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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 6, 2017 5:45am-6:00am GMT

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with hate crimes over a video live—streamed on facebook, in which a bound and gagged man was tortured. police believe the victim may have been kidnapped for up to 48 hours before the attack. we start our news review with the wall streetjournal website. it reports that during a us committee hearing on foreign cyber threats, intelligence chief james clapper described a "multifaceted russian campaign" surrounding last year's american election. president—elect donald trump, who is due to be briefed on the issue, has voiced scepticism about the allegations. the guardian reports the bank of england's chief economist has admitted his profession is in crisis, afterfailing to predict the 2008 financial crash and the impact of brexit. andy haldane says criticisms of economist are "a fair cop". it was last year's election, of
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course. it was! it is 2017, so that was last year. the financial times reports china is flexing its muscles over south korea's decision to deploy a us ballistic missile shield. it says a chinese government official has visited seoul, threatening south korean companies by saying their business in china could suffer. the international new york times writes about how china is investing heavily in the beautiful game. it has the world's biggest football boarding school, boasting 48 fields, and the country's offering multi—million dollar contracts to top players. sushi anyone, or everyone! 7 the japan times has this enormous fish and its flamboyant owner. the sushi restaurant owner nicknamed "tuna king" has paid over $600,000 for this 212 kilogram blue fin tuna. joining us is justin urquhart stewart, director of seven investment management. good morning. good morning. we will
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get onto fishy matters later. let's start with donald trump and his continued scepticism despite the fa ct continued scepticism despite the fact these intelligence people keep appearing to say they are quite sure something happened. this will be fascinating. disputes have to appear. they have to reveal what is going on. the comment was the chief spook, there is the difference between healthy scepticism and disparagement because they have done all this work and donald trump is disparaging them. in order to prove that they have to show what they have been doing. of course that is the last thing they want to be doing. they are fairly confident. it is from this clapham local. i don't
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think we have ever encountered an aggressive campaign to interfere in the process —— clapham bloke. aggressive campaign to interfere in the process -- clapham bloke. to say that in front of the committee, you can't go backwards on that one. fascinating to see how he reacts. trump has come out and said a lot of things before he has met the professionals in whatever area he is in. if he will curb his rhetoric, after seeing the evidence? you would think so. before getting into the white house, when you are exposed to this information, that you can't know before hand. this information, that you can't know beforehand. to come in and say, none of it is true, you know, just wait. normal logic, this is not what he does. he does the opposite and he gets away with it. it will be interesting to see how he gets out of it. he will say it was a matter of it. he will say it was a matter of how they put it across or
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something. it puts intelligence chiefs on the back foot. then they have to prove to him, notjust on this, in the coming weeks and months. how political have some of the appointees being. one of the issuesis the appointees being. one of the issues is whether the senior members will be moved aside. -- been. i thinkjames clapham is moving on anyway. the guardian, an interesting comment from the chief economist... and we have been talking about this, we spoke about it during the crisis and after the crisis, where were the so—called experts? the credit rating agencies didn't get it right, they were. . . agencies didn't get it right, they were... some of them were corrupt! that was a whole other story. they get it wrong all the time, otherwise there wouldn't be a crash. if we all
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had the glass ball in front of us. no one pretended that... you can never be 100% sure. you have to sit one hand on the other and try to steer through the middle and every so steer through the middle and every so often hit a rock. what we know is there will be another crash, we don't know when it will occur but it will be on a different subject. not only did he say they got it wrong in predicting the financial crash, the crisis, but all of the doomsayers about brexit and supposedly what it would mean for the economy. which hasn't happened yet. there is still lots of time. it isn't a short-term issue. all that they can do is flag things and say, here are some risks and opportunities and then you have to interpret that and figure out where to invest the money. and they
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keep it is, coping with irrational behaviour. how can you deal with that? it is by its very nature. back to mrtrump. that? it is by its very nature. back to mr trump. south korea and china... this is all to do with the us, terminal high altitude aerial defence system or thard. every time they come up against this power, this missile defence system, the others don't like it. in this case, china and south korea say they would have tojoin in with china and south korea say they would have to join in with this system. that would call into question china's nuclear deterrent if they can't use it. the same thing also applies in eastern europe if you do the same thing with poland and russia. a very similar argument. this has moved into the economic world because now you have china
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threatening south korean companies as to their investments in china. and if they stuck to the threats, it could have a big impact on samsung and phones that are flogged in china. there are a few people who use of phones in china. they say they are unaware of any meetings. yeah, ok. they are unaware of any meetings. yeah, 0k. talking china, not that i ama yeah, 0k. talking china, not that i am a big soccer... sorry, football fan. china, like what it does with many industries, it is going to start churning out little footballers. don't you love it? the pictures are amazing. it is a factory... that is a very large rice paddy. parents pay $8,700 per year to send their darlings here. there are 2800 students just to send their darlings here. there are 2800 studentsjust purely on football. yeah, no. china, not that
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i follow it, they have just got that bloke, maybe someone can help, that bloke, maybe someone can help, that bloke they are paying 80 million... yeah, don't ask me. and you call yourself british? i think the point was he wasn't well known. they have to get the talent in to teach these kids and to make the school reputable. meanwhile, the ft says beijing blows whistle on football spending spree. so, buy as you pay, ta ke spending spree. so, buy as you pay, take as you choose. so they don't think they are spending much. they are cutting it. sushi? no, not really. 0k, are cutting it. sushi? no, not really. ok, let's wrap it up. laughter what about you? really. ok, let's wrap it up. laughter what about you 7|j really. ok, let's wrap it up. laughter what about you? i like japanese food but i am australian, i don't like raw stuff. you have to barbecue it to death. this is well known. these big tuna cost an arm and a leg. if you eat when you have
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theissue and a leg. if you eat when you have the issue with this guy, the pr king of this. he paid $363,000 for this tent ofjune. of this. he paid $363,000 for this tent of june. well, of this. he paid $363,000 for this tent ofjune. well, it is a big tin of tuna. —— tin of tuna. tent ofjune. well, it is a big tin of tuna. -- tin of tuna. even if he sells it all, it is 25 times... you know... it is purely pr. and we are doing the pr for him. it is probably not even a fish, it is probably plastic. it is actually beautiful, it is quite sad that it is sitting on the table, but anyway. and looking at its size it has probably sitting there for some time. looking at its size it has probably sitting there for some timelj looking at its size it has probably sitting there for some time. i would say it is making me feel hungry, but i don't think it is. no, not at all. have a good day, see you later, goodbye. hello there, good morning. yesterday morning we saw the lowest temperature so far in england this winter, we got to —8.1 in rural oxfordshire. this morning the frost
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is nowhere near as widespread. there'll be some across the south—eastern quarter of the uk, but, the further west you go, a lot more cloud, and that cloud is bringing at least some rain with it, but it's also helping to get the temperatures up, seven or eight degrees to start the day in glasgow and belfast. but it'll be quite widespread in the western side of scotland, the eastern side faring a little bit better. still cloudy and it's quite wet in northern ireland first thing this morning. some rainjust fringing into the western side of england and wales. not quite into cornwall and devon at this stage, so it's largely dry here. head a little bit further east and it's notjust cold and frosty, there'll be some patches of fog, and some of that fog will be slow to clear, and it could be quite dense in places, so do bear that in mind if you're heading out on the roads. and there'll be some patches of fog in eastern anglia, it'll be a chilly old day here. chilly here across northern england, but a fair bit of cloud and just a little bit of rain first thing. now, our main area of rain will be toppling its way a little bit further southwards and eastwards
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through the day, so it'll eventually get down to the midlands, some light and patchy rain here into the afternoon, but it never really gets to east anglia and the south—east, so here it'll stay fairly cloudy into the afternoon, but there'll some breaks, but here's also where we see the lowest temperatures. but furtherwest, milderair coming from the atlantic, it could get into double figures. and that milder air, the less—cold air, comes in from the atlantic on that westerly breeze, and that'll push a little bit of patchy rain across some parts first thing on saturday but, actually, into the weekend, yeah, a lot less cold than what we've seen recently, but a lot of cloud across most places through the weekend and a little bit of patchy rain and drizzle, but certainly not a wash out, just pretty grey skies. so, we do see a lot of cloud on saturday, a little bit of rain here and there, maybe a few breaks in the cloud, top temperatures around about ten or 11 degrees, so something a lot less cold coming into the united kingdom, but we've got this cold northerly wind down across central and eastern parts of europe, and it really will be a very cold weekend through the balkans, it could go as low as —10,
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and that'll be daytime temperatures, so a big contrast across europe this weekend. second part of the weekend back on our shores looks a lot like the first part of the weekend, a lot of cloud, not much rain, but there will be some, and temperatures peaking at around about nine or 10 degrees. and then on into the early part of the coming week we start to see something a bit more unsettled developing, a weather front will be heading its way south and east across the uk, and note on our isobars on the chart, it'll be quite windy, the rain starts in scotland and northern ireland and then it makes a steady progress starts in england and northern ireland and then it makes steady progress southwards and eastwards across the rest of the uk. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. donald trump goes face to face with intelligence chiefs after weeks of speculation over hacking. they'll tell the president—elect why they think russia intervened in the us election campaign, as he faces criticism from both sides of the political divide.
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g row grow up. time to be an adult. you're president. good morning. it's friday, the 6th of january. also this morning: unions say a strike on southern rail will go ahead next week despite a report which says it is safe for train drivers to operate doors. i will
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