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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 7, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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and helen has the weather. good morning, grey and murky, fog and especially over the hills, but in contrast to yesterday, nowhere near as cold, all the details for the weekend in around 15 minutes, join me if you can. good morning, first our main story. the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care. dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week. the royal college of emergency medicine says the system is on its knees, but the department of health says it's investing more money to improve services. dan johnson has more. winter pressure on accident and emergency — nothing new, but the red cross now says the strain on hospitals in england amounts to a humanitarian crisis. the charity claims social—care cuts mean patients are sent home without the right support, so then they end up back in a&e. red cross volunteers support nhs staff and say they've seen patients sent home without clothes,
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some who don't receive the care they need to get washed, even some who've fallen and not been found for days. a&e staff recognise the problems too. i think the pressures on the nhs, and especially in emergency care, are particularly intense at the moment. but what is more concerning is the number of patients who have been managed within four hours, and then the delays to admission into the hospital bed base, which unfortunately are very, very significant, and our staff are working under some pretty intolerable conditions at times trying to manage. and sometimes they just can't manage. figures from nhs england show that overflowing a&e departments had to close their doors to new patients more than 140 times over the last month. compare that with the same month in 2015 — it's up more than 60%. the suspicion is that it's a combination of the cuts that we've seen in social care, in community services run
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by the nhs, and very heavy pressure in general practice. so is the strain on the nhs costing lives? the death of two patients on emergency trolleys at worcestershire royal hospital are being investigated. one of them had waited 35 hours for a bed. the department of health says it's providing billions more every year to ease pressure. nhs england says plans are in place to deal with the extra demand. beds are actually not quite as full as they work this time last year, but everyone in the health service knows things could get worse before they get better. dan johnson, bbc news. earlier on breakfast, dr mark holland from the society for acute medicine said so far it had been a winter from hell. we've seen, over the last week or so, that people who should be in a specialty bed are ending up in a non—specialty bed, or there are beds being created within a hospital that we call contingency beds, and people that i speak to across the country, e—mails that i've been receiving this week, things i've been
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reading in the media, make us conclude that the term "humanitarian crisis" has something to it. police in florida have been questioning a man after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport. the suspect opened fire in the baggage—claim area after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it's pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive. our correspondent gary o'donoghue reports from fort lauderdale. it's a familiar scene at airports the world over, but the baggage—claim hall at the fort lauderdale airport turned into a place of death and mayhem, as a lone gunman opened fire on those waiting to collect their luggage. passengers scattered for cover, hitting the ground, and reports say the assailant had time to reload before opening fire once again, as attempts were made to attend to the wounded. once he was done with ammunition,
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he threw the gun down, and i was about ten feet away from him. he basically threw the gun on the ground and laid on the ground face down, spreadeagled. the gunman has been named as 26—year—old esteban santiago. reports say he was carrying a military id and had a weapon in his checked baggage, which is legal in the united states. one family member said he had been receiving psychological treatment after leaving the national guard last year. this cowardly, heinous act resulted in the deaths of five people. there were eight more people injured by way of gunshot that were transported to local hospitals. in his first reaction to the shooting, president obama said he was heartbroken for the families. these kinds of tragedies have happened too often during the eight years that i've been president. the pain, the grief, the shock. the disruption at fort lauderdale went on long into the night,
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with some travellers stuck on the tarmac for more than eight hours. the fbi says it's ruling nothing out, including terrorism. but the agency has confirmed it had prior contact with santiago in november, when he was referred for a mental—health assessment. the ease with which he was able to transport and use a weapon in an airport will raise serious concerns about public safety. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber—campaign to try to help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump said that hacking had absolutely no impact on the election result but promised to set up a team to stop future attacks, as catriona renton reports. the report from american intelligence claims russia's president, vladimir putin, personally ordered what it called
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an influence campaign to help donald trump's chances of winning the american presidency. the president—elect had earlier described the russian hacking claims as a political witch—hunt by his opponents. at trump tower, he met america's top intelligence officials for a classified briefing. they say russia's actions included hacking into the e—mail accounts of the democratic national committee and top democrats, and using intermediaries such as wikileaks to release the information. russia has previously denied this, and wikileaks founderjulian assange has said before that moscow was not the source. after the briefing, mr trump did not single out russia. in a statement he said... and the incoming vice president says the us
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will strengthen cyber defences. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect the security of the american people from this type of intrusion in the future. donald trump said he had tremendous respect for the work and service done by those in the us intelligence community. but with two weeks to go until he moves into the white house, questions remain over how they will all work together to keep america safe. catriona renton, bbc news. the repair bill to fix the country's pot holes could reach £14 billion by 2019. that's according to nearly 400 councils in england and wales who say the government should pay for repairs from fuel duty. the government says it's already set aside a £250 million fund to tackle the problem,
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but the local government association says more needs to be done. we need a major investment in this country on the road is a structure, the infrastructure, and stopping this sort of patch—and—mend mentality, and giving us enough money to actually replace these local roads that desperately need proper money spent on them. michelle obama has delivered her final speech as first lady of the united states, with an impassioned call on young people to have hope, and fight for their rights. speaking at a ceremony in the white house, she ended tearfully, saying the role of first lady had been the greatest honour of her life. empower yourselves with a good education, then get out there and use that education to build a country worthy of your boundless promise. lead by example — with hope, never fear. and know that i will be with you, rooting for you,
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and working to support you for the rest of my life. so i want to close today by simply saying thank you. thank you for everything you do for our kids and for our country. being your first lady has been the greatest honour of my life, and i hope i have made you proud. not a nota dry not a dry eye in the house! the end ofan era. not a dry eye in the house! the end of an era. we can think about the white house in the future under donald trump. he says he's had a constructive meeting with american intelligence officials, who have released a report saying russia was behind a series of cyber attacks designed to influence the recent election. the president—elect insists the hacking played no part in his victory but says he'll appoint a team to devise ways of combating any future interference. let's remind ourselves what's been happening over the last 18 months. back in september 2015,
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an fbi agent found a russian—linked hacker in the democrats network. his warning was ignored. injuly 2016, wikileaks released private emails from democratic officials just days before the national convention. in october 2016, the fbi and the cia announce they believe the russian government was behind the hacking, and their aim was to interfere with the us election process. so what does donald trump think of it all? well, he's made it clear he doesn't believe intelligence chiefs, tweeting only this week: and less than 24—hours before that briefing, one of his top intelligence advisers, former cia directorjames woolsey, quit his team. they were able to come up with the
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identities of the intermediaries between the russian government and the people who did some of the hacking, they didn't have that before. and that, i think, was one thing that got a lot of people's attention, including mine. todd landman, professor of political science at the university of nottingham, is with us. we are climbing a mountain of political intrigue in the united states this morning! do you buy this interpretation by american intelligence services that russia was behind this, and more specifically vladimir putin directed it himself? i think it goes a bit beyond interpretation, you are looking at 17 intelligence agencies coming together in this joint report which communicates what is allowed to be communicated — there are methods and techniques which are classified. that is the difficulty, we don't see the hard evidence.
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lot of people make hay out of that, but a couple of key things are very interesting. trump is hanging on to the fact that it does not say that the fact that it does not say that the counting of votes was not affected, he won fair and square. it is impossible to determine, however, the degree to which public opinion had changed because of that intervention. that is something to draw from this experience. we don't know what happened behind locked doors in this meeting, but what do you make of the way trump and esteem have dealt with this after the meeting finished? since the meeting, we have seen a bit of forward movement from the trump team, they say a constructive meeting, that is a positive signal. it is odd for a president to go on the offensive against the team that will work with him. they need to work with them everyday, there are 800 military bases around the world, there are co nsta nt bases around the world, there are constant briefings about this, and he needs to be briefed every day, and to disparage that really doesn't show the maturity of office that
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american people deserve. what is the endgame for vladimir putin?“ american people deserve. what is the endgame for vladimir putin? if you can influence world politics from behind your desk, in ways that has already been proven in this case, thenit already been proven in this case, then it is a win for him, and it goes back to that zero—sum world politics of the cold war, that a win for the soviet union was a loss for the united states. but he wants to work closely with trump, forge a working relationship with him. work closely with trump, forge a working relationship with himm work closely with trump, forge a working relationship with him. it is not about trump, it is about hillary clinton, the liberal order, international institutions, and to be able to attack that in ways that he has done, among other ways, is a way of returning to that zero—sum thinking. we are seeing a new paradigm perhaps in world politics, in which popular strongmen are coming to the fore. how damaging is this for trump as president? when he's seen on stage with putin, there will be a recollection in people's
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minds, even if we move on from this — izzy dagg was because of him? minds, even if we move on from this - izzy dagg was because of him? he needs to tackle it quickly, saying that there will be eight task forces the right thing to do. —— there will bea the right thing to do. —— there will be a task force. it could be like the hillary clinton e—mail scandal, it could lingerfor the hillary clinton e—mail scandal, it could linger for many years, and he wants to get rid of it now, make sure something is being seen to be done. what about the uk perspective on all of this? british intelligence services, i think, on all of this? british intelligence services, ithink, assisted on all of this? british intelligence services, i think, assisted american intelligence in some ways in all of this, but also the report made it clear that this isn't necessarily just going to affect america, that it is likely that the kremlin, moscow, will be trying to use this influential power in other countries, in other world events as well. all powerful governments do this, that is an important point. government around the world are able to do this, and there is a tit—for—tat strategy going on in terms of cyber attacks, so it is not
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just a russian problem — it is a way in which power is exercised around the world. military power, soft power, intelligence power et cetera. we shouldn't kid ourselves that this is only a russian problem. thank you very much. lovely to have you with us very much. lovely to have you with us this morning. properly this time, earlier we thought you were someone else, thank you for coming back! helen housby —— as the weather, sunshine breaking through at last! i was fed up of showing you fog this morning, so i found a little bit of sunshine. if you are living up in moray, you may see a bit of sunshine, i would moray, you may see a bit of sunshine, iwould not moray, you may see a bit of sunshine, i would not say the north—east of scotland was one of the better parts to see brightness, because elsewhere it is difficult to see much at all. visibility has not
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really improved since i have been in this morning, and they are unlikely to improve very quickly. the re m na nts of to improve very quickly. the remnants of a weather front in the southis remnants of a weather front in the south is reducing visibility, bristol is down to 50 metres, but that fog is around through lancashire, cheshire, the vale of york, pretty mucky in those areas. and it is great elsewhere. fog, for example, sitting on the chilterns, fog further west, drizzle quite widely across the south—west. wales, mostly dry, but rather murky, particularly over the hills, not a day to godel walking. northern ireland has a lot of cloud, scotland as well, but predominantly dry. —— to go hill walking. through this evening and overnight, all that cloud evening and overnight, all that clou d sto ps evening and overnight, all that cloud stops the temperatures from falling, so relatively mild to start this morning, a relatively mild day compared to what we have had this week, staying largely frost free
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overnight, chilly in the north—east of scotland. but again, the area where we see the best of the sunshine, and other mucky start for most of us, hopefully a little bit more breeze picking up in the north to make it clear more quickly. on balance, more brightness, as you can see for the fa cup, mostly light cloud rather than grey. but effectively it is cloudy! it should be dry, temperatures getting 28—10 degrees celsius, just a smidgen above average. —— getting to 8—10. we currently have freezing rain across the low countries, cold air stag na nt across the low countries, cold air stagnant further east, the average for moscow was minus nine, and we have snow across the greek islands at the moment, so some really wintry weather not too far away from our shores. as for the new we cared, turning more unsettled, low pressure moves in, high pressure keeps us dry. —— as for the new week ahead.
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we will keep you posted on the wind up we will keep you posted on the wind up north, it is the lack of wind thatis up north, it is the lack of wind that is causing problems today with the fog this morning. thank you very much, helen, we will wait for the fog to blow away! when you've pushed yourself to the edge to conquer mount everest, abandoning your climb just 500 metres from the top is not something you do lightly. but that's what our next heroic guest did to help a fellow mountaineer who'd got into trouble. former british serviceman leslie binns turned around to save a woman who'd collapsed while on her trek. but he's attempting to scale the world's highest mountain again soon, thank you very much indeed for coming in! shall we go back to the first time, you tell us what happened? i managed to get to 8000 metres, which is camp 4, it is about
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eight o'clock at night, a lovely night, nice clear whether, and a few hours later we were coming to a balcony, about 8400 metres, and there was a commotion at the head, and the next thing we knew, someone was sliding down the mountain towards me. it was a split—second decision to stop this person, essentially i rugby tackled her to stop her. the next thing i know, she was suffering from frostbite, the gloves were off. and this is the lady that you saved. sunita, she was out of oxygen, she was in a very bad way, i had to get off the mountain, i couldn't leave her there to die. very brave decision, because at that stage you didn't know what kind of assistance she would need, the difficulties you would encounter, and you came across another gentleman in a very dire situation. yeah, me and the sherpa got it
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sorted as best we could, we had a spare bottle sorted as best we could, we had a spa re bottle of sorted as best we could, we had a spare bottle of oxygen, we got gloves back on, and as we were heading down the mountain, there was another guy trouble. we thought he was one of the rescue teams coming up, but when we got to him, we realised he was in a lot of trouble, so we decided to help him as well. and thingsjust seem so we decided to help him as well. and things just seem to get worse from then on, i slipped into a few crevasses , we from then on, i slipped into a few crevasses, we uncoupled from our safety lines, getting down the mountain, we all ended up sliding down, i thought it was the end of may, sliding down this blue eyes, cannot stop yourself. i thought that was it, i was very angry with myself to get myself in that situation. —— blue ice. i was a bit of a startled rabbit in headlights, but i realised i had to help these people, i decided to help the strongest person out of the two, sunita. the other
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quy out of the two, sunita. the other guy was stuck in a crass, which properly saved his life... well, he passed away, but i went to help sunita, i thought he would be ok until the sun came up. i helped sunita into a sleeping bag, we had a flask of tea, we put her hands in it to warm her hands, and she managed to warm her hands, and she managed to get away with just losing her little finger on her hand. but like i say, sadly, the other guy, with thoughts summary would help him in daylight. the sherpas try to bring him down the mountain, but he later died. a reminder ofjust how treacherous embarking on this kind of journey is. after treacherous embarking on this kind ofjourney is. after that, then, you formed a friendship with sunita, understandably! yeah. yes, she keeps in touch with me, mainly my girlfriend, we ask about each other‘s families. i remember chatting to her in the tent at
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comedy, drinking hot tea, she was telling me about her family. comedy, drinking hot tea, she was telling me about herfamily. —— comedy, drinking hot tea, she was telling me about her family. —— at camp 4. having gone through notjust one incident but a number of incidents, which is so scary, so dangerous, a lot of people would say, iam never dangerous, a lot of people would say, i am never going to do that again — but you are going back. yeah, if you want to achieve your dreams, there is an element of danger, it is relevant to what you wa nt to danger, it is relevant to what you want to do. what you have got to understand, it is a harsh environment, a harsh man done. it does take peoples lives, but to get that close to the summit and not to be able to finish it off, that will stay in the back of your mind. if we don't strike again, i have to give itafair don't strike again, i have to give it a fair shot. are you more nervous? i would not save more nervous, but i know what is coming this time. i know there will be a
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lot of heartache, where i have to push myself, get myself out of the sleeping bag in the morning, but i am excited, really excited to go back and have another go at this beautiful mountain. you experienced something like four separate explosions during active military service, did you lose your eyesight in one eye? yes, one of the afghan army soldiers i was patrolling with stepped on an ied, i got the blast down the left—hand side of my face and lost my sight in my left one. so more of a challenge than it would be for some people anyway, gosh, i admire you! how does your girlfriend feel about it? she is very supportive, 100% behind me. obviously, this is all in the back of mind, that things can go wrong, but we put it to one side. as a family, we are focused on getting me to the summit. you have amazing mental strength. and physical strength! good luck, and keep us
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posted, we will see you back here to hear about your successful bridging of the summit. fantastic, thank you very much. —— reaching. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, time now for a look at the newspapers. the writer paul vallely is here to tell us what's caught his eye. welcome back, paul, where are you going to start? the daily mail story about jamie oliver closing some going to start? the daily mail story aboutjamie oliver closing some of his restaurants, is chief executive said that it was due to post—brexit pressures . said that it was due to post—brexit pressures. “— said that it was due to post—brexit pressures. —— his. clearly, his customers do not agree, they have been saying it is high prices and poor food! obviously, you been saying it is high prices and poorfood! obviously, you get a few who are disappointed with everything, but it is quite striking
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that brexit is being blamed. there is another story in the times, a front page about a donor who has given £1.2 million to the tory party, saying he is going to stop supporting it if britain leaves the eu single market. and the paper has a leader about brexit, in which it kind of unpacks some of these intentions. how can you believe these different stories about brexit? it is explaining that the chief economist of the bank of england was talking about a michael fish moment, when they got it wrong, and they are saying the thing about brexit is that we really don't know what is happening still, and it could all unpack in a way in which jamie oliver is using as an excuse at the moment. it is quite a good
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context setting leader, it is worth reading, the times leader on that. virtually every article has brexit in there somewhat! we will be talking to joe in there somewhat! we will be talking tojoe wicks, this clean living, amazing athlete, lots of people following him, but you are talking about fat being back this morning. yes, speaking as someone who was on a died before christmas, lost a stone, put some of it back on, haven't had the dreaded way in yet! —— a diet. this adds to the confusion, written by the business editor of the financial times, she has been a napier died which consists of red meat and double cream, knocking back on the sugar, dairy, alcohol. —— a peculiar diet. it is two pages long, and she says halfway through that there is a lot of confusion, and no wonder the british public is confused. the
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advice is so absolutely contradictory, someone on the diet with was told off for eating an apple, it is that bad. but what it all boils down to, it seems to me, is that every diet makes you conscious of what you are eating, and that makes you eat less, and that seems to be the truth behind all the diets. the faddish nature of them is what stops you succeeding very often. every paper has an offer for some sort of diet or exercise programme. i want to talk you about how a nap keeps you young, anyone who works odd hours, learning to catnap is one of life's great skills, and it can do our brain some good according to the express. skills, and it can do our brain some good according to the expressm skills, and it can do our brain some good according to the express. it is also in the ft article, that sleep is good for losing weight, but this tested people's memory and ability to do maths and various things. it was in america, and it worked out
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that if you sleep for an hour every afternoon, your ability to do things im proves afternoon, your ability to do things improves enormously. if you sleep for less than an hour or more than an hour, it doesn't work quite so well. some of it is pretty common sense. i mean, people have been having siestas in europe for years, haven't they? what it says, basically, is that there is a restorative function that sleep brings, and your brain is kind of overtaxed, and you need to rest it. shall we try no?! god i was thinking aboutjust going home and climbing back in bed, actually! thank you so much for your time, sleep and dietary advice in the papers. all the best. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when donal skehan takes over in the saturday kitchen. donal, what's on the menu for us? it is looking fantastic this morning, our special guest today has
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just dived into the studio, the amazing tom daley, you are facing food heaven or food amazing tom daley, you are facing food heaven orfood hell. amazing tom daley, you are facing food heaven or food hell. food heaven is beef wellington, very british. great for the diet! and food hell? anything like massive bony fish i am not a fan. we are alsojoined by two brilliant bony fish i am not a fan. we are also joined by two brilliant guests, ching—he huang, what is on the menu? i will be making chicken, it is an american dish, very popular, delicious. and making his debut on the show, mark greenaway, is cooking? a very simple brown sugar baked cheesecake with tomato caramel. we are all excited about the tomato caramelised smack and i ama the tomato caramelised smack and i am afan the tomato caramelised smack and i am a fan of cheesecake, we are in a good place, see you at ten, guys. —— tomato caramel! we will all be looking at what he is eating! headlines and more food coming up. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and rachel burden.
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coming up before nine, helen will have the weather. mike will have all of the fa cup sport. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the british red cross is warning of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england, and is demanding the government allocates more money to improve social care. dozens of a&e departments were forced to divert ambulances to other hospitals last week, while one patient died after spending 35 hours on a trolley. the department of health says it's investing more money to improve services. but dr mark holland, from the society for acute medicine, said it had so far been a "winter from hell". we have seen over the last week or so that people who should be in a specialty bed are ending up in a non—speciality bed, or are beds being created, contingency beds. people i speak to across the country, e—mails i have been
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receiving and things i have been reading in the media, make us conclude that the term humanitarian crisis has some validity. police in florida have been questioning a man, after five people were killed and eight injured in a shooting at fort lauderdale airport. the suspect opened fire in the baggage claim area, after seemingly retrieving his weapon from his luggage. the fbi says it's pursuing all leads and hasn't ruled out terrorism as a motive. us intelligence officials have released a report that claims vladimir putin personally ordered a cyber campaign to try and help donald trump win the presidential election. last night, after being briefed on the findings, mr trump said that hacking had had absolutely no impact on the election outcome. his running mate, mike pence, says a team will be set up to stop future attacks. the president—elect has made it very clear that we're going to take aggressive action in the early days of our new administration to combat cyber attacks and protect
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the security of the american people from this type of intrusion in the future. for the first time, the nhs is providing disabled children with prosthetic limbs, that are specially designed for sport. 13—year—old ben from brighton was amongst the first to benefit, after being given a running blade. nhs england says it hopes the programme will allow "several hundred" children a year to receive limbs, allowing them to participate in more sports. a killer whale which was involved in the deaths of three people and featured in an influential documentary, has died at seaworld in florida. tilikum featured in the film blackfish, which led to a global campaign against the keeping of orcas in captivity. sea world says staff are "deeply saddened" by the death of the whale, which was thought to be 36 years old. those are the main stories this morning. the question is, tomorrow morning
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will be be talking about a giant—killing upset in the fa cup? may be a stourbridge player, eastleigh, lincoln? manchester city have certainly made their mark. it was a first fa cup paste work pep guardiola, their manager. he relished it. interesting to see if this helps their league form. before their fa cup third round tie, if —— slaven bilic suggested manchester city was not a confident team and a more. but they responded in emphatic style. city were already out of sight by half time — leading 3—0 thanks to an own goal, a yaya toure penalty, and that tap in for david silva. the gloss on an impressive night was added byjohn stones. the england defender scored his first goal since a summer move from everton. he needed goal—line technology to confirm that he'd actually scored it though. hopefully it can help us to make our players believers,
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that they are good enough to play every game, and try, in both our fans and the people in manchester city, and they can believe that we are good. they know what happened in the past, but we are good guys. so they run a lot, fight a lot, playing good. but they have to believe. we gave everything but as a team it wasn't good enough. it was nowhere near the performance we had here against man united when we were much more compact. that is the disappointment. it will be a special fa cup reunion, today, for one of the members of the treble—winning manchester united team of 1999. former netherlands centre half jaap stam is now the manager of championship side reading, who go to old trafford hunting for a giant killing this lunchtime.
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as a player, there is nothing better than to play over there, in a stadium like that in front of so many fans. and we know, as well, we have our own fans over there as well. hopefully they are joining in and supporting us. the five lower league teams left have a fair chance of getting into the next round. the lowest ranked tea m the next round. the lowest ranked team stourbridge arab wycombe wanderers. some potentially tricky away ties for crystal palace, norwich and arsenal. you have got one of the best teams in europe coming. a manager who has graced the premier league for 20 odd years. the original invincible is against the
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modern—day invincible. it is a fantastic occasion. it will be a sell—out. the third round of the fa cup. there is always a shock. hopefully that will be the case on saturday night. he knows how to create an upset. remember when is leeds united team beat manchester united a couple of years ago? sir andy murray will play world number two novak djokovic in the final of the qatar open today. murray beat czech tomas berdych in straight sets in their semi final, to reach his fourth final in doha. the win was murray's 28th in a row on the atp tour, and another title and victory over his main rival would be the ideal preparation for the australian open, starting a week on monday. we played at the end of last year. the ultimate goal was to find a way to win the match. maybe at the beginning of the year you are focusing a little bit more on yourself, and how you are playing, and how you want to play, moving into the aussie open, rather than just solely focusing on the outcome. newcastle falcons produced
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a stunning late comeback to beat bath 24—22 in rugby union's aviva premiership. bath led by 12 points half way through the second half, but ben harris barged his way over to draw newcastle level less than four minutes from time. man of the matchjoel hodgson kept his nerve to slot home the conversion, and send bath to their third defeat in a row. newcastle move up to sixth. scarlets also came from behind to beat ulster 16—13, to stay fourth in the pro 12. the winning score was a penalty try — scarlets scrum half aled davies was on the receiving end of a high tackle, as he tried to cross the line. elsewhere, leinster beat zebre, and newport gwent dragons beat treviso. this afternoon, sir mo farah is in action at the edinburgh cross country. the four—time olympic champion — who insists he's happy just to be called mo — was surprisingly beaten into second place last year.
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he's using the event as part of his preparation for the track world championships in london later this year, and admits he'll have his work cut out against some cross country specialists this afternoon. it is going to be tough. they will want to hunt me down and beat me as quick as possible. that is what makes cross—country exciting. this is the event. i will fight for it. but it suits certain athletes better. it will be tough. i used to love cross—country. i wasn't one of those who tried to escape. i was quite good. it is
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quite a tough event, especially when it is more the in the winter. it is a completely different skill to track running. it takes different muscles afterwards. indeed. good luck, mo farah. if there was an upset today, i think it could be one of the premier league teams going to a championship team. maybe crystal palace at norwich. enjoy it. it is also a day that has been named sunshine saturday. today is predicted to be the busiest day of the year for booking holidays. it's being dubbed sunshine saturday, with tens of thousands of us buying a break. but is it really the best day to book? the independent‘s travel editor simon calder and alistair rowland from co—operative travel join us now.
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we were talking about this area. is it really the best day to go for a bargain when thousands of other people are trying to book at the same time? presumably travel agents are excited. yes. if you know what you want to go and you want to commit to the best rooms and the best resort, now is the time to buy. todayis best resort, now is the time to buy. today is the biggest single booking day. 1.5% of all bookings in the entire year happened today. are you saying categorically that he did not increase your prices today? no. there is a myth about wait until late to book. i think simon advocated. actually, booking early is best. the deals on now, low deposits, free kids, good rooms. you have all of these travel agents competing with each other today?
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yes, it is a busy day for the travel industry and ourselves as well.“ yes, it is a busy day for the travel industry and ourselves as well. if i may, it is a very good time to look ata may, it is a very good time to look at a holiday if you know exactly where you want to go. but don't just walk into the first travel agent or might go to the first online age into you see, shop around. it is a great year to be a holiday— maker because, for example, in the south of britain you have holidays expanding at birmingham, stansted, and thomas cook and monarch are fighting back. if you are in the north, you can take advantage of the fa ct north, you can take advantage of the fact the school holidays in scotland are earlier than fact the school holidays in scotland are earlierthan in fact the school holidays in scotland are earlier than in england. shop around. see who has got the best deal. beware of going through an odd online travel agent you haven't heard of. over places that have been recommended. 0r talk to a human being. that is always a good idea. if you don't have to go in the school holidays, just relax. there
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is so much stuff around, particularly in the next couple of months. if somebody is prepared to think a bit differently, and go somewhere they haven't been before but do not want to spend lots of money, what is hot? what is hot in terms of where people are going is spain. it had a record year last year and it will do again this year. along with portugal, italy, greece. if you want sure good value, it is the former yugoslavia, particularly macedonia in the far south. romania and bulgaria offering good deals. that will help you stretch your pound. this is the first summer when we will be feeling the pain of the drop in sterling. one viewer has a couple of weeks off in february. last year they went to barbados. this year they are tempted by mexico. which terry would you recommend? if you can cope with the
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long flight, mexico is terrific value. can kuhn. american standards, caribbean field. fantastic value for money. at the moment the average price is only £4 higher than last year. fuel is increasing. so airlines hedge their fuel. year. fuel is increasing. so airlines hedge theirfuel. if year. fuel is increasing. so airlines hedge their fuel. if you leave it late, that price is more likely to be offensive. cuba is changing rapidly. mexico will still be as lovely as ever in five years. cuba will be very different. that is a possibility to do now as well. david from shetland has booked his holidays for the summer and is thinking about next new year. he is very organised. have you got a tip? only if you're planning to fly long haul to australia, new zealand, the caribbean or south africa, you probably should be booking right now because you will get the pick of the airline seats and the fares. you
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have got to get organised. get those leave request in as well. thank you very much indeed. see you in the summer. helen is going to tell us what the weather is going to tell us what the weather is going to tell us what the weather is going to do today. the summer will hopefully have something warmer and less foggy then we are at the moment. it is quite great. it is not going anywhere. this is hill fog that has just settled at low levels. it is giving some nasty conditions. this is moray. we have found some sunshine in wales. this was sent in from carmarthenshire. a little bit of brightness. i have seen the latest satellite picture. it is not ready to show on air yet. a good deal of sunshine in the northern half of scotland. a little bit in north—eastern england. for most, it is grave. drizzly, dank weather as well as the fog in the south. it is
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not going anywhere quickly. it will probably become an issue for the south and west later. visibility down to 50 to 100 metres. it is combined with that drizzle. some of the worst affected areas for fog cup in the west midlands, into the cheshire plains and the vale of york. it is not as foggy in scotland and northern ireland but it isjust as cloudy. good spells of sunshine in northern scotland. hopefully a few more breaks in the cloud this afternoon. overnight the thai returns, as will be missed and fog. it allows us to have a relatively mild night. temperatures do not fall away. fog will be the concern tomorrow morning. some thick patches. we won't have the weather front as close to the south—west. it should be drier in contrast. rain in the north—west. it looks as if it should be a large the dry picture
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for the third round of the fa cup. there will be subtle mild. —— it will be relatively mild in this country. considerably warmer than parts of europe. freezing rain in the low countries. snow in parts of greece. temperatures expected to get to -23 greece. temperatures expected to get to —23 in moscow tomorrow. things will change. low pressure moving into the north and west. this weather system will give some snow. something a little chillier towards the end of the week. a little breeze. that is it from me this morning. see you tomorrow. thank you very much. if you've been hunting online for recipes that won't mess up your new year resolutions, then you've probably came across the namejoe wicks. his face has been everywhere. over christmas, he knocked jamie oliver off top of the best selling cookbook list.
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in fact, he's become the second biggest selling author of 2016. so what's the secret to his success? we'll find out in a minute. but first, let's have a quick look at some of his very popular social media videos. i'mjoe wicks, i'm joe wicks, the body coach. get those knees up. three, two, one. in the van! cod fillets, covered in flour. are you ready? let's get going. land softly. chicken breast, mixed peppers,
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mushrooms... stick the lid on. joe wicks, welcome back to brea kfast. joe wicks, welcome back to breakfast. how are you? i'm good. it's lovely seeing those areas. do you enjoy watching yourself? no, i don't watch them that often. it has been a mad year. started with you training ina been a mad year. started with you training in a park? yes, iwas training in a park? yes, iwas training in a park? yes, iwas training ina training in a park? yes, iwas training in a park? yes, iwas training in a park and garden instagram schering recipe ideas. i never predicted it. i never planned on writing a book or having a tv show. it has just built momentum. that social media thing is the reason you are who and what you are now, that has made you? without a doubt. i still think i would be doing boot camps in richmond. it is something you can harness if you use it in the right way. i have been consistent with my content. free
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videos. facebook live workouts. it is great building a community. people can access your regime and don't necessarily have to pay for it? yes, that is how it started. i really believe in giving out free content. i want people to still have an content. i want people to still have a n a ccess content. i want people to still have an access to recipes and content. what is the basic idea of lean in 15? it is basically cooking healthy food at home that you can eat, burgers, pizza is... that is sweet potato fries. that is healthy home—made fish fingers covered in red crumbs and coconut oil. healthy fish and chips. you don't need to cut calories and deprive yourself. healthy fat as proteins and carbs at the right time, as long as you
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combine it with the exercise. the right time, as long as you combine it with the exerciselj the right time, as long as you combine it with the exercise. i know you have had some grief this week. there has been criticism saying that some of the things you have been making has been expensive. what do you say? unless you are shopping in harrods and buying caviar, i don't know how they managed to say it cost £600 a month. all of my social media followers are doing it for £50 a week. it wasn't correct. healthy food, you have got to fuel your body right. if you're cooking for the family and buying in bulk, you are better off financially than eating out every day. overall, living on the lean in 15 lifestyle is better. it says here you are responsible for 2596 it says here you are responsible for 25% spike in broccoli sales. is that true? the grocer industry said that. i call them midget trees for fun. everyone has started using them in
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their recipes. kids are loving them. a p pa re ntly their recipes. kids are loving them. apparently it has increased by 25%. iam not apparently it has increased by 25%. i am not going to invest in midget trees! i'm not a shareholder! i do like broccoli. i like brock —— raw broccoli and spinach. broccoli in some soy sauce is nice. do you ever have anything that is unhealthy? do you ever stopped at a fast—food place have a burger and enjoy it? last night, i'll be honest, i ordered room service. i had a burger and chips and a bottle of coke, and and chips and a bottle of coke, and a mass of the minibar. it is all about balance and moderation. i fancied a blow out. how long do you work out for in the morning? 15 to 25 minutes of high intensity working out. i do the you tube videos as well. i believe that anyone can be
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lea n well. i believe that anyone can be lean all year round as long as they fit into their lifestyle. you can do it at home, follow the workouts and the recipes and we will be lean and 15. people see the likes of you in magazines and they think, it is all or nothing. you are saying you can balance it? yes, especially this time of the year. the worst thing anybody could do is start a low—calorie diet now. it is not sustainable. work hard, train hard and you can enjoy some treats and stay lea n and you can enjoy some treats and stay lean and maintain your body all year round. congratulations on all of your success. i hope it goes well for 2017. thank you for having me. some chocolates on the way out. for 2017. thank you for having me. some chocolates on the way outlj for 2017. thank you for having me. some chocolates on the way out. i do love a chocolate! the bbc music sound of list aims to predicts the most exciting new music for the year ahead, and with previous winners including adele, sam smith and ellie goulding, it's got a pretty good track record. that a lot delivered to. —— that is
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a lot to live up two. now soul singer ray blk has beaten off stiff competition to be named this year's winner. it is the first time an unsigned artist has won the honour. we'll be speaking to ray in just a moment. but first, let's have a look at her song, chill out. # i told you i was trouble when we first met. # i guess you never got the message. # i guess you never got the message. # i guess you never got the message. # i hate to be so god damn depressive. # bert wemp broken heart has turned me intoa # bert wemp broken heart has turned me into a savage. —— but my broken heart. # i only want you when i'm lonely. # i only want you when i'm lonely. #ona # i only want you when i'm lonely. # on a late—night, on friday. # on a late—night, on friday. # i'll only want you when i'm
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lonely, on a late—night, on friday. rayjoins us ray joins us now. rayjoins us now. good morning. great to have you with us. talking about that particular song. the video is beautiful. how do you get it all together given that you don't have a record label? it was quite a task. i have a really great team together. my manager listened to my vision when i said to him that i wa nted vision when i said to him that i wanted to go to jamaica and film these goalie queen's. the goalie queen's are transgender men who live in the goalie, which is basically the sewers of jamaica. they are ostracised from the community. they face daily abuse. i felt it was something people were not aware of. i wanted to include them in my video. this is some accolade you have been given. the sound of 2017
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by bbc music. an amazing achievement. shall wejust by bbc music. an amazing achievement. shall we just see the moment when you found out you worthy winner. 0h, winner. oh, my god! you arejoking?! oh my god! i genuinely can't believe it! you owe us 17 grand for the microphone that you broke at that point! you have been able to compute it now. i don't think so. it still doesn't feel real. it still hasn't sunk in. ifound out doesn't feel real. it still hasn't sunk in. i found out a doesn't feel real. it still hasn't sunk in. ifound out a little while ago. i'm still in shock, really. must be shocking when you look at the list of people that have won. exactly. the list of people that have won. exa ctly. n o the list of people that have won. exactly. no pressure. tell us a little bit about your musical journey. you have gone from gospel to grime, or that the double r&b
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sound. how did you get there?m started with gospel. i was raised in a church, joined a gospel choir, joint every choir i could. then i found the music that i loved and fell in love with, bar hip hop. slowly i cultivated my sound. all of my inspirations helped me do that. you were lucky in a way to be surrounded by talented friends. they have been successful in the music business? absolutely. i was once in a band where i was about 13 to 16 with emenike, he lived around the corner. it was himself, his brother and a couple of other boys. he ended up and a couple of other boys. he ended up working with all sorts? yes, a megastar. howdy this prize will help you, or assist you to do what you wa nt to you, or assist you to do what you want to do? the danger is you get pigeonholed. how do you keep control? i think me being an
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unsigned artist is what helps me keep control. it means that everything i do can remain authentic and genuine and come spread from me rather than a label making sure that everything is in a particular way and telling me how to sound. you don't want to be signed?” and telling me how to sound. you don't want to be signed? i don't know what i would want to do in the future. if it is the right deal for me, i may sign. there must be people already approaching you? me, i may sign. there must be people already approaching you ?|j me, i may sign. there must be people already approaching you? i mean, yeah mac! have had few conversations. i am enjoying my freedom. are you a control freak? slightly! i am a bit of a control freak. i liked the fact that the people who support me know the music is coming straight from me and know that everything i put out is me. i think we have a stronger connection because of that. that is really important in the music business, particularly when you are young, to know you have —— to have the integrity to know what you want is
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pretty impressive. we were talking tojoe wicks about social media. it helps you as well? definitely. i feel like i social media. it helps you as well? definitely. ifeel like i am social media. it helps you as well? definitely. i feel like i am where social media. it helps you as well? definitely. ifeel like i am where i am because of social media and the internet in general. i have been able to share so much with people who probably wouldn't have heard my music before. thank you so much for coming in. good luck and congratulations. amazing talent. that is it from us today. ben and shannon are here tomorrow. have a good. —— have a good day. goodbye. this is bbc news, i'm gavin esler, the headlines at ten. the british red cross warns of a humanitarian crisis in nhs hospitals in england and calls on the government to provide more money. an american army veteran has been arrested after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport in florida. the megafires ravaging north american forests, how wildfires are becoming increasingly common and destructive. also in the next hour,
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the spiralling cost of repairing potholes in england and wales. councils predict the repair bill could reach £14 billion within two years. white and coming in an hour and the travel show, cuba.
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