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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 5, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines at three: an explosion outside a court house in izmir — believed to be a car bomb — is reported to have killed two and injured at least 10 people. a warning from england's children's commissioner that young people using the internet need much greater protection and guidance. there is a role for government to intervene and strengthen privacy laws, and a role for schools in teaching stronger digital curriculum. living near a busy road increases the risk of getting dementia, according to new research. four teenagers are arrested in chicago overfootage streamed live on facebook, in which a man with special needs was seriously assaulted. i'm ben brown, and personal letters written by princess diana have gone under the hammer. letter revealing prince was
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routinely in trouble and... in school sells for £2400. and we'll talk to the most powerful person in british theatre — the producer sonia freedman. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. officials in turkey say two people have been killed and five wounded by a large explosion, believed to have been caused by a car bomb, in the resort town of izmir. the blast took place outside the entrance to a courthouse in the resort town, which is on the west coast of turkey. security sources say that two attackers have been shot and killed by police. a third man is said to be on the run. let's go straight to our turkey correspondent, mark lowen, who is in istanbulfor us now. bring us right up to date in terms
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of what the authorities believe is happening now, mark. the governor of izmir has spoken and said that the attackers struck when police outside the main courthouse approached their car. they were attempting to search the car when the attackers opened fire on the police. a car bomb was detonated as well. a policeman was killed, a member of courthouse staff was also killed, and we understand that up to ten people were injured. in the shoot out that followed, two of the attackers were killed at the scene. a third is on the run. he is described as wearing a black coat and a white beret. the local government says that initial reports point to the kurdish group the pkk. it is pretty soon after the attack. inevitably, we have to ask about
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security, because this was outside a date, vulnerable, potentially public building, outside a courthouse, and really not that long after run appalling shooting, albeit in a different city, but something which again placed the country on alert. there have been so many attacks over the last year, both targeting official buildings like this, and the attack that happened less than a week ago at the nightclub in istanbul that killed 39 people and was claimed by so—called islamic state. the big challenge for the authorities is how to provide security in this country. there are clear breaches in the intelligence and security services that are allowing these attacks to happen, although it must be said that the intelligence and security services are preventing other attacks. turkey is, frankly, just extremely
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vulnerable at the moment, exposed to the twin threats of islamic state and the pkk kurdish militant group, both of which are carried out over 20 attacks in the last year. as turkey becomes ever more embroiled in the war in syria, targeting islamic state has led to revenge attacks in turkey. how do you secure attacks in turkey. how do you secure a country of 80 million people that borders syria and iraq and has this kurdish insurgency in the southeast? that is the perpetual challenge for turkey, and tragically, we are seeing that it is a challenge that it is not able to meet in its entirety, leading to these attacks in the last few months. mark, thank you very much for now. mark, thank you very much for now. mark, thank you very much for now. mark, in istanbul. young people are being left to fend for themselves when it comes to digital dangers such as bullying and grooming, according to the children's commissioner for england.
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anne longfield says children should be taught in school what they need to stay safe online. she also warned that children are frequently giving personal information away, without knowing how their data will be used. here's our education correspondent, gillian hargreaves. look familiar? teenagers stuck to their mobile phones. millions are connected to their friends via social media but the children's commissioner says too many are allowed to roam in a cyber world with limited protection and regulation. the girls at this high school in warrington think there is a risk. teenagers don't know what they're signing up to. the important thing you need to know about setting up a profile, you need to be talking about it and kids need to be told. rules needs to be short and snappy. not 15 pages. the report calls for the appointment of a digital ombudsman to mediate between children and social media companies over online bullying. it also recommends there should be mandatory digital citizenship courses in schools
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and new privacy laws to protect children's personal information online. what everyone is trying to do is to respond to that change. parents are struggling to do their bit. there is a role for government to intervene to help strengthen privacy laws and a role for schools as well in teaching stronger digital curriculum and training. at hampstead high school, the gcse computer studies pupils are technically savvy with many aware of the dangers of digital technology. i don't think we need another programme. it's something good schools do already. right from the age of four through the sixth form, children are already talk about how to stay safe online in assemblies, working with a bullying officer and police, and we have an evening for
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parents where we invite them in to inform them about how they can help keep their children safe online. schools can only do so much. contracts for social media sites can be lengthy with complicated wording and many children can struggle to understand exactly what they are signing up to. when children use social media sites, they give their content to the site, so comments, photos, e—mail address, name, information like that which they may know about but they may not know that that information is then given to third—party companies who will target them with specific adverts. social media companies like instant gram, facebook and twitter, say they take child security seriously and say their services are suited to children over the age of 13 and will shut down underage accounts. some news coming through in the last
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few moments. we are hearing that jill say what has died unexpected day. we have had a statement from herfamily saying day. we have had a statement from her family saying that it is with the shock and great sadness that we must announce that she died in hospital this morning. the family say that she dedicated the last 30 yea rs of say that she dedicated the last 30 years of her life to helping vulnerable people. she had expressed her wish to be an organ donor. we are grateful for the many expressions of prayer, love and support that we have received. jill sawa rd support that we have received. jill saward became support that we have received. jill sawa rd became well—known support that we have received. jill saward became well—known in 1986 after the ealing vicarage rape case, and she waved her anonymity in the wa ke and she waved her anonymity in the wake of that campaign on that issue. there was huge media coverage and
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her home was the ealing vicarage, and her father was the vicar of ealing. after that attack, there was a trial in which the judge caused some controversy. we will bring you more on that as it comes into us. the rmt union has taken up an offer from the transport secretary chris grayling to hold talks with him in an attempt to resolve the long—running dispute with southern rail over driver only operated trains. it's not clear when the talks will take place. the rmt yesterday changed it's plans for six days of strike action — they'll still go ahead, but will be three day stoppages two days apart. a record number of new cars were sold last year in the uk, up more than two percent on the previous 12 months. the increase was due to high demand from business customers. but sales are expected to fall by five per cent in 2017.
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0ur industry correspondent, john moylan, reports. the ford fiesta. for the eighth year in a row, it's been britain's most popular new car. in 2016, it was one of the reasons why the new car market hit an all—time high. according to the industry, last year, total sales hit almost 2.7 million cars, up 2.3% on the previous year which was also a record high. and it's cheap finance deals which are driving the success. the vast majority of customers now effectively lease cars rather than buy the outright. bringing what was once an affordable within reach. all of the options that are now available with leasing and financing, i can now pay less overall, on a monthly basis, but still go home with a brand—new car. we decided to look around and if we see a new car that's convenient for us, and the finance is all right, we will go for it.
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you can have a car like that for £10 a month more than your golf. that shift in how we buy cars is changing the type of car we are buying, too. there's a real trend for people to buy more upmarket cars because the monthly payments are not that much greater than buying a more mainstream vehicle and people are very conscious and want the latest technology and that's what these manufacturers are offering for a more affordable price than ever. but the industry expects the new car market to fall by 5% this year. consumer demand is waning and higher prices are coming to forecourts. the pressure which comes from a lower value pound to a certain extent does help exporters but the converse of that it makes imports more expensive, around six out of seven cars we sell are imported so the pressure of that depreciation sterling will undoubtedly flow through to price rises. car sales are often a good barometerfor the health of the wider economy, but with sales expected to fall and forecourt prices expected
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to rise, in 2017, the industry could be infora bumpy ride. you're watching bbc news. the time is 12 minutes past three. let's return to the news we have been hearing in the last few minutes — the death ofjill sawa rd, hearing in the last few minutes — the death ofjill saward, who campaignfor the death ofjill saward, who campaign for the last 30 years or so on women's writes and the rights of rape victims as well. we can join oui’ rape victims as well. we can join our correspondent who has more for us on our correspondent who has more for us on this in birmingham. tell us more aboutjill saward — quite an extraordinary woman. she has been campaigning on sexual assault and violence against women issues were the last 30 years. she has advised
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police forces and has been a tireless campaigner, someone who experienced at first hand one of the most brutal and notorious rates at the end of the last century. she was only 21 when burglars broke into her father's house, the vicarage in ealing where she lived, and they attacked and raped her. it was notorious largely because of the way it was prosecuted at the time. the two men who were convicted of rape got lesser sentences than the man who was convicted only of burglary, and some of the comments the judge made were notorious. ultimately, because of the notoriety of the case, her identity became relatively well—known, so she chose to wave her right to anonymity in 1990, the first person to do that. she co—wrote a book, and since then, she has been campaigning on behalf of the rights of victims of rape and
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sexual assault over the years. we knew that she had become very ill yesterday and was in hospital in wolverhampton overnight, but the statement came from the family as short time again, saying: it is with deep shock and great sadness that we announce thatjill sawa rd died deep shock and great sadness that we announce thatjill saward died this morning following a subarachnoid haemorrhage. in consultation with medical staff, the family readily agreed to jill's desire medical staff, the family readily agreed tojill‘s desire to be an organ donor. and the family goes on to say that she dedicated the past 30 years of her life to helping other people. let's look at a statement from one of the campaign groups she was involved with. it says, iam groups she was involved with. it says, i am overwhelmed thatjill sawa rd says, i am overwhelmed thatjill saward died this morning. she was an indefatigable advocate for the victims and survivors of sexual violence, and dedicated her life to
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raising awareness and campaigning against rape. she championed many causes and supported so many through her work, kindness and compassion. she was someone whom, i think, became a familiar face because she was somebody who possibly was a great help to other people that suffered the crimes that she did when she was very young. i know that she suffered post—traumatic stress disorder. she wrote about it in her blog. that was a result of the rate in19 six —— blog. that was a result of the rate in 19 six —— in 1986 in ealing. she was happily married and has three children who survive her. for viewers who are maybe younger run don't remember this case, it was quite a shocking case, wasn't it, the ealing vicarage rape attack? and
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also, her courage in coming forward and in waving her anonymity to talk about it, and to campaign for victims of sexual violence. in 1986, it was a story that shocked the nation. it led the national newspapers for days and weeks, the idea that people could break into a vicarage, attacked a vicar and his daughter and another man, her then boyfriend, not only that but to rape her and the file her in such a way meant that the trial drew a lot of coverage. the sentencing appear to be quite like, —— quite light. it became widely known that it wasjill sawa rd became widely known that it wasjill saward who was the victim of the rate, and she chose to publicly out
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herself to a much wider audience, a brave decision because it was the first time that anybody had waived their right to anonymity. and she then went on to lead such a long life. the focus of her life, apart from being a wife and mother, was that she actively campaigned on behalf of the rights of victims of sexual assault. most recently, she was actively campaigning against people who wanted anonymity for people who wanted anonymity for people who wanted anonymity for people who were accused of sexual assaults, and so she was constantly in the media, and very sadly was taken suddenly and fatally ill yesterday. thank you very much, phil. the headlines: the campaignerfor the rights of victims of sexual violence, jill saward, has died at
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the age of 51. two people have been killed and more than five injured after a car bomb next to the courthouse in the turkish city of izmir. young people are giving away personal information on the internet, according to the children's commissioner for england. makarde children's commissioner for england. makar de silva has been appointed to replace mike phelan. he will be the second youngest coach in the premier league, with whole rooted to the bottom of the table. —— hull. johanna konta's good run of form continues. she is one win away from reaching a third wta final after reaching a third wta final after reaching the semifinals of the shen
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an open in china. i'll be back with more on those stories at around past. —— at around half past three. the chancellor philip hammond has been speaking to sky news arabia on a trip to abu dhabi, he said the out—going ambassador, sir ivan rogers, had done a good job, but had chosen to resign because of the timing of brexit negotiations. the prime minister is expected to give what is being billed as a major speech about brexit later in the month. he was coming up to the end of his tenure, coming to retirement, later this year. he took the decision to go early and allow somebody else to
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ta ke go early and allow somebody else to take over now, before the article 15 0dis is served, before the negotiations begin, and then to see those negotiations right the way through to their conclusion. sir tim barrel, whom i nowell. iworked closely with him and appointed him as my political director at the foreign office. he is a very experienced and caesium and —— and seasoned diplomat. he is very tough, having worked in moscow for years. he has good knowledge of how the eu works and is a tough negotiator, so he will be a great asset for britain in the negotiating process. that was philip hammond, talking a little bit more about the resignation of sir ivan rogers and the government's brexit strategy. a record number of new cars
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were sold last year in the uk, up more than two percent on the previous 12 months. the increase was due to high demand from business customers. but sales are expected to fall by five per cent in 2017. let's discuss this with doctor david bailey, an automotive expert from the university of aston business school. there are exceptionally good finance deals and i doubt whether that will be continued in 2017. why? there are a number of precious loving the market down. costs will increase because of import prices, the depreciation in stirling, and the depreciation in stirling, and the economy is likely to slow. most forecasters think that is the case. it is doubtful whether those good finance terms will remain. we need strong economic growth to soak up
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ca i’s strong economic growth to soak up cars being returned at the end of leasing deals. 2016 was a sweet year, but i don't think it will continue. when you talk about higher productivity costs, is that to do with brexit? what are the factors? the depreciation in sterling we have seen over the last year, some of that has been since brexit, but some was before. we have seen sterling decline in value by about 20%. 85% of cars sold here are imported, and there are increases of around 2%, which is likely continue, meaning ca i’s which is likely continue, meaning cars will be more expensive in the uk, denting overall demand. in terms of the longer term picture, it is interesting how much of the good news at the moment does seem to be driven by companies. business purchases, that sort of thing. do you have concerns about the demand,
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01’ you have concerns about the demand, or lack of it, from ordinary individuals? exactly right. we saw private car sales declined in 2016. over all car sales in december actually declined, including fleet sales as well. we are starting to see some signs of stress in the market. another indication is that preregistrations are increasing. that is where dealers don't sell ca i’s that is where dealers don't sell cars the consumers but register themselves —— register them themselves —— register them themselves to get a bonus from the manufacturer. and the deep that you expect in positive financing deals, positive for the purchaser, is that also just positive for the purchaser, is that alsojust an positive for the purchaser, is that also just an impact of the slowdown in the economy, the changes to sterling, everything you have mentioned? previously, the exchange rate meant, for example, that it was easy to import cars in the uk. with the pick—up in the european car
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market, manufacturers are less interested in dumping cars on the uk market, so such attractive deals won't be available. there is a contract hire deals well people lease a car at a low monthly rate. that depends on the value of the car that we return at the end of the deal, and if that declines, financing rates go up. i don't think financing rates go up. i don't think financing rates go up. i don't think financing rates will be as attractive in the future. professor david bailey, thank you forjoining us. the united states says it has doubled the number of military advisers —— the united states says it has doubled the number of military advisors in support of iraqi forces trying to re—take the city of mosul from the so—called islamic state group.
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iraq's second city has been under is control for over two years, and there are increasing fears for the hundreds of thousands of civilians still there. daniel boettcher has the latest. heavy gunfire in mosul this morning. the us led coalition supporting iraqi security forces says more than 60% of the eastern half has been won back from so—called islamic state. the offensive began in october and is in its second phase. the us says it is now taking measures to speed up the advance and that includes doubling the number of military advisers assisting iraqi troops. time is not on the enemy's side. it's on the side of the iraqi security forces. they are going to retake mosul. they continue making progress in doing so. we're going to continue to support the actions that they do with our air and artillery strikes, isr and our advice and assistance. these unverified images are said to show part of the operation, artillery strikes against is targets. there are still more than 5000 american military personnel in iraq. during a helicopter tour over recently recaptured areas, the commander of the us—led coalition said iraqi forces
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confronting is in mosul were gaining momentum, though he conceded that the attack initially lacked coordination. some of the civilians who fled during the conflict have been returning to their homes in the areas of the city that have been retaken, but the united nations has again warned about the dangers faced by those remaining in is controlled areas. members of the council also expressed grave concern for the almost1 million civilians that are out of reach currently for humanitarian support and access in areas under isil/daesh control in mosul, suffering indiscriminate violence and abuse. though iraqi forces are making gains, they have yet to enter the west of mosul, which is still held by so—called islamic state. daniel boettcher, bbc news. a number of letters written by
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princess diana when her children we re princess diana when her children were young have been sold at auction in cambridge this afternoon for some higher than expected prices, i am told, for some of them. our royal correspondent sarah campbell is at the auction in cambridge. did you manage to bid for one, sarah? i couldn't afford it, jane stopped they were so expensive. the reserve price was around £13,000 for the whole lot. the hammer price came to about £55,000, that is for all 1a lots. it was a very frenetic hour here in the auction house, and luke mcdonald was the auctioneer. quite a bit higher than we might have predicted. extraordinary, absolutely. i don't think i have sold so many lots over such a short
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period. the bidding never seemed to stop. it kept coming and coming, from the internets particularly. white —— from the internets particularly. white -- there were personal letters to cyril dickman. they were personal. it was talking about how please diana was with the little boys, about harry being naughty at school. when harry was born, about william. i got it here, and it says, william. i got it here, and it says, william adores his little brother and spends the entire time slumping harry with hugs and kisses. where we re harry with hugs and kisses. where were people bidding from? all over the world. i saw popping up on my screen the small initials, some were
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australian. japan and america? absolutely. diana was adored throughout the commonwealth and beyond, and i think this was testa m e nt to beyond, and i think this was testament to strong feelings. everyone wanted a little piece of this connection. diana's grabbed the headlines, but there were 1a lots in total, including 16 christmas cards signed by queen elizabeth and the duke, which went out for around £2200. and a slice of their wedding cake. yes, extraordinary. think about it, how many still survive in their original packaging, unopened? here it is, and it was a very personal gift from the queen to several. 50 years is a long time to be in service to one family and to know all that them from infancy to aduu know all that them from infancy to adult hood. it is a personal connection and shows what a place
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several had in the royal household was such a long time. very much, he was such a long time. very much, he was their friend above almost his position and duty. i think you probably need to go and have a glass of water. that was quite an effort over the past ala! 50,000 —— 50 £5,500 for this lot. and a 70—year—old piece of wedding cake which went for a few hundred pounds, but probably not to be eaten! sawa rd saward just a saward line of news. a man has denied escaping from prison. matthew baker, 28, pleaded not guilty to breaking out of hmp pentonville in november. that 28—year—old man pleading not guilty to breaking out of pentonville prison last november.
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it was a cold start today and temperatures have struggled to rise. despite some crisp winter sunshine. if you look at the satellite picture, most of us have sunny skies. there were a few showers, generally more cloud into western areas. where we have the sunshine, temperatures only got up to 4 degrees. in central and eastern areas could see the odd fog patch. maybe some icy stretches, too. a big change to the north—west. rain splashing in and eventually some much, much milder air by the end of the night. who tomorrow we see the rain moving south and east. some brightness across the south—east wa nts brightness across the south—east wants the frog has cleared. murky for northern ireland and western scotla nd for northern ireland and western scotland but mild. those milder conditions spreading to all parts as we go through the weekend. it will be cloudy with some patchy drizzle
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at times. not as much sunshine as we've had but it won't be as cold, either. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 3:30pm. the campaigner for the rights of victims of sexual violence, jill saward has died, aged 51. an explosion outside a court house in izmir, believed to be a car bomb, is reported to have injured at least ten people. police say they have shot dead two attackers and are seeking a third. the rmt union has taken up an offer from the transport secretary chris grayling to hold talks with him in an attempt to resolve the long—running dispute with southern rail over driver—only operated trains. england's childrens commissioner has warned that young people are being left to fend for themselves when using the internet and are frequently
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giving their personal information away. the number of new cars registered in the uk hit an all—time high in 2016, up 2% on the previous year. but the motor industry body says there are signs of a more challenging period ahead. a new study has suggested people who live near busy roads are at a higher risk of developing dementia. the study indicated that noise or air pollution could be significant factors. now, time for the sports news. hull city have appointed the former sporting lisbon and olympiakos coach marco silva as their new manager. he replaces mike phelan who was sacked by the club on tuesday. silva, nicknamed "mini mourinho" because of his roots in portuguese football, is only 39 but has already enjoyed several high profile appointments, having led the greek side to the title last season.
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in this country, we don't know a great deal. he has no english football experience, and is said to have a limited grasp of the english language. however, he has a fairly impressive track record coaching in europe. his most recentjob was at olympiakos, where he won the greek title. he also beat arsenal in the champions league last season, before leaving for personal reasons in the summer. he becomes the second—youngest manager in the premier league, behind only eddie howe of bournemouth. he signed a deal until the end of the season, bringing in three coaches to form his backroom staff. hull were bottom at christmas, only three clubs have ever survived being in that position. they've picked upjust three points from their last nine games. it doesn't get much easier for them with the fixtures coming up, swansea at home in the fa cup, followed by manchester united in the efl cup in midweek, then a huge premier league game next saturday against bournemouth. they travel to chelsea
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the following weekend. it won't be easy, but marco silva is regarded by some as "the new mourinho", and they hope hull will stay in the premier league under his guidance. the other new premier league manager spoke to the media for the first time today. paul clement replaces bob bradley at swansea and has confirmed alan curtis won't be part of the first—team coaching set—up. clement himself has been explaining the allure of the liberty stadium, over his previousjob the allure of the liberty stadium, over his previous job with bayern munich. i'm absolutely up to the challenge. isaid to i'm absolutely up to the challenge. i said to the players, i'm with you, i'm excited by the challenge. i could have stayed at bayern munich and had a great chance to win the league there. and advanced to the further stages of the champions league. it would have been great but i've done that for the last six or
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seven years. i feel good about it. everton have signed the charlton forward ademola lookman for eleven million pounds the 19—year—old, who's played for the england's u20's only broke into the charlton first tea m only broke into the charlton first team last season. he described it as a dream move insisting he was ready to make the step up from league one to make the step up from league one to the premier league it's a play of the future. he is involved in training with the first—team. how long it takes if he gets a chance. it's good signing. we need that kind of player. he is 19. we expect a lot from the boys. british runner laura muir broke the 25—year—old record previously held by fellow scot liz mccolgan over 5,000 metres at an indoor meeting in glasgow last night. her time of 1a minutes 49.12 seconds was 1a seconds faster than the previous record. it was only muir's second track race
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over the distance and she also ran 16 laps out on her own. the impressive time moves her into the top ten on the world indoor all—time list. she'll captain the great britain team competing in this weekend's international cross country race in edinburgh. and andy murray will look to extend his winning run to 27 competitive matches, a career best, if he can beat nicolas almagro in the quarter finals of the qatar open later. also continuing her good run is the world number 10 johnna konta, who is one win away from reaching her third wta final. she's into the semifinals of the shenzen open in china following her victory against katrina pliskova in three sets. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. an update on the situation in izmir
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where there has been an attack which has left two people dead and several injured. it happened outside a courthouse in izmir. we heard from the governor of izmir who said the attackers struck when police approached their car, tried to search the car which prompted a shoot out with police, and it seems a car bomb was detonated, killing a police officer and a member of the courthouse staff as well, and injuring others. this follows the nightclub attack in istanbul on new year's eve which left 39 people dead. that was believed to be the work of islamic state. this is believed to be the work of the kurdish militants the pkk and the deputy turkish prime minister has said that actually a much larger attack was being planned. that's according to evidence from the r according to evidence from the weaponry found at the sight of the
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izmir bombing in that car. the deputy prime minister of turkey saying a much bigger attack was being planned, according to authorities, based upon the weaponry they have found. four people have been arrested in the us city of chicago over a video live—streamed on facebook, in which a bound and gagged man was assaulted. police say the victim has special needs. his assailants can be heard making derogatory statements against white people. the man, whom police say was acquainted with one of his attackers, has now been released from hospital. helena lee. most of the 30—minute video is too graphic to show. the victim, who is white and has mental health challenges, was bound and gagged by his attackers. at least two of whom were african—american and made racist comments. expletives and shouting. at one point, they cut his clothes, several people can be heard
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laughing in the background. then they partially scalp him with a knife. this was all broadcast live around the world on the social media site facebook. it's sickening, and makes you wonder what would make individuals treat somebody like that. the victim was held for up to 48 hours in a flat in chicago, a city where, last year, there were 762 murders, more than in new york and los angeles combined. the victim is now out of hospital traumatised by what happened. four people are in custody and police say they are looking into whether a hate crime has taken place. helena lee, bbc news. a group of mps and peers says immigrants should be expected to learn english before coming to britain, or attend compulsory language classes when they arrive. the parliamentary group also suggests ministers should consider letting different parts of the uk set their own immigration policy.
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our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. i will give my loyalty to the united kingdom. a landmark on the way to being integrated into british society. as a british citizen.... these people are becoming uk citizens, with a promise to respect our rights, freedoms and laws. but there is growing agreement that successful integration into britain also depends on having a command of the english language. migrants, when they arrive in the uk, would like to learn english and are aware of the disadvantages of not learning english. i think we need to make sure that the resources are in place for migrants to be able to access full—time education support. the importance of language provision is emphasised in a report from a group of mps and peers. it says all immigrants should learn english before coming
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to the uk or enrol in classes when they are here. it also calls for courses to teach immigrants about british culture, and the report says the government should give immigrants guidance on the costs and benefits of uk citizenship, and consider cutting the fees for naturalisation. my name is beatrice, i am a student... english classes for immigrants are already available. the home office says its spending an extra £20 million on those in greatest need. some believe it will be unfair if it was compulsory for everyone coming to live in the uk. this will have a huge impact on people coming over to their loved ones, especially those people coming overfrom a village. they are not often very literate, and therefore learning english as a second language is extremely difficult for them. the report on integration, launched at an event in london, also suggests devolving immigration
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policy to britain's nations and regions. they would be able to allocate visas according to local need. shaping immigration criteria to address national or regional needs will instil greater confidence the system works for your area, for every area. under current laws, some immigrants are allowed in to do specificjobs, like these fruit pickers from eastern europe working at a farm near arbroath in scotland. but the home office says it's not planning to introduce local visa arrangements, because it would be too complicated. danny shaw, bbc news. people who live near main roads may be at greater risk of dementia. according to a decade—long study by scientists in canada, one in ten cases could be linked to living near a major road.
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the researchers say more work is now needed to understand the link. our health correspondent robert pigott reports. arterial roads carry the lifeblood of cities such as toronto, but are apparently the source of disease too. a study of nearly 2 million people in ontario over 11 years suggested that among people living within 50 metres of a major road, as many as 11% of dementia cases could be the result of traffic. the study‘s authors say tiny particles from exhaust and tyres could be part of the reason. how those particles work, a bit speculative, but one hypothesis is through fairly nonspecific effects on inflamation and oxidative stress in the body. so we have a potential mechanism, but it is far from proven. dementia robs people of their memories, and leads to increasing disability. 50 million people around the world have the disease, and the rate is rising. the canadian study used people living at least 300 metres from a major road as its baseline. the risk of dementia increased by 2% between 100 and 200 metres, was 11% greater between 50 and 100
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metres, and 7% higher within 50 metres. given that so many people were studied, and for so long, and that the researchers took into account factors such as poverty, obesity, and whether people smoked, the findings are highly striking. but, although the study can show a close association between roads and dementia, it doesn't prove that the roads cause the disease. traffic pollution is one reason, but we know that living next to a busy road is noisy, stressful, people may have more disturbed sleep, which can also be a factorfor dementia. british experts say the study has important applications for public health in the uk, but while the exact causes of dementia remain largely unknown, they say a healthy diet, exercise, and stopping smoking are still the best advice for avoiding it. robert pigott, bbc news. in a moment a summary
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of the business news this hour, but first the headlines on bbc news. the campaigner for the rights of victims of sexual violence, jill saward has died, aged 51. she had suffered from a stroke. two people have been killed and more than five injured following a car bomb next to a courthouse in the turkish city of izmir. youngsters are frequently giving personal information away on the internet, according to the children's commissioner for england. i'm vishala sri—pathma, in the business news. sports direct chairman keith hellawell has been re—elected to his position on the board. but he lost the support of independent shareholders. his re—election was carried by founder mike ashley, who maintains a controlling stake in the company. the company has been dogged by criticism over its treatment of staff and corporate governance.
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younger generations will inherit much more money than their parents and grandparents, but the amounts they get will be very unequal. research by the institute for fiscal studies says the wealth of the older generation has grown by 45% over just ten years. the uk service sector grew at its fastest pace for 17 months in december. however, prices charged in the sector rose to its strongest rate since april 2011. the entertainment industry says we are spending considerably more on music, videos and games than we were just a few years ago. we bought £6 billion worth of media in 2016, that's up by £1 billion on four years back. joining me now is kim bayley, chief executive of the entertainment retailers association. why the rise? there's lots of things going on, but the key thing is we've seen a
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going on, but the key thing is we've seen a rise in the number of digital services, creating new ways for consumers to access music, video and games. the likes of spotify and netflix have been driving that growth. is it also because paying for things, it's a lot easier, click ofa for things, it's a lot easier, click of a button and you've got a song or a movie. have those mechanisms improved sales? i think so, but also the services are better. the fact it is such a fantastic service to get all the music you can have in one place for a reasonable fee has driven sales. you mentioned spotify which is a model where you can access songs for free byjust listening to an advert about a minute. how is the industry making large amounts of money, if these models exist? i think with service is like spotify, spotify or amazon music, the paid service gives you
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loads of advantages, you don't have too listen to adverts, you can listen to the music off—line and a lot more of it than if you are using the free service. there for people are choosing to pay for that service. even a payment is considerably less than what we spent 15 years ago on music and video and film. i think it's sustainable. 15 years ago on music and video and film. ithink it's sustainable. last year we saw £400 million or more spent on digital music services. that's a huge amount of money and that's only a small proportion of the population. if you consider that number is likely to double, that adds a lot of money back into the music industry. thank you. let's take a look at some of today's other business stories. dollar financial uk, the owner of payday lender the money shop, says it has received a bid approach from an unnamed suitor. dollar financial also operates online lenders payday
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loans and payday express, as well as the pawnbroking firm suttons & robertsons. fraudsters are targeting uk schools, demanding payments of up to £8,000 to unlock data. the online criminals are initially cold—calling schools, claiming to be from the department for education. uk police issued a warning, urging educational establishments to be vigilant. us department store chain macy's has seen department store chain macy's has seen its share price fall 14% after announcing plans to make 10,100 people redundant and save just under £450 m. people redundant and save just under £450m. it said almost 4,000 jobs would go in 2017 as a result of store closures. a quick look at the markets before we go. the ftse100 still doing very well in 2017, holding onto those record sessions. that's all the business news. the theatre producer sonia friedman has topped this year's stage 100, the annual list of the uk's most influential people in the performing arts. she is only the second woman in the list‘s history
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to top it as a solo entry. sonia friedman's credits as a producer are numerous, but include dreamgirls, the book of mormon and harry potter and the cursed child. i've been speaking to her and asked her what it means to be number one on the list. i found out a couple of weeks ago, and when i first heard, i pondered about it. it's the first time that a non—theatre owner has been top of the list. i think that's significant right now. the people who compiled the list who are from the stage newspaper and i assume some critics, have recognised the work that i produce, and the artists and writers, directors, actors i work with. i'm pleased that we've made that shift. i'm pleased it's about the work, about the creation, about what audiences actually experience, and not necessarily about the real estate.
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and only the second woman to top it in the list‘s long history. how significant is that for you? do you feel like a role model in the industry? do you welcome younger women coming through? of course. i have a company of 30 who work for me full—time. the majority are women. i wouldn't say i've ever been a conscious feminist, but certainly when i was starting out as a young producer, i was very aware that i was different. people made you feel different? yes, i've had a lot of pats on the head, a lot of people saying, "congratulations young lady", when it feels very patronising, condescending, that i can'tjust be alongside the men earlier on in my career, i had to be, i think, a little better. and work that bit harder,
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and push myself that bit further. but, i've always done it on my own terms, actually. very early on in my career i was encouraged to wear clothes in a particular way, take a suitcase, not a rucksack, and silly things like that. because that's how businesswomen are meant to behave. i've always just tried to be who i am. actually, in the end, all women, so long as they are true to themselves, can be strong and clear and kind and compassionate, will make their way through. we are seeing more women come through in the industry, particularly in direction and artistic directors as well. there will be people who might think, goodness, there is 100 names or groups of names on this list, only seven of those
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are people who are not white. there is still that as an issue within the industry, isn't there? oh yes. particularly in administration and marketing and production. as a producer, i'm doing what i can do to employ and ensure that all the productions i produce have full diversity, and we have an absolute diversity policy and the company. on stage? on stage. we've got a long way to go offstage. and obviously onstage, too. and in audiences. audiences are a real challenge. i'm doing a production of dreamgirls at the moment, which is an all—black company, and i look out in the audience, and it's not a diverse audience, it's not diverse enough. it's about 5—8% non—white. for me, that's not good enough.
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we have to do everything we can do to reach out to all audiences and make sure that they know this show is for them as well as everybody else. i think it's one of the biggest challenges we've got in our industry. a quick thought about the state of the industry, the help of the industry in economic terms, in terms of box office receipts. i'm thinking about affordability as well. you can see great plays in small venues for not much money, i try and take my nieces to see a west end musical, it breaks the bank, is there still a problem there in terms of accessibility? that's the perception. but, like an airline, you can actually, depending on when you book, how you book and where you choose to sit, you can actually get in. for my shows, you can get in for £10, £15, £20, in really good seats.
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but you have to work harder to find those seats. in harry potter, we have 300 seats under £20 for every performance. but of course, they go very, very quickly. the perception is they aren't there. they are there, but they get snapped up first. in the commercial sector, because we don't have subsidy, we have to be much more creative in how we can make our shows accessible. most producers are now finding ways through. but it is, again, a challenge. sonia friedman, top of the stage 100 list. time for a look at the weather. the weather is on the change after a bitterly cold and frosty start. milderair is bitterly cold and frosty start. milder air is set to arrive. we woke up milder air is set to arrive. we woke up to scenes like this with a hard
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frost and sunshine. i suspect who tomorrow and the weekend there will be more cloud. tomorrow there could be more cloud. tomorrow there could be outbreaks of rain. it will be a grey and mild story. for most of us we've kept some sunshine. already you can see the cloud waiting in the wings, that will arrive through the night bringing outbreaks of rain with it. windy and at times wet weather pushing into the extreme north—west. ahead of it, and early evening frost with cloud arriving. down into the south—east corner it could be a murky start. look at the temperatures, nowhere near as cold as the nights just passed. we temperatures, nowhere near as cold as the nightsjust passed. we might see temperatures around freezing or below in the exposed rural south—east but elsewhere a mild start. largely dry but cloudy. we could see dense patches of freezing fog in places. worth bearing in mind if you are up early. further north west the cloud thickens and here is the rain. light and patchy to start with but some heavy bursts into
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northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland from the word go. for your friday morning rush hour it is wet and breezy towards the west. but wet weather will gradually move east, as weather will gradually move east, as we go through the day. pushing across wales into northern england through the afternoon. perhaps the extreme north—east of scotland explain things, staying dry in the south—east. yet, cooler but milder air flooding south—east. yet, cooler but milder airflooding in behind. that milder theme will be the story to take us into the weekend. pushing that cold air back over to the near continent. the milder theme staying with us this weekend but staying cloudy. then it keeps a legacy of cloud in its wake and perhaps some mist and fog first thing in the morning. as we move towards the weekend, a milder theme. a lot of cloud but from that cloud there will be some light drizzle from time to time. saturday is a great day, on the
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whole, not too bad if you've got outside plans, 6—11 celsius. on sunday the potential for more rain to arrive into monday and the early half of next week looking changeable. more details coming up in halfan changeable. more details coming up in half an hour. this is bbc news. the headlines at 4pm. the campaigner for the rights
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of victims of sexual violence jill saward has died, aged 51. two people have been killed and more there is a role for government to intervene, to help to strengthen privacy laws, and a role for schools as well in teaching stronger digital curriculum. -- two people have been killed and more than five injured following a car bomb attack in the turkish city of izmir. two of the attackers were shot dead by police. a warning that children using the internet need much greater protection and guidance.

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