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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 8, 2017 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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apologised after an embassy official was secretly filmed saying he wanted to ta ke was secretly filmed saying he wanted to take down a foreign office official. the may promises a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the everyday injustices experience by working families. nicola sturgeon said she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. the average level of unsecured debt has reached a record high of £13,000 per uk households. heavy snowfalls are continuing gci’oss heavy snowfalls are continuing across europe and the united states causing 20 deaths. ina causing 20 deaths. in a moment the sunday morning edition of the papers. before the papers — sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. so league one millwall produced the biggest upset of the third round. and it was done at a canter. they beat premier league side bournemouth 3—nil. eddie howe selected a completely different starting eleven
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to their last game, but millwall won easily. and their manager neil harris says he's proud of such a dominant display by his side. i enjoyed it, i enjoyed watching my team. the boys worked really hard. they have a hugely talented squad and we knew we were capable of making chances. i am certainly pleased with the clean sheet. west brom lost at home to derby of the championship. this free—kick by tom ince gave derby the 2—1win. delight for the away side and the five thousand travelling fans. and the third premier league club humbled was stoke. championship side wolves with a 2—nil win, and another great freekick sealed it. matt doherty with the strike. it's the first time in eight seasons that stoke have gone out in the third round. we did not start in the right manner
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and found it difficult to shake ourselves out of that, it is only when we went behind that we got your reactions are when we went behind that we got your reactions a re clearly when we went behind that we got your reactions are clearly that is not what is required, you need to be ready to go from the off. it is a disappointment because it was a competition that we targeted and like i said we had a good start that my good starting 11 but we were not able to do the job. two non—league teams will be in the fourth round draw after securing impressive draws. first there's national league side lincoln city. they had been leading ipswich 2—1 thanks to two strikes by theo robinson, before the championship side equalised to send the tie to a replay. fellow national league side sutton united are in the draw for round 4 too. they earned a replay with league one afc wimbledon, with a clean sheet, as it ended nil—nil. and wayne rooney's record was the headline of manchester united's a—nil win over reading. this was his 249th for the club,
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and it means he's equal with sir bobby charlton as united's all—time top goalscorer. a proud moment, to do so in such a massive club manchester united, i am hugely honoured to be able to play for this football club but to be up there in terms of goals with sir bobby charlton is a proud moment for me. hopefully i will be up there on my lonesome but not today. i will enjoy today because it has been a real honour. some selected results for you from yesterday. of the other non—league sides in action, defeats for barrow and eastleigh. and stourbridge — from the seventh tier of english football — lost 2—1 at wycombe. go to the bbc sport website for all the goal from every game in the third round. there are five third round matches today and a couple of opportunities for upsets. chelsea take on peterborough this afternoon, while at lunchtime liverpool play league two plymouth argyle. these players want to have success. these players want to get each chance and take each
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chance they get. it is a historical tournament, and of course we will try everything to win it. it is all pretty exciting, and we are looking forward to it. sir andy murray's winning streak of 28 atp tour matches is over, after he lost the qatar 0pen final to old rival novak djokovic. the world number two was serving for the match in the second set but murray saved three match points to force the final into a decider. the match last nearly three hours and in the end it was djokovic who edged it. despite that defeat, murray retains his number one ranking. i could not ask for a better start of the year, laying in a final against andy not one of the that has been a tremendous form, he won almost 30 matches in a row, it is unbelievable. and i'm believable
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performance today from both of us, we pushed each other to the limit. that's all the sport. now on bbc news here's the papers hello and welcome to the the papers — a look through what the sunday morning papers are looking at. with me are prashant rao, deputy europe business editor of the international new york times and shyana perera, the journalist and broadcaster. the observer says the prime minister is under pressure this weekend to announce an emergency nhs rescue plan to parliament. writing in the sunday telegraph, theresa may says the government has a duty to step in and tackle injustice. the sunday times leads with britain's former ambassador to the eu, ivan rogers, meeting with david cameron before christmas to warn him that theresa may was botching brexit. the sunday express says the man set to become donald trump's ambassador to the eu has revealed that he supported brexit
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and declared: "i love the uk." the mail on sunday features israeli officials allegedly caught making a vow to ‘take down‘ boris johnson's foreign 0ffice deputy. and the sun on sunday feature a story of a man, who was born a girl — twenty years ago, being four months pregnant. let's have a look at them. theresa may, we know she will make a big speech at some point on brexit, but this is an article she has written for the sunday telegraph which they feature on the front page saying that it feature on the front page saying thatitis feature on the front page saying that it is now the sheriff society not the big society. i think if you read the article which is tucked away inside the sunday telegraph, and the size of a normal column by any columnist, all it says is a shared society means a shared society. it does not tell you anything. we will act across as
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really society to restore the furnace which is the bedrock of the social solidarity that makes our nation stronger. what on earth does that mean? i cannot see a big difference between this and big society which was all about active citizenship and all of that is embedded in this. it isjust... shared his three letters longer than big. it is and to reason may maybe has not actually got a single idea to deliver. that is the problem, we know the political mood notjust in this country but across the western world in democracies is very sceptical of politicians and the promises so when you view the big society or shared society and you wonder if going to hospital is a good thing and if you will be seen a lot, there is a disappointing between the reality that many others live in and the politicians. as people are increasingly sceptical of
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politicians promises, interestingly there is this one sentence that struck me, which was championing this idea of the people just about managing at the idea that these people need an act of governance that. up, ithink people need an act of governance that. up, i think that is currently a throwaway phrase but could be interesting about how a conservative government could be more activist when it comes to industry, added more interventionist than it comes to markets, she talks but intervening in failed markets, that is not the typical rhetoric a year from conservative government which places more faith in markets and more faith in businesses to figure things out and this kind of line which i find just a little unusual as not quite in keeping with the conservatives. i thought that was interesting and that the target audience was not the poor but those who some would describe as jams, but normal ordinary working people who think that things have got much more difficult and also our society is
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quite unfair. to reason me is a great strategist and has crept crab—like across the social spectrum to the side that is normally brought by the tories are classified —— pacified by the tories and she's making all sorts of claims about think she will do that do break the model of what tory prime ministers do but there is not a single piece of information behind any of this, it is like a miss world contestants saying i want world peace. it is just where is the basis of any of this? it has been six months, we have not had a single policy that has any value. is it about changing the subject from brexit?” has any value. is it about changing the subject from brexit? i think thatis the subject from brexit? i think that is interesting, a lot of front pages document ivan rogers who continues to dominate headlines,... right back this is the british diplomatic weight. we see on the front page of the sunday times that
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he secretly met with cameron at the end of last year, we have stuff here about the front page of the observer has an op—ed from a canadian trading official who said it will be difficult and sir ivan rogers was correct, this is still a dominant narrative. i think one of the accusations that has been levelled against the prime minister is that the whole brexit thing has sucked up all the oxygen and has not been enough discussion on other that are happening. the nhs, the education system, all these things ever pressing issues. i thought the front page splash of the mail on sunday was terrific. colleagues in al jazeera were behind this but the story is as real plot to take down tory minister. a video cat is the diplomatic conspiring with deputy mp eight two slam a fully minister. you can see let's take down bodices deputy, —— boris. they have done a
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good newspaperjob. we have done a good newspaperjob. we have done a good newspaper job of good newspaperjob. we have done a good newspaperjob of itvjob. let's give credit where it is due. i found this interesting because i did not know boris and allen about that important any more, it felt like thatis important any more, it felt like that is the ministry where we have a couple of puppets and it is being run by someone else. the israelis suggested that boris is now was an idiot. that is the court. it is quite interesting, it has been passed on to us and the upgrade relations with visual, everything is fine, which is usual the poetic speakfor there fine, which is usual the poetic speak for there is a row behind closed doors. there are two things you, one is the grey minister after secretary kenny's speech the pro—minister was more strident in support of israel, and i think with with british history it is a little
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bit, its alliance with the us given that she was so critical of the secretary, secretary kenny, was unusual. we are now hearing more and more about foreign countries tried to intervene in politics. i think this is something of countries elsewhere in the world often suspect of the us and britain, but now we have the situation with russia doing things that the allegations that israel tries to do things in british politics, this is becoming more and more of the narrative. what is interesting about that is to take down a government minister whatever you mean by that, to take down a government ministerfor you mean by that, to take down a government minister for believing that israel's policy of settlements in certain areas is wrong is something that will shock people. not the side bar stuff about what you think of borisjohn is not the idea of destroying someone because you don't like the logical ideas and it isa
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you don't like the logical ideas and it is a foreign government doing it, thatis it is a foreign government doing it, that is the core of this. that is right, but has a long history with israel and a long leash and ship with israel and the idea that whether it would be a foreign government intervening to take down a government minister, it is hard to tell what exactly has been done, if anything, with regards to this by the israeli embassy but even the mere suggestion that this is something that they would want to do. can you imagine if this was a french diplomat saying they wanted to ta ke french diplomat saying they wanted to take down some government minister because they wed in favour brexit. and you imagine the row?|j think there would be a huge row and ifind it odd because think there would be a huge row and i find it odd because we are friends of israel so the idea that they feel they need to take down members of oui’ they need to take down members of our government is worrying that it makes me think someone has always sat on the fence about as real that perhaps we have gone too far into bed with israel. maybe this is a
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shot across the bow for those of us who have been complacent about it and think it is obvious why we have eggsin and think it is obvious why we have eggs in this particular basket and are ignoring others. i think it will tip the balance just as i think the russian hacking as you said will tip the balance. we start to understand, i have just spent the whole christmas period watching that fact that this is just like christmas period watching that fact that this isjust like homeland. happening every day in the newspapers. suddenly you realise that these outlandish narrative you have been watching are happening all the time. we await the french and german elections. i was taken by the study, the sunday telegraph says that universities are worn over quoted snowflakes to the hand to snowfla ke quoted snowflakes to the hand to snowflake students in controversial -- is snowflake students in controversial —— is controversial changes to the
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ranking systems will be approved, it means that student voices as to whether they like the university the art will be taken into account. to dismiss a whole group of people as snowfla kes dismiss a whole group of people as snowflakes because they happen to be young and have views about how they are mentored —— about how they made doesn't post per year tuition fees are being spread as the raiders. there are two different elements to this that are, i told you about this, as you arrested becomes more expensive because one of a financial decision, it is reasonable to say that, they are kind of customers in a way, that they have some say over the product they are paying for. but at the same time there is also the element that university is a place where you're meant to be challenged and you have to ask questions of yourself and questions the —— that yourself and questions the —— that you ask of others that are demanding. the ability to be challenged is a fundamental part of it you come across ideas you don't like. yes but the ship your views.
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that was something about my experience in university that i treasure and if that is eroded you lose something. take your point but the idea that this is a generation of tender little plan to cut the top of tender little plan to cut the top of this, there are some people who complain about people having different views having a platform. yes and that is that i would disagree completely about bowing to snowfla ke disagree completely about bowing to snowflake students demand, if they are basing their satisfaction on whether and not the university allows free debate or not,... or doesn't challenge the prejudices. allows free debate or not,... or doesn't challenge the prejudiceslj am doesn't challenge the prejudices.” am looking for similes but it is like going into falkland and mason and complaining they have kangaroo nose and potato root on the shelves. say well i know it is a well in or to the fancy food store but actually i don't want you to get me fancy food. whole point of education and i envied each of people now, not the fees are lass but the fact that so
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many are able to go to university, to be stretched, to be challenged, to be stretched, to be challenged, to be stretched, to be challenged, to be forced to look of things they don't like. to be fair to most stu d e nts don't like. to be fair to most students that is what they want. that is the point i was trying to make, it is a very small minority who would fit into that category of so—called snowflakes. who would fit into that category of so-called snowflakes. that is true. the danger is to castigate an entire group of thousands of aspiring young people who want to be challenged as snowflakes, but there is a decent numberof snowflakes, but there is a decent number of anecdotes that make you a little bit worried about people who are, we see this all the time, people who want to stay in the bottles and don't want to be challenged. it is coming to the nus which is not a small, might be a small organisation as a whole likeable and many members at hazard has a huge voice and huge influence. the one thing i worried about as being one of those people who say it was better in my day! don't want to
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be that person but that is my concern. be that person but that is my concern. fish stocks ifi be that person but that is my concern. fish stocks if i can find it, the story says, it is somewhere in the observer, the point of the story, thank you very much, how warming seas are forcing fish to seek new waters. and not by a number of things about this. climate change is affecting the fish we have in british waters, cold is further north and this is more difficult to get. that said coming soon, squid suppers. we are plenty of squid, not so suppers. we are plenty of squid, not so much cod, will be changing dietary habits because of this? are you? dietary habits because of this? are o dietary habits because of this? are you? i'm not. you will live cod suddenly goes up in price.” you? i'm not. you will live cod suddenly goes up in price. i suppose the scottish will start on it and pass it down, they like haggis, the like squid. pass over the border and we will all start eating it because there is no more cod. i am a
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scottish squid lover so i am happy to have squid and chips. how about you, prashant? it is interesting because cultures cuisines do change over time because cultures cuisines do change overtime depending on because cultures cuisines do change over time depending on what is available economically and as the climate changes, so wouldn't be surprising. it would be unusual and fun to shake up some of these recipes. can you imagine it with vigour can? whatever sunday roast was built around squid? what would thatis was built around squid? what would that is why? the sunday roast is not something that people have on sundays very often any more. it was something 50 years ago. our tastes have changed. the indian subcontinent, herfavourite have changed. the indian subcontinent, her favourite meal have changed. the indian subcontinent, herfavourite meal is supposed to be checking taken the salad. and it probably is. —— chicken taken masala. this is harder because if you cannot afford because you can go for something else. whenever fish has become you can go for something else. wheneverfish has become fashionable it has always been fish that we
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have, sea bass has become fashionable, then monkfish, you don't really see the local fish becoming fashionable. cod you tend to get into peace, hadn't you get in chickpeas, so i guess the squid will go into the chip shop. is squid is good? you're go into the chip shop. is squid is good ? you're scottish. go into the chip shop. is squid is good? you're scottish. don't hold it against me. i am not of the snuffly generation so i can take it. to pursue the fish angle, salmond has made a huge comeback. 50 years ago it was expensive and now it is quite cheap, it is a good fish to eat.” preferred the atlantic salmon. farmed salmon is a bit flabby.” don't know quite where going. the other big story this month is obviously the presidency of the united states. club tweets in the
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world jobs, this is inside the observer. now, the sunday times. what is interesting about this issue isa man what is interesting about this issue is a man who makes the news by sitting on his phone and quite often if you follow the news he is making, commenting on tv programmes and new shoes he is watching, this is a president unlike any other we have ever seen. president unlike any other we have ever seen. it is easy to talk about that, the more concerning stuff is his tweets have aside from the lyrical impact, we saw the past week he was tweeting about general motors fortitude, the company had to dramatically change the strategy or at somatic changes, otherwise, it is easy to forget that these companies employ hundreds of thousands of people with realjobs, and being affected by 140 characters that the president—elect puts out. maybe the share price of these companies
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bounces back but they suddenly have to veer off course. the impact of these tweets are fascinating because how does the pr industry do with this? if you are the pr for toyota and you're waiting on tenterhooks for what the president—elect might tweet, it could completely upend your strategy overnight. it is fascinating. and also he has been, mrtrump has fascinating. and also he has been, mr trump has been derided for using these tweets, i would suggest he is very smart because you don't get challenged or you ignore the challenges, everybody takes this as news value, and he cannot be interrogated on it. you can't question. he tweeted about how delighted he is to meet theresa may later this spring, but is a great ally. well that is fine but when it comes to what toyota should do, what car company should do, we get into different territory. he has the
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ballast of being himself, so we can't write it off as easily as we would if it were seen president obama who was tweeting. it is interesting because he's absolutely a president for the modern age, he is able to first of all encapsulated things and short pithy sentences and he is able to control and terrorise via twitter which is really a gift i think mrs thatcher would have been like this. this is a man who doesn't sleep. in mind that is cause of the working sometimes it is making —— working sometimes it is making —— working positively and a lot of the time it is working negatively in some danger not sure it is working but the result was something going on andi but the result was something going on and i think this is exciting and interesting, because i'm not affected by it i guess, the moment. ifind this affected by it i guess, the moment. i find this endlessly interesting and entertaining and enlightening, actually, that somebody can be so
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powerful and there must be some truth in some of the things he's saying for companies and people to respond in the way that they do. the other but i was struck by if we have a look on this, this is the telegraph cartoon and you will see the president—elect of the united states being sworn in and he is a glove puppet with vladimir putin with his hand inside a glove. that isa with his hand inside a glove. that is a very interesting, obviously a cartoonist ‘s take on a very interesting story. relations russia in 2017. it is like with it the tweets, it is anyone's guess. it is clear that the president—elect is certainly more open to good relations with russia and sees russia in a different way than i think most are at least the loudest portion of the us foreign policy community views russia, i think this
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will be tricky because his nominee for secretary of state has garnered some opposition from within his own party because of rex kellas and's relationship with russia. as time goes on and this is going to be one of the fascinating narratives of the trump presidency, he really should chip in russia that will be arguably the most important relationship and how it stays —— shapes the security climate. the sound ramifications for the whole world, doesn't it? it is a mexican stand—off between these two superpowers. i think there's something that is incredibly positive about it actually, i like the fact that trump is suggesting he is open —— using opening, what is scary as the curtain suggested that perhaps he's been manipulative, but if ultimately there is some sort of
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agreement, if there is some sort of, think the word i looking for is congress but i don't think that is the correct word, but finding that equilibrium between the two superpowers, think it would be fantastic. on that happy note, that isn't the papers. our faqs to prashant and shyana. we take a look at tomorrow's front pages every evening on bbc news. good morning. anotherfairly quiet weather day, it is misty and create the iliad have some freezing fog and avail of york but it will be all change this week. already the elements line up to the west of the uk every cdna of low pressure that will bring about the first change with you on today. for the meantime, the high pressure is keeping things
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very settled, only school improvements for most with missed low cloud lifting so slightly less grey, the afternoon. the weather front will start to show its hand across the western side of the uk, already patchy rain and drizzle and it will get more persistent and head eastwards so eroding any brightness in eastern parts of grampian for example. there is the chance of some brea ks example. there is the chance of some breaks in the cloud east of the pennines, or north—east wales, that robin freezing fog in the morning. further south we have the weather front close by so it shouldn't be as damp across the south—west that was yesterday, but as i sayjust a lighter shade of grey in disguise so it will be dry for most of the fa cup third round so if you are heading there it will be relatively mild and cloudy. a lot of cold a further east you may have heard of the news, it is bitterly cold with severe weather warnings with ice and snow and of course severe wind—chill, —20 in moscow. we had
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stolen in greece yesterday. the cold airwill stolen in greece yesterday. the cold air will come back to the uk but not for the meantime, for the meantime the rain shows its hand with strengthening wind and gales in the north—west but a wet and windy rush hour across scotland and northern ireland. relatively mild and murky elsewhere. the rain gradually through monday will transfer south across england and wales, containing the mild conditions. it will be breezy and wetter and behind much brighter with some sunshine but the showers will be when today. particularly over the hills but temperatures will fall away to four or5 temperatures will fall away to four or 5 degrees and these are the early temperatures. a brief taste of winter and then we see milder air for the time on tuesday, early wednesday but it is behind that then as we head to thursday that we start to pick up that polar air, snow showers, a bitter wind, it will be quite severe feeling by the end of this week. keep up—to—date online. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at ten.
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a political advisor at the israeli embassy has been secretly recorded saying he wants to "take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan — who's a strong critic ofjewish settlements. theresa may is promising a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the "everyday injustices" experienced by working families. nicola sturgeon says she's not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. the average amount of unsecured debt has reached a record—high of almost £13,000 per uk household. parts of europe and the eastern united states ahead by a cold spell. more than 20 people
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