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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 5, 2017 10:40pm-11:01pm GMT

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two—time british olympic canoeing medallist richard hounslow has retired. the 35—year—old won two silver medals in the canoe double with partner david florence at london 2012 and rio 2016. he said it had been a ‘true honour‘ to represent his country at the highest level. laura muir will captain the british tea m laura muir will captain the british team at the great edinburgh international cross country this weekend. it‘s yet another accolade for muir, who last night broke liz mccolgan‘s 25 year indoor record over 5,000m. voiceover: no television cameras to record the occasion, but this piece of history was captured by one alert spectator, laura muir, wiping1li seconds off the british indoor 5000 metre record. that beat liz mccolgan‘s time, set in1992, record. that beat liz mccolgan‘s time, set in 1992, as she reflected today, it adds to the british 1500 metre record that she set last year. having a name in the record books is very special, dame kelly holmes, liz mccolgan... big very special, dame kelly holmes, liz mccolgan. .. big names. very special, dame kelly holmes, liz
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mccolgan... big names. iam really honoured to be alongside where they were. i hope that i can get in a few more. an element of doubt had emerged about whether the time ran here last night would qualify as an official record, liz mccolgan congratulated her fellow scot, official record, liz mccolgan congratulated herfellow scot, but did query whether the official criteria had been met by the race, in terms of doping controls at the event and also the fact the other athletes in the race only ran 3000 metres. british athletics told bbc scotla nd metres. british athletics told bbc scotland today that subject to the normal checks, they expect the time to be confirmed. with that in the bag, the focus is very much on turning records and times into major medals. it takes time to learn to race in the championship, get that experience, and that is why i try to put a more realistic timeline on it, she was running remarkably fast times, 2013, 2014, are directed night there were still some learning to go on before you were probably in
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possession and —— in position and challenging for medals, that is where we have got to now. definitely, i think that i had been unlucky at previous champing chips but i think that i showed at the world championships in 2015, placed fifth, that was a good achievement for me. i was hoping to build on that. -- championships. diamond lead success that. -- championships. diamond lead success shows that she can beat the best, now she‘s ready to do that on the biggest of stages. —— diamond league. that is all from sportsday, coming up in a moment, the papers, have a good one. welcome to our look ahead at what
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the newspapers will be bringing us tomorrow. no muddled thinking tonight, please, we will be speaking truth to power... crystal clear! some of the front pages: the financial times, top spies in the us are on a collision course with president—elect donald trump, two weeks before his inauguration, after they rejected his dismissal of his findings that russia interfered with the election. sex assault campaign and rates survivorjill saward has died at the age of 51, the newspaper calls her bravest of the brave. the mail also pays tribute tojill, and leads on a story that civil servants working on brexit have asked for a pay rise due to unsustainable pressure. investigation into new homes built on flood plains, saying it has found that 1200 properties have been built in what it calls danger areas. the telegraph‘s top story, the admission by the bank of england chief economist that
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warnings of an economic downturn in the wake of the brexit vote were wrong. the times also leads on optimism regarding the british economy and news that theresa may will visit donald trump next month after her two most trusted aides began what it calls a secret mission to build bridges. the express leads on the six—day run of highs of the ftse 100. on the six—day run of highs of the ftse100. we will start with the times, britain has the world top economy after brexit, starting with mystic make, lord digbyjones... laughter you said, brexit is where we should be, it is going to be amazing and wonderful and so far, you may be proven right. i hate to say i told you so. taking you back to early june... you so. taking you back to early june. .. not you so. taking you back to early june... not too you so. taking you back to early june. .. not too far back, because we only have 15 minutes. laughter the day after "brexit", the world was going to end, death of the
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first—born, all these economist, the bank of england, all of them saying the same thing. i wanted to stay in a reformed europe, iam no the same thing. i wanted to stay in a reformed europe, i am no swivel eyed brexiteer, buti a reformed europe, i am no swivel eyed brexiteer, but i would prefer to have stayed in a reformed europe, iam not to have stayed in a reformed europe, i am not an ideologue, but i could not see it at the time. the british economy has been really resilient. fundamentals of the british economy are actually in a good place. inflation will rise. this is a snapshot, britain has the world's top economy after "brexit", six months after "brexit". business
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activity has hit a 17 month high. i wa nt activity has hit a 17 month high. i want the best for britain and all who sail in her, say a week is a long time in politics, this isjust the brilliant. to armageddon. . . ? to what happens when we trigger article 50 and during the two years of negotiation and what happens thereafter, a lot of potential shocks may come further down the road. the reason why this story has made the headlines, notjust the figures, the chief economist of the bank of england, who had predicted doom and gloom, he admits that maybe, is industry, economics, is in crisis. and he compared the forecasting performance to michael fish's infamous... this is where he
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said they —— there would not be a hurricane. but they bring up this point. dire predictions were predicated on david cameron triggering article 50 the day after the vote. they were not, a lot of this was alarmist, to frighten the british voter in devoting to remain, a lot of this had a political undercurrent. some of it was economics. where we are going to be in violent agreement is... i would say three to five years, i would not say three to five years, i would not say six months, years "brexit" negotiations, this is going to be choppy water. the problem we have as a nation at the moment is you have the eu remains propaganda sheet, the financial times... the eu remains propaganda sheet, the
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financial times. .. tried to destroy it that stage. trying to rip it up? any time you get bad news, it is always... the fact is, so far, the doom mongers are wrong. for now. from the bank of england they say, business as usual, the spending power in peoples pockets was not materially dented, that is a key point, because... you don't hear the word sorry. interest rates are historically low. people still spending on the never—never, big—ticket items, the cars. very crucial, crucial to remember that people still have money in their pockets. why will they rise, because the pound has collapsed. no, that is the pound has collapsed. no, that is theissue the pound has collapsed. no, that is the issue where you are both wrong.
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i spend money, the issue where you are both wrong. ispend money, i the issue where you are both wrong. i spend money, i live in britain. if you actually have... through a porous change rate... the pound collapsing... it does not necessarily pass to consume inflationary pressure. lots of people are saying that it may, including the chief economist... so often the middle person absorbs the profit. gentleman, if i often the middle person absorbs the profit. gentleman, ifi can come in, ifi profit. gentleman, ifi can come in, if i can come near. you profit. gentleman, ifi can come in, ifi can come near. you have profit. gentleman, ifi can come in, if i can come near. you have got your gavel. you are going to need it! companies have absorbed the shock, they have hedged, the prediction is by many that they will not be able to hedge for ever. prediction is by many that they will not be able to hedge for everlj agree but there is another point. they will not be able to do it forever, i agree, they will not be able to do it forever, iagree, but they will not be able to do it forever, i agree, but the other point is that there is a whole world out there and if you have a component suppliers saying prices go up component suppliers saying prices go up because of currency, go and find another supplier. we will end that discussion there. thank you.
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financial times, financial times, us by chief rejects trump doubts over kremlin interference from the election. we had senatorjohn mccain, armed services committee republican chairman, telling the intelligence committee when he took evidence from james clapper, and admiral michael rogers, head of the national security agency, and each of them, both pretty angry. seeming to prefer the advice and evidence of julian assange seeming to prefer the advice and evidence ofjulian assange to his own intelligence officers and they are doubling down, as the american say, in their belief that the kremlin interfered at every level, regularly, and that this is a form of warfare. lloyd jones. .. he regularly, and that this is a form
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of warfare. lloyd jones... he has two double down, if he admits, if he says there is clear evidence that the russians interfered with the election, that delegitimise is his job, or at least it delegitimise is him in thatjob. —— delegitimises. the process by which he got it.|j ee, the process by which he got it.|j agree, the answer to this by henry is very good, and where the problem trump has worked in into... —— worked himself into... i understand this new paradigms, constant tweets, he is connecting with the people who voted for him, making it clearly understood where he stands on many issues, a very good example would be that this man has not yet been elected and yet he has forward to say, we are not going to invest in mexico, we will do it in detroit. 1000 jobs saved in indiana by an air conditioning factory. these tweets are connecting with the very people who elected him, but the downside, if he‘s not careful, is of his own volition he‘s been forced into positions from which we cannot grow back. this one... it is one thing
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when you put out a view and a company response, it is another game when you take side internationally, with rather unsavoury figures. on that basis, where henry... not that nail on the head, he‘s in charge of the two agencies. —— knocked the nail on the head. they will leak vigorously against him. nail on the head. they will leak vigorously against himlj nail on the head. they will leak vigorously against him. i do believe... inaudible going back to the daily mail, the picture there are, jill saward, who has died at the age of 51, she was attacked, sexually assaulted, rigged in1986, attacked, sexually assaulted, rigged in 1986, the first british rate victim to actually waive anonymity. —— raped in 1986. to highlight not just what she went through but also to put victims at the centre of any future prosecutions. all about views
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and ideas, takes second place to the grieving that the family must be feeling, 51, brain haemorrhage, this is awful. even more sad of course on a national level that it has taken her death to bring this up to the point where the daily mail are saying in their headline, what a disgrace that she never received an honour. whether they are right or wrong, whatever the honour may be, ta ke wrong, whatever the honour may be, take out the word honour and use the word recognition because actually what she did... the establishment, the right word? certainly, the judicial system, anyway, tended to be on the side of the accused, not on the side of the victim. during the period of life on mars, where the period of life on mars, where the police, the judiciary did not pay attention. what she did, because daughter, virgin, 21, raped, and she
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came out of a september x into system that was saying, the quiet, and she said, i will not, this is my name, this is my photograph and this is what happened to me. —— vicar‘s daughter. and people to then this happened should have the courage and society should support the courage to do that. —— came out of a system that was saying, you be quiet, and she said, i will not. we have seen the bravery of the footballers that have come out, victims who have come out, with jimmy have come out, victims who have come out, withjimmy savile, this is where putting the victim at the centre of the case, this is where it started. protecting identity, initial stages, very important, tough enough for men to do it now, when they are talking about what happened 20 odd years ago, but this woman did it in 1986, the country with very different back there. tesco says the john with very different back there. tesco says thejohn the band... lloyd jones, you have got your pyjamas on, i know that you sneak down... —— tesco says that pyjamas
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may be banned. i only wish they did not take the photograph they have of me... laughter iam me... laughter i am convinced in my indecision, at one level, they are trying to say, there is a standard here, whatever that standard may be, or the benefit of everyone, not just tesco, that standard may be, or the benefit of everyone, notjust tesco, there area of everyone, notjust tesco, there are a few standards, we... we do not wa nt are a few standards, we... we do not want to see digby wandering around in his onesie... want to see digby wandering around in his onesie. .. that is a site! the problem is, we do live in a free world, and as long as... within the bounds of decency. if you want to wear your onesie ads tesco at three in the morning, why not! it is not the kind of thing that i would do, andl the kind of thing that i would do, and i have never seen people wandering around in their onesie or their pyjamas, but there is lots and lots of supermarkets which may say, tesco does not want you, we will ta ke tesco does not want you, we will take your business. it is the old
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idea between freedom on one hand, freedom on one hand, human decency, and... time, time! laughter gentlemen, please! knocking. laughter you are avoiding it! just the thought of what you are talking about! onesie! peter stringfellow. .. laughter just run the title, i can say goodbye! laughter good evening. this week has been a roller—coaster ride of temperatures, one morning cold and frosty, the next, cloudy and mild. that story continues, this was the scene in north would london but when you wake up tomorrow morning i suspect you will probably
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see a story like this, a lot of cloud thickener to force outbreaks of rain. it will be a mild start. early frost is possible, we may cling on to freezing fog in places, across the south—east, but a strengthening wind will bring in cloud and rain from the west, some of it heavy. mild night here, seven or8 of it heavy. mild night here, seven or 8 degrees, we may see temperatures hovering below freezing in the far south—east corner. it. after cloudy, with bits and pieces of patchy rain across south—east england and wales, there is the freezing fog patches, slowly lifting, worth bearing in mind that if you travel towards the capital in the early morning rush—hour. outbreaks of patchy rain, some of it turning quite heavy, not looking too bad, scattering of showers into the northern isles. looks as though the extreme north of scotland will miss the worst of the heavy rain,
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gradually pushing its way east and south through the day, clinging onto some brightness for daylight hours. double figures into the north—west by the middle of the afternoon, and this milder air will push the cold air that we saw through the course of the day rain will clear away, it will do so overnight friday and into the early hours, leaving some mist and hill fog around first thing on saturday, cloudy, drizzly start of the day. slowly brightening, six to 12 degrees the higher, staying milder. milder, cloudier, a theme continuing into sunday, could be a lot worse for the weekend, and in actualfact, lot worse for the weekend, and in actual fact, pretty good timing, because things will change into monday. for the weekend, because things will change into monday. forthe weekend, milder, rather cloudy, any rain that we see will really be light, drizzly in nature. all change again as we move
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into monday, we will see some wet and windy weather stretching south and windy weather stretching south and east. this is bbc news. i‘m clive myrie. the headlines at 11.00: america‘s top intelligence officials have warned that russian cyber attacks pose a major threat to the us and beyond. the justice secretary wants to close a loophole which allows domestic abusers to cross—examine former partners during some court hearings. latest figures suggest britain‘s services sector grew in december at its fastest rate for 17 months. the rmt union has agreed to meet the transport secretary in an attempt to resolve the southern rail dispute. on newsnight, we discuss the difference thatjill saward made to the treatment of violence survivors, campaigning for changes to the judicial system.
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