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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 8, 2017 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at ten. a political advisor at the israeli embassy has been secretly recorded saying he wants to "take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan — who's a strong critic ofjewish settlements. theresa may is promising a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the "everyday injustices" experienced by working families. nicola sturgeon says she's not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. the average amount of unsecured debt has reached a record—high of almost £13,000 per uk household. parts of europe and the eastern united states ahead by a cold spell. more than 20 people dead and this transport chaos. —— there is
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transport chaos. —— there is transport chaos. hollywood is gearing up for this year's golden globes — the bbc drama, the night manager is up for four awards and at half past ten — bbc wales investigates sepsis and discovers whether thousands of lives are being lost through a lack of awareness. ——0f sepsis. the israeli ambassador in london has apologised after the embassy‘s political officer was secretly filmed saying he wanted to "take down" some british mps —— including the foreign office down" some british mps — including the foreign office minister, sir alan duncan.
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shai masot was recorded by an undercover aljazeera reporter as he lunched with a female aide to the mp robert halfon — a former political director of the group, conservative friends of israel. mr masot is also heard describing the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, as an idiot. the ambassador, mark regev, said the comments did not reflect the israeli government's views. jane—frances kelly reports. the emergence of the footage is highly embarrassing for the israelis. it shows shai masot dining with, among others, an aide to the conservative education minister robert halfon. mr masot, a senior political adviser at the israeli embassy, says he would like to bring down a member of the british government. sir alan duncan has been a fierce critic of israeli policy. just over two years ago, he described israel's control and division of the west bank city of hebron as nothing short of apartheid, where palestinians were treated as second—class citizens. in the covert footage, mr masot also describes sir alan's boss, borisjohnson,
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in less than flattering terms. sir crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee, described mr masot‘s comments about sir alan as outrageous and deserving of investigation. the director of the conservative friends of israel said we utterly condemn any attempt to undermine sir alan duncan, or any minister or any member of parliament. in a statement, the foreign office said: while the british government is not taking any further action, the film raises uncomfortable questions about mr masot, and just how much influence he has been able to wield. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. nicola sturgeon has insisted she is not bluffing about the prospect of a second independence referendum. the first minister said that if the terms of the brexit deal were not right for scotland,
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she would be prepared to call for a second vote. they will be making a big mistake if they think i'm in any way bluffing. if it comes to the point, two years after scotland being told "don't leave the uk, lead the uk" here we are — we voted to stay in the eu and we were told voting no was the only way to stay, and now we face being taken out. that creates a much more fundamental question for scotland. if something is fundamentally as important as the membership of the european union and the single market is cast aside, her interest cast aside, that can happen with anything and we have to ask ourselves in scotla nd and we have to ask ourselves in scotland if we are happy to have the direction of a country, the kind of country want be, determined by a right—wing conservative government perhaps for the next 20 years arctic and trail of our own future? in
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those circumstances i think it would be right for scotland to have the right to decide. the first minister also said please don't disregard scotland. i don't feel i know any more about theresa may ‘s negotiating objectives today than i did six months ago and what is perhaps more worrying as i am not sure she knows more about her objectives than she knew then. nicola sturgeon said this was unacceptable. donald trump has said he is "very much" looking forward to meeting theresa may in the coming months and described britain as a "very special" ally. the president—elect — who is due to meet the prime minister in the spring — wrote on twitter — "i look very much forward to meeting prime minister theresa may in washington in the spring. britain, a long—time us ally, is very special!" new figures suggest the average household in the uk now has more unsecured debt than ever
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before — almost £13,000. that's before mortgages are taken into account. the tuc, which analysed official figures, says it shows families are struggling to get by on their pay alone, but officials at the bank of england maintain debt levels are falling. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. with christmas over, many of us will be poring over our bank statements to check our finances. but it appears that some of us are taking on increasing amounts of unsecured debt, including overd rafts, student loans, credit cards and personal loans. analysis of official data by the tuc shows the average amount of unsecured borrowing per household has doubled since 2000 to £12,899. furthermore, the proportion of unsecured debt in proportion to the personal income has dropped from 21% to almost 28%, leaving a record total of unsecured debt of £3119 billion in britain. we are worried about that because we are expecting to see a slowdown in wages and an increase in inflation next year, meaning households can find it much harder to service those debts and to pay off the debts they owe.
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but while unsecured debt is rising, secured borrowing, such as home loans, is becoming more affordable. the bank of england says mortgage arrears and defaults have been steadily declining since 2011. but policymakers are worried nonetheless that many of us are taking on too much debt, which may become an issue if the economy weakens in 2017. joe lynam, bbc news. earlier i spoke to siarkiewicz — who is head of debt advice for the money advice service — about the high levels of debt. these figures are concerning and a great part of the picture because one of the things we know now is people are falling behind with a number of different debts. people are struggling with their rent and housing costs as well as their utility bills. the picture of debt is quite a complex one made up of secured, unsecured and other debts. could a large proportion of this increase be due to the fact
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that those of us who know students know that students are taking on more debt because it is much more expensive to go to university because tuition fees have gone up? that is very much part of the picture. what we know about over indebtedness across the uk is that there are nearly 8 million people struggling with debts — a huge number of people. that looks different in different parts of the of the population in those areas are struggling with debts so it is a picture across the whole uk which is made up a number of different debts making up a picture of over indebtedness. we have seen quite a lot of economic commentary about post brexit britain saying that consumer spending stayed up. is that because people are taking on more debt to buy stuff
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because they think that in 2017 whatever they were going to buy is going to be more expensive? i think the most important thing we should think about when we're thinking about people struggling with debts is that people need sustainable income levels so people will spend according to the levels of income. the biggest issue people struggle with this when there's an income shock. people have unsecu re employment what they are set out in terms of the budget for spending, there is under stress and that causes over indebtedness. if interest rates increase hat increases the number
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of people go forward for debt advice. an american war veteran has been charged over the shooting at fort lauderdale airport in florida, in which five people died. esteban santiago, who's 26, could face the death penalty if found guilty. prosecutors say they still don't know why he chose fort lauderdale. it's emerged that one of the victims, a woman in her 80s, was born in britain. 0ur correspondent, gary 0'donoghue has more from fort lauderdale. she was a mother, a grandmother, a great—grandmother and a wife. 0lga woltering was born in britain, but had lived in the united states for decades. she was on her way to join a cruise ship to celebrate her husband's 90th birthday. also among the dead was 57—year—old michael 0ehme, also heading for a cruise ship with his wife. she was shot, but survived. three others died in friday's carnage as the gunman used a semiautomatic weapon in the baggage hall, scattering terrified passengers. this is the man police have charged with causing death and serious injury, esteban santiago, a 26—year—old former member of the military with mental health problems.
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his aunt says he was never the same after returning from a tour of duty in iraq. as things started to return to normal at the airport, it has emerged that santiago had told fbi agents that the government and the cia were forcing him to watch videos from the islamic state group. that prompted a mental health assessment, during which a gun was confiscated, but later returned. the fbi says mr santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. was confiscated, but later returned. the fbi says mr santiago has been questioned at length. esteban santiago will appear in court tomorrow. the fbi says he is cooperating with investigators, and agents have spoken to other members of his family. at this stage, they don't believe he was operating with any other individuals. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, fort lauderdale, florida. it's unclear whether the queen will be able to attend a church service at sandringham this morning. she missed both the traditional christmas day service
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and the service last sunday. 0ur royal correspondent daniela relph is at sandringham. it is unclear whether the queen will attend the service at 11 o'clock at the sandringham estate. 0n the previous occasions that she is missed church on christmas day and new we have not had that information yet so we have not had that information yet so for members of the public arriving here they are feeling quite hopeful that because we have not had any news yet perhaps the queen will be here shortly. in terms of guidance from buckingham palace officials we have not had anything to say other way at the moment. 0ver the course of the past week the signs have been a bit more positive. last sunday when other members of the royal family princess anne were said to tell a member of the public that a mother was feeling better. we
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have a sense of business as usual from the royal household this week. the queen has sent a message of condolence to the president to the premise that of turkey. she is also sent a letter to a long standing member of staff from here. she is carried on with business of state in terms of government red boxes and the people watching is to. the signs are better but she has clearly been u nwell are better but she has clearly been unwell for the past three weeks of the lingering heavy cold but the weather is good at strydom today. it isa weather is good at strydom today. it is a bit chilly and a bit damp but not raining like it was last week. in terms of looking at how things are going we're hopeful she may attend the service later this morning. heavy snowfalls and sub—zero temperatures are continuing across europe — causing more than twenty deaths — and bringing transport chaos. airports and ports have been hit — and many roads are gridlocked. and in the eastern united states
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the snow and ice has caused several fatal crashes on the roads. 0ur correspondent leanne brown reports. bellsjingle temperatures in some parts of europe are now below those in the arctic. behind the beauty of this winter wonderland, a dark reality. at least ten people have died in poland, many of hypothermia. as temperatures plummet to —20 degrees, it's the vulnerable most at risk. police are checking abandoned buildings for those forced to sleep rough. in eastern romania, blizzards cut power to hundreds of thousands of homes, burying some in snow drifts higher than fences. one woman was forced to give birth in an emergency vehicle
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at the side of the road. winter storms claimed at least seven lives in the southern and central italy. towns hard hit by last year's earthquakes face a new threat. here it amatrice, firefighters struggle to shore up dozens of damaged buildings. in turkey, bitterly cold air and heavy snowfalls have brought parts of istanbul to a standstill. roads are blocked, hundreds of flights are cancelled and the bosphorus waterway closed to traffic. it has also hit greece, including thousands of refugees and migrants on the greek island of lesbos more used to warmer conditions. after ten years in greece, snow comes. all the people are very happy. even for those seeking the snow, it proved too much. some skiers in bosnia decided to head home. translation: we came here thinking maybe the ski track would be ready and that we could ski but it's just too cold. too cold especially on our hands. for thousands of people
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in the deep south of america the storm has brought eight inches of snow. tens of thousands of homes without power and four people at least thought to have died. in atlanta 4000 flights have been disrupted. residents are listening to advice which is to stay inside. we have got wood by the fireplace ready to go. roads have been turned to ice rinks as the storm moves to the north—east. it is causing traffic pile—ups. for both the united states and europe forecasters are warning icy conditions will remain for a few days at least. a political advisor at the israeli embassy has been secretly recorded saying he wants to "take down" the foreign office
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minister sir alan duncan — who's a strong critic ofjewish settlements. the israeli ambassador has apologised. theresa may is promising a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the "everyday injustices" experienced by working families. nicola sturgeon says she's not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. sport now and with a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's katherine downes. it's fa cup third round weekend and today's action beings injust over an hour — with cardiff taking on fulham. and we hope the all—championship tie will be more interesting than neil warnock would have us believe! you can say to the few who come is try to get up early and try to enjoy the game. there are no points at sta ke the game. there are no points at stake and it is a great cup but it
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is not one of the ties that grab the headlines, is it? farfrom it and i think fulham fans will be treating it exactly the same as the majority of ourfans. it exactly the same as the majority of our fans. it it exactly the same as the majority of ourfans. it is disappointing, really, to be drawn in the same league as you. i was like an underdog or the premier league, something different to whet the appetite of the fa cup and this does not take any of the boxes, i'm afraid. it is on bbc wales if you wa nt to afraid. it is on bbc wales if you want to watch it. maybe not. there are four other matches too, and a couple of opportunities for upsets. chelsea take on peterborough this afternoon, while at lunchtime liverpool play league two plymouth argyle. league one millwall produced the biggest upset of the third round of the fa cup. and it was done at a canter. they beat premier league side bournemouth 3—0. eddie howe selected a completely different starting 11
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to their last game, but millwall won easily. and their manager neil harris says he's proud of such a dominant display by his side. defeat too for west brom, and stoke. matt doherty‘s strike giving championship side wolves with a 2—0 win — and defeated manager mark hughes says his stoke side let themselves down. we didn't start on the right manner and it is only when we went behind at the gut reaction. you need to be ready to go right from the off so it isa ready to go right from the off so it is a disappointment the cut it was a —— because it was a competition of the targeted and made a good starting 11. two non—league teams will be in the fourth round draw after securing impressive draws. national league side sutton united drew nil—nil with afc wimbledon, and lincoln city had been leading ipswich 2—1 thanks to two strikes by theo robinson, before the championship side equalised to send the tie to a replay. and wayne rooney's record was the headline of manchester united's 4—0 win over reading.
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this was his 249th for the club, and it means he's equal with sir bobby charlton as united's all—time top goalscorer. it's such a proud moment to do so at such a massive club, like manchester united, you know. i'm hugely honoured to be able to play for this football club. to be up there in terms of goals with sir bobby, it is a really proud moment for me, and hopefully i will be up there on my own soon. but i will enjoy today, because it is a real honour. some selected results for you from yesterday. of the other non—league sides in action, defeats for barrow and eastleigh. and stourbridge — from the seventh tier of english football — lost 2—1 at wycombe. go to the bbc sport website for all the goal from every game in the third round. sir andy murray's winning streak of 28 atp tour matches is over, after he lost the qatar 0pen final to old rival novak djokovic. the world number two was serving for the match in the second set
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but murray saved three match points to force the final into a decider. the match last nearly three hours and in the end it was djokovic who edged it. despite that defeat, murray retains his number one ranking. you couldn't ask for a better start for the year, playing finals against andy who is number one in the world and has been a tremendous farm from almost 30 matches on a roll. it is an unbelievable performance. let's hope for some big battles between those two this year. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. i will be back with more for you in the next hour, gavin. the number of ambulances called to english prisons has risen by almost 40% in the last three years, according to figures seen by the bbc.
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there were almost 10,000 call—outs to england's 117 jails and young offenders' institutions in the ten months to october, averaging one every 45 minutes. emma forde reports. 2016 saw the worst disorder in british prisons for two decades, with critics of the ministry ofjustice blaming overcrowding and staff cuts for increases in violence, drug overdoses and suicide attempts. while ambulances are sometimes called when an inmate is sick, they are also needed to respond to these incidents. the bbc asked every ambulance trust in england to find out how often they have been called to one of the 117 jails in england between january and october last year. the figures show during that time, 10,000 ambulances were needed. that is one on average every 45 minutes, twice the number it was five years ago. paramedics have told the bbc that this is putting an increased
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strain on services. the justice secretary, liz truss, has promised to spend £1.11 billion on new prisons and says she will provide an extra 2000 prison officers. emma forde, bbc news. a 24—hour strike by london underground workers — affecting up to four million commuters — is due to start this evening. unions are angry aboutjob losses and the closure of ticket offices. transport for london says it's put a new deal on the table, but that's been rejected by the biggest rail union the rmt. let's give you a few more details of what could be a chaotic week for rail commuters in the south east of england. the 24—hour london underground strike begins at 6pm tonight. widespread disruption is expected. the majority of central london tube stations will be closed. there will also be a limited services on other tube lines in outer london. and it could be the first in a series of rail strikes this week. drivers on southern rail are due to walk out on tuesday, wednesday and friday.
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and there are a further three strikes planned for the 24th, 25th and 27th, which could mean yet more disruption for passengers. hollywood is gearing up for this year's golden globes — one of the biggest nights in the entertainment calendar. the ceremony is traditionally seen as an indicator of which films will do well at the oscars and there are plenty of british contenders. this report by our los angeles correspondent james cook contains some flash photography. heavy snowfalls and sub—zero temperatures are continuing across europe — causing more than twenty deaths — hollywood likes nothing better than talking about itself.
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this year it has gone a step further, singing and dancing. la la land's love interests are played by ryan gosling and emma stone, and the city of stars itself. you've never seen it? i've never seen it. oh, my. you know it is playing at the rialto? really? yes. the next contender for golden globes glory could hardly be more different. usually can take care of hisself. he good that way. moonlight, with six nominations, is a coming—of—age story. naomie harris plays a drug—addicted mother, and she thinks the industry is getting better at telling stories about people with colour. i think there is a fantastic level of diversity this year, and i think it is something that is so to be celebrated. and it is a shame that we have to... it almost seems so regressive to have these conversations about race, in 2017 now, that we are still fixated about that. we just want great movies, really. do you think there is a change this year? where do you think we stand? i think there is a change happening all the time. when i think about my career 25 years ago, and starting out, and how few actors there were to fill the very few roles for people of colour, the stories were just not the stories that people — didn't realise they were stories that people wanted to see.
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another story that continues to fascinate is that of the british royalfamily. claire foy has been showered with praise for her portrayal of the young elizabeth. what a role to take on. i know, what an idiot! do you know what the royals think of it? no, i wish i did. i was wondering if i might take danny into town? for what? a change. in tv, the bbc coproduction the night manager has four nominations. the adaptation of thejohn le carre novel has won praise from critics and audiences, to the delight of its star, tom hiddleston. when you make something, you never know when it's going to catch fire or ignite people's interests, but it seemed to. and that is testament to the writing ofjohn le carre. i think spy thrillers will be enduringly popular, and he is the master. riz ahmed is also up for his role in the hbo crime drama the night of. i think the reality of being caught up in a murder case,
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facing the slow wheels ofjustice, it is not a walk in the park. so far, there is no clear favourite to sweep the board this awards season, which just makes the golden globes, always keenly followed for clues as to 0scars success, all the more intriguing. it has been another grey and missed the start and we have had freezing fog and the vale of york. the best of the weather will be east of the grampians and east of the penny ins. —— pennines. we will see more consistent when arriving in north—west and strengthening winds with that. drizzle and the north—west will tend to ease away.
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another murky night but wet and windy it will turn across scotland and northern ireland are so quite a change come tomorrow morning ‘s rush. at least it should stay mild across the country. that way more then sleet is way gradually southwards and eastward during the day on monday and it will clear quite quickly after the rush hour for scotland and northern ireland. much brighter but it will feel colder. we will have sunshine and blustery winds over the hills. still mild but increasingly wet and breezy further south. much colder for all of us from midweek on. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the israeli ambassador in london has apologised
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after an embassy official was secretly filmed saying he wanted to ""take down" the foreign office minister sir alan duncan — who's a strong critic ofjewish settlements. theresa may is promising a far—reaching programme of social reform to tackle what she calls the "everyday injustices" experienced by working families. nicola sturgeon says she's not bluffing about the prospect of a second scottish independence referendum if the terms of brexit are not right. the average amount of unsecured debt has reached a record—high of almost £13,000 per uk household. heavy snowfalls and sub—zero temperatures are continuing across europe and the eastern united states — causing more than twenty deaths — and bringing transport chaos. i'm derek brockway.
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if you've seen me on the tv before it's probably because i've told you about the weather or the best walks in wales. but tonight i'm going on a very different kind ofjourney, a personal one, to find out about a condition which killed my dad. well, to see him suffering like that, it was dreadful. i still miss him now. it's not the same, is it? no. sepsis is taking and changing thousands of lives. people of all ages, across wales. i meet some remarkable people, a mother who lost her teenage daughter. anyone is at risk of sepsis. anybody could fall to this silent killer. doctors on the wards who tell me how we could save more lives. if i was brought in with sepsis, what treatment would i get? a survivor determined not to let sepsis win.

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