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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 7, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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in the early hours of the morning, when vulnerable people might be watching this, it reads "i tried to kill myself several times." i object strongly to this, this is obscene. again, we asked bbc news for a statement on issues of language about suicide and they told us: well, thank you for all of your comments this week. as a new year gets under way on newswatch, we would like you to tell us what topics you would like us to cover, which news figures we should be interviewing. you can give us your opinion on bbc news current affairs and you can be quoted, or even appear on the programme. you can call us on... or do e—mail newswatch. you can find us on twitter and do have a look at our website address. that's all from us, we will be back to hear what you thought of the bbc news coverage again next week. bye bye.
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hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and jon kay. the british red cross warns of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england. the charity says the government needs to provide more money to ease the strain. it's after dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals. good morning, it's saturday 7th january. also ahead, an american army veteran has been arrested after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport in florida. donald trump promises to look at ways of combating cyber attacks on us elections after a briefing
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from intelligence chiefs. a bump in the road — councils predict a huge rise in the repair bill for potholes in england and wales. in sport, it's a stroll for city in the fa cup as manchester city put five past west ham united to go through to the fourth round. and in the next hour, we'll meet the schoolboy putting his new blade into action as children in england are given sporting prosthetics for the first time on the nhs. and helen has the weather. is good morning. it is grey and murky out there, some fog around, especially over the hills, but in contrast to yesterday, nowhere near as cold. all the details for the weekend in around 15 minutes, join me if you can. good morning, first our main story. the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care.
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dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week. the royal college of emergency medicine says the system is on its knees, but the department of health says it's investing more money to improve services. dan johnson has more. winter pressure on accident and emergency — nothing new, but the red cross now says the strain on hospitals in england amounts to a humanitarian crisis. the charity claims social—care cuts mean patients are sent home without the right support, so then they end up back in a&e. red cross volunteers support nhs staff and say they've seen patients sent home without clothes, some who don't receive the care they need to get washed, even some who've fallen and not been found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems too. i think the pressures on the nhs, and especially in emergency care, are particularly intense at the moment. but what is more concerning is the number of patients who are being managed within
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four hours, and then the delays to admission into the hospital bed base, which unfortunately are very, very significant, and our staff are working under some pretty intolerable conditions at times trying to manage. and sometimes they just can't manage. figures from nhs england show that overflowing a&e department had to close their doors to new patients more than 140 times over the last month. compare that with the same month in 2015 — it's up more than 60%. the suspicion is that it is a combination of the cuts that we've seen in social care, in community services run by the nhs, and very heavy pressure in general practice. so is the strain on the nhs costing lives? the death of two patients on emergency trolleys at worcestershire royal hospital are being investigated. one of them had waited 35 hours for a bed. the department of health says it's providing billions more every year to ease pressure.
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nhs england says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand. beds are actually not quite as full as they work this time last year, but everyone in the health service knows things could get worse before they get better. dan johnson, bbc news. earlier on breakfast, dr mark holland from the society for acute medicine, said so far it had been a winter from hell. we've seen, over the last week or so, that people who should be in a specialty bed are ending up in a non—specialty bed, or there are beds being created when the hospital that we call contingency beds, and people thatice we call contingency beds, and people that ice pick to across the country, e—mails that i have been receiving this week, things i have been reading in the immediate, make us conclude that the term humanitarian crisis has somebody to it. we will return to that story throughout the morning breakfast. police in florida have been questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport.
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the suspect opened fire in the baggage—claim area after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it's pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive. our correspondent gary o'donoghue reports from fort lauderdale. it's a familiar scene at airports the world over, but the baggage—claim hall at the fort lauderdale airport turned into a place of death and mayhem, as a lone gunman opened fire on those waiting to collect their luggage. passengers scattered for cover, hitting the ground, and reports say the assailant had time to reload before opening fire once again, as attempts were made to attend to the wounded. once he was done with ammunition, he threw the gun down, and i was about ten feet away from him. he basically threw the gun onto the ground and laid on the ground face down, spreadeagled. the gunman has been named as 26—year—old esteban santiago. reports say he was carrying
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a military id and had a weapon in his checked baggage, which is legal in the united states. one family member said he had been receiving psychological treatment after leaving the national guard last year. this cowardly, heinous act resulted in the deaths of five people. there were eight more people injured by way of gunshot that were transported to local hospitals. in his first reaction to the shooting, president obama said he was heartbroken for the families. these kinds of tragedies have happened too often during the eight years that i've been president. the pain, the grief, the shock. the disruption at fort lauderdale went on long into the night, with some traveller stuck on the tarmac for more than eight hours. the fbi says it's ruling nothing out, including terrorism. but the agency has confirmed it had prior contact
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with santiago in november, when he was referred for a mental—health assessment. the ease with which he was able to transport and use a weapon in an airport will raise serious concerns about public safety. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber—campaign to try to help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump said that hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result but promised to set up a team to stop future attacks, as catriona renton reports. the report from american intelligence claims russia's president, vladimir putin, personally ordered what it called an influence campaign to help donald trump's chances of winning the american presidency. the president—elect had earlier described the russian hacking claims as a political witch—hunt by his opponents. at trump tower, he met america's top intelligence officials for a classified briefing.
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they say russia's actions included hacking into the e—mail accounts of the democratic national committee and top democrats, and using intermediaries such as wikileaks to release the information. russia has previously denied this, and wikileaks founderjulian assange has said before that moscow was not the source. after the briefing, mr trump did not single out russia. in a statement he said... and the incoming vice president says the us will strengthen cyber defences. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intrusion
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in the future. donald trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service done by those in the us intelligence community. but with two weeks to go until he moves into the white house, questions remain over how they will all work together to keep america safe. catriona renton, bbc news. the repair bill to fix the country's potholes could soon reach £14 billion. that's according to councils in england and wales, who say the government should pay for the repairs from fuel duty. the government says it's already putting £250 million into fixing the problem, but the local government association says that's not enough, as duncan kennedy reports. we need a major investment in this country on the road is a structure,
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the infrastructure, and stopping this sort of patch and amend mentality, and giving us enough money to two action be replaced these local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them. —— to actually replace. michelle obama has delivered her final speech as first lady of the united states, with an impassioned call on young people to have hope, and fight for their rights. speaking at a ceremony in the white house, she ended tearfully, saying the role of first lady had the been the greatest honour of her life. empower yourselves with a good education, then get out there and use that education to build a country worthy of your boundless promise. lead by example — with hope, never fear. and know that i will be with you, rooting for you, and working to support you for the rest of my life. so i want to close today by simply saying thank you. thank you for everything you do for our kids and for our country. being your first lady has been the greatest honour of my life, and i hope i have made you proud.
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michelle obama on herfinal speech at the white house. the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida has drawn attention to possible weaknesses in us aviation security. local authorities say the gunman opened fire in the baggage claim area yesterday, after retrieving a weapon from his checked luggage. five people were killed in the attack, and eight others were injured. joining us from our london newsroom is philip baum, editor of aviation security international. thanks for your time this morning on brea kfast, thanks for your time this morning on breakfast, a lot of people will be stunned to hear that if they have been to florida, they have stepped off microplane, gone to pick up their bags off the plane, that among their bags off the plane, that among the bags they could be gallons, legally, it inside people's
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suitcases. —— guns. explain how it works. first of all, we are talking about a country that allows people to carry firearms, albeit with permits, and as anywhere in the world, if you are allowed to carry a firearm, you are allowed to take it onto an aircraft, but you have to have the correct paperwork, check in the firearm, which must be unloaded, and then in a separate package, checkin and then in a separate package, check in the ammunition for it. and of course there comes a point in time when the passenger is reunited with their checked luggage at the arrivals belt. i don't really think this is actually a problem with aviation security, it is actually a problem that could have happened anywhere in society. we have had 223 deaths this year in the united states already as a result of firearms incidents. this happened at an airport, and yes, of course, it is going to be of concern to passengers that are travelling, but you know, it really could have
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happened anywhere. but airports have been such a focus of security and threats in recent years, and airports go to such lengths to try to make sure that, as you enter them, you are separated from anything that could be a risk to people. it seems extremely ironic that when you arrive, you can be reunited with a weapon, and with ammunition, so easily apparently, and you are still within the confines of the place that is supposedly so safe. absolutely, but asi supposedly so safe. absolutely, but as i say, americans are entitled, if correctly licensed, to carry firearms, and therefore to take them with them. the objective of airport security is to separate the passenger from the firearm on board the aircraft so that they cannot use it to hijack the aircraft. this was a lesson the israelis learned back in1972, a lesson the israelis learned back in 1972, with a massacre, when three members of the japanese red army we re members of the japanese red army were reunited with their baggage, opened it in what is now tel aviv
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airport and carried out a firearms attack, killing many people. this is attack, killing many people. this is a challenge that we face that we have to screen people, but you have to remember that 27 million people go through fort lauderdale every year, there are questions to be asked, one of the things i would be saying is, what was the behaviour like of the passenger when he checked in in anchorage? we know he had mental health issues. what was his behaviour like in minneapolis said paul, when he was in transit? the check—in agents would have known that he was travelling with a firearm, andi that he was travelling with a firearm, and i think what we will find at the end of the day, the failure was to connect the dots, and thatis failure was to connect the dots, and that is what happens so often with airport security, one person knows, but does the information get fed down the line. this passenger had no mental health problems, had reported himself to authorities in anchorage but was still allowed to have a permit, so it is not the fact that
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he was able to check—in a firearm, people do that on a routine basis, including in the uk, because people do go on hunting trips, shooting competitions, and there are often law enforcement personnel that carry firearms and have them separated on board the aircraft. it is a challenge that we face, but we have to remember that this was a tragic incident, but as i say, 223 deaths so far in 27 as a result of gun related crime, and i am afraid that, with the forthcoming trump administrations starting in two weeks' time, i don't think we will see any greater controls on guns. for now, philip baum, thank you for your time for now, philip baum, thank you for yourtime and for now, philip baum, thank you for your time and breakfast. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. the british red cross is calling for more money to be spent on social care, as it warns of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england. a us army veteran is being questioned by police afterfive people were killed in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida.
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also coming up in the programme... # making a big deal... # she was an outsider to win, but ray blk is now following in the steps of adele after topping the bbc‘s sound of 2017 poll. she'll bejoining us here before ten. when you look at the list of people who have won that award, it is quite something to live up to! she has got amazing music as well, looking forward to talking to her. it has been a misty and murky morning today, you can see from the pictures, helen willetts, things improving? not really, i'm sorry to say, it will be a slow improvement, this was sentin will be a slow improvement, this was sent in from staffordshire, but we
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have had numerous from that part of the world, quite foggy in parts of the world, quite foggy in parts of the vale of york and around the seven asjury at the vale of york and around the seven as jury at the moment. this was just to show you some cisak coming down in dudley. —— the severn estuary. extra ca re coming down in dudley. —— the severn estuary. extra care will be needed, particularly on the motorway network, where we have that foggy around the bristol area. —— fog. this rain in the south fairly widely light rain and drizzle across southern parts of the country, re m na nts of southern parts of the country, remnants of a weather front that will take much of the day to fizzle out. they could be a bit of brightness here and there, but don't hold out hope of much, it will for the majority of the ukba —— the uk bea the majority of the ukba —— the uk be a cloudy saturday. the vale of
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york may see some brightness later. what it is is nowhere near as cold as this time yesterday. these are the temperatures we saw yesterday, minus six in the south. that is because we had no cloud through the night. the cloud will be giving us grey conditions today, acting like a blanket tonight, stopping temperatures from falling, so it looks like it should be largely frost free, chilly in some of the glens of scotland. we have a weather front coming through the course of sunday, strengthening the breeze, lifting the fog across the northern half of the country, bringing patchy rain and drizzle. for sunday itself, largely dry, predominantly cloudy. a better chance of more brightness tomorrow, although for the fa cup third round, today and tomorrow, it looks cloudy and grey. a little bit damp in southern areas today. temperatures tomorrow as today, just nudging above average, a far cry
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from what is happening elsewhere across europe. we had cold air yesterday and in previous days, that is now stuck across central and eastern europe, where temperatures are considerably lower. no sign of a change back to the cold weather in the uk, much more unsettled into next week. look at all light blue, very cold in other parts of europe! for the first time in the nhs is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs that are designed for playing sport. nhs england hopes took up several hundred children a year with limbs to enable them to participate in more sport. here is health correspondent robert pigott. right, how have you been doing, then, since you had your blade? when ben made the decision at the age of ten to have his stunted right leg amputated, his dream of a future in sport seemed remote. would you like to put it on for me and show me what you can do with it? three years on, ben is one of the first children to receive a running blade on the nhs. as if he were changing a shoe, he can swap is false leg
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for the blade and feel a new freedom and energy. the spring of it is the bit makes me go faster. i used to not be able to, like, be able to run as fast or able to kick a ball as well, but now i've got a good amount of power in my leg, and i've got the right size, so i can do loads of skills and hit a ball really well. the blade and the treatment costs around £1000, but clairejohnson, a health service expert in prosthetic limbs, says the nhs will more than recoup the cost by keeping children active. we're hoping that it will give them a level playing field, so that he can compete with his peers and be able to participate in a lot more sports. it does help in the wider scheme of things, and hopefully give a longer longevity to their lives by giving them the opportunity to do sport. ben is among 2500 children in england with limbs that are either absent or which don't work properly.
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the nhs hopes to fit several hundred of them with a sports prosthetic every year. the scheme not only opens the way to sport for a group of disabled youngsters, but it comes with an added message. at a time when so many teenagers are couch potatoes, it makes an example of an extraordinary few who overcome all the odds to carve out a life in sport. the new blade, for me, can do a lot more than my prosthetic can do, cos now i can run with more freedom. ben's mother kathleen says running blades can change a disabled child's whole outlook on life. he seems more confident, and more eager to get out and about now. he's wanting to put it on and go out more, nd do more sports, more activities. now he has got the blade, the sky is the limit. ben says he is now training for the paralympics, and he's talking dates — 2024, at the very least.
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2020? who knows? robert pigott, bbc news, brighton. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer paul vallely is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning to you, thanks for coming in, we have been talking about this hacking, the alleged hacking, claims of hacking in america, that is the first story you have spotted. the first thing was that cartoon, the genius cartoonist from the times as a small pea in the brain of donald trump, and it is understandable why when you read the story. it tells you that the evidence that the various us intelligence agencies have given to
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trump is very direct, it says that putin himself ordered this campaign of hacking, not just putin himself ordered this campaign of hacking, notjust something that has been done by freelance agents off their own bat. and the reason the pea brain struck me as being so apt is that he is consistently in denial at the facts of the story, co nsta ntly denial at the facts of the story, constantly trying to divert them in different directions. basically, he is fed up of the idea that people will think he is not a legitimate president, because it does not follow that the result was influenced. no, it is important to make that point, but extraordinary, because not just make that point, but extraordinary, because notjust the actual hacking, this campaign of influence, as they described, using charles on social media to try to influence public discourse. —— troubles. media to try to influence public discourse. -- troubles. they set up a website, and when nobody read it, they leaked it to julian assange,
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a website, and when nobody read it, they leaked it tojulian assange, a very strange micro alliance, julian assange and donald trump, talking about an odd couple! the detail as this is quite extraordinary, and yet trump is trying to divert attention to how nbc got the details of this, as though that is the important issue. and what struck me most is that a poll shows that 20% of trump supporters, only 20% believe it, whereas 87% of clinton believe it. so the divisions in america are really deep and getting deeper. be classified nature of a lot of the findings, it is hard for the rest of us findings, it is hard for the rest of us to know what they are talking about. they give us a broadbrush report, but we do not know what they have found. the daily mail has been running a campaign about foreign aid and potential issues of funds from the uk. yes, this is another example of
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dog whistle politics, it puts a lot of things together and makes you think that there is something was going on than there is. obviously, aid needs scrutiny, because there are bad examples of misuse of aid, but this project that the mail is going about, an ethiopian equivalent of the spice girls getting british money, it is actually a project to empower. there is a lot of early marriage in ethiopian air, which becomes a kind of child slavery, and educating girls out of that, educating girls out of that, educating society out of those assumptions, if you educate girls, you find hiv transmission rates go down, child mortality goes down, family income is raised. they are picking on the excrescence, which makes it look silly... but there are no doubt genuine areas of concern, andi no doubt genuine areas of concern, and i think the mail is tapping into
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and i think the mail is tapping into a considerable public opinion issue here. the point that concerns me is that the areas which the times highlighted, for instance, too much spending on western consultants, some of the salaries of charity bosses being far too large — there are legitimate areas of concern, but there is a kind of dog whistle element to this story, which tends to make you think, oh, well, all aid is bad, so we should scrap it. making out that huge amounts of money go in aid, where it is about 7p out of every £10 of national income. it is to help the world's most vulnerable people. we started talking about the incoming president elect, trump and his family, let's look back, can we? this interesting piece in the guardian looking back to the 19605 and the kennedy5. a new film coming out called jackie, it really deconstruct5 the way that she
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made the start of the myth, the legend rather of kennedy, and in an interview soon after his death, she gave a journalist the insights that kennedy had loved the broadway mu5ical camelot, and he had pleaded mo5t mu5ical camelot, and he had pleaded most nights. she concluded there will be great presidents again, but there will never be another camelot. thi5 there will never be another camelot. this film shows that she had a background injournali5m, this film shows that she had a background in journalism, 5he this film shows that she had a background injournali5m, she had interviewed richard nixon, cover the coronation of queen elizabeth, 5he wa5 coronation of queen elizabeth, 5he was a seasoned journali5t, coronation of queen elizabeth, 5he was a seasoned journalist, and it showed how clever 5he was a seasoned journalist, and it showed how clever she was in building the myth of her husband, which has been one of the great subjects of hollywood. issuing public opinion, as russia a p pa re ntly issuing public opinion, as russia apparently has been, in a very different way! thank you very much. we will see you again in an hour's time. coming up before the end of the programme,
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two years ago he was running bootcamps in his local park, nowjoe wick5 is a publishing and social—media 5en5ation. he'll be here to give us his recipe for success just before ten. stay with us, headlines coming up. i feel really unfit when i wait until you hear what he is! —— eat5. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden. coming up before nine, helen will have the weather. mike will have all of the fa cup sport. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england, and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care. dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week, while one patient died after spending 35 hours on a trolley. the department of health says it's investing more money to improve services.
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but dr mark holland, from the society for acute medicine, said it had so far been a "winter from hell". we have seen over the last week or so that people who should be in a 5pecialty bed are ending up in a non—speciality bed, or are bed5 being created, contingency bed5. people i speak to acro55 being created, contingency bed5. people i speak to across the country, e—mail5 i have been receiving and things i have been reading in the media, make us conclude that the term humanitarian cri5i5 conclude that the term humanitarian crisis has some validity. police in florida have been questioning a man, after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport. the suspect opened fire in the baggage claim area, after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it's pur5uing all lead5 and hasn't ruled out terrorism a5 a motive. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try
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and help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump, said that hacking had had absolutely no impact on the election outcome. his running mate, mike pence, says a team will be setup to stop future attacks. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggre55ive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intru5ion in the future. the repair bill to fix the country's potholes could reach 20 million pounds. the government says it has already set aside a £250 million fund to tackle the problem, but the
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local government association say5 more needs to be done. a killer whale which was involved in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential documentary, has died at seaworld in florida. tilikum featured in the film blackfi5h, which led to a global campaign against the keeping of orcas in captivity. sea world say5 staff are "deeply saddened" by the death of the whale, which was thought to be 36 years old. those are the main stories this morning. fa cup day—to—day. third round. ab5olutely. started la5t fa cup day—to—day. third round. ab5olutely. started last night. pep guardiola's first—ever ta5te ab5olutely. started last night. pep guardiola's first—ever taste of the fa cup with manchester city. a goal fe5t for city at west ham. fa cup third round weekend got underway last night, with manchester city the first side through to round four, thanks to a 5—0 thrashing handed out to west ham. city were already out of sight by half time — leading 3—0 thanks to an own goal, a yaya toure penalty, and that tap in for david silva.
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the gloss on an impressive night was added byjohn stones. the england defender scored his first goal since a summer move from everton. he needed goal—line technology to confirm that he'd actually scored it though. hopefully it can help us to make our players believers, that they are good enough to play every game, and try, in both our fans and the people in manchester city, and they can believe that we are good. they know what happened in the past, but we are good guys. so they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good. but they have to believe. it will be a special fa cup reunion, today, for one of the members of the treble—winning manchester united team of 1999. former netherlands centre half yaap stam is now the manager of championship side reading, who go to old trafford hunting for a giant killing this lunchtime. as a player, there is nothing better than to play over there, in a stadium like that in front of so many fans. and we know, as well,
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we have our own fans over there as well. hopefully they are joining in and supporting us. there are 25 games in all today. dan walker and the football focus team are on the road at one of the non—league sides left in the cup. before he left, dan left us a little message. hello breakfast friends. i cannot be with you today because we are out and about. football focus is on the road for the third round of the fa cup. we hear from road for the third round of the fa cup. we hearfrom all five non—league teams and we will be live at barrow, who take on rochdale. mark clemmit has been to stourbridge to speak to bobby gould's grandson as they prepare to take on wycombe wanderers. eastleigh manager martin allen will speak to us ahead of his return to brentford. trevor nsekhe
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—— traversing clear is out and about. and we will be at sutton, too. what more could you possibly wa nt too. what more could you possibly want on the third round weekend at the fa cup? we are live from midday bbc one. look forward to it. thank you. sir andy murray will play world number two novak djokovic in the final of the qatar open today. murray beat czech tomas berdych in straight sets in their semi final, to reach his fourth final in doha. the win was murray's 28th in a row on the atp tour, and another title and victory over his main rival would be the ideal preparation for the australian open, starting a week on monday. we played at the end of last year. the ultimate goal was to find a way to win the match. maybe at the beginning of the year you are focusing a little bit more on yourself, and how you are playing, and how you want to play, moving into the aussie open,
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rather than just solely focusing on the outcome. newcastle falcons produced a stunning late comeback to beat bath 24—22 in rugby union's aviva premiership. bath led by 12 points half way through the second half, but ben harris barged his way over to draw newcastle level less than four minutes from time. man of the matchjoel hodgson kept his nerve to slot home the conversion, and send bath to their third defeat in a row. newcastle move up to sixth. scarlets also came from behind to beat ulster 16—13, to stay fourth in the pro 12. the winning score was a penalty try — scarlets scrum half aled davies was on the receiving end of a high tackle, as he tried to cross the line. elsewhere, leinster beat zebre, and newport gwent dragons beat treviso. this afternoon, sir mo farah is in action at the edinburgh cross country. the four—time olympic champion — who insists he's happy just to be called mo — was surprisingly beaten into second place last year.
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he's using the event as part of his preparation for the track world championships in london later this year, and admits he'll have his work cut out against some cross country specialists this afternoon. it is going to be tough. they will try and put me down and beat me as quick as possible. that is what makes cross—country exciting. this is the event. i will fight for it. but it suits certain athletes better. it will be tough. now as the big teams enter the fa cup this weekend, i am sure we will see some silky skills on display — but none as spectacular as those performed by players in the sport of sepak takraw. it isa it is a work of art, isn't it?
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it's been one of asia's biggest sports for centuries. it does hurt to head that. it's heavy, yeah! outshot! go easy! close range. you don't want it on your head. i'm used to it now. let's see how it is properly played. it is asia's best—kept secret, the sport that has been part of the culture in countries like malaysia since the 15th century, combining football skills with the moves of kung fu. and now, sepak takraw is taking off in the uk as well. it is linking the martial art, or the art of the body, with this game, because you need to have the agility, flexibility, and things like that. first of all, you are learning
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the basics of kicking up, really. and it can be foot, head... it does hurt, i can tell you that, a little bit, because... look at that. that is beautiful skill. let me show you. this ball is quite hard. it is plastic now. slightly softer than the original ones, which were made of rattan, but it caused too many injuries. if you play football, therefore you can play this game as well. so it is football meets volleyball, and has now spread across the world. and who better to recruit for the newest team forming this year, than freestyle football world recordholderjohn farnworth. now, the size of the ball was a surprise. but he took it in his stride. it seems to me more power.
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hey! in matches it is only three a side, and you only have three touches per team, before it has to go over the net. so there we are. we serve, the game is in play. great shot. you do have set positions — the server, the feeder and the striker. an acrobatic smash at the net. and this can take some practice. servers should know their place. the flexibility these guys possess is incredible. they are getting their legs way above their head. it is like what zlatan ibrahimovic does. if i can do it, so can you. and if we win the point, the celebration. it has got to be worth it for that.
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john, there is potentialfor you. you did a header. they are trying to form a national league in the uk. open to get a british team together by the summer to take on the likes of switzerland, belgium and france, who lead the european challenge tour. you start off practising keepy—uppy? yes. iam impressed by your high kicks. i was ok at serving. when it came to the complicated net stuff, i left that tojohn. it complicated net stuff, i left that to john. it would complicated net stuff, i left that tojohn. it would be great to see a british team on the world stage. that is enough heading! concentrate on my foot skills. we are doing foot skills later with joe wicks. we have had lots of texts
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and e—mails and facebook messages on potholes this morning. £14 billion funding issue on that. that is how much they say it will cost to repair all of the potholes in england by 2020. masses of correspondence. tammy says the front wheel of bicycle went down a pothole. it stopped and she didn't. one ambulance, a hospital visit and a week off work. even though the pothole was filled, she is still nervous about that section of the road. in fact, nervous about that section of the road. infact, cycling nervous about that section of the road. in fact, cycling has never been the same for. lots of cyclists involved. gary, back in 2015, he hit a pothole in the rain. it was full of water. he went over the handlebars. we had eight months of work. still having treatment. lots of you with similar stories. police say that 35 children have come forward to them, fearing they have been groomed online following the publication of a film
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about the life of murdered schoolgirl kayleigh haywood. the 15—year—old had chatted with a man on facebook for two weeks, before she was killed in 2015. the five—minute video, made by leicestershire police, was shown to 35,000 school pupils in september and made available online this week. we'll speak to the force's chief constable in just a moment, but first let's take a look at the film. it was as if we were old friends. i'll ride to stay at katie's tomorrow? yeah, all right. mum and
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dad wouldn't understand. they don't know he is different. chief constable simon cole joins us from our leicester studio. it's a very powerful film. it's a very unsettling film to watch. the first thing we should point out is this was done with the cooperation and approval of caley‘s family? yeah, absolutely. caley‘s family have been integral. they wanted as we wa nted have been integral. they wanted as we wanted that there was a legacy which would mean some good came out of something so tragic. they have been hugely supportive. the film was not an easy watch because it is not an easy topic. she went, 15 days from meeting someone online, to tragically being murdered. along the way there are 2643 messages exchanged. it is a pretty sobering watch. i would suggest to viewers that they watch it and certainly i have watched it as a police officer
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and asa have watched it as a police officer and as a parent. online there are fantastic opportunities, lots that is good. but there are also some risks. that is what this film tries to demonstrate using a very sad case. it could have been anyone's child, hani won —— anyone family? yes, if you watch the film and we now believe more than 5.5 million people have watched it since it went online earlier this week. it is such an ordinary story. we have shown the film in supported viewings to 35,000 school children all across leicestershi re school children all across leicestershire and rutland. 35 of them have come forward and said something similar had happened to them, which has led us to investigations and safeguarding work. this is going on. there is much that is good online. i hope the film makes people aware of the
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risks. the man who contacted kayleigh haywood and the means he went and read it, would that be quite typical of the techniques that anyone grooming a child would use? yes, i think it would. the texts in the film are real texts. he is now doing 12 years in prison. it became apparent that he was also in contact with other young people in a similar way and he was representing himself as something that he wasn't and someone he wasn't. his next door neighbour and friend was the person that killed kaylee haywood and he is doing 35 years. it is pretty typical. that is why it is being shown in the way it is shown, using some of the real words we use. when you take it from here when people come forward? we have been working with other partner agencies across leicestershi re with other partner agencies across leicestershire and rutland. the most important thing is to safeguard the
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young person. the next stage is often an investigation. there have been investigations that have followed on from the 35 disclosures. and the film is about trying to create a legacy of prevention so that people behave differently, people perhaps think about who they are talking to online. people realise they don't always know who they are talking to. if they then finish up meeting people they have met online, that they do that in a way that is safe and they can be saved. i think a lot of parents will be interested in looking this up and putting it into any search engine. what sort of age range are we talking about? what age range is appropriate for a? we have shown that in supervised showings from 11 yea rs that in supervised showings from 11 years —— for children from 11 years and upwards. it is not an easy watch. as you watch it you sort of
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find yourself trying back into your seat thinking, goodness me. but we have watched it in a supervised way, children of 11 and upwards, because those are the kind of children that are active online, which is mostly good, but they need to be aware of the risks. watch it with your children and talk to them about it is the general message? yeah, absolutely. thank you very much indeed. chief constable simon cole. details of organisations offering information and support are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free any time, to hear recorded information on 0800 077 077. it is pretty mild this morning. it
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is also misty and murky. there is the evidence. it is. it is not going anywhere quickly, this fog. it is a cloud layer. it has hit the surface in some areas because we have no wind. there is the risk of further travel disruption this morning and into the afternoon. this is staffordshire. the fog is the main concern. it is particularly thick through northern england, the vale of york, cheshire and manchester. in bristol, visibility is down to 100 metres. that will affect airports. we have got the drizzly rain across the south. that will be slow to clear. it is cloudy, it is grey and the cloud is thick enough to give us drizzle. in the southend west, that
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will be reluctant clear. few glimmers of sunshine. i wouldn't like to promise them in any particularly lengthy spells, but possibly in north—eastern scotland and eastern northern ireland faring better. it will ease up a little bit this evening and overnight in the north. but the cloud... generally mild, the temps —— temperatures. it will be a murky morning tomorrow. misty and foggy weather once again. the fog taking time to clear. in the south, a mostly dry and cloudy day. slightly brighter without the weather front. in the south and north, possibly brighter spells. weather front. in the south and north, possibly brighterspells. if you are heading to the fa cup today and tomorrow, it is basically leaden skies. relatively mild. —6 yesterday, this morning, six, tomorrow, eight to ten. the breeze
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strengthening tomorrow. it is significantly warmer than eastern parts of europe. at the moment across parts of belgium and holland, parts of france, we have freezing rain, icy conditions. into next week, all change. we get rid of the high—pressure. we have low pressure. so bands of rain and breeze picking up so bands of rain and breeze picking up as well. that clears the fog at least. thank you. this week hsbc launched adverts for its new voice recognition security system for customers of its telephone banking service. it's just one of several initiatives to get rid of passwords. typically it is estimated we each have more than 20 online accounts which need one — and most of us struggle to remember them, or don't keep them very secure. goodness knows, keeping one password
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for all 20 is the worst thing you can do. you have to keep changing them. paul lewis of radio 4's money box programme has been looking at password security, and joins us now from our london studio. it is complicated, isn't it? there are so many demands on our password security. it is. you have to keep changing them. the advice is not to use one over several sites. you mentioned hsbc. they are trailing this. voice recognition will replace passwords. mastercard are trying out taking a selfie of yourself when you log on. see if that works. with the iphone you can use your thumb print. passwords are here to stay for a long time and managing them is difficult. hsbc talking about voice recognition over the phone. that doesn't mean the end of passwords?
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not at all. not for now, certainly. the advice is, and i have been talking to experts, people still use passwords like one, two, three, four, five, six. perhaps stick a punctuation mark in the middle. that is virtually on trackable. you can use password managers. these are sites on the web that you can join and you just have one very secure password which, of course, you have to remember. they then manage your passwords and make them very difficult or impossible to crack. you have to pick the right firm. you have to trust them with their —— your password. the real problem is not just us. it your password. the real problem is notjust us. it is the firms. if someone has a password breach and your passwords are stolen, thieves can crack those passwords. if you
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use them on different sites, once they have got one password, they have got access to everything. so you have to have a lot of secure passwords to keep yourself safe. it isa passwords to keep yourself safe. it is a problem. but we have to deal with it. it isn't like locking the front door and the windows when you get out. and having to change your keys every couple of weeks! that is a very good example. with password management tools, you just have to remember one. you don't write it down. you have to remember it. then you have two ask yourself, what is my password?! there will be more on that story on money box at midday on bbc radio 4. when you've pushed yourself to the edge to conquer mount everest, abandoning your climb just 500 metres from the top is not something you do lightly. but that's what our next heroic guest did to help a fellow mountaineer who'd got into trouble. former british serviceman
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leslie binns turned around to save a woman who'd collapsed while on her trek. but, he's attempting to scale the world's highest mountain again soon, and joins us now in the studio, ahead of his next mission. good morning. i think you have the wrong guest. you are tired landman! i love that this man and god, he doesn't necessarily look like a mountain air. i think the mountaineers that man behind us. that's the one. do you have any heroic stories to tell us?|j that's the one. do you have any heroic stories to tell us? i have but none involving mount everest. we will talk to leslie binns later. todd, we definitely want to talk to you about what is going on in america, donald trump and vladimir
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putin, who has been accused of engineering the cyber attack on the united states. coming up before the end of the programme: she was an outsider to win, but ray blk is now following in the steps of adele after topping the bbc‘s sound of 2017 poll. she'll bejoining us here before ten. stay with us — the headlines are next. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and jon kay. the british red cross warns of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england. the charity says the government needs to provide more money to ease the strain. it's after dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals. good morning,
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it's saturday 7th january. also ahead, an american army veteran has been arrested after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport in florida. donald trump promises to look at ways of combating cyber attacks on us elections after a briefing from intelligence chiefs. a bump in the road — councils predict a huge rise in the repair bill for potholes in england and wales. in sport, it's a stroll for city in the fa cup as manchester city put five past west ham united to go through to the fourth round. he managed to bumpjamie oliver off the top of the christmas bestseller lists. we'll be joined by a star of social media. the body coachjoe wicks will be with us on the sofa. and helen has the weather.
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good morning, grey and murky, fog and especially over the hills, but in contrast to yesterday, nowhere near as cold, all the details for the weekend in around 15 minutes, join me if you can. good morning, first our main story. the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care. dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week. the royal college of emergency medicine says the system is on its knees, but the department of health says it's investing more money to improve services. dan johnson has more. winter pressure on accident and emergency — nothing new, but the red cross now says the strain on hospitals in england amounts to a humanitarian crisis. the charity claims social—care cuts mean patients are sent home without the right support, so then they end up back in a&e.
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