by 15%. that said, it is down around 9% since thejune referendum. goodbye. handwritten letters from princess diana are due to be auctioned in cambridge later. written to a steward at buckingham palace, they reveal that prince harry was routinely in trouble at school. in one letter, she says how both young princes are well and enjoying boarding school a lot, although harry is constantly in trouble. the collection will be sold over approximately 40 lots, with
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estimates ranging from £80 up to £900. the latest driverless car... the latest driverless car, headphones that can translate languages instantly and the latest smart gadgets for the home. these are just some of the things we can expect from this year's international consumer electronics show. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is in las vegas ahead of one of the biggest events in the tech industry and has this report. in a penthouse suite at a ritzy las vegas hotel, smart home exhibits are on show. there is a smart speaker for children, each toy has a playlist. # kung fu fighting...# a voice activated door lock. and upstairs... ..there's even nora, described as a smart snoring solution. it's paired with a pad under the pillow which detects the snoring and moves just enough to stop me, without waking me up. the big theme this year is turning
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the advances in artificial intelligence into products. there are robots of course. this one is meant to be a shop assistant, while this one is designed as a companion for children or elderly people. ai seems to get everywhere, even into this toothbrush, which learns how you brush your teeth. artificial intelligence is not just gathering the data, it's being able to use it. then you learn where your weaknesses are, where your strengths are and the purpose is to become better at taking care of your oral health. this walking stick is also smarter than it looks. an in—built mobile phone sim card means it can help if there is an accident. it will detect the fall of the user and when it detects it it will alert the family or the neighbour, so they can come and help these people. and this clever mirror helps anyone to try out make—up. we have a new las vegas!
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out on the las vegas strip, this young entrepreneur from manchester has just flown in. welcome to las vegas. his instant translation headphones aren't quite ready. they will eventually be tiny earbuds, that he is still looking forward to ces. this is important because we will be able to showcase what we've been working on to the world, to show this is something we started years ago as a small team, as a small start—up, with dedication and passion. the odds are against danny, a one—man band taking on giants like apple and google, but he's betting that he has the product that can change the world. ijust want i just want to remind you ijust want to remind you about our
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ask this that we have got coming up at 12:30pm, you can put your questions to two experts at 12:30pm. dojoin us for that. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. it is gloriously sunny. if you wait a few layers, it is fantastic out there. this was taken in the london area. it will stay sunny for most of us for the rest of the day. more cloud across northern ireland, just pushing into western scotland as well. temperatures are somewhat higher than they will be elsewhere. it will stay frosty in the shade and evenin it will stay frosty in the shade and even in the sunshine it will get no higher than 5 degrees through the afternoon. here is a snapshot, mid afternoon. here is a snapshot, mid
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afternoon. i think this will be the peak of the temperatures, around 3pm. after that, they will fall away very quickly. sunshine for most of scotland. there is that cloud across northern ireland. this evening we are going to see some rain arriving. so for some of us, a change in the weather overnight tonight. some frost across england and where. and some freezing fog patches developing two. then wet weather spilling across into scotland. temperatures on the rise in wales but frost further south and east and some freezing fog. that is going to be an issue first thing tomorrow morning. not much sunshine tomorrow. rain pushes in from the north—west, the south—east. that rain heavy but it will take all day to arrive in east anglia. turning milderfurther north and west. this is bbc news —
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and these are the top stories developing at midday. new car sales reach an all—time high but there are signs of a slow—down — last month sales fell. the price of petrol and diesel reach their highest levels for a year and a half. a warning children are being left to fend for themselves in the digital world against dangers like bullying and grooming. people who live near major roads may be more prone to dementia, according to new research. four black teenagers are arrested in chicago overfootage and streamed live on facebook, in which a white man with special needs was bound, gagged and assaulted. also: a collection of personal letters written by princess diana are up sale. they reveal details about the lies only in princes william and harry at kensington palace. —— the lives of princes william and harry. and we're in las vegas for the world's biggest consumer electronics show,
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and sample some of the more unusual gadgets on offer. this little device is paired with a pad under the pillow which detects me snoring and moves just enough to stop me without waking me up. good afternoon. it's january 5th. welcome to bbc newsroom live. a record number of cars were registered in the uk last year, but as more of us than ever before splashed out on a brand new vehicle the industry is warning that this could be the peak of sales. there were nearly 2.7 million new cars on the roads in 2016. that was the ever number of new cars demanded by uk customers and up 2.3 per cent on last year. this is largely because the way we're buying cars is changing with more affordable finance
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deals on offer. in 2015 nearly three quarters of cars were bought using something called a personal contract purchase — or pcp. that's when you pay a deposit, make monthly payments for three orfour years, and at the end of that you have a choice to buy the car outright or give the car back to the dealer and upgrade. manufacturers are also predicting a 5% fall in new car sales this year, with the weaker pound pushing up prices. one more detail there were more new diesel cars registered in 2016 and one more detail — there were more new diesel cars registered in 2016 than in any previous year, almost 1.3 million. that's despite concerns about the effect of diesel emissions on health. earlier i wasjoined by fiona godlee from the british medicaljournal and the motoring journalist steve berry. he said the figures should be celebrated.
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in diesel cars. but what i am going to do is try and ask the question, why were we told for so long red diesel cars were better, because they got better mileage, that meant they got better mileage, that meant they were better for the environment, and are we going to hear the same criticism of people who buy petrol— a electric hybrids? are we going to be told down the road that they are not very environmentally friendly because all they do a separate the pollution between the vehicle and the power station where the electricity is generated? it station where the electricity is generated ? it takes station where the electricity is generated? it takes a while for people's car—buying habits to catch up people's car—buying habits to catch up with what doctors, scientists and government are telling us, but i think it is a bit harsh on the day which we celebrating not only the highest ever sale of cars in the uk, but also last year, more cars made here in the uk than at any other time in the history of the motorcar. if you want to know how important matters, just think about how much buzz there was about this and staying in the uk, and how much time people like the bbc spent discussing
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that. absolutely, and that was my next question, in fact. clearly, there is another angle of good news, and economic angle to the story, as well. how important do you think these figures are in the sense of showing us a thriving car industry, or do you have concerns that this is a peak, and there may be a drop of hereafter? there will be a drop off next year because of brexit, and right or wrong, there will be a drop—off, because people's confidence has been shaken by brexit. so there will be a drop—off, but it is a great reflection of how well we do in this country. we are the best maker of specialist cars in the world. rolls—royce, aston martin, jensen, lotus, tv are being revived. we are the best at that, but we are also incredibly good at building every day five door family cars. that is
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why manufacturers want to build here in the uk. they want to build engines here in the uk. and instead of knocking the car industry, which implies hundreds of thousands of people in this country, we should celebrate these stats today. yes, the figure about diesel is a bit disappointing, but the public were told that these was better. it will ta ke told that these was better. it will take a while for people's perception to catch up on their car—buying habits, to catch up with what has been said to them by scientists and doctors. fiona, i will put that question to you. you knocking the car industry? not in the least. it is an important pa rt of not in the least. it is an important part of our economy. but we have to think about putting people's public health above necessarily those kinds of concerns. we have estimates of 40,000 to 50,000 access premature deaths in the uk at a cost of £20 billion to the nhs each year. so we have real economic cost here, not only affecting pupils lives, but the economy as well. i think we have to look at the gradual phase—out. we
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banned smoking in public ices. air pollution is the second biggest cause of premature death after that. we have to act on this major public health crisis. you are talking about a phase—out of diesel specifically? yes, in paris, athens, mexico city and madrid, they have announced a phase—out of diesel and city centres by 2035. that gives us a good amount of time to get to that. i appreciate, people's car— buying habits take time. but we are damaging peoples health now, and we are laying out large health problems for the future. steve, would you support a phasing out of diesel? absolutely. these are the dying days of fossil fuel the motor cars. i have enjoyed it while it has lasted, but what i have been glad to see in these stats is the increasing number of petrol— electric hybrids and pure electric cars. i have been a motoring journalist long enough to have driven some of the early fall electric cars, they were dreadful. the current breed of full electric
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ca rs the current breed of full electric cars from manufacturers like nissan and bmw and vauxhall and ford are fantastic. i can't wait for the day when every car on sale in the uk is an electric car. that was steve barry talking to be a bit earlier. but the cost of actually driving your car is going up, as oil prices are once again rising on world markets. the price of petrol and diesel rose to their highest levels in a year and a half last month. the rac says both fuels went up by three pence a litre in december. joining me now from a service station in west london is our correspondent sian grzeszczyk. are the drivers you have been talking to really noticing the difference in the price at the pump? yes, they are. i have spent the last couple of hours speaking to people filling up today. there is a very clear message coming through from motorists. they have frowned as soon asi motorists. they have frowned as soon as i mentioned the recent increase in filling as i mentioned the recent increase infilling up as i mentioned the recent increase in filling up with fuel. i spoke to a woman called helen who said it has
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affected his other by where she is really trying to make an effort to walk on journeys where she can, rather than getting the car and using more fuel. i spoke to someone called jerry, who said that he really feels the situation is in and fair, particularly for people who are self—employed. —— and fair. it ta kes are self—employed. —— and fair. it takes people around £10 more to fill up takes people around £10 more to fill up with diesel than last year, and slightly less for petrol. thank you very much for that. a survey said the uk's service sector group in december. the sector, which cove rs group in december. the sector, which covers everything from accounting to banking, makes up three quarters of the economy. whether this is our correspondentjonty bloom. the economy. whether this is our correspondent jonty bloom. so the economy. whether this is our correspondentjonty bloom. so a really important sector of the economy. tel is more about this growth and what is behind it. this is the kind of third reported the
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row from the purchasing managers, saying growth is exhilarating and their part of the economy. we pay attention to them because these are the people who are buying raw materials and components that go into factories and offices and restau ra nts a nd into factories and offices and restaurants and so on. so they probably have an idea of what future demand will be like. so we look on it as demand will be like. so we look on itasa demand will be like. so we look on it as a predictor of what might happen. at the end of last year, they seemed very confident, they also predict a good year ahead. so this is good news for the government, going into the brexit aux? yes, it is. there seems to be a resilience and confidence in the economy. this is not the only survey we have had. we have had one covering the construction sector and all of them were shown to be more optimistic and confident than we thought they would be. they seem to think the economy is continuing to grow, and will continue to do quite well in the year had. is this survey saying anything about how this sector is trying to really
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embed this growth and trying to ensure that it continues beyond the period they are looking at? no, it is much more of a predictive thing, looking forward at what they hope to happen in coming months and for the rest of the year. but there is one downside, and it was in the other surveys as well. all three sectors are reporting price pressure, that the fall in the value of the pound means they have to import goods, and those prices have gone up. they are all saying they have to pass this on. that means if you look at the survey and then the inflation figures, you would predict inflation figures, you would predict inflation in the uk will increase, because we are ready seeing the raw material purchases saying it is costing them more now. thank you very much. the children's commissioner for england has warned that young people are being left to face the dangers of bullying and grooming online alone. anne longfield says children — and often their parents — have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites, and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school.
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0ur education correspondent gillian hargreaves has more. digital technology can enrich children's minds, but there are pitfalls too. millions of youngsters have joined social media sites to keep in touch with friends, but many of those questioned by the commission have little idea of what they're signing up to. with pages of terms and conditions, it seems few realise the risk to privacy. the children's commissioner calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. she also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what no—one has done yet is to look at how we design and intervene with a digital world in a way that can really give children the support they need for the place they spend an awful lot of time, but also the information and the power to be able to get what they need out of the internet.
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while instagram, facebook and twitter recommend that their services are most suitable for children over the age of 13, younger children can circumvent the rules and open an account. a short time ago, i talked to professor sonia livingstone from the london school of economics, who took pa rt london school of economics, who took part in this study. she told me that people need more help in getting advice. i think parents are often quite alert to what the risks are, but they don't really know where to get advice on what the best things to do and how to keep their children safe. so parents may know that they need to set up safeguards on the computer, but beyond that, is that not enough? what else do they need to do? well, i think the digital media are
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changing really fast, so i think many parents have understood putting privacy settings and private is a good idea, but they don't necessarily know which social media their children are using, and i think many are not understanding — non—us really understand —— and the ways in which the different services connect up. so the ways in which one company might share data with another, and they don't exactly understand how best to make sure their children's images and messages don't get shared all get out of control all get used by some. so, it sounds as though, as well as children perhaps needing this to be pa rt children perhaps needing this to be part of their curriculum, internet safety, parents part of their curriculum, internet safety, pa rents need part of their curriculum, internet safety, parents need lessons as well. but who would provide those? the digital ombudsman that the children's commission recommends, that would be a clear source of information from both children and pa rents. information from both children and parents. but i'll to think that if
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children were getting opportunity to learn and discuss questions of privacy and safety in school from a low wage, they could also be in courage to go home and discuss it with their parents, so that would probably be the best way parents really knowing what it is their children are doing, what level of understanding they do have, and where the gaps are that they need support with. do you think some schools do better on this than others? it is perhaps not uniform provision? absolutely, it is not uniform provision. some schools are trying very hard. there is no question that when you go to talk to children about internet safety, they will kind of roll their eyes and say, yes, we did that last year. what they are not getting is the updating that recognises the ways in which the social media get more complex or privacy settings change or new risks arise. i think the other thing is that they're not always getting it young enough. so we really have lots
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of toddlers, 2—5 —year—olds now online, and there is a challenge then reaching them, but we definitely would want to digital safety, digital citizenship, taught from the start of primary school. professor sonia livingstone from the london school of economics. if you're worried about how safe your children are when they go online, you can put your questions to two experts on the bbc news channel at 12.30. we'll be joined by eleanor levy, editor at parent zone, a company which provides information to families and schools about their online use, and liam hackett, who runs the anti—bullying charity ditch the label. you can get in touch using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, text on 61124, or email your question to askthis@bbc.co.uk we will try to answer as many of those questions as possible. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a record number of new cars were
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sold last year in the uk, up more than 2% on the previous 12 months. the price of petrol and diesel rose last month to their highest levels ina yearand last month to their highest levels in a year and a half stop the children's commissioner for england is warning that children are being left to fend for themselves against online bullying and grooming. time for sport, and back tojohn. many thanks. arsene wenger, the arsenal manager, has said strike alexis sanchez is fine, despite him appearing angry with his side's 3—3 draw with bournemouth on tuesday. arsenal came from 3—0 down, but despite the comeback, sanchez quarrelled with team—mate aaron ramsey below throwing his gloves on the ground in frustration at full—time. he has yet to sign a new contract with the club amid rumours he is considering his future. arsene wenger said his reaction was normal for a player who wants to win matches. 23 premier league players will be
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involved in this month's africa cup of nations. leicester city, stoke city and sutherland are the most affected, with three players each unavailable for up to five weeks. the players sunderland are losing to the tournament include kone, you'll be playing for the ivory coast. the defender, who signed lastjanuary, has so far made 33 appearances. sadly money is going to the tournament, playing from liverpool for senegal. he has scored nine goals for liverpool so far this season. british runner laura muir broke the 25—year—old record previously held by fellow scot liz mccolgan over 5000 metres at an indoor meeting in glasgow last night. a time of 14 minutes, 49.12 seconds, was 14 seconds faster than the previous record. it was only new‘s second track race over the distance, and she also ran 16 laps on her own. the impressive time moves her into the top ten on the world and all time
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list. she will captain the great britain team competing in this weekend's international cross—country race in edinburgh. the former swimmer rebecca adlington has defended katrina cox's decision to appear in the channel 4 show the jump. the paralympic star won golds in both cycling and athletics in the games in rio and has had herfunding suspended while she appears on the show. cox has described her life as a ticking time bomb since being diagnosed with ms, and adlington believes it is only fair she is allowed to profit from their recent su ccesses allowed to profit from their recent successes in rio. we don't get footballers' pay. i think a lot of people get perception that we are earning so much money, but actually, that is not the case. probably getting more money from the jump then she is in her whole funding, so you have got to take those chances when there isn't much money for sponsorship and things out there nowadays. and that is all the sport from now.
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we will have the next update at around 1:30 p.m.. thank you very much, john watson. four people have been arrested in the us city of chicago over a video live—streamed on facebook, in which a bound and gagged man was assaulted. you may find some of the images we are about to show distressing. police say the man being attacked has special needs. his assailants can be heard making derogatory statements against white people and president—elect donald trump. at one point the attackers apparently use a knife to remove part of the victim's scalp. chicago police department have expressed their disgust. it is sickening, you know? it makes you wonder what would make individual street somebody like that. i've been a cop for 28 years and i've seen things that you shouldn't see in a lifetime, but it still amazes me how you still see things that you just should not. if you looked at that video, that was just stupidity. chicago police say the victim was found walking around the city's west side area during the early
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hours in a disorientated state. he was traumatised fairly good. like isaid, it he was traumatised fairly good. like i said, it took most of the night for him to calm down enough to be able to talk to us. detectives say careful consideration will be given to what charges — if any — follow their investigation of the four suspects in custody. you know, although they are adults, they are 18. kids make stupid decisions. i don't know if we should call them kids. they are adults, young adults, but they make stupid decisions. that will certainly be pa rt decisions. that will certainly be part of whether we seek a hate crime, and to determine whether or not this is sincere orjust stupid ranting and raving. alex perez from abc news is outside chicago police headquarters. alex, thanks for joining alex, thanks forjoining us. what more do we know about this incident? well, still so many unanswered
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questions here, so many people, including the police department and the investigators, just in shock right now when they saw this video. when all this came to light, authorities say when they first discovered this man walking down the street, it was in such a days, it took them a while to even get him to talk to them. they said he was in police custody for a few hours before he was able to completely explain to them what happened to him. it wasn't until police saw that facebook live video that they started to please all of this together. that video was posted and then taken down, but before it was taken down, it was shared by several other people, and that's how it was first brought to light, and authorities were able to see it. but right now, a lot of questions. authorities trying to figure out why these four suspects would do this and what the motivation behind all of this was. how is the american public reaction to this, and the fact it was streamed over social media? it is one of those things, it is
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dropping jaws everywhere. people can't believe, number one, that something like this is happening. but then, number two, that someone would facebook live this, streaming live on the internet for everyone else to see. as you might imagine, a lot of shock here. people want a nswe rs. lot of shock here. people want answers. they want to know who did this, particularly because authorities say this victim may have mental challenges. so they want to know who would abuse someone like this and why. and what could possibly happen to the four people who have been arrested, the four suspects? that's a big question right now. authorities say they have been interviewing and interrogating these suspects for the last several hours, and we are anticipating that at some point today here, authorities will announce criminal charges against these four suspects. they are all believed to be 18 years old. two man and tee women. authorities say they could even face hate crime charges once all of this has settled and
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done, but for now, authorities, prosecutors and investigators working hard here to determine exactly what charges these four people will face. it is believed several charges will be heading their way. when they very much, alex. —— thank you ray much. we're going to a brexit story next. we're going to a brexit story next. we will be talking about southern rail ina we will be talking about southern rail in a minute, but first, brexit, because to reason me is planning a major speech on brexit later this month. if she does, her words will be scrutinised even more closely following the charge of muddled thinking of a brexit levelled by britain's outgoing ambassador to the eu, sir ivan rogers, in his resignation e—mail. he was replaced yesterday by sir tim barrow, former ambassador to moscow, the downing street described as a seasoned and tough negotiator. let's go live now to westminster and our chief political correspondent in westmister, vicki young. this speech that theresa may will
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make later this month, we are told, will be scrutinised as never before? yes, it will. in some ways, we're starting the year as we finished last year, which is really still for a nswe rs. last year, which is really still for answers. of course, it has been given extra pressure put on downing street, because of the resignation of sir ivan rogers. he said he wasn't aware of the government's negotiating position, which caused people to say, well, is there one? has the government decided yet? has theresa may decided what she wants from these negotiations, which are due to start sometime after the end of march? a lot of speculation today in the papers, particularly about immigration. we know from what to reason me has said publicly in the last few months that she thinks the brexit vote was about immigration, about people wanting and desiring to control borders. we'll so know from those in the eu that they feel that britain cannot stay as a member of the single market if it doesn't
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accept freedom of movement. so i suppose the logical consequence of thatis suppose the logical consequence of that is that people are saying, if we are going to control immigration, we are going to control immigration, we will have to leave the single market. so, i'm awful lot of speculation. we expect a speech in the coming weeks from theresa may. the government also waiting received green orjudgment on whether parliament will have to be consulted and whether there will have to be a vote in parliament before article 50 is triggered. —— that supreme court judgment. and let's go now to southern rail. the two sides of the long—running southern rail dispute are a ‘universe apart‘ according to the leader of the drivers' union aslef. mick whelan told our transport correspondent that any drivers until an idea to work out for another three days next week. —— drivers and southern are due to walk out. mick whelan told our transport correspondent that any resolution is a long way off. 0ur transport correspondent richard westcottjoins me now. the sort of language that is being used, that is really worrying, isn't
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it? it doesn't suggest the two sides are anywhere close to a resolution, or even beginning to find one? yes, it is very demoralising if you area yes, it is very demoralising if you are a customer. the strike issue, and that the trains have been very bad anyway because there is an overtime ban, and their husband a lot of sickness as well. the service has been disrupted, many will tell you, for moadamiya. but no obvious resolution in sight. mick whelan, who i was speaking to, from the drivers union aslef, they had been informal talks earlier this week. he said the company was dishonourable, and had one deals. they don't go on strike that often, and haven't done so since 2000, he says. so it is not that it so since 2000, he says. so it is not thatitis so since 2000, he says. so it is not that it is their first instinct to go on strike. but theyjust cannot find a resolution over this issue of what the second person does on board the train, this guard. should they be trained up to a certain safety level? the union want that guard to close the doors, which they say is a
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safety critical job. close the doors, which they say is a safety criticaljob. they the wanted isa safety criticaljob. they the wanted is a former driver to do that. the company once the flexibility for just the driver to do it. there is no grey area here. you cannot come up no grey area here. you cannot come up with an amount of money in the middle. the person is either on the train or they are not stop so it is ha rd to train or they are not stop so it is hard to say where this goes. richard, you have covered various disputes. is this as intractable as you have seen? i can't see it changing any time soon. i can't see it changing any time soon. the economic effect is huge. the university of chichester predicted £300 million cost for that region. we are getting big bosses from big companies with headquarters in croydon brighton, saying staff are unhappy, relationships are breaking down, people aren't getting him to see their kids. so this is not just a him to see their kids. so this is notjust a train line going faulty, it is affecting the whole coming from london to surrey and sussex. thank you very much for that update, richard. and now, time for the weather forecast. let's find out about what warm up a
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little. here is ben. thank you. let's find out about what warm up a little. here is ben. thank youm is going to be warming up a little bit. we will see some milder weather by the weekend. as that happens, we will lose a lot of the sunshine. more cloud on the way. let's make the most of this chris winter sunshine this afternoon. plenty of it, but it does not help temperatures much. we keep hold of this blue shading in places, showing one or two spots may stay below freezing all day long, even where we get the best of the sunshine. different out west, more cloud into northern ireland, the south—west of england, and that will bring the odd spot of rain. across central and eastern areas this evening, we will see a frost and perhaps some icy stretches. perhaps dense fog patches across the far south—east. a big change at west lothian of the far south—east. a big change at west lothian overnight. ray moving in, milderairas lothian overnight. ray moving in, milder air as well. during tomorrow, this cloudy, wet weather was bad erratically southwards and eastwards before lifting to leeds and brightness across the south—east and
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behind our rain band, things turning significantly milder. 11 degrees in belfast by afternoon. it stays mild through the weekend, but as i mentioned at the start, that will bring more cloud and a fuse box of rain at times. -- a few spots of rain. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30am: the number of new cars sold in the uk hit an all time high in 2016, up 2% on the previous year. the increase was due to more demand from customers and the launch of several new models. the price of petrol and diesel rose by 3p a litre during december, meaning the price of fuel is now at its highest level since july 2015. the fall in the value of the pound is partly to blame. new research warns that children are being left to fend for themselves on the internet and were not prepared to deal with dangers such as bullying and grooming. a new study suggests people who live
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near busy roads may be more prone to dementia. researchers say air pollution or noisy traffic could contribute to the brain's decline. let's return to that warning from the children's commissioner for england. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, has warned that children and often their parents have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. with me is eleanor levy, editor at parentzone, a company which provides information to families and schools about their online use. also i'm joined by liam hackett, who runs the anti—bullying charity ditch the label. welcome to both of you and thank you
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very much for taking the time to a nswer very much for taking the time to answer our viewers' questions. let's begin with this one from suzanne clark from watford. my kids are on the pc at home all the time. i don't know what they do when i am not around. i have to go out to work to put food on the table. how can i stop my kids coming across controversial website? i guess a lot of people are in that position. there are things that parents can do if they want to control what their children are looking at online. there are controls you can put on devices. there are things you can say to them to warn them about things, that is probably the most important thing. the chances are that as your children get older, you are that as your children get older, you a re less that as your children get older, you are less able to control what they see, and that is a fact of life pa rents see, and that is a fact of life parents have got to accept,
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especially once the kids get to teenage years. you then have to make sure that if your child does come across anything that makes them upset, that they feel threatened by, that doesn't feel right, that they have someone to talk to, whether thatis have someone to talk to, whether that is you, another trusted adult, a teacher at school, a friend's parent. if you are going to talk about your kids about online safety, just as you would about off—line safety, which is your duty as a parent, you need to let them know where to report something and to make sure they talk to someone. in an ideal world, we would not get to the stage where children see something which has except —— upset them. what can parents do in terms of trying to avoid that?|j them. what can parents do in terms of trying to avoid that? i think it isa very of trying to avoid that? i think it is a very fine balance and the
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feedback we get from a lot of parents is the fact they feel so overwhelmed by the pace of innovation with technology. we are seeing new applications and new social networks almost every other day. the most important thing is to have a proactive, open and honest relationship with your child so they know they can talk to you about any issues and also to bring up their digital lives in normal conversation. but there are some warning signs you can look out for in your child, such as sudden be changes in behaviour, aggression, lack of appetite. all these are signs that your child is being bullied or are going through something they need to talk about. that is an interesting point about bringing up your child's digital online life. i am not sure whether people really have those conversations. i mean, research shows that one in three internet users are now below the age of 18 and when you look at the internet,
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it is so immersed around them. even your own fridge can be connected to the internet now. we are now at a point where we are redefining the digital experiences of young people because the internet was not developed with young people in mind. so many kids are active online now so so many kids are active online now so it is so important to have those conversations. let's move on to this next question. my child uses a virtual private network. should i be worried? i guess the answer to that is, it depends what they are seeing on it. you don't know what they are watching. they could be seeing things that you have no idea about. but can i just things that you have no idea about. but can ijust go back to your last point because i do think that pa rents point because i do think that parents do sometimes get a raw deal. this report, to a certain extent, backs that up. of course's report in
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september, when they interviewed lots of young people and over 90% of them had had conversations with their parents about online safety, about internet safety, and also they had had conversations at school. pa rents had had conversations at school. parents go in to talk to teachers. those conversations are going on. pa rents those conversations are going on. parents sometimes ask you to ask because lots of teenagers in particular are very private and they would tell you, which is why i go back to my point, as long as they talk to someone, that is the important thing. liam, what do you think about these vpn? are there extra dangers in using those?m think about these vpn? are there
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extra dangers in using those? it is important to understand why they are using those, what are they trying to mass, and what behaviours are they trying to hide and from who? that really does boil down to trust and open communication. up to seven in ten young people have at some point experienced bullying online, which isa experienced bullying online, which is a huge issue and has a profound impact. we know that young people tend to use the internet to escape the traumatic situations they are facing off—line, which is why online support services like ours are so important. i will pick up with the next question. parents no longer have control of their children's internet access when they have a mobile phone in their pocket. do you agree or disagree with that point? what i find so positive about this report is the fact that one of the key recommendations is to start teaching young people digital citizenship skills in school because when you look at the curriculum we
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have at the moment, we are teaching kids how to use and code software but we are not teaching them the social etiquette they need to navigate around the internet in a safe, humane and ethical way. particularly as children grow older into their teenage years, they tend to see any sort of parental intervention as an invasion of their privacy. 0ne intervention as an invasion of their privacy. one of the recommendations is that this is peer led. you have older students talking to younger students about the pitfalls of using the internet and social media, and i think that is really important because it is not about restricting access to the internet, it is about guiding young people in the way they should appropriately be using it. very interesting point. another comment. is it a lack of awareness ora comment. is it a lack of awareness or a sort of desensitisation? children know about privacy but don't care about the general lack of such online. i think that is a real issue. even talking to my own son,
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who is in his 20s now, when he signed up to facebook, i said he had no privacy settings, but he said he didn't care. i think that is a generational thing. as adults, we have grown up with privacy being very important to us and there is a whole generation of children growing up whole generation of children growing up now, where it is the norm to have eve ryo ne up now, where it is the norm to have everyone know what you are doing. getting around that is one of the biggest challenges for parents. how do they persuade children that they need to have those boundaries? what they need to do is, the previous point about getting peers to talk to them about experiences they have had, both good and bad, will work well. i think they will listen to them more than parents or teachers. but what you need to do is show them that they could be consequences. people often talk about, you might apply for a job and people will look at your facebook page or your
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instagram account and it could do against you, equally it could go in your favour if you have a positive account. but kids don't think like that. you have to explain to them how if something is shared that they don't want to be shared, it is embarrassing, they could look bad in front of their friends. that kind of thing will resonate more than warning them. i want to get through the remaining questions. what makes you think schools are the best place to teach children about online safety? presumably it is school and at home, isn't it? we see online safety as a societal issue and this report highlights that because this is not about pointing the finger at schools or parents or anyone else in isolation, it is about saying this isolation, it is about saying this isa isolation, it is about saying this is a real issue we are facing as a society. the internet was not built around young people and it is now time to redefine what the internet is about. i think schools have a
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role to play in terms of education, parents have a role to play in teams of communication with young people, but something that is often overlooked is the duty of care from the social networks. we found in our research that the majority of young people who report abuse on social media platforms are really dissatisfied with the response they have received or not received or that it have received or not received or thatitis have received or not received or that it is quite a lengthy process and it tends to be quite automated as well. this is a real societal thing and it is great that we are having this conversation but it is not about pointing the finger, it is about everybody coming together to work towards a mutual aim. that point about social media ties in with the point that in their terms and conditions, they should be very clear and straightforward to understand for young users. absolutely. when you look at instagram's terms that conditions, it is 17 pages long. you need a postgraduate degree in order to
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understand it. and how can we expect young people to read something so long and to understand it and to have an idea of the things they are getting themselves into? as part of this report, young people are given a simplified i—page version of instagram's terms and conditions and they were absolutely horrified at some of the things they had agreed to do. they did not know instagram could be reading their private messages, they did not know instagram were selling their data on to advertisers, for example. that is a question that came in. a final question, which asks, can't websites be given ratings like cinema certification? for example, it is suitable for under 18 ‘s or under 12 and so on. they could, whether it would make much difference, i don't know. i think it would make parents
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feel more comfortable but whether children would pay much attention to them, who knows? it seems like the overarching message from what you have both been saying is, get that open and honest communication going, whether it is in school or at home or amongst friends and peers. thank you both very much for answering those questions. thanks again for your time today. let's get more on the appointment of sirtim let's get more on the appointment of sir tim barrow as the new ambassador to the eu. he was coming to the end of his tenure, coming up to his retirement later this year, and he has taken the decision that he should go early
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and allow somebody else to take over now, before the article 50 note this is served, before the negotiations begin, and then to see those negotiations right the way through to their conclusion. sir tim barrow, who i know well. i was a former foreign secretary myself and worked very closely with tim barrow. i appointed him as my political director in the foreign office. he isa director in the foreign office. he is a very experienced and seasoned diplomat. very tough. he was our ambassador in moscow for many years. he has worked in the eu before so he has good knowledge of how it works. he is going to be a great asset for britain in this negotiating process. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia, according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada. the medical causes of the brain disease have yet to be identified but the research suggests air pollution and noisy traffic could be significant factors. dan johnson reports. memories lost, thoughts confused, personalities gradually fading.
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dementia affects 850,000 people in the uk. now there's a claim it could be linked to traffic. this study from canada shows that people living close to busy roads had higher chances of developing dementia. researchers in ontario followed more than two million people over 11 years. the ones who lived within 50 metres of heavy traffic had a 12% higher risk of dementia than those more than 200 metres away. so what is it that's actually affecting the brain? ultra—fine particles, the very smallest ones, can actually move across the lungs into the bloodstream and circulate in the body. how those particles work, a bit speculative, but one hypothesis is through fairly nonspecific effects on inflammation and oxidative stress on the body. so we have a potential mechanism but it's far from proven. experts here have cautiously
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welcomed the results as important and provocative. they've stressed it shows an association, not a cause. they've pointed out dementia is also affected by age, lifestyle and genetics. but they are encouraging further research into the impact of traffic and pollution. dan johnson, bbc news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the number of new cars sold in the uk hit an all time high in 2016, up 2% on the previous year. the price of petrol and diesel rose by 3p a litre during december, meaning the price of fuel is now at its highest level since july 2015. the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield, has warned that children and often their parents have no idea what they are signing up to on social media sites and pupils as young as four should be taught about internet safety in school. fresh doubt has been thrown on the theory that there has been a slowdown in global warming
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in the first years of this century. a new study has found that ocean temperatures had in fact risen at twice the rate previously estimated. it concluded that the old data, which suggested a slowdown in rises, was based on a faulty interpretation of temperature readings from ships and buoys floating in the ocean. handwritten letters from princess diana are due to be auctioned in cambridge later today. written to a steward at buckingham palace, they reveal that a young prince harry was routinely in trouble at school. in one letter, dated 17 october, 1992, she says how both young princes are well and enjoying boarding school a lot, although harry is constantly in trouble. the collection will be sold over approximately 40 lots, with estimates ranging from £80 to £900. the auction also includes letters from the queen, written on windsor castle headed paper. 0ur correspondent sarah campbell has been to the auction in cambridge
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with the letters are expected to sell for thousands of pounds. it isa sell for thousands of pounds. it is a collection which has attracted interest from bidders around the world, from japan, the us and germany. i am with the director of the auctioneers here. can you ta ke of the auctioneers here. can you take as to what we have got? clearly, letters relating to the princes. the birth of harry and william smothering him with kisses and hugs. this one here. this is to cyril. he was the head steward at the palace. that's right. april three, 1992. this one is in october. this relates to harry and harry is consta ntly this relates to harry and harry is constantly in trouble. he is always known as the mysterious younger brother. what is lovely about these
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is that they are her handwriting, written on kensington palace notepaper. is that part of what makes them so valuable?” notepaper. is that part of what makes them so valuable? i think it is the whole connection. many different aspects. this one is rather fun because it has got a smiley face on it. he is hoping for a speedy recovery. cyril wasn't very well. the first mod. you are absolutely right. it is notjust diana, although she is really the big attraction. i think on this occasion, that is the case. it is almost 20 years since she died and i think a lot of people today still relate to her. her activities, whether they were with charity, and many other ways, but they did relate to her. it is six letters from her but also a hand written note from
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the queen. yes indeed. her signature. there are also signed photographs of the queen and prince philip. there are christmas cards. it gives you the sense that this man with the royal household for 50 yea rs. with the royal household for 50 years. he started when he was about 15. looking out for the bombings during the blitz. from the roof of buckingham palace. this has to be one of my favourites. this is a piece of wedding cake from 1947. princess elizabeth. don't open it. it says to open, cut through the line above. i don't think we will. i am with you on that. you are expecting it to reach? figures banded around but the lowest is £13,000 but i think, in all honesty,
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expect a lot. thank you. fascinating. bidders notjust here but on the phone as well and online. iam sure but on the phone as well and online. i am sure we will bring you details of that auction later on. a skier has been rescued from a chairlift in u—turn after being trapped by his backpack. the incident happened on monday at a mountain resort south of salt lake city. the lift operators acted quickly, put a mark on the ground below in case this dfl. he kicked off his skis and through his poles down as two potatoes —— operators found a ladder and got him down. it is the second time in the last three weeks that a child has become stuck ona weeks that a child has become stuck on a lift by a backpack at the resort. there he goes, safe once more. i bet that seven minutes felt like an awfully long time. nearly 5,000 contestants have taken
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part in an annualjapanese calligraphy contest in tokyo. the competition requires participants to write phrases or poems of increasing complexity with a traditional brush and black ink within an allotted 24 minutes. those taking part, aged from three to 93, werejudged on the beauty of their strokes and the expression of their writing. the winners will be announced at a separate ceremony in february. a five—month—old baby elephant has been taking a dip in a swimming pool in thailand as part of a lengthy rehabilitation process to heal her injured foot. baby fah jam's front left leg was caught in a trap set by local villagers in november, but although the wound and her health improved significantly, she refused to put any weight on her injured leg. the treatment, which is being undertaken so she can avoid having to use a prosthetic leg, could take up to two months. the latest driverless car, headphones that can translate languages instantly and the latest smart gadgets for the home. these are just some of the things
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we can expect from this year's international consumer electronics show. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is in las vegas ahead of one of the biggest events in the tech industry and has this report. in a penthouse suite at a ritzy las vegas hotel, smart home exhibits are on show. there is a smart speaker for children, each toy has a playlist. # kung fu fighting...# a voice activated door lock. and upstairs... ..there's even nora, described as a smart snoring solution. it's paired with a pad under the pillow which detects the snoring and moves just enough to stop me, without waking me up. the big theme this year is turning the advances in artificial intelligence into products. there are robots of course. this one is meant to be a shop assistant, while this one
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is designed as a companion for children or elderly people. ai seems to get everywhere, even into this toothbrush, which learns how you brush your teeth. artificial intelligence is not just gathering the data, it's being able to use it. then you learn where your weaknesses are, where your strengths are and the purpose is to become better at taking care of your oral health. this walking stick is also smarter than it looks. an in—built mobile phone sim card means it can help if there is an accident. it will detect the fall of the user and when it detects it it will alert the family or the neighbour, so they can come and help these people. and this clever mirror helps anyone to try out make—up. we have a new las vegas! out on the las vegas strip, this young entrepreneur from manchester has just flown in. welcome to las vegas. his instant translation headphones aren't quite ready.
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they will eventually be tiny earbuds, that he is still looking forward to ces. this is important because we will be able to showcase what we've been working on to the world, to show this is something we started years ago as a small team, as a small start—up, with dedication and passion. the odds are against danny, a one—man band taking on giants like apple and google, but he's betting that he has the product that can change the world. in a moment the news at one. first, the weather. good afternoon. it certainly felt like winter if you were out early this morning. we had a widespread frost and our weather watchers were busy taking pictures. this one from london and another frosty picture
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from 0xfordshire, not farfrom banbury. we saw temperatures dropped to —8 there. the coldest start to a day in england so far this winter. it is called across many areas because we had clear skies overnight and foremost we keep those clear skies this afternoon. lots of sunshine. but cloud creeping in for some areas like northern ireland and eastern scotland. lots of sunshine through the rest of the uk but not helping temperatures much. a little bit extra cloud creeping in across parts of pembroke sure, cornwall, the western side of devon. but where we end the day with bright skies, through this evening and tonight under clear skies, we will again see frost. they could be fog patches developing across eastern areas. but notice how west things are changing.
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some rain moving in through northern ireland and scotland. through tomorrow morning, we see these frontal systems pushing in from the west, bringing rain eastwards. as the weather fronts move across the country, we introduce milder air from the south—west. those temperatures will be climbing as the day goes on. a 40 start for parts of the south—east. cloud and outbreaks of rain spreading eastwards. 5 degrees in norwich but behind it, 11 degrees in norwich but behind it, 11 degrees by the afternoon in belfast as that mild air continues to work in. through the weekend, it will feel milder but rather cloudy and at times that cloud will produce some patchy rain and drizzle. saturday could bring more persistent rain for a time across southern areas. some brighter spells. temperatures between seven and 11 degrees. 0n sunday, maybe a patchy frostbite
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generally a lot of cloud around. some splashes of rain at times. young people using the internet need much greater protection, says the children's commissioner for england. she says children are being exposed to dangers and giving away personal information without understanding the potential risks. with children the biggest users of the internet, we'll be asking what parents can do to help. also this lunchtime. uk car sales hit a record high last year but are expected to fall steeply this year. america increases the number of advisors in iraq, as the battle for mosul intensifies. does living near a busy road increase the risk of getting dementia? new research suggests there could be a link. and the naughty boy prince harry. letters from princess diana about her sons go up for auction this lunchtime. and coming up in a sport on bbc news, angry and frustrated,
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