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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 8, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. embarrassment for israel. its ambassador to the uk apologises after an embassy official is secretly filmed discussing how to "take down" a conservative minister. the official told an undercover reporter that sir alan duncan was causing "lots of problems" for the israelis. and is seen describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an "idiot". good morning.
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it's sunday the 8th of january. also ahead: theresa may sets out her vision for britain. the prime minister says she wants to build a "shared society" with a commitment to fairness. london underground staff get ready to start a 24—hour strike tonight as millions of commuters face a chaotic start to the week. an iraq war veteran has been charged after five people were shot dead at fort lauderdale airport in florida. in sport: three premier league sides are knocked out by lower league opposition in the fa cup third round — among them bournemouth, who were beaten 3—0 by league one side millwall. and helen has the weather. good morning. a very similar day to yesterday, weatherwise. it is grey and misty with fog in a few localities first thing. i will have more details if you join me in 15 minutes. thanks, helen.
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good morning. first the main story. the israeli ambassador has apologised for comments which appear to show an embassy employee plotting to bring down a government minister. undercover footage, filmed by middle east news network aljazeera, shows an israeli government employee saying he would like to take down the foreign office minister sir alan duncan. the video also shows the official insulting borisjohnson, as jane—frances kelly reports. the emergence of the footage is highly embarrassing for the israelis. it shows shai masot dining with, among others, an aide to the conservative education minister robert halfon. mr masot, a senior political adviser at the israeli embassy, says he would like to bring down a member of the british government. sir alan duncan has been a fierce critic of israeli policy. just over two years ago, he described israel's control and division of the west bank city
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of hebron as nothing short of apartheid, where palestinians were treated as second—class citizens. in the covert footage, mr masot also describes sir alan's boss, borisjohnson, in less than flattering terms. sir crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee, described mr masot‘s comments about sir alan as outrageous and deserving of investigation. the director of the conservative friends of israel said we utterly condemn any attempt to undermine sir alan duncan, or any minister or any member of parliament. in a statement, the foreign office said: while the british government is not taking any further action, the film raises uncomfortable questions about mr masot, and just how much influence he has been able to wield. jane—frances kelly, bbc news.
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theresa may is promising to introduce wide—ranging social reforms to correct what she calls the "everyday injustices" faced by ordinary working families. in an article for the sunday telegraph, she says she wants to build a "shared society", with a commitment to fairness, and reveals a deliberate attempt to break away from her tory predecessors. our political correspondent susana mendonca joins us now. susanna, what do you think she means by a "shared society"? ed miliband setback in 2015, and he we have theresa may talking about this shared society —— said this. the idea is we should not focus on individual rights but on the responsibilities we have for one another. in the past, she says governments have been too focused on helping the poorest in society and
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eight are focus on helping people across the board. distancing herself from previous conservative leaders. david cameron talked about the big society, about charities doing their bit, and margaret thatcher talked about there being no such thing as society. a very different message. in essence, we don't know if that means more money going from government to try to prove inequality. she has not talked about the detail. the reality is she wants to move away from discussions round brexit and for the focus to be elsewhere. she does not want to premiership defined by that. that will be difficult this week. we have the article 50 ruling by the supreme court expected and criticism from people like nicola sturgeon, which will be entry marsh wrote the prime minister has no plan for brexit. —— andrew martin show. she will have a meeting with donald trump, the president—elect. she had been criticised for not having a close
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enough relationship to him. he has tweeted: in a post— brexit world, britain needs a good trading relationship with countries like america, so it is crucialfor her. good to talk to you. thank you. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew marr show, to be shown later this morning, the first minister said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum if the terms of brexit were not right. they will be making a big mistake if they think i'm in any way bluffing. if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told in the independence referendum, "don't leave the uk," here we are — we voted to stay in the eu and we were told voting no was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. labour is calling on the prime minister to approve a £700 million emergency cash injection to help the nhs through the winter.
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it comes after the british red cross claimed there was a "humanitarian crisis" in hospitals in england. the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth, said mrs may needed to ensure that "this year's crisis" never happened again. a 24—hour strike by london underground workers, affecting up to 4 million commuters, is due to start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses and the closure of ticket offices. transport for london says it's put a new deal on the table, but that's been rejected by the biggest rail union, the rmt. let's give you a few more details of what could be a chaotic week for rail commuters in the south—east of england. the 24—hour london underground strike begins at 6.00pm tonight. widespread disruption is expected. the majority of central london tube stations will be closed. there will also be a limited services on other tube lines in outer london. and it could be the first in a series of rail strikes this week.
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drivers on southern rail are due to walk out on tuesday, wednesday and friday. and there are a further three strikes planned for the week after on the 24th, 25th and 27th of january. that could mean much more misery for passengers. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who's 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. it's emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her eighties, was born in britain. our correspondent gary o'donoghue has more from fort lauderdale. she was a mother, a grandmother, a great—grandmother and a wife. olga woltering was born in britain, but had lived in the united states for decades. she was on her way to join a cruise ship to celebrate her husband's 90th birthday. also among the dead was 57—year—old michael oehme, also heading for a cruise ship with his wife. she was shot, but survived. three others died in friday's
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carnage as the gunman used a semi—automatic weapon in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers. this is the man police have charged with causing death and serious injury, esteban santiago, a 26—year—old former member of the military with mental health problems. his aunt says he was never the same after returning from a tour of duty in iraq. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that santiago had told fbi agents that the government and the cia were forcing him to watch videos from the islamic state group. that prompted a mental health assessment, during which a gun was confiscated, but later returned. the fbi says mr santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. at this stage, they don't believe he was operating
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with any other individuals. gary o'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. cold weather across a number of european countries has left more than 20 people dead over the last two days. these icy pictures show snow blizzards sweeping across parts of romania, one of the worst—affected areas, where over 500 people were stranded in their cars. ten people lost their lives in poland, where temperatures dropped to —14. and in turkey, flights were cancelled this weekend after heavy snow and icy conditions were forecast for istanbul. we will get the latest forecast for us we will get the latest forecast for us and wider afield in the next few minutes. let's return to our main story. this morning theresa may will be setting out her new approach, the "shared society".
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political commentators say it's the most she's revealed about her politics since she entered number 10. are they just a are theyjust a distraction are they just a distraction from are theyjust a distraction from the big job at hand, brexit? tim shipman is the political editor for the sunday times, and hejoins us now from south—east london. this is a big week for theresa may. lots of announcements. let's start with this idea of big society. it is a concept we have heard a lot about and we have heard about it from the other side of the political fence. it is the shared society, not big society, and that is the point. theresa may became prime minister very quickly. she did not go through a long leadership election, which is where you normally spell out who you are and what you are about. since she became leader, the whole leadership has been dominated by
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brexit. what downing street wanted to do early injanuary is come out and say, this is a prime minister who is about more than just brexit. she has a lot of social reform instincts and it will be making a series of speeches to explain that. some people see her as the new margaret thatcher. but she said there was no such thing as society. david cameron said there is a big society. it is not the same thing as the state. theresa may is coming in asa the state. theresa may is coming in as a conservative prime minister saying, look, there is such thing as society, and government is needed to try to help connect people to strengthen the bonds between community is. this is quite a departure certainly for margaret thatcher and even david cameron. certainly, as she lay out, theresa may is suggesting there is a need for society but also for government to manage that society. i suppose the question is whether the government can afford it. we are told in these tough economic times the government does not have the
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money to enable it to do what it wa nts to money to enable it to do what it wants to do. can it afford to do this? i think what the government will try to do in theresa may's vision is bring people together. yes, david cameron sort of said let's get charities and local groups involved, doing the things the state used to do. what theresa may says is left to their own devices, that does not necessarily work. the state has leadership and it has the ability to work out what is working in different communities and spread those ideas and bring people together. i think that is what she is attempting to do, bring the two ideas together. we also get some news this week on what may happen as far as brexit is concerned. some suggesting that this idea of shared societies are a distraction from the realjob at hand. the realjob at hand is brexit. is that if you you share? well, as i say, they are certainly trying to distract the public‘s attention from brexit, but
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u nfortu nately public‘s attention from brexit, but unfortunately the resignation of sir ivan rogers means it is all over the front pages again this morning. theresa may knows that government will be defined by how she performs on brexit, and herfirst cabinet meeting on the subject is this thursday. the government is waiting for the ruling by the supreme court, which they are expecting to lose, which they are expecting to lose, which will tell them they need to pass legislation before they can trigger article 50, which kickstarted the whole process. brexit is very much at the forefront of ministers‘ minds, but theresa may, with a speech on monday, is trying to say there is more to my government the night. she knows full well how she performs on brexit will form the first line of her political obituary. i have looked at the article you have written on the front page of the times looking at the role of sir ivan rogers and whether it is an orderly or disorderly brexit. that really will be the key, the fact he had a meeting with david cameron beforehand also throws some doubt over those negotiations. well, ivan
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rogers left partly because they did not want in there and partly because he had had enough of theresa may and her team. the thing that concerned ivan rogers was that in the planning that ministers are doing, there is a lot of talk about hard and soft and clea n lot of talk about hard and soft and clean brexit. he is worried about a disorderly brexit where we try to do a deal with the other 27 countries and for whatever reason, that proves to be impossible, and he thinks this isa to be impossible, and he thinks this is a 50—50 chance that we go crashing out of the eu in a couple of years, and if that happens, he thinks the government needs to be prepared. it could be fairly difficult economically. one of the reasons he left was because downing street thought he was briefing the media and felt he was too much of a sort of ramona character. it will interest them greatly he has been going off and having breakfast with the former prime minister, david cameron, who of course was the leader of the remaining forces. that will not be guaranteed to calm down
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their nerves over their breakfast this morning. it is good to talk to you. thank you for talking to us. here is helen with a look at this morning‘s weather. hello. good morning to you. it is not quite as foggy as it was this time yesterday, but the benign, settled weather continues with those problems with fog, particularly across the salisbury plain this morning and also in the vale of york where it is notjust fold, it is freezing fog. temperatures with clear skies have got below freezing but for most of us it is a mild and murky start and the improvements today will just be murky start and the improvements today willjust be slow. that blanket of cloud sitting on the hills, hence the hill fog for the most part. again, the sunshine will be quite limited but there should be some around and an incursion of more rainfor some around and an incursion of more rain for the north—west of scotland. that is the first change coming our way later today, and it would be quite changeable week whether for so
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the best of any changes east of scotla nd the best of any changes east of scotland will be in the grampians, some brightness and patchy rain and drizzle for northern ireland, mild and cloudy, a breezy sort of day. for northern england some freezing fog on the vale of york but some brightness is of the pennines, possibly north—eastern parts of wales as well and it shouldn‘t be as bank across the south—west as yesterday. we will be considerably milder than across in central and eastern europe as you have been hearing. it is bitterly cold and there are red warnings out for the temperatures, the ice and the snow and a bracing north—easterly wind which is accentuated in the severe windchill in these areas. we are seeing a change to our weather later on today and overnight, that is in the form of wet and windy weather. gail or severe gales in the far north of scotland and for most of us it will be a cooler night. rain coming in, horrible rush—hourfor the north and it quickly brightens
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up the north and it quickly brightens up so we get the sunshine back but temperatures will drop down to about four celsius. wintry showers across scotla nd four celsius. wintry showers across scotland and northern ireland, another season by the end of the day. while we remain mild, wet and breezy in some areas so it is all change, as i say. initially we have this benign and mild weather but from mid week on we have a screaming northerly potentially coming down so much colder with some wintry weather, some snow potentially, especially in the north and east. thank you very much. looks like it is turning colder and wetter. now, lots of us will be feeling the pinch after christmas, but new figures suggest the average household in the uk now has more unsecured debt than ever before, almost £13,000. that is before mortgages are even taken into account. the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone, but officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling. let‘s discuss this more now with jane tully from the national debtline. good morning to you. it is a
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familiar tale, isn‘t it? the credit ca rd familiar tale, isn‘t it? the credit card bills arrive in the post after christmas, and people have had a blowout in the harsh reality that they have to pay it back. it is, and this is one of the busiest january is we have had in recent years at national debtline. the bills start to land and people realise they have to land and people realise they have to pay them back and lots of people look at their finances and knew at the beginning of the year and they seek help and advice. what sorts of things people asking you when they do call your helpline? what sorts of advice can you give? our advice to people is some pretty obvious things, but unfortunately not always things, but unfortunately not always things that people do. very often people contact us because they really are in financial difficulty. they find themselves experiencing some form of unexpected circumstances or life shocks, so it
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could be a redundancy, a bereavement, which has brought about financial difficulties for them, and the advice always starts with setting a budget, think about what money you have coming in and going out. january is a great time to do it, start now and the rest of the year and look at that every month and use it as a guideline. secondly we would say to people make sure you open your statements. it is so easy to bury your head in the sand if you have other stresses in life at that particular time. so make sure you open them, and thirdly, take advice from the three agencies which are out there because we know that about 40% of our callers wait at least a year before contacting us. in that time they are carrying all the stress and worry. and that is the issue, as it snowballs and becomes bigger and bigger, and issue, as it snowballs and becomes biggerand bigger, and becomes issue, as it snowballs and becomes bigger and bigger, and becomes a bigger and bigger, and becomes a bigger problem. that is the advice for someone who is maybejust getting into debt. if you already have a massive debt and you don‘t
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know where to start, what should you be is it about consolidating and trying to have fewer debts, orjust paying it off? you start off with your primary debts, your household bills. your energy, council tax, your mortgage and rent. there may be a consequence if you don‘t manage to pay them off. in those cases it is a lwa ys pay them off. in those cases it is always helpful to contact an agency like ours and to contact creditors because they can be very helpful in helping you negotiate some form of repayment. if we look at the wider picture, obviously the tuc research with regard to average family incomes, they are more in debt than ever. what is your response to that? we are certainly seeing a lot of struggling households at the moment, we know there is an uncertain economic climate and borrowing is at its highest level in years. that is a concern to us at the moment because if the economy does it in anyway, if there are challenges over
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the next year or two, there is a significant minority of families who will really struggle. so with wage growth fairly or stagnant that is cause for us to be watchful and vigilant over the next little while. thank you very much, and thanks for the advice as well. the andrew marr programme is on bbc one this morning at 9:00am. andrew, what have you got coming up? as you probably know by now, my main guest is nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland. she is issuing a direct league this morning to theresa may, saying the bus in the single market or scotland will have another independence referendum within about the next 2.5 years. london says she is bluffing, she says she is not laughing and really means this. that is interesting. i am joined by the greatjoanna scanlon, the star of the thick of it, talking about the new shared
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society, what does it really mean? and there will be the usual morris dancing, bad jokes, all you expect. at nine a.m.. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. it is time now for a look at the newspapers. reverend sally hitchiner is here to tell us what has caught her eye. good morning. lovely to see you. we will head straight inside and the first thing which has caught your eye is the end of trained chemists. it is only one story, it is quite small but it struck me as being incredibly important. local chemist shops, local pharmacy shops, are a p pa re ntly shops, local pharmacy shops, are apparently run by a mixture of technicians and trained chemists who go through up to five years of training, and the trained... the senior chemists are going to be dropped from lots of shops as part ofa £3 dropped from lots of shops as part of a £3 million cut from the
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government and at pharmacies in particular. —— aimed at pharmacies. and the technicians, who are often only a level trained, will be running the entire shop. my perspective is that this is very shocking, actually. it is something that we need to be aware of, and very concerned about. many people in the face of cuts to gps, and it is more and more difficult to get seen at a&e if you need to, are using chemists and pharmacists as a way of managing minor ailments. how many people know that you can do that? i think there is a tendency to go into the chemist, hand over your prescription and you get what the doctor prescribed. not that many people know you can go and ask for advice. it is a total mixture and there is a mix of people who do and don‘t do this and perhaps what we need to do is maybe boost gps‘ surgeries so there are people you can walk in and get quick advice
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from there. there are not many places that you can actually just walk in and say i have a split in migraine, which is the best thing to ta ke migraine, which is the best thing to take for that? you wouldn‘t want to book a gps appointment for that but you can walk into your local chemist and get expert, professional advice about which drugs are best to take. ido about which drugs are best to take. i do think this is part of a wider colour concerning trend about cutting things in frontline care —— wider, concerning trend. and the department of health are saying that any changes to who can dispense medicines will be properly consulted and they won‘t compromise patient safety. at the level of consultation at the moment, but if it were to be implemented, personally i‘m not sure how it could have no bad consequence on safety of patients, but i do trust that the department of health spokesperson is saying that. let's ta ke spokesperson is saying that. let's take a look at another story in the telegraph, giving into students will
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harm standards. explain this story. the snowflake student story. harm standards. explain this story. the snowflake student storylj harm standards. explain this story. the snowflake student story. i work for a university and we are very professional, we were closely with oui’ professional, we were closely with our students in terms of providing the levels of training and education that we provide. i am picking up a trend across universities across the country where people are full of anxiety about the new trend, because stu d e nts anxiety about the new trend, because students are paying more and more in terms of their fees, their expectations are higher and higher. and there is a new proposal being put to the lords, the house of lords, they are kicking up a big fuss where it places student satisfaction at the heart of where the universities are considered good 01’ the universities are considered good or bad in the league tables. and this is amidst massive changes in how universities are having to be careful about providing safe space, which can mean that students don‘t feel extremely offended by things,
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01’ feel extremely offended by things, or don‘t hear speakers that are extremely offensive, or considered dangerous by them, for example political or religious opinions that are considered difficult to hear. personally i think university should bea personally i think university should be a place for debate. i think we should discuss things robustly in a university, and this worry of vice chancellors at the moment, and a number of vice chancellors are quoted in this article saying they are filled with anxiety and they feel they can‘t do theirjobs well as professionals in providing education. there is a point, i suppose, as you rightly point out, the fees for university are getting higher and higher so in certain respects the student is the customer and they will say i need to be satisfied, i am and they will say i need to be satisfied, iam paying and they will say i need to be satisfied, i am paying you a lot of money. and it has changed, i was talking to my colleagues about when lecturers go on strike. 20 years ago the students would have been on strike with them. ten years ago they we re strike with them. ten years ago they were glad of the day off and now
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they are suing their university, because their fees are so high. we are here on the bbc news channel until 9am this morning, and coming up here on breakfast this morning: last year saw the worst disorder in british prisons for two decades. now, figures obtained by the bbc show a huge increase in ambulance call—outs to jails. we will have more after 8am. we will be speaking to the explorer ranulph fiennes live from the foot of one of the highest mountains in the world. all that to come on the bbc news channel. hello. this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. coming up before 8.00, helen will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning‘s main news. the israeli ambassador to the uk has apologised after an embassy employee was secretly recorded discussing a plan to bring down a government minister. undercover footage, filmed by middle east news network aljazeera, shows the official saying he would like to "take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan.
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the video also shows the official insulting the foreign secretary borisjohnson. the british government says it considers the matter closed following the apology. theresa may is promising to introduce wide—ranging social reforms, to correct what she calls the "everyday injustices" faced by ordinary working families. in an article for the sunday telegraph, she says she wants to build a "shared society", with a commitment to fairness, and reveals a deliberate attempt to break away from her tory predecessors. i think what the government will try to do is bring people together. yes, david cameron sort of said, lletget charities and local groups involved doing the things the state used to doing the things the state used to do —— let‘s get. theresa may says birth to their own devices, that does not necessarily work. —— left to. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum. speaking on the andrew marr show,
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to be shown later this morning, the first minister said she was prepared to call a fresh referendum if the terms of brexit were not right they will be making a big mistake if they think i‘m in any way bluffing. if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told in the independence referendum, "don‘t leave the uk," here we are — we voted to stay in the eu and we were told voting no was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. a 24—hour strike by london underground workers, affecting up to 4 million commuters, is due to start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses and the closure of ticket offices. transport for london says it‘s put a new deal on the table, but that‘s been rejected by the biggest rail union, the rmt. let‘s give you a few more details of what could be a chaotic week for rail commuters in the south—east of england. the 24—hour london underground strike begins at 6.00pm tonight. widespread disruption is expected. the majority of central london tube stations will be closed.
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there will also be a limited services on other tube lines in outer london. and it could be the first in a series of rail strikes this week. drivers on southern rail are due to walk out on tuesday, wednesday and friday. and there are a further three strikes planned for the week after on the 24th, 25th and 27th of january. that could mean yet more misery for passengers. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who‘s 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. it‘s emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her eighties, was born in britain. prosecutors say they still don‘t know why he chose ft. lauderdale. the average household in the uk now has a record amount of unsecured debt — almost £13,000.
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officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling, but the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone. we are seeing a sharp increase in the level of household debt other than mortgages to a new record high of nearly £13,000 per person. we are worried about that because we are expecting to see a slowdown in wages and in increase in inflation next year, which means households might find it much harder to service these debts and pay off the debt they owe. time for the sport. it is exciting because it is when the big names in the premier league get involved, the third round of the fa cup. there we re third round of the fa cup. there were three giantkillers yesterday. wayne rooney makes it onto our
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screens because it was a big day for him. he equalled sir bobby charlton‘s goalscoring record at manchester united. he is up there with the greats. he will have several years with the greats. he will have several yea rs of with the greats. he will have several years of playing, so he will be setting the new benchmark for manchester united stars of the future. but let‘s start with the action from yesterday. so league one millwall produced the biggest upset of the third round. and it was done at a canter. they won 3—0 against premier league side bournemouth. eddie howe‘s side selected a completely different starting eleven to their last game, but the ease to which millwall won the match was obvious. and millwall manager neil harris says he‘s proud of such a dominant display by this team. i enjoyed it. i enjoyed watching my team. the boys worked hard on thursday and friday trying to stop bournemouth and nullify their threats. they have huge talent in their squad. we knew there were capable of making chances. delighted that it was clinical at the right times and really pleased with the clean sheet.
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west brom lost at home to derby of the championship. this free—kick by by tom ince gave derby the 2—1win. delight for the away side and the 5,000 travelling fans. and the third premier league side humbled was stoke. championship side wolves with a 2—0 win, and another great freekick sealed it. matt doherty with the strike. it‘s the first time in eight seasons that stoke have gone out in the third round. two non—league sides will be in the fourth round draw after securing impressive draws. first there‘s national league side lincoln city. they had been leading 2—1 thanks to two strikes by theo robinson, before the championship side equalised to send the tie into a replay. and fellow national league side sutton united are in the draw for round four too. they earned a replay with league one afc wimbledon, with a clean sheet, as it ended 0—0. and wayne rooney‘s goalscoring record was the headline of manchester united‘s 4—0 win over reading. this was his 249th for the club, and it means he‘s equal with sir bobby charlton. there he is watching on.
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and his managerjose mourinho says it‘s only a matter of time. it is amazing because everybody knows who sir bobby is and what he means for the history of the club and the history of english football. for wayne to score that number of goals for manchester united is fantastic. but again, the best day will arrive. some selected results for you from yesterday. of the other non—league sides in action, defeats for barrow and eastleigh. and stourbridge — from the seventh tier of english football — lost 2—1 at wycombe. go to the bbc sport website for all the goal from every game in the third round. there are five third round matches today and a couple of opportunities for upsets. chelsea take on peterborough this afternoon, while at lunchtime liverpool play league two plymouth argyle. these players want to have success.
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these players want to get each chance they can and take each chance they get. it is a historical tournament, and of course we will try everything to win it. it is all pretty exciting, and we are looking forward to it. sir andy murray‘s winning streak of 28 atp tour matches is over, after he lost the qatar open final to old rival novak djokovic. the world number two was serving for the match in the second set but murray saved three match points to force the final into a decider. the match lasted nearly three hours, and in the end it was djokovic who edged it. despite that defeat, murray retains his number one ranking. could not ask for a better start of the year. obviously playing the final against andy, who is number one in the world and has been into
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mendis form, one almost 30 matches ina row, mendis form, one almost 30 matches in a row, it is unbelievable, and unbelievable performance to date from both of us. —— tremendous form. we pushed each of us to the limit. munster thrashed racing 92 32—7 in their european champions cup tie, a match rearranged after the death of their head coach anthony foley in october. the significance of the match was marked with 30 seconds of applause before kick—off. on the pitch, munster completely outplayed last year‘s runners—up, scoring four tries in all. they now sit top of their pool. saracens have returned to the top of the premiership after coming from behind to draw 13—13 with exeter chiefs despite having a man sent off after only ten minutes. elsewhere there were wins for northampton, harlequins and gloucester. ospreys are top of the pro 12 after beating champions connacht 29—7. ashley beck secured the bonus point win with a try in the final minute. glasgow also won, they beat cardiff blues. sir mo farah‘s attempt to win the great edinburgh international cross country for a second time ended in disappointment.
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the two—time double olympic champion struggled at holyrood park, finishing seventh in his first race of 2017. britain‘s callum hawkins was beaten into second by america‘s leonard korir in a sprint finish. i‘m definitely a little bit behind. yeah, the last bit of training hasn‘t gone as well as i wanted. but it is a team event, and i want to come out here and represent my country, and help the guys. but early on it was one of those things where ten days beforehand it was like, what do i do? i did a session, and i knew from that things were going to be a hard day. nice to see sir mo farah running cross—country. it sort of levels him down. a visibly he is outstanding at cross—country, but doesn‘t that take you back to your school days running around in the mud, splashing
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everywhere. the difference is he does it in style. he doesjust about everything in style. good to see him back on track, where he is expected to do well at the world championships in london this summer, and then expected to hang up his spikes and turn his attention to the marathon. and maybe more cross—country, who knows? lots more to come from him. fingers crossed. thank you. legal air pollution limits for the whole year have been broken just five days into 2017 on one road in london. it‘s not looking good for other areas in the capital either, as the london air project predicts more sites are close to breaking their annual limits. simon birkett is the founder of the clean air in london campaign. good morning. how concerning is this? it is not the first time that the areas of london have breached these limits, is it? it is not. it is very concerning because air
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pollution levels are much higher than most of us have realised, and a great number of people are exposed to the levels that we see. but to put it in context nationally, 37 out of 43 uk zones exceeded the world health organization guideline and legal limit for nitrogen dioxide in 2015. that really shows that it is a national problem, notjust a london problem. the area that you are picking up and talking about especially here now in this context is brixton road in london, and very busy part of london. one of the things i know you have been talking about is what people can do for themselves, not eating outside. you have spoken about a ban on that, i understand. how much can it affect people‘s health? perhaps people don‘t realise what the dangers are. air pollution affects everyone to some extent or another. we know it
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can cause or exacerbate respiratory problems or even cause heart attacks or strokes. to put it in perspective, the world health organization says that you should have no human exposure over 200 units of nitrogen dioxide ever, and the legal limit is 18 hours in the whole year. brixton road, we had beaten that a ten hour limit for the whole year in it, as you say, just five days —— 18 hour. but the levels we re five days —— 18 hour. but the levels were almost twice 200, at 350. at that sort of level, i think it is right that buses should be suspended because it is diesel that we are really concerned about. people should be advised not to drive to those areas. wherever possible, pedestrians should avoid it. that is the scale of this problem and i think we need urgent action now. that would cause a lot of disruption, no doubt. the government are saying they have committed more than £2 billion since 2011 to
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increase uptake of ultralow emissions vehicles and support greener transport. the mayor of london is saying he has announced ten additional low bus signs, one including bristol road. what you think of those measures? siddique khan has definitely got off to a good start, but to put the government‘s efforts into context, twice the court has said it has no plan, no credible plan to comply with these guidelines all legal limit -- with these guidelines all legal limit —— sadiq khan. we would like to see a proper plan from the government to comply with these legally binding limits, like new clea n legally binding limits, like new clean airact legally binding limits, like new clean air act fit for the 21st century, and we need to really hammer down on diesel emissions and encourage alternatives, like cleaner vehicles but also walking, cycling and more use of public transport. 0k, and more use of public transport. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. thank you. here is helen with a look at this morning‘s weather.
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hello there. it is murky out there this morning. this was one of our weather watchers‘ pictures which has been sent into us here. obviously it is quite dark out there still. thank you very much. you can see in staffordshi re you very much. you can see in staffordshire it is looking quite murky. some extra care required and freezing fog for the vale of york. icy conditions as well. slow today. it isa icy conditions as well. slow today. it is a quiet, settled weather picture. not a great deal of ram, but quite damp in the south—west and wales and it will become through the afternoon across the north—west of scotland. some of that rain getting through the central lowlands, accompanied by strengthening winds. some gales in the north—west later on. severe gales overnight. the best chance of rightness will be in eastern parts of scotland. for northern ireland, cloudy and mild, down at times through the day. some brightness where we see the freezing fog come through. north—eastern parts of wales, not quite as wet across the south—west come the
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afternoon as it was yesterday, but we are mild at least. which is obviously vast very different to what is happening across central and eastern parts of europe. some very extreme conditions at the moment, with red warnings about. snow, as and a severe windchill. for ourselves we keep the mild weather overnight, because again the wind strengthens. and for scotland and northern ireland, big changes. it looks wet and windy come tomorrow morning. the rush—hour not particularly nice and for northern england that rain will sink south fairly quickly tomorrow. it clears away from northern ireland and scotla nd away from northern ireland and scotland fairly quickly by the afternoon hours and then it is much brighter. sunshine returns, not much of that on offer this weekend but temperatures falling away and we keep that rather mild weather in the south. for the evening rush—hour it will be easy and quite wet as well. then from midweek on much, much colder i have been saying. we get a cold, northerly wind to exacerbate
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the chill and it will feel really bitter, with an arctic wind and some snow showers potentially as well. so lots to keep our highs on at the moment. we are back with the headlines at 8:00am. first, let‘s get all the latest technology news with spencer kelly and the team. here is click. right, let‘s get 2017 started in style, shall we? flashing lights. check. modest, understated hotels. check. lots of people queuing for photos of a sign. check. a motorcycle vest with built—in airbag? 0h!
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check. every january, las vegas hosts the massive consumer electronics show, and if you have a product to launch, you want to launch it here. and that‘s why i am being followed by a drone, specifically, the hover camera passport drone. first one i have seen which follows you not by tracking a signal from your mobile phone, but instead by locking on to a face in its camera view. come with me. you can tell it which face to follow by tapping on it in the accompanying app on your phone. and the latest version will let you scan and upload your face to the drone so it can find and recognise you automatically. the theory is that you then don‘t need the phone at all. the drone knows and loves your face, just like a loyal puppy. and, with guarded blades and sensors underneath to help it steer clear of obstacles, it certainly seems safe and light enough to fly in amongst other people, or indeed to grab it out of the air and fold it up.
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hence the name — passport, you see. unbelievably, ces is now in its 50th year, and in that time it‘s got big, very big. the show has spread beyond the walls of the las vegas convention centre to the surrounding hotels, and we have seen all sorts of ideas come and go in those five decades. the event might have grown, but the technology, of course, has shrunk. the tv screens have got so thin that they blend into the walls, so thin you can peel them on and off. and in amongst the major companies are a number of tiny companies. lara and marc have been
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checking some of them out. most people understand that if i do this with my fingers it means give me a call on the telephone. however, if i am wearing this strap when i make that gesture my hand becomes part of the telephone itself and can send and receive calls. the strap has a little body conducting unit in here which sends vibrations down my hand and when i stick my finger in my ear, they become amplified sound. there is a microphone just in the strap there, so i can talk into it. let‘s just see if that works. and it does. so this is the prototype. the finished thing looks like a normal watch strap and can be fitted to any old watch. now, when you want to hang up, that‘s simplicity itself. all you‘ve got to do is take your hand away from your ear. health is once again a big theme here at ces. and, whilst more people than ever are following gluten—free, dairy—free or other sorts of specialist diets,
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they don‘t necessarily need to be unless they‘ve had a proper medical diagnosis. and that‘s something that this device aims to overcome by helping people create the perfect diet for their own personal digestive system. air connects via bluetooth, and its mission is to miniaturise a breath test that gastroenterologists have been using since the ‘90s. it analyses reaction to various forms of carbohydrate, such as lactose or fructose. this is based on the idea that, if you consume a food that you can‘t break down, then it will ferment in the gut, and from that point chemicals will disperse into the bloodstream. that blood will be making its way into the lungs, and then when you breathe out you‘ll be able to analyse how well that food has been digested. so, once it learns what works for you, it should be able to help you customise your diet as the finished app‘s food database
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indicates how likely you are to react to any given food. so, if you find the answer, all that‘s left to do is actually stick to the lifestyle and diet you need to. now then, i‘m officially calling it. this year‘s big theme at ces was cars. and, as always, it‘s often the most outrageous concepts that grab all the headlines. rinspeed has previously proposed a car with its own deployable drone. well, now it‘s got one that has a space—age cockpit, with more glass than a greenhouse, which is quite fortunate because it has a garden in the dashboard. yes, that‘s a garden in the dashboard. why? well, so you get a nice smell when you‘re driving, of course, and you can even take part of it with you when you go shopping. don‘t forget to switch the fan on, so you get that lovely whiff. actually, a lot of the more serious car stuff is happening in small steps, incrementally, so it‘s harder
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to grab the headlines. that said, marc cieslak has just been for a couple of extraordinary drives. there‘s a certain german car—maker that boasts of building the ultimate driving machine. but here at ces 2017, most of the motor manufacturers seem intent on building the ultimate self—driving machine. it isn‘tjust motor manufacturers that are showing off self—driving vehicles here. they‘re doing it with the help of tech companies, as well. this vehicle is fitted with a system called bb8, which has been created by nvidia, a company most famous for manufacturing high—end graphics chips. artificial intelligence software which learns helped by sensors have trained bb8 to be able to make driving decisions. here, an obstacle hasjust appeared in the route
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that we were going to take to get to the other end of this track. the car has decided that they‘d better not drive into that obstacle, so it‘s driven around it. driving around a car park is one thing but how do these autonomous vehicles perform out on real roads? electronic supplier delphi has partnered with driver assistance and sensor outfit mobileye and created a mini fleet of autonomous audi suvs which are driving around vegas during ces. there are 2a different sensors spread out across the body of this car which allow it to drive autonomously and what i am struck by is that you don‘t notice any of them. you can‘t really see any of those sensory devices. they‘re hidden. this car is an indicator, if you like, of how autonomous vehicles will look in the future, which is pretty much like any car does in showrooms today. those sensors include lidar, radar, and cameras all around the vehicle. here, we can see what the car
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sees through them. identifying other vehicles as well as pedestrians, and behaving accordingly, as it weaves its way through traffic. so, i‘m a rear passenger in the back of this self—driving car. and so far zero dramas, apart from looking forward and noticing that the driver doesn‘t have his hands on the steering wheel. i could be forgiven for thinking that i am actually being driven around bya human being. the thing is, we‘ve been driving around in prototype self—driving cars for a couple of years now. how long is it going to be before cars like this are available to buy in showrooms? there is quite a wide consensus among the industry that 2021 is the time where the technology will be ready, and after a number of years where society will start gaining confidence in this kind of technology, then society would be at the point where the driver can be completely out of the loop. with that 2021 goal in mind, mobileye announced that, in partnership with bmw and intel, it will be testing a0 autonomous
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vehicles on real american and european roads in the second half of this year. so, the countdown has begun. autonomous automobiles are most definitely on their way. now, if you are someone who prefers the wind to be rushing through your hair, ces also offers plenty for riders as well as drivers. this is surely the most fun you can have on a beach with your clothes on. the super 73 is an electric bike that can hold enough charge to travel for more than 25 miles. its top speed is 27mph, which on newport beach is certainly enough to get the wind in your hair. you have the thumb here. don‘t press on itjust yet and you have the two brakes right here. two brakes right here...
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so are you ready to go? you go first and i will follow you. follow me. go. 0h! ha—ha! the bike was funded via kickstarter, where it raised almost $500,000, and now each bike is being carefully crafted here in orange county california. we have every machine needed to create an entire bike. there‘s some days where we have got, you know, 30, a0 bikes being welded in a single day. that‘s to ensure that everything is done properly, safely, and will hold up for a lifetime. the batteries in these things are getting more affordable, they‘re getting lighter, so it means at ces this year we‘re seeing a host of interesting ways to help us get around. chinese company leeco unveiled these bikes. they‘re powered by normal pedals, but they have the android mobile operating system built in so you can track your progress. and then there is things like the movpack. this is a regular backpack, that with one movement you can turn it into an electric skateboard, that‘s actually easier to ride
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than a regular skateboard. but it‘s perhaps more futuristic ideas like this one from honda that really get the imagination going. this concept car is more about having something that you don‘t necessarily own, but you kind ofjust call it up whenever you need a vehicle to pop to the shops or do some of those small errands. it will drive itself to you, pick you up, and when you are done with it you canjust let it go itself. and we will have to stop the ces coverage right there, because this is the short cut of click. we are back in vegas next week. in the meantime, you can follow us on twitter. thank you very much for watching, and we will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with sian lloyd and ben thompson. embarrassment for israel. its ambassador to the uk apologises after an embassy official is secretly filmed discussing how to "take down" a conservative minister. the official told an undercover reporter that sir alan duncan
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was causing "lots of problems" for the israelis. and is seen describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an "idiot". good morning, it‘s sunday 8th january. also ahead: theresa may sets out her vision for britain. the prime minister says she wants to build a "shared society" with a commitment to fairness. london underground staff get ready to start a 24—hour strike tonight as millions of commuters face a chaotic start to the week.
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