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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 8, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. embarrassment for israel. its ambassador to the uk apologises after an embassy official is secretly filmed discussing how to damage the career of a conservative minister. the diplomat suggests he wants to "take down" sir alan duncan because he's creating problems for the israelis, and is seen describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an "idiot". good morning. it's sunday the 8th of january. also ahead: theresa may sets out her vision for britain. the prime minister says she wants to build a "shared society" with a commitment to fairness. london underground staff get ready to start a 24—hour strike tonight as millions of commuters face a chaotic start to the week. in iraq war veteran has been charged
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after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport in florida. in sport: three premier league sides are knocked out by lower league opposition in the fa cup third round — among them bournemouth, who were beaten 3—0 by league one side millwall. and helen has the weather. good morning. a very similar date to yesterday weatherwise. it is grey and misty with fog in a few localities first thing. i will have more details if you join me in 15 minutes. thank you, helen. the israeli ambassador has apologised for comments which appear to show a diplomat plotting to bring down a government minister. undercover footage, filmed by middle east news network aljazeera, shows an israeli government employee saying he would like to take down the foreign office minister sir alan duncan. the video also shows the official insulting foreign secretary borisjohnson. jane frances—kelly reports.
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the emergence of the footage is highly embarrassing for the israelis. it shows shai masot dining with, among others, an aide to the conservative education minister robert halfon. mr masot, a senior political adviser at the israeli embassy, says he would like to bring down a member of the british government. sir alan duncan has been a fierce critic of israeli policy. just over two years ago, he described israel's control and division of the west bank city of hebron as nothing short of apartheid, where palestinians were treated as second—class citizens. in the covert footage, mr masot also describes sir alan's boss, borisjohnson, in less than flattering terms. sir crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee, described mr masot‘s comments about sir alan as outrageous and deserving of investigation. the director of the conservative
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friends of israel said we utterly condemn any attempt to undermine sir alan duncan, or any minister or any member of parliament. in a statement, the foreign office said: while the british government is not taking any further action, the film raises uncomfortable questions about mr masot, and just how much influence he has been able to wield. jane frances—kelly, bbc news. theresa may is promising to introduce wide—ranging social reforms to correct what she calls the "everyday injustices" faced by ordinary working families. in an article for the sunday telegraph, she says she wants to build a "shared society" with a commitment to fairness, and reveals a deliberate attempt to break away from her tory predecessors. our political correspondent, susana mendonca, joins us now from our london studio.
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susanna, what do you think she means by a "shared society"? it isa it is a phrase we have heard before. ed miliband, the former labour leader, use this phrase back in 2015. interesting that we have a conservative prime minister using the same language. it is very different language to the kind of thing we heard from david cameron, the former conservative leader, who talked about having a big society, where charities were very much involved in dealing with inequality. margaret thatcher famously said there was no such thing as society. theresa may is talking about a shared society, and says in the past governments have not really focused on trying to help people as much as they should. our focus on trying to help people as much as they should. ourfocus has been on they should. ourfocus has been on the individual and we need to be thinking about the responsibilities we have for one another. very little detail on how she will make that
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happen. she wants to shift the focus away from talk of brexit which will be difficult because the supreme court ruling is expected. she has ongoing criticism from people within the political spectrum about her dealings with the brexit negotiations. we know they are supposed to be happening. for her, one good bit of news is that donald trump, the president—elect, she has been criticised for not having a closer relationship to him. he has twittered about her overnight saying: we know that meeting will be happening. britain needs close trade relations with countries like the us ina relations with countries like the us in a post— brexit 12. relations with countries like the us in a post- brexit12. 0k, relations with countries like the us in a post- brexit12. ok, for now, thank you. —— post brexit world. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew marr show, to be shown later this morning, ms sturgeon said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum if the terms of brexit were not right. they will be making a big mistake if they think i'm in anyway bluffing.
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if it comes to the point, two years after scotla nd if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told the didn't leave the uk, we voted to stay in the eu and we were told voting there was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. labour is calling on the prime minister to approve a £700 million emergency cash injection to help the nhs through the winter. it comes after the british red cross claimed there was a "humanitarian crisis" in hospitals in england. the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, said mrs may needed to ensure that "this year's crisis" never happened again. a 24—hour strike by london underground workers, affecting up to 4 million commuters, is due to start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses and the closure of ticket offices. transport for london says it's put a new deal on the table, but that's been rejected by the biggest rail union, the rmt. let's give you a few more details of what could be a chaotic week for rail commuters in
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the south—east of england. the 24—hour london underground strike begins at 6.00pm tonight. widespread disruption is expected. the majority of central london tube stations will be closed. there will also be a limited services on other tube lines in outer london. and it could be the first in a series of rail strikes this week. drivers on southern rail are due to walk out on tuesday, wednesday and friday. and there are a further three strikes planned for the week after on the 24th, 25th and 27th of january. that could mean yet more misery for passengers. we will have all of the latest on that for you as we get it. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who's 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. it's emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her eighties,
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was born in britain. our correspondent gary o'donoghue has more from fort lauderdale. she was a mother, a grandmother, a great—grandmother, and a wife. olga woltering was born in britain, but had lived in the united states for decades. she was on her way to join a cruise ship to celebrate her husband's 90th birthday. also among the dead was michael, also heading for a cruise ship with his wife. she was shot, but survived. three others died on friday's carnage as the gunmen used a semiautomatic weapon in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers. this is the man police have charged with causing death and serious injury. his esteban santiago, a 26—year—old former member of the military. he has mental health problems. his aunt says he was never the same after returning from a tour of duty in
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iraq. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that santiago had told fbi agents that the government and the cia were forcing him to watch videos from the islamic state group. that prompted a mental health assessment, during which a gun was confiscated, but later returned. fbi says santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. at this stage, they don't believe he was operating with any other individuals. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. the number of ambulances called to english prisons has risen by almost 40% in the last three years, according to figures seen by the bbc. there were almost 10,000 call—outs to england's 117 jails and young offenders' institutions in the 10 months to october, averaging at one every 45 minutes. emma forde reports. 2016 saw the worst disorder in
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british prisons for two decades. with critics of the ministry of justice blaming overcrowding and staff cuts for increases in violent, drug overdoses and suicide attempts. while ambulances are sometimes called when an inmate is sikh, they are also needed to respond to these incidents. the bbc asked every ambulance trust in england to find out how often they have been called to one of the 117 jails in england between january and october last year —— ill. the figures show during that time, 10,000 ambulances were needed. that is one on average every 45 minutes. twice the number it was five years ago. paramedics have told the bbc that this is putting an increased strain on services. the justice secretary, liz truss, has promised to spend £1.11 billion on new prisons and says she will
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provide an extra 2000 prison officers. you can hear more on bbc 5 live investigates today at 11.00. the average household in the uk now has a record amount of unsecured debt — almost £13,000. that's before mortgages are even taken into account. the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone, but officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling. joe lynam has more. with christmas is over, many of us will be poring over our bank state m e nts will be poring over our bank statements to check our finances. it appears that some of us are taking on increasing amounts of unsecured debt, including overdrafts, student loa ns, debt, including overdrafts, student loans, credit cards and personal loa ns. loans, credit cards and personal loans. analysis of official data by the tuc shows the average amount of unsecured borrowing per household has doubled since 2000 to £12,819.
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furthermore, the proportion of unsecured debt in proportion to the personal income has dropped from 21% to almost 28%. weaving a record total of unsecured debt of £319 billion in britain. we are worried about that because we are expecting to see a slowdown in wages and an increase in inflation next year, meaning households can find it much harder to service those debts and to pay off the debt they owe. but while unsecured debt is rising, secured borrowing such as home loans is becoming more affordable. the bank of england says mortgage arrears and d efa u lts of england says mortgage arrears and defaults have been steadily declining since 2011. but policymakers are worried nonetheless that many of us are taking on too much debt, which may become an issue if the economy weakens in 2017. cold weather across a number of european countries has left more than 20 people dead over the last two days. these icy pictures show snow blizzards sweeping across parts of romania, one of the worst—affected areas, where over 500 people were stranded in their cars. ten people lost their lives
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in poland, where temperatures dropped to —14. and in turkey, flights were cancelled this weekend after heavy snow and icy conditions were forecast for istanbul. helen can bring us up—to—date with the weather. we are seeing those icy pictures there across europe. a huge swathe of blue behind you. yes, good morning. it is exceptionally cold at the moment. the other issue we have isa the moment. the other issue we have is a screaming northerly wind exaggerating the chill. they are red warnings out, the most severe type you get across many parts as far south as greece. that of course is for the ice, snow and those unbelievably low temperatures, —21 today in moscow and heavy snow in lesbos yesterday. the fountains in st peter ‘s square in rome froze over. it is really bitter at the
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moment. that northerly wind is heading our way later next week. for the time being, back in the uk, it is fairly benign weather. we have high pressure with us. fog around and a freezing fog in fact with clear skies overnight in the vale of york. enough to bring temperatures to freezing. icy patches as well as poor visibility and perhaps towards the north—east of scotland. every big grey and misty start for most of us. hill fog quite widely with patchy drizzle across the south—west of wales. using a weight slowly. perhaps brighter, the afternoon, but in contrast, more rain later today and a strengthening wind bringing rain with cows in the north—west of scotla nd rain with cows in the north—west of scotland later. perhaps as a consequence, more brightness in eastern parts of scotland and is the pa rt eastern parts of scotland and is the part of northern ireland. on the whole, patchy rain and drizzle towards the north and west. further south, quite grey and damp this morning. hopefully, we will see a little more brightness breaking
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through or slightly less grey, i suppose, by the time we get to this afternoon. if you're heading to the fa cup third round continuing today, it is looking largely dry. again, pretty cloudy for the dry and return home later on. much changed through the night? not for england and mars. a murky affair. towards the north—west, the rain starts to take shape as a weather front sweeping right across the country three to nine and because of tomorrow. northern ireland, scotland and eventually northern england seeing wet and windy weather with severe gales. temperatures down to four or five celsius at the last. relatively mild. tomorrow, behind the weather front, we see a cold snap, but not as god is late in the week, with wintry showers over the hills. the wet weather is coming with ita care. i will keep you up—to—date through the morning. —— brighter weather. let's have a quick run through the
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papers. the sunday telegraph with oui’ papers. the sunday telegraph with our top story, the government has a duty to step in and tackle injustice, according to theresa may, setting out her vision for britain. a big departure from previous tory leaders, not least david cameron and margaret thatcher about the role that society plays in our everyday lives. the sunday times also has that story on the front, the pm launches shared society. they also have a story about theresa may, saying that sir ivan rogers is in secret talks with david cameron before christmas to warn him that theresa may was watching brexit. the ambassador to the eu resigned last week after accusing the government of muddled thinking over brexit. a
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big week for theresa may, expecting to hear a lot about brexit in the cabinet meeting which gets under way later in the week. theresa may urged to get a grip on the nhs as the winter crisis spirals. under intense pressure, it says, this weekend to announce an emergency rescue plan in parliament amid calls, or certainly warnings, that the nhs could run out offunding. and warnings, that the nhs could run out of funding. and the mail on sunday, that story that we have been covering this morning. as it says, astonishing undercover video capturing a diplomat inspiring with rival mps to smear the deputy foreign secretary. we will be back with the headlines at 6:30am. now on breakfast, it is time for the film review, with ben brown and antonia quirke. hello, and a very warm welcome to the film review.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is antonia quirtke. we are going to start with silence, martin scorsese's new film, liam neeson, andrew garfield, adam driver, they are playing jesuit priests in 17th—century japan. passengers, starring chris pratt, jennifer lawrence, about two passengers sleeping in suspended animation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a far—away planet and they wake too early. and also, assassin's creed, michael fassbender‘s big movie, based on the computer game. let's kick off then with silence, a great passion of martin scorsese, trying for years and years to get this made. first talk of it in 1990 with daniel day lewis, gael garcia bernal and benicio del
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toro have been attached to it. he was famously brought up a devout catholic, had a great and genuine interest in the priesthood, at one point he was going to join the priesthood, so catholicism has been a real thing for him. religion in his films, the last temptation of christ and kundun, but even something like mean streets, marvellously there. what is the religious martin scorsese like? this is a difficult film to watch, it is about the persecution and torture of priests and their flock. 161 minutes, incredibly long, and relentless, long conversations reflecting martin scorsese's own ambiguity towards his own faith. i know that it has been very highly praised, and not many people have gone to see it, but it has been critically tremendously well received. ifound it...
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i think that there is a pulse of confusion in it, i was not clear what martin scorsese was trying to say. the directors he admires, religious directors, carl dreier, joe navarre, robert bresson, there is a euphoria in those sorts of films. things likejoan of arc. and yet, you can't help think, this was scorsese's moment to join the ranks of those kind of directors. i'm not sure that he has done it, but i know that many people disagree with me. let's take a little clip here, for a preview. padre. we have been forced to trample on the lord. you must pray for courage. if we do not do what they want, then there could be danger for everyone in the village. they could be put in prison,
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they could be taken away forever. what should we do? trample. trample! it is all right to trample. what are you saying? you can't! you can't. .. as you were saying, a long watch, a pretty gruelling watch, but the performance is good? absolutely, andrew garfield, when he played spider—man, that role did that young actor no favours and here he is, he has a quality of deeply inherent youthfulness and vulnerability, anyone who saw him in never let me go will remember that, and also, a japanese actor, issey ogato, he plays the grand inquisitor in this, and he is an incredible actor, ingenious casting for martin scorsese. and this is a comedic actor, but he playing someone who does the most terrible things,
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he's a comedic actor, he has wonderful kabuki gestures, and the performance are something else. something pretty different, passengers — silence, gruelling, is passengers something easier? a lot fluffier, a lot more fun, this is about two passengers in suspended animation, hibernation for 120 years on their way to a new colony on a new planet and for reasons we will not go into, spoiler alerts, they wake up early. wonderful idea, so two strangers facing an eternity together, walking endless corridors, gigantic spaceship, and, breaking into the entertainment facilities, and with their little wristbands, one of the funniest things is the ways in which there is even if no—one else existing, you are still slaves, your life had been formalised
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before you left earth. also this lovely simmering sexual tension between the two main stars... it would have been all right to leave it at that, but there is this derring—do, in the third act, not entirely necessary. you can feel moments where it is reaching for some tougher kind of glory, think of something like alien and wandering the corridors of that spaceship, intensely sinister and threatening place to be, but this place looks pretty nice. i would not mind moving there myself! there are moments when you are shown howjerry—built this craft is, hammering away against things, putting fuses together to get things to work, that ought to have been frightening and made me feel how vulnerable these people are and yet it does not quite do that. there is a wonderful cameo, michael sheen plays a bartender, rather sinister. he is a robot.
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and you can see that he is struggling with the part, trying to bring more to it than is there on the page, unfortunately, it is not on the page but it is fun. let's talk about assassin's creed, which video game players will be very familiar with, based on the video game. movies used to be based on novels... now they are based on video games(!) this is catastrophic... nine instalments in this video franchise, one of those movies that has been long in production, lots of re—shoots, rejigs, starring michael fassbender, marion cotillard, jeremy irons, charlotte rampling, incredible cast. to even begin to describe the plot, i am not sure there is any point! the assassins... assassins against knights templar, let's take a look. do you recognise this? it is an assassin's blade. this is the actual one that your father used
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to take your mother 's life. he's here, you know... your mother's death, not something a boy should ever be made to see. so, catastrophic, you said... charitably, i am sure a lot of people will go to see it nonetheless. why do you think it doesn't work? unbelievably incoherent, extraordinary, it is... it opens... it opens with three flashbacks, three flashbacks! what a flashback does in a film, someone is standing there and saying, hang on a sec, let me fill you in, and then they do that twice more. hang on, if you don't know this... the rest won't make any sense... three times, 15 minutes! feels like the movie never starts, then you are in there and you feel like the movie will never end!
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i went to the cinema to see this, two people were asleep at the end of the row that i was sitting on, that sums it up. probably does! never mind. so that is assassin's creed. best movie out at the moment, in your opinion. a monster calls, now this is the most extraordinary sell, actually, it is a fantastical terminal illness melodrama for children. maybe it is not for children, it stars a 12—year—old boy. he's visited by a yew tree, over a few evenings, and it is played by liam neeson, it has a wonderful shape, dickensian shape, visited three times to be shown things that may help you deal with life. it is a flat—out classic, it has the emotional heft of the railway children, moments of iron man by ted hughes and pan's labyrinth, i think it is a masterpiece,
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go and see it and take all of the family. good recommendation! best dvd? a terrific film which is just... featured quite a lot in the golden globes nominations. hell or high water, ben foster and chris pine, they play bank robber brothers, and jeff bridges is the texas ranger who is tracking them down, which sounds terribly familiar, that kind of plot, and features a great deal in cinema. one of them is on a roll, the other brother is a little too wild, the texas ranger is always a step ahead of them. it feels like a movie of the mid—19705 or early 1980s, like midnight run, where you come away from it thinking, you will look through the tv listings and think, hell or high water is on tonight, unmissable, fantastic! it has slotted into that classic film territory already, jeff bridges has been nominated for a golden globes for his best supporting actor and he does the most fantastic thing towards the end of the movie.
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there is a death scene and just in a couple of seconds you see everything that jeff bridges can offer as an actor, the way that he absorbs the shock, it is a magical moment, such a terrific film. thank you very much the joining us. that is it for this week, thank you so much for watching, goodbye. hello. this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. coming up before 7.00, helen will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the israeli ambassador to the uk has apologised after an embassy employee was secretly recorded discussing a plan to bring down a government minister. undercover footage, filmed by middle east news network aljazeera, shows the official saying he would like to "take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan. the video also shows the official insulting the foreign secretary borisjohnson. the british says it considers the matter closed following the apology. theresa may is promising
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to introduce wide—ranging social reforms, to correct what she calls the "everyday injustices" faced by ordinary working families. in an article for the sunday telegraph, she says she wants to build a "shared society", with a commitment to fairness, and reveals a deliberate attempt to break away from her tory predecessors. her comments come ahead of a speech on monday on social reform. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew marr show, to be shown later this morning, the first minister said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum if the terms of brexit were not right they will be making a big mistake if they think i'm in any way bluffing. if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told don't leave the uk, here we are — we voted to stay in the eu
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and we were told voting no was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who's 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. it's emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her eighties, was born in britain. our correspondent has more from fort lauderdale. she was a mother, a grandmother, a great—grandmother and a wife. olga woltering was born in britain, but had lived in the united states for decades. she was on her way to join a cruise ship to celebrate her husband's 90th birthday. also among the dead was 57—year—old michael oehme, also heading for a cruise ship with his wife. she was shot, but survived. three others died in friday's carnage as the gunman used a semiautomatic weapon in the baggage hall,
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scattering terrified passengers. this is the man police have charged with causing death and serious injury, esteban santiago, a 26—year—old former member of the military with mental health problems. his aunt says he was never the same after returning from a tour of duty in iraq. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that mr santiago had told fbi agents that the government and the cia were forcing him to watch videos from the islamic state group. that prompted a mental health assessment, during which a gun was confiscated, but later returned. the fbi says mr santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. at this stage, they don't believe he was operating with any other individuals. gary o'donoghue, bbc news,
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fort lauderdale, florida. the number of ambulances called to english prisons has risen by almost 40$ in the last three years, according to figures seen by the bbc. there were almost 10,000 call—outs to england's 117 jails and young offenders' institutions in the 10 months to october. that averages one every 45 minutes. 2016 saw the worst disorder in british prisons for two decades, with critics of the ministry ofjustice blaming overcrowding and staff cuts for increases in violence, drug overdoses and suicide attempts. while ambulances are sometimes called when an inmate is sick, they are also needed to respond to these incidents. the bbc asked every ambulance trust in england to find out how often they have been called to one of the 117 jails in england between january and october last year. the figures show during that time, 10,000 ambulances were needed. that is one on average every 45
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minutes, twice the number it was five years ago. paramedics have told the bbc that this is putting an increased strain on services. the justice secretary, liz truss, has promised to spend £1.11 billion on new prisons and says she will provide an extra 2000 prison officers. emma forde, bbc news. you can hear more on that story on bbc 5 live investigates today at 11 o'clock. the average household in the uk now has a record amount of unsecured debt — almost £13,000. officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling, but the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone. time for a look at the sport. there
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was a big upset yesterday? there was, at a selected scene of the drama yesterday. three premier league clubs knocked out. you like to see that in the third round, the little guys doing well against the big guys. and wayne rooney equalling johnstone's goalscoring record. lots of debate raging in the papers this morning and social media about where wayne rooney ostensibly comes to manchester united —— charleston. he is up with the likes of roy keane and gary neville, all of the 90s superstars. it is an illustrious list. is wayne rooney up there? he has had an up—and—down relationship, coming from everton. will he leave not? he has had petulant times but has been a superstar for him and the
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fa ns has been a superstar for him and the fans love him as well. lots of debate this morning about where wayne rooney extends. but let's get to the action yesterday. —— stands. so league one millwall produced the biggest upset of the third round. and it was done at a canter. they won 3—0 against premier league side bournemouth. eddie howe's side selected a completely different starting eleven to their last game, but the ease to which millwall won the match was obvious. and millwall manager neil harris says he's proud of such a dominant display by this team. i enjoyed. i enjoyed watching their team. the boys way to the hard on friday trying to stop bombing another fight their threats. they have huge talent in their squad —— bournemouth. we knew there were capable of making chances. delighted that it was clinical at the right times and really pleased with the clea n times and really pleased with the clean sheet. west brom lost at home to derby of the championship. this free—kick by by tom ince gave derby the 2—1win. delight for the away side and the 5,000 travelling fans. and the third premier league side humbled was stoke. championship side wolves with a 2—0 win, and another great freekick sealed it.
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matt doherty with the strike. it's the first time in eight seasons that stoke have gone out in the third round. two non—league sides will be in the fourth round draw after securing impressive draws. first there's national league side lincoln city. they had been leading 2—1 thanks to two strikes by theo robinson, before the championship side equalised to send the tie into a replay. and fellow national league side sutton united are in the draw for round four too. they earned a replay with league one afc wimbledon, with a clean sheet, as it ended 0—0. and wayne rooney's goalscoring record was the headline of manchester united's 4—0 win over reading. this was his 249th for the club, and it means he's equal with sir bobby charlton. there he is watching on. and his managerjose mourinho says it's only a matter of time. it is amazing because everybody
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knows who sir bobby is and what he means for the history of the club in the history of english football. for wayne to score that number of goals for manchester united is fantastic. some selected results for you from yesterday. non—league barrow‘s hopes of reaching the fourth round for the first time were dashed as rochdale beat them 2—0. all the goals from every game in the third round on the website. there are five third round matches today and a couple of opportunities for upsets. chelsea take on peterborough this afternoon, while at lunchtime liverpool play league two plymouth argyle. these players want to have success. these players want to have success. these players want to have success. these players want to get its chance backin these players want to get its chance back in and take each times they get. it is a historical tournament,
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and of course we will try everything to win it. it is all pretty exciting, and we are looking forward to it. sir andy murray's winning streak of 28 atp tour matches is over, after he lost the qatar open final to old rival novak djokovic. the world number two was serving for the match in the second set but murray saved three match points to force the final into a decider. the match last nearly three hours, and in the end it was djokovic who edged it. despite that defeat, murray retains his number one ranking. munster thrashed racing 92 32—7 in their european champions cup tie, a match rearranged after the death of their head coach anthony foley in october. the significance of the match was marked with 30 seconds of applause before kick—off. on the pitch, munster completely outplayed last year's runners—up, scoring four tries in all. they now sit top of their pool. saracens have returned to the top of the premiership after coming from behind to draw 13—13 with exeter chiefs despite having
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a man sent off after only ten minutes. elsewhere there were wins for northampton, harlequins and gloucester. ospreys are top of the pro 12 after beating champions connacht 29—7. ashley beck secured the bonus point win with a try in the final minute. glasgow also won, they beat cardiff blues. the bdo world darts championship is under way at lakeside. in the men's draw, this year's world number and top seed for the tournament glen durrant is safely through to the second round. he beat wales' nick kenny by three sets to one. in the women's draw, the world number five trina gulliver is also safely through. she beat fellow english player claire brookin by two sets to nil. sir mo farah‘s attempt to win the great edinburgh international cross country for a second time ended in disappointment. the two—time double olympic champion struggled at holyrood park, finishing seventh in his first race of 2017. britain's callum hawkins was beaten into second
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by america's leonard korir in a sprint finish. i'm definitely a little bit behind. yes, the last bit of training hasn't gone as well as i wanted. but it is a team event, and i want to come out here and represent my country, and help the guys. but early on it was one of those things where... ten days beforehand it was like, what do i do? i did a session, and i knew from that things were going to be a hard day. so mo farah, always smiling. and he said it isjust mo farah, he doesn't wa nt to said it isjust mo farah, he doesn't want to be called sir. it sort of sitting. i worried want to be called sir. it sort of sitting. iworried because want to be called sir. it sort of sitting. i worried because sir mo sounds a bit like slo mo. i hope it does not slow him down. first margaret thatcher famously
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said there was "no such thing as society", then david cameron championed his plans for a "big society". now theresa may has turned her back on both of them by talking about her vision for a "shared society" instead. but what does she mean exactly? and in a big week for brexit, is that vision just a distraction? let's discuss both those things now with jon tongue, who's professor of politics at liverpool university. so she will talk about this tomorrow in her speech. what does she mean by shared society? it is quite an important vision theresa may is articulating because it does represent a break with market that, who said there is no such thing as society —— margaret thatcher. it also signed a break with david cameron, who said he wanted charities to step in. theresa may has been explicit in the shared society argument that the state has to intervene at certain times to help those that she terms are just about managing, the jams. you can't
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rely on the voluntary sector or free market economics to help those at the bottom. she pledges a new form of social justice, a the bottom. she pledges a new form of socialjustice, a major gram of social reform. the devil will be in the decal. everybody can articulate these ideas. no minister ever commits to unfinished, —— on the fairness. we see what tough economic times we're in. you imagine they would be to offload costs but now they are looking to say we will deal with it. can they afford to? probably not. there is very little detail in theresa may's statement. some of the areas she talks about our making housing more affordable. you can cut stamp duty but most of all you need to build more houses. is there money to build more houses? secondly, is this government really committed to eight —— and expansion
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of social housing? you can see where theresa may is going. some of the language this morning very much reflects what she said on the steps of downing street last july reflects what she said on the steps of downing street lastjuly when she became prime minister, when she said she wanted to stand up for those struggling in society. this is a real pitch for votes as well. that is not being unduly cynical. 4 million people voted for ukip at the last election and feel they are economically struggling. theresa may is promising to deliver brexit and not just look after the interests is promising to deliver brexit and notjust look after the interests of those already financially well off. is she moving into labour territory? it is really putting tanks on the lawn of the labour party and saying we can be the party for the working class as well. the labour party are struggling as well. theresa may police the labour party is there for the taking at the moment. you still
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can't roll out a snap election next year eve n can't roll out a snap election next year even though i think it is unlikely. theresa may does not want to be defined purely by brexit. she wa nts to to be defined purely by brexit. she wants to be a prime minister associated with a vision. they might bea associated with a vision. they might be a theresa may vision we can expect. she wants to be prime minister who is remembered and can articulate ideas rather than seen as articulate ideas rather than seen as a technocrat. 0f of coarse brexit is important, a busy week for the prime minister in terms of that but also donald trump has been tweeting as well. there we are, we can see it. there will be a sigh of relief from number ten downing street over that. it is rather better than having let's have nigel farage as uk ambassador. the special relationship is important to both sides, theresa may will be anxious to establish good relations with donald trump. that will take the spotlight of brexit but all eyes are not so much
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on donald trump at the supreme court. we expect a decision any day soon as to whether theresa may has to delay a bill before parliament in terms of triggering article 50, which triggers the brexit process. the question is whether they will uphold the original decision and not so much whether the government can get article 50 triggered, it can, but whether there will be awkward amendments tabled in parliament which make life awkward for the parliament, and theresa may having to declare her hand on the single market, about which there appears to be no decision yet within government. thank you forjoining us. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: israel's ambassador to the uk has apologised after a member of his staff was secretly filmed saying he wanted to take down a conservative minister. theresa may is promising far—reaching social reforms, to correct what she calls burning injustices in modern britain. also coming up in the programme: it could be a good night for the brits at tonight's golden globes, with the night manager and the crown both tipped for success in the tv categories. we will have the latest
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from hollywood in just a few minutes. here is helen with a look at this morning's weather. hello. good morning to you. the fog isn't as widespread as this time yesterday, but there are some thick patches around, particularly through the likes of the salisbury plain, across parts of wales in the south—west, and through the vale of york where temperatures are actually around freezing. that means there will be some ice as well to content with, so not particularly nice travel conditions this morning and the improvements will be very, very slow. like yesterday we have that blanket of cloud across the country, patchy rain and drizzle across parts of wales in the south—west, slowly easing. later sunshine coming of wales in the south—west, slowly easing. latersunshine coming in of wales in the south—west, slowly easing. later sunshine coming in the north and west, the best of the sunshine in eastern parts of both
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england and scotland, perhaps north—east wales as well. but more limited once again. if you see the sunshine you are one of the lucky few, really, ithink sunshine you are one of the lucky few, really, i think today. sunshine you are one of the lucky few, really, ithink today. as sunshine you are one of the lucky few, really, i think today. as the beggars on the cloud thickens the wind strengthens to bring rain. northern ireland it will be a breezy, cloudy, mild day with some patchy rain and drizzle at times. we will see for much of england and wales that slow lifting of the cloud race, that might become slightly less grave. but it will overall remain quite cloudy and mild. the light vryzas overnight will see the mist and fog returning across england and wales, that lowering of the cloud, but all change further north. wind and rain across scotland initially across scotland and northern ireland and england through the morning. quite an unpleasant rush—hourfor parts the morning. quite an unpleasant rush—hour for parts of scotland and northern ireland. the rain clears away moves its way southwards and for northern ireland in scotland it will be much brighter but much colder. wintry showers especially over the hills. for england and
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wales the mist and fog lifts, ahead of the rain. windier and wetter conditions in the south for the afternoon rush—hour. the maximum temperatures will dip down, probably three orfour in temperatures will dip down, probably three or four in the north the afternoon. that is because we have a brief incursion of colder and the mild their returns by the middle of the week. after that we get the northerly wind showing its hand. here it comes, coming down from the arctic. big changes on the way by the end of next week and it will feel bitterly cold in comparison to this weekend, which is really relatively mild and benign, apart from that mist and fog. thank you very much. we will stay across that as it gets colder and wetter and we will have more from hell in a little later. —— helen. overweight football fans are being offered the opportunity to get in shape, with specialised diet and training programmes that are usually only available to players. football fans in training, which was set up by academics in scotland, is now being run
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by five english football clubs, and it is hoping to expand to others. shaun roberts—ferguson was 22.5 stone before signing up to the scheme, and he is here to tell us about it, along withjon holloway, the trust manager at swindon town football club. gents, very good morning to you. nice to see you both. tell us your story, how did you get involved in this? it was... i have been a swindon town fan for 42 years now, and they put on the website this thing about football fans in training, they put a video up showing how it had gone at and, in scotland, and i was sat down doing nothing as usual and i thought this looks good, this looks for me. it is just a brilliant plan. and it was the connection to the club that convince you to have a go, was at? it was the idea that other people at the club would be doing it and it was something you knew and loved already. yes, it was the fact it was
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swindon town. that is what worked for me, it has been a big part of my life for a0 odd years. for me, it has been a big part of my life for 40 odd years. and how do you feel now? you have lost about seven stone, you have done brilliantly. yes, and is notjust me. those have lost weight. my lifestyle is completely different now, and am a lot fitter. that was before you started. you are saying you feel fitter now, any other general health benefits?” you feel fitter now, any other general health benefits? i can shot for nice clothes now! more choice. and running as well, you have taken up and running as well, you have taken up running? i was supposed to be taking ten k this morning until i get called here. most of my friends are doing a race somewhere. sorry about damaging your fitness regime. you are allowed to go afterwards. tell us what it is about these groups that make it work. because as we heard there from shaun, it is about the association with the club, something we already know so it is not a big leap into the unknown. definitely, and the guys don't see it as coming into a healthier
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lifestyle programme. they are coming to their football club, it is based at the football club and they are co mforta ble at the football club and they are comfortable right from the start. they all have a common interest in football and swindon town and ethics is success. how does it work? we have a group of 30 guys in a 12 week programme. there are two main elements. the first is trying to educate them to have a healthier dietand educate them to have a healthier diet and better food educate them to have a healthier diet and betterfood choices, and put in more physical activity, increasing their physical activity, and putting those two elements together yield some really powerful results. i guess it is open to women football plan swindon town as well? initially this programme hasjust been funded for guys, and the reason why is because of the research they had done that there was a lot of projects out there for females but not a huge amount for guys at this age group, from 35 to 65. it has been funded by public health swindon and the council to focus on guys
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trying to get middle—aged guys back in healthy again. it has actually started being rolled out forfemales up started being rolled out forfemales up in scotland, and i'm sure that will come south very soon as well. and we are hearing now from john about what it involves day to day. talk me through a typical training programme and how you kept up the motivation to be involved in. the motivation to be involved in. the motivation was easy because the coaches, john, shane, louise, the three of them, they take us on it, and they are so enthusiastic about it that it rolls into you. the thing that works as the group mentality of it. you are like a team, and obviously men like competition and it all builds around that. they work you on it. it is not easy. so they put you through your paces. the first week just up put you through your paces. the first weekjust up and down the stand at swindon about killed us. as john said to shane, these boys will never do this. but it motivates you all the time. it is notjust the
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exercise. it is all the education you get from it. it is things you knew but you just forgot, and you get relaxed into your lifestyle. and thatis get relaxed into your lifestyle. and that is the point, isn't it, john? i suppose a lot of this for many people will be common sense but is about putting it into action. definitely, it is not rocket science. and that is the key to it, is just about making small changes that will hopefully have a long—term lifestyle benefits for the guys. some of the topics we look at our portion size, overcoming barriers, looking at the calorie count, understanding food labels. so the 90 minute session is split into 2a5 minutes. the first a5 minutes is partly education, looking at a different topic on healthier eating, and the second session is the exercise and increasing the activity. and that is done brilliantly as well because all of the guys are given pedometers and initially they give their average step count and it is about building up step count and it is about building
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up their weekly step count to them becoming... for it to continue afterwards. the guys are now doing lots of different activities. there is small sided football, a running club, a cycling club, a group that goes swimming, a group to regular golf now. so that mentality, and they are looking to continue, for it toa they are looking to continue, for it to a long—term lifestyle change, and thatis to a long—term lifestyle change, and that is the most important thing. initial 12 weeks but continuing to go into the future. best of luck with it. thank you for coming in and telling us about that. i'm sure many other people will be wanting to get involved, but for now, nice to see you. sorry for getting in the wave you. sorry for getting in the wave you this morning! —— way of your run this morning. hollywood is gearing up for this year's golden globes, one of the biggest nights in the entertainment calendar. the ceremony is traditionally seen as an indicator of which films will do well at the oscars, and there are many brits hoping to get their hands
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on one of the gongs. our los angeles correspondent james cook has been looking at the contenders. hollywood likes nothing better than talking about itself. this year it's gone a step further, singing and dancing. la la land's love interests are played by ryan gosling and emma stone, and the city of stars itself. you've never seen it. i've never seen it. oh my. you know it is playing at the rialto? really? yes. the next contender for golden globes glory could hardly be more different. usually can take care of himself. he did that way. moonlight, with six nominations, is a comics coming—of—age story. naomi harris plays a drug addicted mother and she thinks the industry is getting better at telling stories about people with colour. i think there is a fantastic level of diversity this year and
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a fantastic level of diversity this yearandi a fantastic level of diversity this yearand i think a fantastic level of diversity this year and i think it is something thatis year and i think it is something that is so to be celebrated. and it isa that is so to be celebrated. and it is a shame that we have to... it almost seems so regressive to have these conversations about race, in 2017 now, that we are still fixated about that. we just want great movies, really. do you think there isa movies, really. do you think there is a games this year? where do you think we stand? i think there is a change happening all the time. when i think about my career 25 years ago and starting out and how few actors there were to fill the very few roles for people of colour, the stories were just not the stories that people... didn't realise they we re that people... didn't realise they were story that people wanted to see. another story that continues to fascinate is that of the british royal family. claire foley has fascinate is that of the british royalfamily. claire foley has been showered with praise for her portrayal of the young elizabeth. what a role to take on. portrayal of the young elizabeth. what a role to take onlj portrayal of the young elizabeth. what a role to take on. i know, what an idiot! do you know what the royal think of it? i no, iwish i did. i
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was wondering if i might take danny into town? for what? a change. in tv, the bbc coproduction the night manager has four nominations. the adaptation of the novel has won praise from critics and audiences, to the delight of its star, tom huddlestone. when you make something you never know when it's going to catch fire or ignite people's interests, but it seemed too. and thatis interests, but it seemed too. and that is testament to the writing of john. i think spy thrillers will be enduringly popular, and he is the master. ahmed is also up for his role in the hbo crime drama the night of. role in the hbo crime drama the night of. | role in the hbo crime drama the night of. i think role in the hbo crime drama the night of. i think the reality of being caught up in a murder case, facing the slow wheels ofjustice, it is not a walk in the park. so far there is no clear favourite to sweep
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there is no clear favourite to sweep the board this awards season, which just makes the golden globes, always keenly followed for clues as the oscars success, all the more intriguing. still to come on breakfast: we will have an in—depth look through the sunday papers, in about 20 minutes' time. that is after the headlines, injust a moment. stay with us. hello. this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. embarrassment for israel. its ambassador to the uk apologises after an embassy official is secretly filmed discussing how to "take down" a conservative minister. the official told an undercover
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reporter that sir alan duncan was causing "lots of problems" for the israelis. and is seen describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an "idiot".
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