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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 6, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:00. donald trump come in for heavy criticism from the vice—president for questioning us intelligence agencies. not to be prepared to listen to, the myriad of intelligence agencies from defence intelligence, the cia, etc, is absolutely mindless. russia orders the withdrawal its aircraft carrier from the mediterranean, where it's been involved in military action in syria. a giant iceberg, a quarter the size of wales, is ready to break off from the larsen c ice shelf in antarctica. the funeral of the man killed during a police operation in west yorkshire on monday is taking place in huddersfield today. ba rack obama describes
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the torture of a mentally disabled man in chicago, streamed on facebook live, as a "despicable" hate crime. also, the winner of the bbc‘s sound of 2017 has been announced. ray burke. greg burke. 22—year—old south londoner, ray black, has been described as embodying female black britishness. and a more ancient noise. how stonehenge may have sounded, thousands of years ago. good morning. it's friday 6th january.
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i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the us president—elect, donald trump, has voiced fresh scepticism about claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election, just hours before he's due to receive a detailed briefing from intelligence chiefs on the alleged cyber—attack. he appears to be sticking to the opinion. the in a series of tweets overnight, he said: the three intelligence heads have collectively insisted the kremlin ordered the attack to undermine mr trump's opponent, hillary clinton and have warned the president—elect against disparaging their findings. it comes as the outgoing vice
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presidentjoe it comes as the outgoing vice president joe biden says the president joe biden says the president needs to grow up. our correspondence, dan johnson reports. the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election intending to help donald trump win. hacking is only one part of it and it also entails classical propaganda, misinformation. that the president—elect has again questioned theirjudgment. it's the latest in a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials, before saying he's a big fan, then challenging them once again. the cia director said he was expecting expecting a feisty meeting.
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i am hoping that he is going to be respectful of the profession, respectful of our agency as well as the rest of the intelligence community and looking forward to a rather robust, if not sporty, discussion. on this issue. there's been more blunt criticism of mr trump's approach from his political enemies. for a president not to have confidence in, not to be prepared to listen to, the myriad of intelligence agencies from defence intelligence, the cia, etc, is absolutely mindless. grow up. time to be an adult. you're president. you got to do something. show us what you have. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump's already announced at least two of these men will be
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replaced when he takes office two weeks today. with me is our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. it is worth reflecting again that it isa it is worth reflecting again that it is a pretty astounding situation agreeing. but not the analysis of the us intelligence agencies. what you talking about those tweets? the us intelligence agencies. what you talking about those tweets7m was interesting. suggesting that somehow the fbi had not looked at the servers of the democratic national committee. the very servers that were the target of this alleged russian hack. it was actually suggesting that the dnc had not allowed the fbi to look at the servers. that is actually not true. but it is true that the fbi did not conduct forensics analysis on the
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servers. that was done by a third party, a private organisation. it is worth bearing in mind that here is a party who's candidacy for the presidency hillary clinton was at that moment being investigated by the fbi over her e—mail saga and so there perhaps was a reluctance on behalf of the democrats to allow the fbi in. it is also been reported in donald trump ought to know this that when the fbi first contacted the democrats to say we think something fishy is going on, the democrats told them to go away. they thought it might be a hoax slightly ironically. would love to be a fly on the wall. how donald trump reacts to this. is it going to start pulling in the same direction as them or not? this is a man who has got a reputation already for sounding very robust one minute and
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then backtracking and then sometimes going on there attack again. picture the scene coming here he is confronted by the intelligence chiefs who are saying here is the evidence that vladimir putin helped and try to get you elected to the presidency. that is not an easy message for president—elect to hear. that is maybe why in the last few weeks he has been vehemently opposed to hearing that gain traction. we're hearing more and more that the intelligence chiefs are certain. we have the individuals, they are saying, who are responsible for passing that to jullien saying, who are responsible for passing that tojullien aside. donald trump at some point is
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current have to say yes, i accept what you are saying here or is he going to carry on with this extraordinary desire to keep the intelligence agencies who are soon to be his intelligence agencies at arms length? is it the latter? if so, we arms length? is it the latter? if so, we are arms length? is it the latter? if so, we are in for a very difficult relationship. joining me now from our central london studio is professor anthony glees, director at the centre for security and intelligence studies at the university of buckingham. does all of this look like weakness and fragmentation to america's enemies? i think it does. and fragmentation to america's enemies? ithink it does. ithink this is a genuinely serious situation. it must be unprecedented for a president, situation. it must be unprecedented fora president, president—elect, situation. it must be unprecedented for a president, president—elect, to be at loggerheads with his intelligence jeeps. be at loggerheads with his intelligencejeeps. yes, we know some of them can be replaced, maybe
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all of them, but actually to express all of them, but actually to express a lack of confidence in the us security and intelligence community is unprecedented. it also is extremely dangerous for the rest of us. extremely dangerous for the rest of us. there are three aspects to this quarrel that is going on. first of all, the internal american aspect, people shouldn't forget that the allegation is unjust that the russian's hacked and passed on to julian assange, but that it was only hillary clinton's campaign that was being undermined by the information that was being put out. so, directly doing down hillary in order to play up doing down hillary in order to play up donald j trump. doing down hillary in order to play up donaldj trump. the second issue is the fallout on global security of an american president saying basically, our intelligence
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community is rubbish. they gave us weapons of mass to structure and —— weapons of mass to structure and —— weapons of mass destruction why should we trust them. this is a very ignorant and simplistic point to make. then there is our own relationship with the americans in the united kingdom. that relationship is almost totally and intelligence sharing relationship. donald trump has said not only that he has little confidence in his secret agencies, but also that he wa nts to secret agencies, but also that he wants to bring back waterboarding and believes in torture as well as walls to keep muslims out. i do a lot of our people in the uk won't wa nt to lot of our people in the uk won't want to work with american intelligence under those conditions. so, it is a serious headache everywhere you look at it. and joe biden has said those comments that he made in that interview that has been broadcast all around the world,
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where is donald trump getting his information from? is basically saying to the people who know about these things that what they are saying is rubbish. is donald trump cutting through one of the pillars of how america does things post 911? it is one thing to say that you want to come into washington and do things differently, it is very different now here's president—elect. different now here's president-elect. yes. what we are seeing, globally, but particularly in america and perhaps the united kingdom, we're seeing people who know, civil servants, secret civil serva nts know, civil servants, secret civil servants in this case, who understand the complexities of situations. you understand in the case of intelligence, it is a very imperfect art, being kind of thrown out of the window and replaced by very simplistic statements by people, but also by a much more simplistic and simple view of the
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world. trump has never had any political governing instrument at all. he is saying that i am a man who can do deals. if you look at the people who he has already appointed as his national security advisers and chief, they are largely generals. generals good at giving orders, but also good at taking orders. will the challenger trump? i don't think so. look at the secretary of state. somebody who has had the middle of friendship conferred on him by the man we must 110w conferred on him by the man we must now learn to call president putin. it augurs ill for us in britain, for us it augurs ill for us in britain, for us in europe. above all, it's an opening for putin. he has already been given one opening by president obama in the middle east. who would have thought of that four years ago? that russia would be the sole dominant power in the middle east. now, he appears to be given him an
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opening in europe and eastern europe in particular. at the same time, the very people we expect to keep us safe before it gets into military action, the security and intelligence community are being taken to the cleaners by the president—elect of the united states. very disturbing. thank you very much. scientists have told the bbc that a giant iceberg, a quarter the size of wales is ready to break off from the larsen c ice shelf in antarctica. as you can see in this image, the ice bucket expected to be around the corner the size of wales. the multicoloured line shows have a crack has lengthened over the years. this image captured by scientists on nasa's is bridge mission. it shows the crack from above. when it eventually breaks off, it is likely to be one of the ten largest ever recorded. researchers say that this isa recorded. researchers say that this is a geographical and not a climate
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event. here is matt mcgrath. we are talking about maps and the vast expanse of ice. the fissure that assaulted another huge block of ice has been expanding and lengthening in recent weeks, hasn't? yes. it is something that has been aware of for many yea rs. that has been aware of for many years. it has been growing slowly, in his sped up in the last year or so, but the last few months it is really raced ahead. it is now only being held on by a small crack of ice. that is all that is holding this huge is blocked from carving, as scientists call it, and breaking away. this is a geographical event and is not thought to be anything to do with global warming. there is certainly no evidence to say that climate change has made any difference to this. it is something that has been going on for many decades. it is come to the surface
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now, we're not sure why. others believe that the warming of the earth could be speeding this up. there is no direct evidence of global warming having an impact on this. concerns, though, that there might be. is there any evidence that when large blocks of ice like this break off to create these huge icebergs, does it have any significant impact on the ecology of the area? yes. one of the big things people are concerned about is that it is the rest of the eye shop. when a previous event like this happens in 2002 when a large piece of ice broke off, the large shallow minded decision appeared within a month. scientists don't expect that to happen here, but it is possible. it is holding back the great in holding back the ice to get into the sea. that would have indications of sea levels around the world are fitted happen. any idea when it might happen? within months. the headlines on bbc newsroom live
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donald trump is due to meet intelligence agencies today after questionnaire findings of interference in the us presidential election. russia says it is sending home and aircraft carrier deployed to the syrian coast as it scales down it's military presence. scientists say giant iceberg quarter oversight of wales is ready to break off from antarctica. and in sport, p9p off from antarctica. and in sport, pep guardiola says he's looking forward to a special first experience of the fa cup this evening. his manchester cities i travel travel to face west ham in the third round. the british number one don't have a contest offered a shop defeat in their semifinal beaten by what number 52. i will be back with more
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with the story is just after half past. russia says its aircraft carrier, the admiral kuznetsov, is to come home from the mediterranean, where it's been involved in military action in syria. its return is part of a scaling down of russia's military deployment in the region. the announcement comes days after russia and syria negotiated a ceasefire. it is largely holding. i'm joined now by famil. talk to me about the context. once admiral kuznetsov pulls out, what will be left? well, it depends. if does not take a large chunk of the russian airforce does not take a large chunk of the russian air force group does not take a large chunk of the russian airforce group in does not take a large chunk of the russian air force group in the area. it was not considered a big military
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asset, mainly propaganda asset. it showed to the russian general staff that tee three had technical difficulties. —— admiral kuznetsov had technical difficulties. the remaining aircraft on the battle cruiser, aircraft carrier, will go back with it. the major part of the aircraft will still continue with operations in syria. is this symbolic? is this russia saying that we think will we have done what we set out to do in syria? is this russia saying that they think president assad is secure in power? we have seen last year that when president putin pulled out, but then we saw the battle cruiser sent to
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the area. i would say this is part of russian military tactic to show one thing, but in fact do completely different. thank you. the funeral of yasser yaqub, who was shot dead by police on monday, has taken place in huddersfield. hundreds of people attended the service, which has now moved on to a local cemetery. mr yaqub died after police stopped a car nearjunction 2a of the m62. his mother cried as her 28—year—old son's coffin was carried out another man is appearing in court in dewsbury today, charged with firearms offences. our correspondentjudith moritz is in huddersfield for us now. could you bring it up to date with events with the investigation and so on? yes. several different elements of that to tell you about. just to begin with, the funeral which happened here earlier run, it was full on
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this road. xxx three's coughlin was carried up this hill and as that happened —— mr yaqub coffin. in the end of a short service, the coffin was taken away from here for burial. friends of mr yaqub have said to us that they feel... it was a very calm atmosphere here this morning, very respectful, but there is an undercurrent of anger. questions being asked about the shooting on monday night and why mr yaqub was killed. the elements of the investigation you have talked about, a man has been charged in connection with the case. charged with firearms offe nsives. with the case. charged with firearms offensives. a 30—year—old from dewsbury is due to appear before
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magistrates this morning in leeds. over in bradford, their‘s been an inquest which was opened and adjourned, a very short hearing in the case. it was adjourned to the end of march, when it will be heard more fully. the fact that we gleaned from court this morning in bradford included the cause of death, which was established as gunshot wounds to their chests. we were told in court that a firearm was recovered from the passenger foot well from the car in which mr yaqub was travelling and that he was identified from his fingerprints. we also were told that in that hearing that his profession was an office clerk. that is what he was an office clerk. that is what he was recorded as, he was a single man. lots of questions surrounding the incident. the complaints commission continue their
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investigation. we heard in court from the coroner officer that the vehicle in which tee three was travelling was involved in a hard stop. west yorkshire police stopped that car. when the vehicle was stopped on a slip road just near to the m62. a little bit more detail and merging their in court, i think in due course more of that will come out. these are early days in terms of thejudicial process. more and more mental health... ministers say they will be spending £400 million over the next four years, to ensure mental health teams can provide support to people in their homes. michael buchanan has more. oliver lang helps his father run a small post office in norfolk. in 2014, the 27—year—old was detained under the mental health act. he spent several weeks in a psychiatric unit but even when he was well enough to leave he couldn't.
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delays in arranging suitable support in the community meant he spent a further two months unnecessarily in hospital. ijust felt like i was in danger in there because a lot happens in hospital and i felt like if someone attacked me i would have to defend myself, but if i did defend myself and hurt someone then they'd say i was a danger to the public still and they would keep me locked up for longer, so i was trying to be whiter than white. the latest figures show more than 200,000 bed days were lost in the nhs in england as a whole in october 2016 due to delayed discharges. for nhs trusts specialising in physical health care, that represented a 30% rise on the previous 12 months. but for those trusts most closely focused on mental health and learning disabilities, the increase was 56%. the analysis was carried out for this former care minister who says the figures show that mental health patients are being discriminated against. it means there's a shortage of community psychiatric nurses, a shortage of support services like detox facilities and a shortage in social care,
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which i think has hit people with mental ill— health disproportionately hard. ministers say they're spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide more support to people in their homes. michael buchanan, bbc news. and we can talk now to the former care minister and liberal democrat mp norman lamb, who you saw in that report. thank you forjoining us. delayed discharge, problems and social care. bed blocking. easing to be constant is now when our discussions about the nhs. what is the impact for people who are ready to be sent home but can't be for whatever reason? those who are waiting to get into medical care, hospital care, to be treated for medical illness? you are absolutely right to focus on the impact on people. it is very
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important care. imagine someone who is ready to leave an institution to try and return to independent living and they are stuck there for longer than they need to be, this makes it much more difficult to achieve independence again. the other problem that you get is it means that hospitals and mental health units are often full to overflowing because they can't discharge patients. that means that someone else who needs inpatient care can't get a ccess else who needs inpatient care can't get access to a bed. they often shunted elsewhere in the country. sometimes for hundreds of miles from home. we know that is associated with an increased risk of suicide. here we have a whole system under impossible strain, in my view. it is having a genuine and serious impact on individuals. i think it is intolerable. is it discrimination so? you have said that. it is. we have talked about the mental health service being the poor relation of
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health. you think that still exists? yes. totally. when i was minister i introduced the first ever maximum waiting time standards to start to achieve a more equal system of rights. but for most people with mental ill—health, they are still waiting for that right to have treatment on a timely basis. we set out a vision to achieve that by 2020, but the government isn't funding it. the whole of the nhs is under really impossible financial treasure. but when the system is under pressure, it's always mental health that loser that more than other parts of the system. that means that amounts to discrimination with people with mental ill—health, which i think in today's society is just impossible to justify. so, that 400 million overfour years just impossible to justify. so, that
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400 million over four years to just impossible to justify. so, that 400 million overfour years to help improve care with people in their homes, it is difficult sometimes to get a grasp on what a huge figure like that would mean in practice.“ that going to be another? no, it won't be enough. here is the reality. my own family has experienced mental ill—health. when oui’ experienced mental ill—health. when ourson, experienced mental ill—health. when our son, oui’ experienced mental ill—health. when our son, our oldest son, experienced mental ill—health. when ourson, our oldest son, needed treatment in his teenage years and we we re treatment in his teenage years and we were told we had to wait up to six months to get treatment, we did what i guess any family would do if they could achieve it, we paid for care. but how could you possibly tolerate a situation where people with money can get access to good ca re with money can get access to good care when they need it and those without are left waiting? i don't think that's acceptable. that's why i will continue the campaign to ensure that the rhetoric from government, which these days is pretty good, is actually matched by the reality. the experience of individuals and families around the country. thank you very much for
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your time. sunday is just coming into us, a teenager accused of killing polish man in harlow last summer has appeared at a youth court in chelmsford. magistrates have sent this case to the crown court and the youth will appear there onjanuary the 9th. so, the teenager accused of killing arekjozwik appeared in court. so, the stunt our world famous, but no one knows why they we re famous, but no one knows why they were there. but now there's a theory that the sound of stonehenge could unlock some its hidden history. 0ne archaeologist has taken up the challenge of recreating what the acoustics of the ruins would have been like 3,000 years ago and he says it could reveal why the site was so important. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. wind blows eerily people have been coming here for at least 4000—5000 years,
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so we're walking in the feet of history. when the wind blows, some people say they hear a strange hum. thomas hardy wrote about it in tess of the d'urbervilles, and doctor rupert till is convinced the sound of stonehenge is part of its magic. taps you hear between this beat a little echo. & leaves you, and hits the stoning comes back at you. —— as the sound. the problem is this isjust a fragment of the sound people would have heard 4000 years ago.
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i met the site's historian, susan greening. so, this is the front door of stonehenge we're going through right now? that's right, yes, and we are coming into the central space now. it does change a little bit, doesn't it? it does, you have the feeling of being enclosed within a space. and that's with many of the stones having gone. what we're looking at today is the ruin of stonehenge. many stones have been taken away from the site, many have fallen down, lots have been eroded, they're covered in lichen. it would've been a completely different atmosphere, wouldn't it? yes, it would. however, rupert tell has an answer. what this new vr technology offers is a possibility, a chance to, well, return back and see and also hear what this place used to look like in the past. we have constructed it by rebuilding stonehenge digitally and rebuilding the acoustics of the space as it would have been when all of the stones were here. so, how different is the old sound
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to the sound we have today? well, if i tap this drum now, you will hear a little bit of an echo. when all of the stones are put in place, there is a much more powerful sense of enclosure, a slight reverberation, more echo, and it changes more as you walk around. and the reason he is convinced ancient people were interested in sound is because of his work on caves. hundreds of metres underground, they found ancient instruments and human marks on certain stalactites. stalactites that are musical. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25. plays notes on stalactites so today, it's just ruin beside a city road,
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a chance to say goodbye to the 21st century and experience the last sound of stonehenge. now, let's have a look at the weather. it is pretty cloudy at stonehenge at the moment and across most of the uk today. particularly compared to yesterday where we had more sunshine. that cloud is generating some rain and some heavy rain as well. bits of brightness further east but nowhere near as much sunshine as we have seen and a raw feeling day as well as temperatures are slow to rise. no more than four 01’ are slow to rise. no more than four or5 are slow to rise. no more than four or 5 degrees across central and eastern areas. more mild further west, and in scotland. it tends to
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dry out later on, keeping a lot of clout and fog over higher ground. the exception will be scotland where the clear skies will lead to a touch of frost tomorrow morning. the theme for the weekend is that it won't be as chilly as it has been. disappointingly cloudy for many, not much anyway sunshine and some patchy drizzle as well. more detail in half half an hour. good morning. this is bbc newsroom live. donald trump will meet intelligence agency chiefs later after casting doubt on their claims of russian interference in the us presidential election. the outgoing vice—president joe biden has called for mr trump to ‘grow up' and stop undermining the agencies. not to be prepared to listen to the myriad of intelligence agencies,
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from defence intelligence to the cia extra, is absolutely mindless. russia has ordered the withdrawal of its aircraft carrier from the mediterranean, where it's been involved in military action in syria. off from antarctica. a long—running rift in an ice shelf grew suddenly in december and now the piece — which is a quarter the size of wales time for a full round up of the sports news — here's hugh. good morning. it's one of the biggest weekends of the football calendar, it's fa cup third round weekend — the point where premier league and championship teams enter the competition. the first tie of the round is live on bbc one this evening — and sees manchester city visit the london stadium to face west ham united. for city boss pep guardiola,
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it's a first experience of the cup. what i hear before, the cup is special because the lower teams can beat the big teams. that's why it is so fascinating. it happens in the cup as well. that's why i'm looking forward. but of course it is tough, it will be luck of the draw. a big game for us and a big game forthem, the fa cup. it is a big game for the fans of course and i am sure they will put a very strong team tomorrow, because it's a big chance for them to get a trophy. tomorrow will be a special fa cup moment for the former manchester united hero jaap stam. the dutchman was part of the treble winning side of 1999 and will return to old trafford as the manager of championship side reading. it would be nice to have a warm
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welcome. i had a great time over there. the fans, the club, they were very important period in my career andi very important period in my career and i haven't been back in an occasion like this, so it is good to be back, good to play over there, but i said it a couple of times. it's not about me. it's about the time that comes there and hopefully we can be a surprise, show ourselves there. following the likes to carlos tevez, demba ba and ramires — the chinese super league has picked up another premier league player. nigeria's jon 0bi mikel follows former chelsea team—mate 0scar to china, joining tianjin teda fc. in an emotional letter to his ‘chelsea family‘ on social media, the midfielder thanked fans for making the ‘impossible, possible.‘ former manchester united midfielder ravel morrison is training with wigan athletic. the 23—year—old has been playing for lazio since being sold by west ham. while with the hammers he had loan spells at birmingham city, qpr and cardiff city. wigan manager warren joyce
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describes him as having the "x factor" and as good as any youngster he ever worked. he says outside influences are the reason why his career has never matched his potential. the manor formula one team have gone into administration. the british—based team, who finished last in last year‘s world championship, will collapse without new investment. bbc sport understands staff were informed of the development earlier this morning. johanna konta has suffered a shock defeat in the shenzhen 0pen semi—finals, losing to world number 52 katerina siniakova. the british number one went down in three sets to her 20—year—old opponent in china. third seed konta — the world number ten — was the highest—ranked player remaining in the draw. sir andy murray is playing tomas berdych later today for a place in the final of the qatar 0pen. he beat spain‘s nicolas almagro yesterday for his second match in a row.
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there was a tie—break in the opening set and murray won it. he took the second 7—5. murray has not been beaten in his last 27 matches. that is all for now. we will be back in the next hour. president barack obama has described the torture of a mentally disabled man in chicago, which was streamed on facebook live, as a ‘despicable‘ hate crime. the four suspects are seen assaulting a man with special needs, while making anti—white racial taunts. the victim was found wandering the streets traumatised, after being held bound and gagged for up to two days. they‘re due in court today accused of aggravated battery with a weapon. a third of hospital trusts in england have warned urgent action is needed to cope with the pressure of patient numbers — according to figures seen by the bbc. however new figures from nhs england show slightly fewer patients attended accident and emergency
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departments in england the week between christmas and new year, as compared to earlier in december. however the pressure of the number of people admitted to hospital prompted a third of hospital trusts in england to warn that urgent action was needed. that data comes from a health—care think tank, the nuffield trust. let‘s go live now to salford and our health correspondent dominic hughes. a lot of figures there. just make sense of those for us and put them in context. what is the overall figure? traditionally, the week of christmas week has always been a quiet week for the nhs, notjust in england but across the uk. you can imagine that is because people are spending time with their families and their families are there to look after them if they are not feeling
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so good, but after christmas we are ina so good, but after christmas we are in a period when the pressure becomes really evident, particularly in accident and emergency departments across the uk, where they tend to see a surge. we went to get the detail and that until next week. it‘s not surprising we have seen the figures we saw today, but what we have seen in the other big as he referenced, what the hospitals that are saying they are struggling to cope with, one third of hospitals issuing these alerts, if you like, saying they are in danger of not being able to provide proper care for their patience, that really reflects the on growing pressures we have seen right across the help system in the uk. this relates really not so much to what is happening in a and e itself. that is where the symptoms show up. it is what is happening at the back—end of
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the hospital, where patients are discharged. maybe elderly patients going into a care home or home to their own homes with care, they are struggling to discharge those patients because social care plans are not in place, building up the rest of the hospital meaning they cannot put a patient into the beds being occupied by those who could otherwise go home. it is a picture we have seen for some months. we a lwa ys we have seen for some months. we always come back to that, don‘t we, social care? it is an issue which is dominating the nhs notjust across the winter, but it has been ongoing since the summer. social care has been a problem across the uk as a whole, but in england in particular where councils are struggling to resource social care. social care budgets have been cut back enormously and we know that councils are struggling to provide that social care, having an impact on the nhs. there are lots of efforts to
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try to integrate systems, to try to make the system one whole system of health and social care, but these things take time and resources. it is obviously proving to be a big struggle. everybody in the nhs and social care system knows that there is an issue that and they know it has to be addressed quickly. thank you very much. ray blk, a soul singer, has topped the bbc sound of 2017 left. the track record of the award is good, having previously spotted the likes of dowell and j. we are currently in croydon, about
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to go somewhere that everyone here knows. he gripped a great breakfast. —— you get a great breakfast. can i please have a caribbean breakfast? in my head, from really young, i was a lwa ys in my head, from really young, i was always sure i would end up in the music business. i didn‘t know how. i wasn‘t from a musical family and no one in my family was even particularly interested in music. somehow it got recognised in primary school and so they picked me as one of the kids to go on the gifted and talented scheme for music. i was so chuffed as i spend my summer singing, recording, writing songs andi singing, recording, writing songs and i was like, this is who i am. this is a community spot. i love how eve ryo ne this is a community spot. i love how everyone from the area comes here and hangs out and you are bound to
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bump into somebody you know coming here. there is no such thing as a small breakfast here. ijust started ripping beats off youtube. no resources , ripping beats off youtube. no resources, i didn‘t know anyone in music. i wasjust resources, i didn‘t know anyone in music. i was just determined to make it happen myself. i‘ve learnt so much from being in south london. ya, it‘s made me the woman i am today. my food was the one that really kind of started everything. the producer started the chords on the piano and something about it felt so nostalgic and it took me back to where i was from and what it was like growing up there. really, honestly, i hated where i was from and ijust
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really, honestly, i hated where i was from and i just wanted really, honestly, i hated where i was from and ijust wanted to get out. and that‘s really how the song came about. 2016 has been such a whirlwind. i don‘t think i could have had a better year, to be honest. this time next year, i just want to be a better artist, making more good music. i think i‘d just like to be better. ray blk. the indian actor, 0m puri — who starred in the british comedy "east is east" — has died of a suspected heart attack. he was 66. 0m puri also appeared in other films, including "gandhi", and more recently he played opposite dame helen mirren in "the hundred footjourney". let‘s ta ke let‘s take a short look at a clip. this is private property. excuse me,
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do you own this property? no. so you are just passing to? can i order a masala cooked the way you cook? we open on saturday night. my son is the best indian chef in europe. come in. don't be shy. with me is film director, gurinder chadha — who‘s behind hits such as ‘bhaji on the beach‘ and ‘bend it like it beckham‘ — she‘s been working with 0m puri on her upcoming film ‘viceroy‘s house‘. thank you so much forjoining us. i know that in your last conversation with him, 0m puri had asked you when he was going to see the film, but sadly, of course, he hasn‘t had the opportunity to do that. no, it's very galling for me and very sad, because he was so excited when he got the script. he was so excited to be in
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got the script. he was so excited to beina got the script. he was so excited to be in a film about independence, 35 yea rs be in a film about independence, 35 years after being in gandhi and he was a film from a british agent perspective and he was very excited about that, particularly being a punjabi like myself. 0n the set he was very exuberant and very misty tedious, but also —— very mysterious, but also very mindful about the events of independence for all of us. for him to watch the film was going to be a great pleasure for me, to sit down with him and have a drink after, chat about it. i was looking forward to doing that, going to india very soon and showing in the film. we are just seeing some pictures here of you all and set. there you are going over towards him. what was he saying to you there? hey, he is saying to me, you are doing a good job and i said, you did a good job too. that was the thing about him. all that crowd
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there, they were all there at four in the morning, trying to do a party scene and everyone was flagging, but 0m puri stepped up to the plate and got everyone excited, got everyone in the party mood and i think that really is him. and that, he was very serious when the cameras were on him, but off—screen, he relished the idea of being on set and enjoyed just the whole process and i think that he made sheeting with him a much more pleasurable experience than just the hard much more pleasurable experience thanjust the hard grind. in much more pleasurable experience than just the hard grind. in your film, he was playing the part of a blind man and i understand you were impressed with how he researched the role, extra props he asked for to make it more realistic. when you work with an actor like 0m puri, someone so talented with that career, it is always a pleasure as a director because you don‘t know what they will pull out of the bag. with me, he would ask for little things
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and in this case, he was a blind man and in this case, he was a blind man and he asked for a newspaper. i said, what are you going to do with a newspaper in this scene? he said, please give me one. i was surprised because he was supposed to be listening to the radio but he took a newspaper, scratched it into a ball and used it as a ball, like a stressful. he did that in the scene and it was genius because it showed how as an elderly person, he was concerned about is health and it gave him something to do as an actor. it added a new guy mentioned to his character as a blind man that he was still concerned about his health. that comes with experience, with commitment to your craft. but that also comes with being a consummate professional. i have disabled for me, that‘s what it was. if you look at the body of his work, in gandhi he was very young, in east
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is east, he played a pakistani yorkshire man. he has played indian nationals, he has played british actors. hugely versatile. hugely versatile and a terrible, terrible loss for us in the film industry who try to make global films with indian actors. he was one who was known all over the world. thank you very much for your time for remembering 0m puri. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first — the headlines on bbc newsroom live: donald trump is due to meet intelligence agency chiefs later today — after questioning their findings of russian interference in the us presidential election. russia says it‘s sending home an aircraft carrier deployed to the syrian coast, as it scales down its military presence. scientists say a giant iceberg a quarter the size of wales, is ready to break off from antarctica. in the business news...
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the failure to predict the financial crisis was a "michael fish" moment, that‘s according to the bank of england‘s chief economist. andy haldane said economists were "in crisis" following the 2008—09 crash and the brexit vote. but he defended predictions of a post brexit slowdown in the uk economy we are still expecting this rather difficult balancing act with a slowing. not a huge slowing, but nonetheless, a material slowing during the course of next year. as the effects of higher prices in the shops begin to chew away a little at the spending power of consumers, we predict that. high street sales fell in december for the fourth year in a row, as shoppers shifted more christmas shopping online. sales were 0.1% lower than in december 2015,
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according to bdo‘s high street sales tracker, with consumers spending more on home wares but less on fashion. but online sales were 19% higher than a year earlier. never mind those exploding phones! samsung‘s on track for its best profit in years — and pledges to put the galaxy note 7 debacle behind it — the south korean tech giant is forecasting profits of £6.3 billion for the last three months of 2016. how? components. samsung makes chips and screens for the whole tech industry. in a week that‘s seen the resignation — and new appointment — of the uk‘s ambassador to the eu, tweet threats of border taxes by the us president elect, and a confirmation that uk prime minister theresa may will meet donald trump in the spring — trade is a big issue. i‘m joined by lesley bachelor, director general from the institute of exports. thank you forjoining us this morning. trade is obviously very
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important as we explored about 28% of what we make and import even more than that. recently, with brexit, with donald trump the new us president, this trade conversation has been getting bigger and bigger. what —— what challenges are uk trade facing this year? i suppose the main challenge is that we are very uncertain about the exchange rates. it makes exports cheaper but if we are importing raw materials, that is going to start impacting in exactly the same way as it will on the high street. so issues like currency uncertainties but also looking ahead, talking brexit, we are also talking about protectionism. how worrying if it for the uk economy that donald trump has been making these threats againstjulie —— us companies and threatening border taxes? the us is our biggest export
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market, germany be next. it is causing us a lot of anguish. it is making sure that we are all a lot better prepared. exporters have been able to cruise a little bit because it has been so easy to work with the eu and now they are going to have to find out a lot more about pricing intelligently, hedging their currency risks and really understanding the nitty—gritty of how international trade works. understanding the nitty—gritty of how international trade worksm feels as though recently we are seeing a move away from those big, multinational trade deals like the transpacific partnership multinational trade deals like the tra nspacific partnership and multinational trade deals like the transpacific partnership and a move towards perhaps bilateral trade deals, deals between two countries. do you see that? there is still room, i have to say, the transatlantic investment partnership, the one that really looked after the northern hemisphere, was a very intelligent idea. obviously it was difficult to pull off but perhaps the one to ones are there, but that will increase
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paperwork for small businesses, a lot more bureaucracy to work with. it is better to have larger ones really as far as the industry and business is concerned. thank you very much for your time this morning. we‘vejust got very much for your time this morning. we‘ve just got time to have a quick look at the markets. all the markets are focused on the us today, as we have figures coming out in a few hours‘ time that could show where they are going to go with interest rises. if jobs where they are going to go with interest rises. ifjobs have been created, that could suggest a more robust economy, one that could stomach a faster, higher set of interest rates. we will look at those when they come out. the ftse down ever so slightly yesterday but it ended on another record high yesterday and it is on course to hit by straight weeks upgrade at the moment. easyjet came out with some passenger load figures and their share price has gone upjust over
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196. share price has gone upjust over 1%. but oil price is up again, up at just over $57 a barrel. there will be more business throughout the afternoon. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two — first, we leave you with a look at the weather. temperatures have been struggling to rise this morning, not helped by the fa ct rise this morning, not helped by the fact there is a lot of clout in this cry —— a lot of clout in the sky producing some rain. you can see the extent of the rain as we have been through this morning. it is patchy, with some heavy bursts pushing in across western parts. it will take all day for that rain to arrive across the east. it will start to dry out across northern ireland and the north of scotland not doing too
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badly. pretty wet and miserable across badly. pretty wet and miserable a cross m ost badly. pretty wet and miserable across most of northern england, down through wales and into parts of southern england. these temperatures are very southern england. these temperatures are very low further east, some places only three or 4 degrees through the afternoon. as we had through the afternoon. as we had through this evening and into tonight, this rain slumps its way down towards southern and eastern counties, with fog over higher ground too. across scotland, we are more likely to see clearer skies developing, so a touch of frost in some highland clans. but temperatures higher than we have seen the last few nights. a rather disappointingly cloudy weekend to come. drips and drops of rain across southern counties, with things not improving much here at all. the best of the sunshine tomorrow should be across scotland and the east of scotla nd across scotland and the east of scotland should do very well indeed after the frosty start. temperatures reaching five or 6 degrees. despite
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the cloud further south, one or two spots could get into double figures. sunday sees very little change. a lot of dry weather, with the odd drizzly burst across western hills. the best chance of sunshine in the east. it is definitely better here thanit east. it is definitely better here than it is in eastern parts of europe. the weather making headlines with some fiercely cold winds all the way down towards the mediterranean coasts of greece and turkey. we look to the west for our weather, out into the atlantic as we go into next week. a succession of drugs coming in on a jet stream meaning much more lively spells weather over the next week or two. wet at times and often quite windy as well. all the latest on the weather where you are can be found on the bbc weather website. we will be back in around half an hour‘s time. yes, it would.
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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at midday. donald trump is due to meet intelligence agency chiefs later today after questioning their findings of russian interference in the us presidential election. but his stance has come in for heavy criticism. not to be prepared to listen to, the myriad of intelligence agencies from defence intelligence, the cia, etc, is absolutely mindless. russia orders the withdrawal of its aircraft carrier from the mediterranean, where it‘s been involved in military action in syria. a giant iceberg, a quarter the size of wales, is ready to break off from the larsen c ice shelf in antarctica. the funeral of the man killed
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during a police operation in west yorkshire on monday has taken place in huddersfield. ba rack 0bama describes the torture of a mentally disabled man in chicago, streamed on facebook live, as a "despicable" hate crime. also, the winner of the bbc‘s sound of 2017 has been announced. music 22—year—old south londoner, ray blk, has been described as embodying female black britishness. and a more ancient noise. how stonehenge may have sounded, thousands of years ago. good afternoon.
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welcome to bbc newsroom live. the us president—elect, donald trump, is to have a face to face meeting today with america‘s top intelligence chiefs. mr trump has consistently expressed doubts over their strongly—held view that russia was behind a hacking attack designed to interfere with last years american election. and he appears to be sticking to that opinion. in a series of tweets overnight, he said: the three intelligence heads have collectively insisted the kremlin ordered the attack to undermine
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mr trump‘s opponent, hillary clinton and have warned the president—elect against disparaging their findings. it comes as the outgoing vice—presidentjoe biden says mr trump should "grow up" and that it is "absolutely mindless" for the president—elect not to have faith in intelligence agencies. 0ur correspondent dan johnson reports. the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election intending to help donald trump win. hacking is only one part of it and it also entails classical propaganda, disinformation, fake news. but the president—elect has again questioned theirjudgment. it‘s the latest in
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a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials, before saying he‘s a big fan, then challenging them once again. the cia director said he was expecting expecting a feisty meeting. i am hoping that he is going to be respectful of the profession, respectful of our agency as well as the rest of the intelligence community and looking forward to a rather robust, if not sporty, discussion on this issue. there‘s been more blunt criticism of mr trump‘s approach from his political enemies. for a president not to have confidence in, not to be prepared to listen to, the myriad of intelligence agencies from defence intelligence, the cia, etc, is absolutely mindless. grow up.
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time to be an adult. you‘re president. you got to do something. show us what you have. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump‘s already announced at least two of these men will be replaced when he takes office two weeks today. earlier i spoke with professor anthony glees, director at the centre for security and intelligence studies at the university of buckingham. he said the break—down in the relationship could have global implications. think this is a genuinely serious situation, it must be unprecedented for a president or a president—elect to be at loggerheads with his intelligence chiefs. yes, some of them can be replaced, perhaps all of them, but actually to express a lack of confidence in the us security
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intelligence community is unprecedented and it also is extremely dangerous for the rest of us. there are three aspects to this quarrel which is going on. first of all, the internal american aspect. people shouldn‘t forget the allegation isn‘t just people shouldn‘t forget the allegation isn‘tjust the americans hack and pass it on tojullien sarge who is in london, but that it was only hillary clinton‘s campaign that was being undermined by information thatis was being undermined by information that is julian was being undermined by information that isjulian assange was putting out. the second issue is that the fallout on global security of an american president saying basically our intelligence agencies are rubbish, they gave us weapons of
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mass destruction in 2003, why should they be trusted now‘s it is a simplistic ignorant point to make. thirdly, there is our own special relationship in the united kingdom with the united states intelligence community. our special relationship is almost totally and intelligence sharing relationship. donald j is almost totally and intelligence sharing relationship. donaldj trump has said that not only does he have little confidence in his agencies, but also that he wants to bring back waterboarding and believes in torture as well as walls to keep muslims out. it think a lot of our people in the united kingdom don‘t wa nt to people in the united kingdom don‘t want to work with american intelligence under those conditions. it isa intelligence under those conditions. it is a headache, a serious headache everywhere you look at it. it is...
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and joe biden has said those comments that he made in that interview that has been broadcast all around the world, where is donald trump getting his information from? is basically saying to the people who know about these things that what they are saying is rubbish. is donald trump cutting through one of the pillars of how america does things post 911? it is one thing to say that you want to come into washington and do things differently, it is very different now here‘s president—elect. yes. what we are seeing, globally, but particularly in america and perhaps the united kingdom, we‘re seeing people who know, civil servants, secret civil servants in this case, who understand the complexities of situations.
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you understand in the case of intelligence, it is a very imperfect art, being kind of thrown out of the window and replaced by very simplistic statements by people, but also by a much more simplistic and simple view of the world. trump has never had any political governing instrument at all. he is saying that i am a man who can do deals. if you look at the people who he has already appointed as his national security advisers and chief, they are largely generals. generals good at giving orders, but also good at taking orders. will the challenger trump? i don‘t think so. look at the secretary of state. somebody who has had the middle of friendship conferred on him by the man we must now learn to call president putin. it augurs ill for us in britain, for us in europe. above all, it‘s an opening for putin. he has already been given one opening by president obama in the middle east. who would have thought of that four years ago? that russia would be the sole dominant power in the middle east. now, he appears to be giving him an opening in europe and eastern europe in particular. at the same time, the very people we expect to keep us safe before it gets into military action, the security and
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intelligence community are being taken to the cleaners by the president—elect of the united states. very disturbing. thank you very much. what he says afterwards is going to be fascinating and crucial. it is going to be starting to sound like he is pulling in the same direction as his intelligence agencies or not? i would love to be a fly on the one that meeting is in the tension between the parties. two things are clashing, the intelligence community feel that intel is pelle —— they are being challenged. some of those intelligence officials are leaving. not all of them, some of them. donald trump will be bringing his own team. so, ifeel like one
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donald trump will be bringing his own team. so, i feel like one of the things to watch is does donald trump try and this marriage —— disparage them? say that they are the obama people? is hard to imagine him saying that he believes them. his twitter feed will be watched closely to see if he does comment on any way on what is meant to be a classified briefing. you expect that most will —— some will be released, but it is meant to be classified. the idea thatjoe biden saying that donald trump knows more than the experts. what is donald trump dating his tweets ? what is donald trump dating his tweets? that is what is important. until now, it is based on his understanding. this is the first time he has come face—to—face with the details as the agency. it is right that he would be sceptical,
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because it can be wrong. it often fragmentary, often relies on interpretation. that they will build case this time. we do not know for sure how concrete this is. willie sits down and sees it the first time, he is going to make his own mind up and finding out how credible is it. for him to be disparaging about america‘s own intelligence committee in such a public way, that isa committee in such a public way, that is a big problem here, isn‘t it? yes. a big deal. for morale within the intelligence committee, it will suffer. it has been suffering because of the concerns from donald trump‘s statements. it will bring in his own people, and perhaps try and performance. ring him his own people. —— bring in. it is a very important time. russia says its aircraft carrier, the admiral kuznetsov, is to come
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home from the mediterranean, where it‘s been involved in military action in syria. its return is part of a scaling down of russia‘s military deployment in the region. the announcement comes days after russia and turkey negotiated a ceasefire in syria which is largely holding, according to the un. earlier i spoke to famil ismailov from the bbc russian service, and i asked him why the carrier was being sent back to russia: i don‘t know. itself it is not considered a big military asset. it is mostly a propaganda acid. also, a training opportunity for naval pilots. unfortunately, it showed to the russian general staff that admiral kuznetsov itself has technical difficulties, problem with engine, problem with landing. it is not ready worth it as they sit. it will go back a refit. the remaining aircraft on the battle cruiser, will
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go back with it. the major part of the f was. continued operations and syria. is this russia saying that we have done what we have plan to do? that president assad it secure in power? we saw last year when president putin announced a poll out of servicemen and technical capabilities from syria, but then we saw admiral kuznetsov and the new killer powered rocket crews are of the area. —— nuclear powered. i would say it is part of a tactic to show one thing but in fact do com pletely show one thing but in fact do completely different. we are going to show you some live pictures from nasa. this is of the international space station. we are accessing inside the control room as i look at the screen. we have got
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the control room. the operators there, they are looking at images of there, they are looking at images of the international space station. every defeat will cut back to that injusta every defeat will cut back to that injust a second every defeat will cut back to that in just a second because we are about to see two astronauts embarking on a spacewalk which is designed to upgrade the international space station‘s power system. it looks as if the feed is sticking with the control room for the moment, but we will be back when we see those two astronauts leave the space station. there we go! what they are going to be doing is putting up a electrical connections for six new batteries and installing adapter plates. these are delivered the space vision in september. this is going to be the 196 spacewalk in support of space station assembly and maintenance. it is expected to
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ta ke and maintenance. it is expected to take six and half hours to complete. it will come back to that once we see those two astronauts emerging from the international space station. scientists have told the bbc that a giant iceberg, is ready to break off from the most northern ice shelf in antarctica. as you can see in this image, the iceberg is expected be around a quarter the size of wales. the multi—coloured line shows how the crack has lengthened over recent years. and this image, captured by scientists on nasa‘s icebridge mission, shows the crack from above. when the iceberg does eventually break off, it is likely to be one of the ten biggest ever recorded. researchers say that this is a geographical and not a climate event. the funeral of yasser yaqub — who was shot dead by police on monday — has taken place in huddersfield. hundreds of people attended the service. mr yaqub died after police stopped
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a car nearjunction 24 of the m62. his mother wailed as her 28—year—old son‘s coffin was carried out another man is appearing in court in dewsbury today, charged with firearms offences. 0ur correspondentjudith moritz is in huddersfield for us now. bring us up to date. various different elements to this all happening at the same time this morning. iam happening at the same time this morning. i am just outside the mosque in huddersfield where the funeralfor mosque in huddersfield where the funeral for yasser mosque in huddersfield where the funeralfor yasser yaqub mosque in huddersfield where the funeral for yasser yaqub was held earlier on and as you just said, there were hundreds of people here. they could not all fit in the mosque, they were overflowing into the street. behind me, outside. we watched as the coffin was carried up the steep hill here into the mosque and then when it was taken away for burial. the family for yasser yaqub
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crowding round and his mother‘s sobs we re crowding round and his mother‘s sobs were audible. she was very distressed at that point. the funeral happened first thing this morning, but about the same time, in bradford the inquest into the death of yasser yaqub was opened and adjourned, that was a very short hearing. there will be eight full inquest in due course. a few facts emerged in the court room. —— a full inquest. we had in court that the cause of death was gunshot wounds to yasser yaqub chest. we were also told that there was a firearm recovered from the passenger foot well for the mac in which he was travelling. and the coroner‘s officer said that he had been shot bya officer said that he had been shot by a police officer in the execution of his duty. that was the way it was put in court. that was the inquest. separately to that, over leeds, that has been a court appearance for a
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man charged for a range of firearm offences in connection with the case, including the position of a firearm, a self loading pistol and ammunition. he has been remanded in custody. the only spoke during that short hearing to give his personal details, but it was told that it would have to appear again in front of the crown court in leeds on the 3rd of february. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: donald trump is due to meet intelligence agency chiefs later today, after questioning their findings of russian interference in the us presidential election. russia says it‘s sending home an aircraft carrier deployed to the syrian coast, as it scales down its military presence in the region. scientists say a giant iceberg a quarter the size of wales, is ready to break off from antarctica. letter to the sports. by the biggest
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weekend of the football calendar. the fa cup round. it is the point where teams from the premier league in the championship enter the competition. it is live on bbc one this evening. it is manchester city the london stadium to take on west ham. felicity bossis boss is going to be the first experience of the cup. the cup is special because it is so fascinating. it is happening in the cup, as well. that is why i am looking forward to it. it is a premier league game. it will be tough. a big game for us. big game for them. the big game for them, tough. a big game for us. big game forthem. the big game forthem, it is the fa cup. a big game for both clubs. it is for the fans of course.
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lam sure clubs. it is for the fans of course. i am sure that they are going to also put a very strong team. jon 0bi mikel is the latest premier league player to join the chinese super league. the nigeria midfielderfollows former chelsea team—mates 0scar, ramires and demba ba to china, joining tianjin ty—da fc. in an emotional letter to his ‘chelsea family‘ on social media, the midfielder thanked fans for making the ‘impossible, possible.‘ former manchester united midfielder ravel morrison is training with wigan athletic. the 23—year—old had been playing in italy for lazio since leaving west ham in early 2015.
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while with the hammers, he had loan spells at birmingham, qpr and cardiff city. wigan manager warren joyce describes him as having the "x factor" and that ‘outside influences‘ are the reason why his career has never matched his potential. the manor formula one team have gone into administration. the british based team, who finished last in last year‘s world championship, will collapse without new investment. bbc sport understands staff were informed of the situation the british number one went down in three sets to her johanna konta has suffered a shock defeat in the shenzhen 0pen semi—finals, losing to world number 52 katerina siniakova. the british number one went down in three sets to her 20—year—old opponent in china. third seed konta — the world number ten — was the highest—ranked player remaining in the draw. for a place in the final of the quatar 0pen. sinn fein have published proposals for an investigation into a financial scandal which has caused a political crisis in northern ireland. they‘re insisting that dup leader arlene foster must temporarily stand aside as first minister while the mismanagement of a green energy scheme is investigated.
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joining me now from belfast is our correspondent, chris page. chris, this row is all about this scheme called the renewable heat incentive. perhaps begin by reminding our viewers where this row began. it began with what opposition parties here have called the biggest financial scandal in the history of the government‘ss in northern ireland. it was a scheme to get people to switch to environmentally friendly fuels. wood pellets, for example. initially, unlike a similar scheme running in the rest of the uk, there was no upper limit to the amount of money that could be paid out. arlene foster is in the firing line because she was the stormont enterprise minister when that scheme was set up in 2012. she has been over the lot of pressure over the last few weeks to stand aside from her role as first minister. present role as first minister in order for
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the investigation to take place. today, sinn fein have investigated this. this is their plan for an investigation. a panel which will have the power to compel witnesses and documents and they can choose to hold some of their proceedings, maybe all of their proceedings in public, if they like. sinn fein‘s bottom line remains this. arlene foster must temporarily stand—down as first minister while this investigation takes place police for a few weeks until there has been a report. that is the crux of this crisis. 0ne report. that is the crux of this crisis. one half of this sinn fein say that arlene foster should stand aside. arlene foster‘s party say she has no intention to develop. it is ha rd to has no intention to develop. it is hard to see how will be resolved. there been various crisis points in this relationship. how biggest this one? well, there have been numerous crisis throughout nine or ten years
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of devolved government where the two party took been power—sharing is. what makes this different is it is all about arlene foster‘s position at first minister. parties talk tough, maximising the political benefits they get, but they still give themselves enough wiggle room to come to some sort of copper mines at the end. this time, it is a very clear case of dust arlene foster stay as first minister or does she stand aside for a few weeks? does not appear to be much wiggle room on the sinn fein ‘s edition on that and that means it will be a showdown. 0n monday the 60 the january sinn fein will bring a... that motion will call on mrs foster to stand aside. if she doesn‘t stand aside, the dup can block that, the matter what with the voting goes, such are the rules of stormont voting, then sinn fein will have a decision as do whether
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they continue or walk out on the government and resign, triggering a election. there will be a big moment. on monday the prime minister is expected to make a major speech talking about mental health. today we can reveal that more abominable health —— mental health... 0liver lang helps his father run a small post office in norfolk. in 2014, the 27—year—old was detained under the mental health act. he spent several weeks in a psychiatric unit but even when he was well enough to leave he couldn‘t. delays in arranging suitable support in the community meant he spent a further two months unnecessarily in hospital.
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ijust felt like i was in danger in there because a lot happens in hospital and i felt like if someone attacked me i would have to defend myself, but if i did defend myself and hurt someone then they‘d say i was a danger to the public still and they would keep me locked up for longer, so i was trying to be whiter than white. the latest figures show more than 200,000 bed days were lost in the nhs in england as a whole in october 2016 due to delayed discharges. for nhs trusts specialising in physical health care, that represented a 30% rise on the previous 12 months. but for those trusts most closely focused on mental health and learning disabilities, the increase was 56%. the analysis was carried out for this former care minister who says the figures show that mental health patients are being discriminated against. it means there‘s a shortage of community psychiatric nurses, a shortage of support services like detox facilities and a shortage in social care, which i think has hit people with mental ill—health disproportionately hard. ministers say they‘re spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide more support
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to people in their homes. michael buchanan, bbc news. time for the weather. . it is a day of change. cold frosty mornings are out, cloud is in for the weekend. we have got cloud and rain spreading its way in from the north—west. sinking its way across england and wales at the moment. never quite reaching the south—east during daylight hours here. after frosty start, a bit of brightness. cloudy across much of northern ireland and scotland. mild. 11 degrees in belfast. chilly air holding on across the east of england. to the east, the rain continue southwards and eastwards. milder air, east, the rain continue southwards and eastwards. milderair, a east, the rain continue southwards and eastwards. milder air, a lot of clouds, mist and murk. and eastwards. milder air, a lot of clouds, mistand murk. hill fog. maybe a touch of hill fog.
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temperatures will hold above freezing. many others will hold onto the cloud for much of the time. back cloud should break and we will see spells of sunshine. 5 degrees in aberdeen, still fairly chilly. double figures in the south. we will stick to the less chilly feel in the sunday, but still lots of cloud. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30. donald trump is to meet intelligence agency chiefs after repeatedly voicing doubts about claims of russian interference in the us presidential election. the outgoing vice—president joe biden has condemned mr trump for undermining the agencies. not to be prepared to listen to the myriad of intelligence agencies, from defence intelligence to the cia etc, is absolutely mindless. russia has ordered the withdrawal
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of its aircraft carrier from the mediterranean, where it‘s been involved in military action in support of syrian president assad‘s regime. it‘s part of a scaling down of russia‘s military deployment in the region. scientists say a giant iceberg — a quarter the size of wales — will soon break off from the most northern ice shelf in antarctica. it looks set to become one of the ten biggest icebergs ever recorded. hundreds of people have attended the funeral of a man killed during a police operation in west yorkshire. 28—year—old yasser yaqub was shot by officers on the m62 motorway on monday. a third of hospital trusts in england have warned urgent action is needed to cope with the pressure of patient numbers — according
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to figures seen by the bbc. however new figures from nhs england show slightly fewer patients attended accident and emergency departments in england the week between christmas and new year, as compared to earlier in december. the total was 370,000. that‘s compared to nearly 375,000 in the week to the 18th december. and the run up to christmas itself was also quieter, withjust over 330,000 patients going to casualty in the days before christmas day. however the pressure of the number of people admitted to hospital prompted a third of hospital trusts in england to warn that urgent action was needed. that data comes from a health—care think tank, the nuffield trust. 0ur health correspondent dominic hughes explained to me what these figures mean. so, traditionally the week of christmas week has always been a quieter week for the nhs, notjust in england but right across the uk.
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you can imagine that is because, for example, people are spending time with theirfamilies example, people are spending time with their families and their families are there to look after them if they are not feeling so good. but after christmas, it‘s this week that we are in at the moment when the pressure really becomes evident, particularly in accident and emergency departments right across the uk. they tend to see a surge this week and we went to get the data on that until this time next week. it‘s not that surprising that we‘ve seen these figures out today but what we are seeing, really, in those other figures that he referenced, what they mean, hospital saying that they are struggling to cope, with a third of hospital issuing these alerts, saying they are in danger of not being able to provide proper care for their patients, that really reflects the ongoing pressures that we the right across the health system in the uk. this relates really not so much to what is happening in accident and emergency itself, that is where the symptoms
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show up, but what is happening at the back end of the hospital. where hospitals are struggling to discharge patients who might otherwise be fit enough to go to a ca re otherwise be fit enough to go to a care home, a care setting or their own home. they are struggling to discharge those patients because social care arrangements have not been put in place and that fills up the rest of the hospital, meaning they are struggling to admit patients to be beds occupied by those who are struggling to go home. that is a picture we have seen now across the health service for some months. yes, we always come back to that, don‘t we, social care? months. yes, we always come back to that, don't we, social care? yes, it is the issue dominating the coverage of the health service, notjust this winter, but stretching back to the summer. it shows the intense pressure that social care is in right across the uk, but in england in particular where councils who provide social care in the main are struggling to resource that. social ca re struggling to resource that. social care budgets have been cut back enormously and we know that councils
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are enormously and we know that councils a re really enormously and we know that councils are really struggling to provide that social care and that has an impact on the nhs. there are lots of effo rts impact on the nhs. there are lots of efforts to try to integrate systems, to try to make the system one whole system of health and social care, but these things take time and resources and it is obviously proving to be a big struggle. everybody in the nhs and the social ca re system everybody in the nhs and the social care system knows that there is an issue there and it must be addressed quickly. dominic hughes, our health correspondent. the indian actor, 0m puri — who starred in the british comedy "east is east" — has died of a suspected heart attack. he was 66. 0m puri also appeared in other films, including "gandhi", and more recently he played opposite dame helen mirren in "the hundred footjourney". let‘s take a short look at a clip. this is private property. excuse me, do you own this property? no. so you are trespassing too? 100 feet across the street, they
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have three mission and styles. the president of france eats there. can i order a masala cooked there? we open on saturday night. my son is the best indian chef in europe. come in. don't be shy. i have been speaking to a film director who had been working with 0m puri on a film and says the saddest thing for her is that he will never get to see it. it is very galling for me, very sad for me, because he was so excited when he got the script. so excited to get a film about independence, 35 years after being in gandhi, a film from a british asian perspective, so excited about that, particularly being a punjabi like myself. 0nset, he was very exuberant, very mysterious —— this tedious, but also
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very mindful of the significance of these events on independence, so for him to watch the film was going to bea him to watch the film was going to be a great pleasure for me. to sit down with him afterwards and have a chat about it. i was looking forward to doing that, going to india soon and showing in the film. we are just seeing some pictures here view onset. you are going a bit towards him. what was he saying to you there. here he is saying, you are doing a really good job here. and i said, you did a good job too. that was the thing about him. all that crowd there, they were all there at fourin crowd there, they were all there at four in the morning and we were trying to do a party scene and eve ryo ne trying to do a party scene and everyone was sort of lacking but 0m puri stepped up to be played there and sort of got everyone excited, but everyone in the party mood and i think that really is him. and set,
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he was really serious when the cameras were on him, but when he was off—screen, he relished the idea of being on a set and shooting with him was made a much more pleasurable experience and just be hard grind. and in your bill, he was playing the pa rt and in your bill, he was playing the part of a blind man and and in your bill, he was playing the part ofa blind man and i and in your bill, he was playing the part of a blind man and i understand you were really impressed with how he researched the role, extra proxy asked for to make things more realistic? when you work with an actor like 0m puri who had such an amazing talent and career, it is a lwa ys amazing talent and career, it is always a pleasure as their director because you don‘t know what they are going to pull out of the bag. with me, he would ask for little things and in this case, he was a blind man and in this case, he was a blind man and he asked for a newspaper. i said, what are you going to do with a newspaper in this theme? he said, please, just give me a newspaper. i was surprised because he is supposed to be listening to radio but he took the newspaper, took a page and
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scrunched it into a ball and made it one of these balls to do exercise with, a stressful, and during the thing he did that. it was genius because it showed how atvod elderly person he was concerned about his health and also gave him something to do as an actor. it added a dimension to this character of a blind man, that he was still concerned about his health. that comes with experience, that comes with commitment to your craft, but that also comes with being a consummate professional will stop andi consummate professional will stop and i have to say, for me, that‘s what it was. and if you look at the body of his work, in gandhi, obviously he was very young. in east do this, he played a pakistani yorkshiremen. he has played indian nationals, british actors. hugely versatile. hugely versatile and a terrible, terrible loss for us in the film industry who try to make
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globalfilms the film industry who try to make global films with indian actors. he was one who was known all over the world. remembering om puri. president barack obama has described the torture of a mentally disabled man in chicago, which was streamed on facebook live, as a ‘despicable‘ hate crime. the four suspects are seen assaulting a man with special needs, while making anti—white racial taunts. the victim was found wandering the streets traumatised, after being held bound and gagged for up to two days. they‘re due in court today accused of aggravated battery with a weapon. let‘s speak to a crime reporter. what charges will be is for face? today, they will be in court to face charges of hate crimes and kidnapping and they will hear whether they will stay in jail or get bail. the fact that this was all streamed live on social media and
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that the president have commented on this crime as well, what sort of debate is that leading to? what the president said is that this doesn‘t necessarily indicate that racism is on the rise in chicago or around the country, but people take to social media for everything. essentially they are living their lives on social media and we have seen that over and over in chicago. street gangs that commit crimes in chicago have posted videos that antagonise each other and lead to violence. so, in that sense, this is not surprising. as the police said, people put very surprising things on facebook and essentially in this case they put evidence on facebook that led to their charges. but this type of crime, is that unusual?m is unusual. there were a handful, six or seven cases that were charged
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in the last year or two in the cou nty in the last year or two in the county where i am now. white people and black people have all —— have both been charged with hate crimes. an african—american gentleman was charged with stabbing someone in a robbery and saying that he hated white people. on the other hand, we have two university students at northwestern university who went into a chapel at the university, painted racial epithets and they we re painted racial epithets and they were crying —— charged with a hate crime as well. it‘s an unusual thing but prosecutors do bring it from time to time. thank you very much. the time is approaching 1245. its stones are world famous — and no one knows exactly why its there, but now there‘s a theory that the sound of stonehenge could unlock some its hidden history. 0ne archaeologist has taken up the challenge of recreating what the acoustics of the ruins would have been like three thousand years ago —
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and he says it could reveal why the site was so important. 0ur arts correspondent david sillito reports. wind blows eerily people have been coming here for at least 4000—5000 years, so we‘re walking in the feet of history. when the wind blows, some people say they hear a strange hum. thomas hardy wrote about it in tess of the d‘urbervilles, and doctor rupert till is convinced the sound of stonehenge is part of its magic. taps you hear between this beat a little echo. the problem is this isjust a fragment of the sound people would have heard 4000 years ago.
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i met the site‘s historian, susan greening. so, this is the front door of stonehenge we‘re going through right now? that's right, yes, and we are coming into the central space now. it does change a little bit, doesn‘t it? it does, you have the feeling of being enclosed within a space. and that‘s with many of the stones having gone. what we're looking at today is the ruin of stonehenge. many stones have been taken away from the site, many have fallen down, lots have been eroded, they're covered in lichen. it would‘ve been a completely different atmosphere, wouldn‘t it? yes, it would. however, rupert tell has an answer. what this new vr technology offers is a possibility, a chance to, well, return back and see and also hear what this place used to look like in the past. we have constructed it by rebuilding stonehenge digitally and rebuilding
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the acoustics of the space as it would have been when all of the stones were here. so, how different is the old sound to the sound we have today? well, if i tap this drum now, you will hear a little bit of an echo. when all of the stones are put in place, there is a much more powerful sense of enclosure, a slight reverberation, more echo, and it changes more as you walk around. and the reason he is convinced ancient people were interested in sound is because of his work on caves. hundreds of metres underground they found ancient instruments and human marks on certain stalactites. stalactites that are musical. 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25. plays notes on stalactites
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so today it‘s just a ruin beside a city road, this, a chance to say goodbye to the 21st and experience the lost sound of stonehenge. ray blk, an r‘n‘b soul singer, has just topped the bbc‘s sound of 2017 list, which highlights the most exciting new artists in music. ray was chosen by more than 100 djs, journalists, festival bookers, bloggers and critics. their track record is good — having previously spotted the likes of adele and jessie j. let‘s take a look at her music. # love me, love me... cani
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can i please have a caribbean brea kfast? can i please have a caribbean breakfast? in my head from really young, i was sure i would end up in the music business. i didn‘t know how. i don‘t come from a musical family and no one in my family is particularly interested in music, not even as listeners. somehow it got recognised even in primary school so i was picked as one of the kids to go on the gifted and talented scheme for music and i was so chuffed because i spent the summer writing songs, recording my first studio session and i was like,
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this is who i am. this is a community spot. i love how everyone in the area just comes here and hangs out and you are bound to bump into someone. there‘s no such thing asa into someone. there‘s no such thing as a small breakfast here. ijust started ripping beats off youtube. no resources, i didn‘t know anyone in music. i wasjust determined to make it happen myself. i‘ve learnt so much from being in south london. yeah. it‘s made me the woman i am today. my hood was the one that really catapulted everything. it was just me and the producer in the studio and he started the chords on the piano and something about it was only starjake. it took me back to
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where i‘m from and what it was like growing there. —— so nostalgic. really, i hated where i grew up and i wanted to get out and that‘s really how the song came about. 2016 has been such a whirlwind. i don‘t think i could have had a better year, to be honest. this time next year, to be honest. this time next year, ijust year, to be honest. this time next year, i just want to be year, to be honest. this time next year, ijust want to be a better artist, focused on making more good music. i think i‘d just like to be better. my colleaguejoanna gosling spoke to ray this morning and to kevin geoghegan from the bbc music news live team. she asked ray her reaction on winning. i screamed, jumped forjoy, yeah. it was amazing, like the most shocking news either the god. the point of
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this is its sporting talent for the future, so there will be a lot of people not familiar with your music. tell us about your music and your inspirations. so, i grew up in the church, started in the gospel choir, joined the adult choir about 11, 12, and had always written songs from when i was about seven years old. they weren‘t that good. but they are better now. i got into ar and b and soul music and that‘s primarily the type of music i make now. let's have a listen. i think that this is chill out? yes. # on a friday with some hot girl... # i don‘t get what you feel
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# you‘re making a big deal . don‘t say you were misled. you heard me when i said. don‘t make a big deal. i don‘t think you should —— ijust big deal. i don‘t think you should —— i just think you should big deal. i don‘t think you should —— ijust think you should chill out. i know you thought you and me we re out. i know you thought you and me were onto something but i had no plans of loving you. so call me whenever you want... beautiful music and a really striking video, so tell us more and a really striking video, so tell us more about the music and the message. my music in general is really about empowerment and this songin really about empowerment and this
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song in particular, chill out, i wrote to empower women. i think there are so many societal pressures on women and they are all based on male privilege. i made this video in jamaica because i felt this was a topic the spotlight needed to be on, the amazing women in this video are transgender men who live injamaica and they are ostracised from the community, attacked on a daily basis and it‘s something that not a lot of people speak about and they are not given any support, really. so i felt it was something that needed to be spoken about and now we are trying to raise money to try to get them to save housing. kevin, we were looking before at the long list of well—known names that have gone before ray. tell us more about the people picking this particular award and how it is that they have got
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such a good track record. this list has been going since 2003. the first winner was at that time a little—known winner was at that time a little— known wrapper from new winner was at that time a little—known wrapper from new york called 50 cents. obviously we know what he went and we saw some of the names that have been thrown up through the years there. adele, obviously. this year, for the first time, it was opened up to people from outside of the uk. music critics, bloggers, 170 different people from across the world, and each one of them puts forward three names ofan each one of them puts forward three names of an artist that they think is likely to break through the following year. then obviously all of those names were collated and we have a long list initially of 15 and then that is whittled down to the five. but yes, there have been some
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fantastic names picked out in the past. you've done very well there, ray, just hearing that whole process. in terms of what success lookalikes and where you are going, you are unsigned and that is amazing, that you have gone through this and you are still unsigned. do you want to be signed or is this a deliberate decision?” you want to be signed or is this a deliberate decision? i decided to stay and signed for now. i don‘t know what the beach will hold but i feel like i am still growing, growing as an artist and learning more about myself and what path i wa nt to more about myself and what path i want to take. i feel as though i wa nt to want to take. i feel as though i want to have my autonomy for now until i am prepared to be assisted bya until i am prepared to be assisted by a label and that may never be the case. but for now, i have decided to stay as i am. what are the chances of someone having massive success without being signed, kevin? the great thing about the internet is that it has two a large point
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democratised music because young artists no longer feel they must be signed by a large label. as ray said, perhaps to get the extra push promotion early, perhaps there is the need for a large body behind you with the great wealth of money that comes with that, but the great thing is that young artists now can create music and upload it to numerous websites and get the music out there. of course, when it comes to touring that music again, it's a very, very expensive thing to do and that's where the major label can come in and help with that kind of thing. but there are artists that have seen great success, most notably the mercury music prize winner last year, an independent artist who does everything on his own, touring up and down the country, and he is an example for young artists that you can go out and do this on your rain. so how much of it has been hard work for you? most of it. most of it has been
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ha rd you? most of it. most of it has been hard work. i won‘t lie to any other unsigned artists out there, it is a difficult road and there is not that huge budget behind you to support you but the internet is an amazing tool and i think that‘s what‘s been the driving force for me so far and a lot of other artists. i believe the internet will continue to push it. ray blk, the winner of the sound of 2017. in a moment, the news at one with kate silverton but first, the weather. as we head into the afternoon, we can mostly waved goodbye to the cold, frosty mornings but we also waved goodbye to most of the sunshine. it was certainly a sunny start in hitching in hertfordshire with temperatures below freezing. whereas in lanarkshire, the below freezing. whereas in la narkshire, the cloud below freezing. whereas in lanarkshire, the cloud was invading, keeping the temperature is above freezing. that will be bp made the
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weekend, as it will be warmer but with more in the way of cloud. you can see the cloud invading from the west on the satellite picture and tied up in that is milder air. that is bringing this, mark and cloud across northern ireland and look at those temperatures, 11 degrees in belfast, nine in glasgow, some brighter spells in northern scotland, but heading through northern england into wales and the south—west, we see rain, with perhaps heavy bursts across the hills. as the rain arrives in the midlands, it will be quite chilly. for degrees in birmingham, some brightness to be had across the ba rca brightness to be had across the barca southeast at times. even here, the rain will arrive as we go on previous evening. as the main body of the rain clears through, it leaves behind a lot of cloud but most of us avoiding a frost. maybe just a touch of frost for sheltered glens of scotland. into tomorrow, it
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isa glens of scotland. into tomorrow, it is a cloudy day for the most part with most places holding onto that cloud. the odd outbreak of patchy light rain in some parts. fairly chilly still in aberdeen. 5 degrees, but mild across the far south—west. as we go on three saturday night, we stick with the cloudy perplexing —— complexion to the weather, with stag na nt complexion to the weather, with stagnantairand light complexion to the weather, with stagnant air and light winds and meaning we do not shift much of the cloud as we go through sunday. again, afairly cloud as we go through sunday. again, a fairly mild day on sunday, particularly in the west, a little bit chilly in the east, but that is nothing compared to the weather in eastern europe at the moment. sunday‘s forecast has temperatures well below zero, —25 in moscow, with this cold weather causing one two problems. head—to—head — donald trump is to meet us intelligence chiefs in the row over their claims of russian hacking.
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they insist they‘ve evidence the kremlin interfered with the presidential election — claims mr trump has challenged. his use of social media to engage in the row have prompted the outgoing vice presidentjoe biden to tell the president—elect to grow up. also this lunchtime: hundreds of people attend the funeral in huddersfield of the man shot dead by west yorkshire police on monday. russia says it‘s starting to withdraw its forces from syria in light of the current ceasefire. an iceberg a quarter of the size of wales is close to breaking away from the antarctic ice shelf. wind whistles. and the sounds of stonehenge — scientists reveal another of the ancient stones‘ secrets.
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