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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 9, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an overhaul of mental healthca re in england. the prime minister offers extra support to schools and companies saying she'll transform the way people with mental illness are treated. opponents say more funds are still needed. good morning. it's monday, the ninth of january. also this morning: a strike by tube staff closes much of the london underground for rush hour commuters. it could cost the uk economy £50 million in lost trade and staff who can't get to work. unions say the walk out is vital to protectjobs. i will have the details live from london. a fantastic night for the brits at the golden globes. tom hiddleston, hugh laurie
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and olivia coleman pick up awards for their roles in the bbc‘s night manager. the film la la land breaks records by winning seven. good morning. in sport, an excellent result for plymouth argyle, from the fourth tier of english football, earn an fa cup replay after drawing with liverpool at anfield. an icy blast hits large parts of eastern europe. these are the conditions on the beaches of greece. carol has the details of what it will be like here. good morning. by by the end of the week some of us could well see some snow. not all of us, though. today we have a grey and sta m ps start us, though. today we have a grey and stamps start with rain moving south eastwards. behind it we return to some sunshine and blustery showers. and very windy in the more west. i'll have more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will outline plans which she says will transform mental health services in england. in herfirst major speech on health since becoming prime minister, mrs may will announce a review of services for children
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and teenagers as well as extra support for schools and businesses. labour says people are being let down by a lack of funding. 0ur correspondent elaine dunkley reports. there are no words for what it does toa there are no words for what it does to a family. shock is not the word. it is just your whole reality is blown to pieces. in 2014 this woman's son took his own life. he was just 20 years old. he had woman's son took his own life. he wasjust 20 years old. he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. 10 weeks later he was dead. don't discharge patients with inadequate information. the doors were closed for us. we were told to either go to a&e amat or the gp and that is the only way to come back. we had no direct access back to the special services. that is wrong. today the prime minister theresa may is expected to announce plans to reduce
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the waiting times for patients needing mental health services. the details also include more help from employers when staff need time off work and schools will also be expected to play a bigger role in identifying mentally vulnerable pupils. 0ne identifying mentally vulnerable pupils. one of the key concerns is funding. mental health is still very underfunded compared to other areas of medicine. it generates up to 25% of medicine. it generates up to 25% of the total disease burden and yet the funding is 10% — 4%. of the total disease burden and yet the funding is 10% - 4%. he wasjust always making faces. she says talking about her son's life is so important but today she wants the government to take action that will lead to change in mental health services. 0ur political correspondent chris mason is in westminsterfor us. there has been a lot of criticism making headlines of the nhs over the
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weekend. will it make a difference? yes, good morning. ithink the weekend. will it make a difference? yes, good morning. i think the prime minister and downing street are aware of the headlines at the moment about the health service. we saw the remarks in the —— from the red cross talking about a humanitarian crisis in the health service in england. this speech has been in the diary for the prime minister. time. part of the bigger picture of what she will talk about will be to create a shared society —— for the prime minister for sometime. shared society —— for the prime ministerforsometime. be shared society —— for the prime ministerfor sometime. be specific mental health, it has been a cinderella service in the nhs for too long, and it has been associated with too many stigmas and the unwillingness to talk frankly about it. at the same time she will know that in giving this speech she will face lots of questions about the broader health service and questions too about whether funding that is pa rcelled too about whether funding that is parcelled up for use within mental health services could be spent elsewhere because of pressures on
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the services elsewhere. what we are also seeing today from the government, notjust from also seeing today from the government, not just from the also seeing today from the government, notjust from the prime minister but also from the foreign secretary is about a desire to talk about stuff other than brexit, which will dominate the working life of this government, but the prime minister is keen to talk about the health service and the foreign secretary is in washington meeting seniorfigures of what secretary is in washington meeting senior figures of what will soon be the trump administration. yes, brexit is beat but the business of government rolls on. ok, chris, thank you very much. we will speak to you later. we'll be speaking to the health secretaryjeremy hunt at around 7:50am this morning. plenty on that through this morning. severe delays are expected in london during this morning's rush hour because of a strike across the entire tube network. workers from the rmt and the transport salaried staffs' association are walking out for 24 hours in a dispute overjob losses and ticket office closures. ben is at piccadilly tube station for us this morning. good morning. a damp and miserable
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start for many trying to make their way into central london. we are here at piccadilly circus. you can see the station is deserted at this point. normally a thriving heart of london's west end. and as you said, the walkout began last night. let me run you through the details that we know so far. about 4000 ticket office staff went on strike last night, that began at 6pm, they walking out, objecting to closures of ticket offices and the removal of front—line staff on the tube network, and that means in central london most of the stations are closed, including vital transport hubs, like euston, victoria, kings cross, the train stations you might pass through if coming into london from elsewhere in the country. this is not a storyjust from elsewhere in the country. this is not a story just about from elsewhere in the country. this is not a storyjust about london and certainly not central london, it is about the uk economy too, with
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estimates suggesting this could cost tens of millions of pounds. 0ne estimates suggest £50 million impacting the ua —— uk economy and people not getting to work. and of course the reputational damage too. thousands of tourists pass through stations like this everyday. they are not able to so because of the strike. there is concern about what it could mean for london on the international stage. all morning we will hear from both sides of the debate and find out exactly what has caused it and whether there is hope ofa caused it and whether there is hope of a resolution. the london underground network hope they will try to get a normal service up and running tomorrow morning but of course as always with transport strikes would you often find is that trains are in the wrong place at the wrong time and it might take some time before the full service is up and running. more from me a little later. and we will cover that through the morning as well. and in one hour we will speak to the president of the rmt union, that is
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around 7:10am. thousands of british drivers hit by the volkswagen diesel emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker. vw admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests, leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide. a compensation scheme was approved in the united states last year, and lawyers want british customers to be offered a similar settlement. thousands of police officers in london are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed with a gun or taser. a survey by the metropolitan police federation will consult its members on the issue. a spokesman for the force said the number of officers carrying tasers has increased twice in recent years and that its weapons policy is regularly reviewed. more than a quarter of young people don't feel in control of their lives according to a survey by the prince's trust. worries about money and recent political events are some of the issues making them feel anxious about their future and it found well—being at its lowest in eight years.
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anisa kadri reports. for 19—year—old merely worldly getting help was crucial to getting her life back on track after her mum died —— millie rawley. her life back on track after her mum died —— millie rawleylj her life back on track after her mum died -- millie rawley. i faced a series of relationship breakdowns and different forms of abuse until eventually when i was 16 i became homeless for three months and this was when mental health really declined. after receiving treatment in hospital, milly is living at the ymca while doing her a—levels and she is now feeling much happier. compared to years ago i know that where i want to go, what i want to do andi where i want to go, what i want to do and i know how to get there. according to the prince's trust, which has supported milly, more than a quarter of young people don't feel in control of their lives. the charity says well—being for 16 to 25 —year—olds is at its lowest level in eight years of research. we need to invest in things like programs in schools that are character building
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and encourage teamwork. i think we need to invest much more heavily in vocational training and further education sector. concerns over body image, recent political events including the brexit vote and the serious situation, as well as money worries, were all raised by the survey, issues these young people say are a concern. of recent political events and the economic outlook, there is just political events and the economic outlook, there isjust a really high level of uncertainty. you have to have a certain income... a lot of employers expect you to have lots of experience just even to find an entry leveljob. while life can be difficult for all young people, milly says it is important to reach out when you know things are really spiralling out of control. more than 20 people have died as a result of freezing temperatures across much of central and eastern europe. the cold weather has caused major disruption to utility and transport networks while snow has been recorded as far south as the greek islands. 0ur central europe correspondent nick thorpe joins us from the banks
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of the river danube in budapest. it looks seriously cold, what is going on? yes, good morning. it is a very cold morning indeed. not as cold as yesterday. as you can see behind me, the danube isn't frozen but huge ice flows floating down. they appiah couple of days ago. temperatures in hungary reaching —28 on the northern border with slovakia, so very cold in hungary, with huge disruptions, less so in hungary, down through the balkans, romania, bulgaria, central europe, germany and austria as well. quite extraordinary pictures. thank you very much indeed. we will have more on that. the cold weather will be here by the end of the week. not
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quite —28, fear not. now, i love this program. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night manager, which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards. iam not i am not really allowed to say that on the bbc. i think you would have given it all of the awards. on the bbc. i think you would have given it all of the awardslj on the bbc. i think you would have given it all of the awards. i would! tom hiddleston, 0livia colman and hugh laurie all collected prizes for the bbc series. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama as the queen in the crown. the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land, which took home a record seven awards. 0ur los angeles correspondent james cook reports. los angeles, california, where stories are spun and stars are born, a place of glitz and glamour, of cou nts a place of glitz and glamour, of counts and gossip, the place they called... la la land. la la land. this is a film for dreamers and i think that hope and creativity are
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two of the most important things in the world and that is what this movie is about. in the television categories it was a british invasion. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama for playing the queen in the crown, and three awards in the bbc production the night manager allowing hugh laurie to have a go at donald trump. more amazing to say i want is that the last ever golden globes. i don't mean to be gloomy, it is just that it has the word hollywood, foreign and press in the title. receiving a lifetime achievement award, meryl streep also lambasted the president elect and his plan to deport millions of immigrants. so, hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners, and if we keep them all out you will have nothing to watch button football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. well, hollywood can be fun and frivolous but it also prides itself on tackling serious subjects. and
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many stars here on the red carpet are predicting a surge in political films this year following the most divisive of elections. well, we'd love to speak to anyone from the night manager who would like to call us this morning although i suspect they would be busy. tom hiddleston, especially. for editorial reasons, of course. yes. and it was a big fa cup weekend. no awards for liverpool yesterday. i am going to shoehorn from the golden globes to the fa cup. jurgen klopp fielded liverpool's youngest ever starting 11 and today he has to defend that choice after failing to beat plymouth argyle in the fourth tier of english football, so, leagues below them, and they couldn't beat them at anfield, soap or old jurgen klopp is coming in for some stick. —— so, poor old jurgen klopp.
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plymouth argyle caused a shock in the third round of the fa cup. the league two side held liverpool — the team second in the premier league — to a goalless draw at anfield, forcing a replay on the south coast. premier league leaders chelsea swept past league one peterborough 4—1. despite nine changes to their team, two goals from pedro helped chelsea into round four. there were also wins for tottenham, middlesbrough and fulham. wasps returned to the top of rugby union's premiership with a hard—fought victory over leicester tigers. it was their 19th straight home win but james haskell left the field less than a minute into his comeback game, because of a head injury. johanna konta ease into the second round of the sydney international after winning in straight sets. so, yeah, johanna konta enjoying the sunshine in australia, she reached the semifinals last year, so fingers crossed she can do this will this time. some of the front pages. on the
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times this morning is ourfront some of the front pages. on the times this morning is our front to make main story as well. a revolution in child mental healthcare. we will be discussing that later on with the health secretary. and the main photo is of the queen who has had a heavy cold for a few weeks. she went to church yesterday in sandringham, her first public appearance in a month. she has not been well. i think many people have suffered a horrible cold. the financial times are talking about the blizzards in europe and about the north sea oil platform saying that uk taxpayers are facing a huge bill for the decommissioning of those oil drills. 0n the daily telegraph, many people on the red carpet at the golden globes. this is meryl streep who was awarded a lifetime achievement at the golden globes and the main story is about waris —— borisjohnson
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meeting a member of donald trump's team. class-action on volts wagon. that could cost fozzard and billions of pounds. —— could cost vw billions of pounds. —— could cost vw billions of pounds. —— could cost vw billions of pounds. i noticed on twitter over the weekend you were getting quite a lot of stick from various football fans about why the bbc had chosen to show only premier league ties. my life is not dictated by this. it does happen a lot. a lot of people getting in touch saying that it is just the premier league ties? if none of the managers from low league teams say, they ended up with a goalless draw and they will have a replay and they say, look, why was
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out replay and they say, look, why was our match not televise? that is what the fa cup is about. lower league teams getting a chance to be on television. in another manager has come out and said that tv money could build new changing room at the clubs. it would be worth about £75,000 of which is about 25% of its budget for a year. so a really big payday for the lower league clubs but, instead, it was, you know, west ham and manchester city on friday night. save they say that it's a myth for the low clubs and they hope that when they have their replay it will be the lower league clubs to get their moment in the spotlight because, after all, they say that is what the fa cup is all about. because, after all, they say that is what the fa cup is all aboutm because, after all, they say that is what the fa cup is all about. it was a proper nonleague club and it was lovely. that is what the club is about isn't it? i love this story. pa rt about isn't it? i love this story. part of being in the office is buying tea and taking part in secret santa... anyway, they have done a
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little thing in the telegraph, eight working out of how much it costs you for those added extras. they say that it costs £40,000 over a typical lifetime of being at work to stay in people's good books. it goes towards cups of tea is, secret santa is, people leaving... that sort of thing. collections for new babies. the list is fantastic, obviously. secret santa, apparently, the average secret santa gift is £42. ?! white! 0unces between five and £10. christmas parties and dinners cost the average employee lee £96. -- the
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average employee £96. if you spend that sort of money on secret santa, let us know. you need to budget better. 40 grand! incredible. over your working lifetime. what did you get for your secret santa, carol? i think i got a catfish for my cat and many think i got a catfish for my cat and ma ny lovely think i got a catfish for my cat and many lovely things to wear outdoors on cold broadcasts. look at this picture this morning in wales. this isa picture this morning in wales. this is a weather watcher picture from yesterday. it is quite murky and thatis yesterday. it is quite murky and that is what is like across many areas at a harbour has also been reined reding south—east was as we go through the course of the day. courtesy of this weather front. some rain is heavy and it will eventually reach the south—east. if you look at the squeeze on the ice above that will tell you that it will be very windy in the north—west, particularly labour. of this rain has been heavy this morning. if you
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are travelling watch out for xs service water and spray on the road and if go through the course of this morning, there will be some blustery showers behind it. it will be wintry above above 500 metres. the rabbi at above above 500 metres. the rabbi at a cloud getting into southern scotla nd a cloud getting into southern scotland and northern england, stretching across wales and entered down into south—west england. ahead of it, vista will be a lot of cloud and dampness in the air but as this rain comes it will lift the cloud and the rain will arrive in the south—east through the afternoon. there it goes. blustery around this band of rain. and behind it, bright skies and sunshine. a lot of showers, wintry on the hill but with exposure on the north and west we are looking at gales sewed gusts at 60, 65 are looking at gales sewed gusts at 60,65 mph. we are are looking at gales sewed gusts at 60, 65 mph. we are still are looking at gales sewed gusts at 60,65 mph. we are still in mild conditions especially as we pushed down towards the south and the south—east. as we had an through the evening and overnight we need you lose that band of rain. there will also be a touch of frost in some
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central and eastern areas but already we will have a plethora of showers, some emerging across the north—west. it will still be windy for a time but the wind will either touch in the west as we go through the course of the night. tomorrow morning we start with the combination. again, a breezy day, a blustery day, we lose the rain from the south—east and then brighter skies coming across central and eastern areas with sunshine but he comes in next weather front, introducing some more rain and moving from the west towards the east with cloud ahead of it and brighter skies behind. again, hanging onto this mild air by the skin of our teeth in the south. and then as we move into wednesday, we continue with the blustery theme. there will be a dry weather around the you may even see the sun. you can see a couple of showers dotted around and some of those could be wintry across the far north of scotland. the average why is that we
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are into the cooler air, depending on which end of the country you are in. as we head into the latter part of the week the wind evens out and it will have across the whole of the uk. by the end of the week, there will be a novel north—westerly wind that we look at that is going to turn much colder. not as cold as it is this morning. look at southern europe. miners 30 in moscow, —12 in belgrade, minus three in athens. these are a good ten to 15 degrees lower than they should be at this stage of the year. the reason for this is because normally we have a siberian high which is anchored across russia. how hard you can see it as more of a sausage shape at the moment and what happens with high—pressure is that the echoes around it in a clockwise direction so around it in a clockwise direction so it is moving up towards the arctic and pulling this cold air down. exacerbated by the fact that we also have low pressure off the screen here. that puts it in an
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anticlockwise direction so it is doing the same thing, pulling the airdown doing the same thing, pulling the air down towards the mediterranean. i must say, i am glad i air down towards the mediterranean. i must say, iam glad i am air down towards the mediterranean. i must say, i am glad i am not there today. so am i. it sounds like we may get a little taste of by the end of this week. we will but it is not connected to what is happening here. we will have a blast of north north—westerly wind.|j we will have a blast of north north-westerly wind. i was watching carefully. see you later. pets can offer companionship particularly for older people who feel isolated. but for elderly animal owners, a change in circumstances can pose difficult questions. a leading pet charity has told us they're helping more and more people decide what to do if they can't take their pet into a care home or sheltered accommodation. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. two years ago, this man's wife died. while grieving, in the bond has deepened. he has been everything to
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me, that dog. everything. here's my life, you know. home for bob, margaret and their pet schnauzer was this of time and village near lockerbie where he still lives. but the owners have told him that his dog can no longer stay. we met at a nearby hotel. they don't like the dog. iwant nearby hotel. they don't like the dog. i want to kick the dog out and i will have to shift. i will have to be on my way. he is my life. here's my comfort. my chief companion that's what that little dog means to me. ijust that's what that little dog means to me. i just love that's what that little dog means to me. ijust love that little dog. the owners of the retirement village did not wish to be interviewed but they said they made a difficult decision because the dog had barked and run and visitors, had fouled in all ways and visitors, had fouled in all ways and was sometimes left unsupervised. they said they bought in a social
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worker to set for bob and others had offered to look after his beloved pet so bob could still see him. ultimately they had to take the views of staff and other residents into account. he does bark but it $0011 into account. he does bark but it soon dies off. i admit that he has made a mess because i have cleaned it up. but i don't think he has ever annoyed visitors to any great extent. he loves company. when elderly people going to care the prospect of saying goodbye to a much loved pet can be devastating. according to one piece of research, 40% of uk care homes describe themselves as pet friendly. but that expression is open to interpretation and there are calls for greater clarity and consistency. an online petition backing bob now has around 80,000 signatures. the owners of his retirement village say they've received threatening e—mail ‘s. a
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sign of how difficult and emotive situations like bobs can be. he's not leaving me. he very loyal to me. i would like to pay him back. are you already sending your comments about that? it is hard to watch. msn —— and that says that she believes the dogs can be helpful but about staff with allergies? another person suggests that it should be looked at on a case—by—case basis. we will be talking about some of thoseissues we will be talking about some of those issues later in the programme. still to come this morning, how clean is your hotel room? from dirty door handles to bacteria on the bedspread. find out why star ratings and standards in cleanliness don't always go hand in hand.
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i have read some of that report and, honestly, it really makes me think about going to hotel rooms at all, really. they are not all bad. just to reiterate. though not change the channel. time now to get the news, travel and weather from where you are. we will be here at 630. stay with us. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. as we've been hearing, a 24—hour strike by some london underground workers is set to cripple transport in the capital today. all zone one tube stations are shut. the victoria and waterloo and city line aren't running at all, and there'll be a severely reduced service on all other lines, especially in outer london. so let's see how things are looking at the moment.
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as you can see — a rather odd looking tube board. huge problems on nearly all lines because of the strike. as i said before no service at all on the victoria and waterloo and city lines. it's probably easier if i tell you what is running this morning. it's not clear from the board but the london 0verground, tfl rail and trams all have a good service at the moment. if you are trying to travel on the tube today the best advice is to check transport for london's website for details of your route. tickets are being accepted on buses and national rail services but they are expected to be far busier than usual. and if you're trying to use the trains instead today — great northern has no trains on the moorgate line. they're diverting to king's cross. and c2c services are not stopping at west ham. of course the tube strike will mean lots of extra traffic on the roads as you can see here it's already looking very busy on the approach to the blackwall tunnel. and we will be keeping you up to date with the travel situation throughout the morning. bosses of southern rail and the rmt
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union have agreed they need to get round the table for talks following a heated tv debate on the crisis—hit network, bbc london understands. regular southern commuters in our audience spoke emotionally about the poor service. three days of action on southern trains are planned from tomorrow in britain's worst rail strike in 20 years over the role of guards on trains. and you can see that debate, called southern rail crisis, tonight at 7.30pm on bbc one. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather grey and damp start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around and a little bit of drizzle here and there as well. but significant rain on its way a little later on. i think specially cold this morning, still reasonably mild as this cold front, however, pushes through the rain becomes heavier and more persistent. 0'bree. to strengthen as well, starting from a south—westerly note that then gradually switching to a
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north—westerly overnight as the fresher reptiles in. maximum to add to the debate —— temperature today nine degrees. we are hanging onto a brief look so we shouldn't not see too much in the way of frost. minimum temperature is down in singleseat is. for tomorrow morning it isa singleseat is. for tomorrow morning it is a bright and fresh start. we may get a little sunshine but gradually through tomorrow to grab —— cloud will fit in and we will see outbreaks of rain. the colder air heads our way on wednesday and wind sta rts heads our way on wednesday and wind starts to strengthen. a strong north—westerly wind could see a couple of showers which potentially could turn little wintry as we had three thursday, friday and through saturday. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30am, on monday, the ninth of january. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the nhs has been hitting the headlines with claims it faces
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a humanitarian crisis. we'll askjeremy hunt about the state of the health service and the government's plans to tackle mental illness. a study of young people reveals they don't feel in control of their lives. we'll ask what can be done to raise their self esteem. singing renee fleming has performed for president 0bama and sang from the balcony of buckingham palace. america's best loved soprano joins us after 9am. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will outline plans that she says will transform mental health services in england. in herfirst major speech on health since becoming prime minister, mrs may will announce a review of services for children and teenagers as well as extra support for schools and businesses. labour says people are being let down by a lack of funding. 0ur correspondent elaine dunkley reports.
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there are no words for what it does to a family. shock is not the word. it's just your whole reality is blown to pieces. in 2014, dr sanghita mahajan's son took his own life. he was just 20 years old. he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. 10 weeks later he was dead. don't discharge patients with adequate information. the doors were closed for us. we were told to either go to a&e or the gp and that is the only way to come back. we had no direct access back to the special services. that is wrong. today, the prime minister, theresa may, is expected to announce plans to reduce the waiting times for patients needing mental health services. the details also include more help from employers when staff need time off work, and schools will also be
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expected to play a bigger role in identifying mentally vulnerable pupils. one of the key concerns is funding. mental health is still very underfunded compared to where other areas of medicine. it generates probably 20%—25% of the total disease burden and yet the funding is 10%—12% in this country. he was just always making faces. sangeeta says talking about her son's life is so important but today she wants the government to take action that will lead to change in mental health services. we'll be speaking to the health secretaryjeremy hunt at 7:50am this morning here on breakfast. about that and other matters as well. borisjohnson has held talks with some of donald trump's key advisers during a visit to new york. the foreign secretary has become the first british minister to hold face—to—face meetings
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with members of the president—elect‘s incoming administration. the exchanges were described by officials as positive but frank. severe delays are expected in london during this morning's rush hour because of a strike across the entire tube network. workers from the rmt and the transport salaried staffs' assocition are walking out for 24 hours in a dispute overjob losses and ticket office closures. andy moore reports. the first tube stations began closing soon after the strike began last night. many more are expected to follow today, including most in central london. there will be no underground services from any of the big london rail stations, such as king's cross, waterloo and paddington. the dispute is overjob losses and ticket office closures. at last—ditch talks yesterday, transport for london said it had offered to employ new staff, but the tssa union said that was too little, too late. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, said the strike would cause misery for millions of londoners.
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he said there was a good deal sitting on the table that would ensure station safety. the last time there was a major tube strike was in the summer of 2015. as on that occasion, there will be extra bus services laid on, but it's expected they will struggle to cope with the demand. if tube stations open at all, it will probably be later than normal, and many will close at 7:00pm in the evening, even though the strike will have finished by then. transport for london says it expects the tube service to be severely restricted. thousands of british drivers affected by the volkswagen diesel emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker. vw admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests, leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide. a compensation scheme was approved in the united states last year, and lawyers want british customers to be offered a similar settlement. police in tyne and wear have arrested a man suspected of taking hostages at a bookmakers in an armed seige.
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northumbria police were called to a branch of coral bookmakers injarrow on sunday evening following a report of a man with a loaded firearm. four people were thought to have been held in the incident, with three being released before police ended the standoff and a 39—year—old man was taken into custody. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night manager, which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land, which took home a record seven awards. claire foy, star of netflix's the crown, dedicated her win to the queen. i really, really, really wouldn't be here if it wasn't for some extraordinary women. i am going to
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thank them. one of them is queen elizabeth ii. she has been at the centre of the world for the past 63 yea rs centre of the world for the past 63 years and i think the world could do with a few more women at the centre of it, if you ask me. and we'll speak to the creative minds behind the success of ‘the night manager‘ after 8am. there has been some great drama going on. the fa cup third round, when the draw was made, there were complaints that they were not those beautiful ties, but they have kept us beautiful ties, but they have kept us entertained. did you hear in the award are talking about fulham versus cardiff, he was supposed to sell it to the game, and he said, well, it isn't going to grab the headlines, is it, and for those who
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turn up it won't be exciting. sell it! liverpool and plymouth argyle provided a shock. it is the kind of game we look out for. i think what i liked most about results like that is the confidence it gives smaller teams. so exciting. derek adams, the manager, said his team's performance was one of the best defensive displays that anfield has ever seen. you cannot knock confidence like that. he has thrown it out there! he has. league two plymouth argyle have earned a replay with liverpool in the third round of the fa cup after a goalless draw at anfield. it was the youngest starting line—up in liverpool history and managerjurgen klopp was forced to send for the likes of england striker daniel sturridge from the bench. even he couldn't find a way through the stubborn plymouth they will now welcome the premier league giants home. it causes us an extra headache, as
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it does for liverpool. it is great for the city. we are still in the next round of the fa cup as well. frustrated by the percentages. i knew before the game, actually, with the other line up it could have been exactly the same. we could have encountered the same problem. it is not really likely, but possible. that is a very important experience for the boys. i that is a very important experience forthe boys. lam happy that is a very important experience for the boys. lam happy for this. obviously they want another game, they deserved it. and now we will go there and try to do that. premier league leaders chelsea had no such problems against league one peterborough united. chelsea registered 35 shots on goal in their 4—1 victory at stamford bridge, spanish striker pedro scoring twice. tottenha m overca me a stubborn aston villa. after a dreadful first half, they ground out at 2—0 win. ben davies scoring his first goalfor spurs. wasps are confident that england flanker james haskell will make a quick recovery from the head injury he suffered during his comeback match last night. after a seven—month absence, haskell lasted just 35 seconds in their win over leicester,
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which took wasps back to the top of the premiership table. he appeared to be knocked out after a tackle but he was able to walk off the pitch. three british tennis players have been in action overnight, in the run—up to the australian open. dan evans won his match in sydney, but kyle edmund was knocked out. and johanna konta beat arina rodionova in straight sets. konta reached the semi—finals at the australian open last year and she's had a pretty good start to the season. in the bdo world darts championships, three—time champion martin "wolfie" adams came from behind to beat fellow englishman ryan joyce 3—2, and reach the second round. there was no dividing the pair so the fifth set went to sudden death and adams finished with a double nine to take the match. england's lisa ashton beat sharon prins of the netherlands to reach the second round in the women's draw.
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ashton has won this title twice, and she looked comfortable in a 2—0 victory. and you know when we were talking about secret sa ntas and you know when we were talking about secret santas and clubbing together? oh, yeah. there's often talk about football clubs giving back to supporters but here's an example of fans literally giving back to their club. morecambe managerjim bentley was recently fined £1,000 after being sent from the touchline against cheltenham. but with the league two side struggling financially, supporters have clubbed together and given bentley the cash to pay the fine. he was moved to tears by the gesture. he was really quite emotional, wasn't he? , there he is. oh, bless him. he is gonna go. you have a tear in youreye... him. he is gonna go. you have a tear in your eye... oh, bless him. he did the thing that blokes do, just shrugged his shoulders. i don't care! oh, that is lovely, that,
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isn't it? another nice lower league tea m isn't it? another nice lower league team story. i can't imagine manchester united players helping jose mourinho. well, they are fined about 100 grand, aren't they? it's the beginning of a difficult week for commuters with drivers on southern rail expected to walk out for three days from tomorrow, and last night station and ticket staff on the london underground began a 24 hour strike. several rounds of emergency talks had failed to break the deadlock between transport for london and the unions. ben is at piccadilly tube station for us this morning. normally it would be incredibly busy, but a no go today. yes, good morning to you, welcome to the start ofa morning to you, welcome to the start of a difficult week for commuters, especially in london, the gates at piccadilly circus firmly shut, normally of course at this time of day one of the busiest stations on the network right in the heart of
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london and if you don't know where i am, this would give you a clue, the centre of the west end in london, and it is coming to a halt. there is all sorts of entrances and exits for the tube station here but it is buses and cars and roads that will bear the brunt of this. and remember it is not just bear the brunt of this. and remember it is notjust about getting around in central london, it is coming into london, network stations like euston, paddington, victoria likely to face problems because those stations are shut. why is the walkout under way? here is an industrial relations adviser. good morning. why are we in this situation, why is the network not running? this strike is about closures to ticket offices, reductions in staff that have already happened, introduced by the previous mayor. (inaudible). owed, the blue screen. apologies for that. we will speak to the union
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later on and, of course, if you are affected by it, feel free to get in touch with us. lots of people i imagine we'll have to walk to work. yes, in and around london it will be busy on the roads, and nothing on the tubes. we will keep you right up to date. up up to upto4 up to 4 million commuters face significant disruption this morning because of the strike across the entire london underground network. it is aboutjobs and ticket office closures. we may not be able to speak to ben but we can talk to carol and there is plenty to talk about. it is murky, isn't it? perfect. murky is a good way and i'm
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glad you use it. take your umbrella out later on because it is murky and london. rain spreading south—east and it is what across ireland and scotla nd and it is what across ireland and scotland courtesy of this weather front which is continuing south eastwards through the day. right behind it, look at that squeeze. it will be windy in the north—west with gales. a lot of rain as we have gone through the night so there will be a lot of spray on the roads and surface water this morning. take care. by the time we reach eight o'clock the rain will be across southern scotland with showers coming behind and turning colder. a mild start to the day and the rain will come in across the north of england, wales and also south—west england. ahead of it there is a lot of low cloud. murky and damp. a few in the south may see a little bit of
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brightness but it will not last for long because as we go through the day the rain will continue to sink south. blustery wind around as a pushes to the south and behind that, right skies with sunshine. wintry in nature and then we are looking at gusts around 65 mph. as we had an through the evening and overnight period we lose that rain quickly from the south—east. there will be clea ra nce from the south—east. there will be clearance in the sky. some frost across parts of central and eastern areas and then a platter of showers coming in. some merging for longer spells of rain. it will still be windy in the north and that tra nsfers to windy in the north and that transfers to the north—east and the wind will start to drop a bit in the north—west. as we go into tomorrow's still a cloudy start where we have frost we have clear skies. it will not last because everything will move from the west towards the east
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so move from the west towards the east so the rain will eventually reach the east over the course of the day. blustery winds with it. if you step out, it is still mild in the south but colder in the north and you will start to feel let especially if you are exposed to the wind. on wednesday a lot of dry weather around. there will be sunshine and a lot of cloud at times. phil showers but as the cool air comes in from the north we will see some showers turning a bit more wintry in nature. the cold air seeps across as all as we had three thursday and into friday. the wind will come from the north and it will come down from the arctic so that means as we head towards the latter part of this week, especially on friday, we are looking at drifts off snow and that snow could be almost anywhere. but i know means will we all see it. i don't want to build up your expectations but someone will be
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seeing the all i heard was no almost anywhere. and i'm excited. i know causes big issues but it looks lovely. thank you, carol. we will try to reconnect the cup with a very long piece of string down to picadilly station. ben, are you there? iam. good morning. it is the dampeners that carol was talking about that is finally reached the camera. 24—hour strike that has crippled the tube network this morning. with me is anti—. we were speaking earlier about why we in this position. what has gone on and why is the tube not running this morning? it is about changes that have already happened, changes to ticket offices and changes to staff. under boris johnson those ticket offices and changes to staff. under borisjohnson those changes we re under borisjohnson those changes were made and the union is now putting pressure on the new mayor to
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get that changed. why are we striking about something that has already happened ? striking about something that has already happened? the union says we need this stuff on the frontline yet tfl say they can take the staff from the ticket office. many of the agreements were made 30,40, the ticket office. many of the agreements were made 30, 40, 50 yea rs agreements were made 30, 40, 50 years ago when they do not reflect the changes to technology and the way the passengers these days conduct theirjourneys. what way the passengers these days conduct their journeys. what we're seeing here is the employer, tfl, we are trying to make efficiencies and use of staff in a different way to reflect the way that technology has changed the way theirjourneys take place. the strike is due to end at six o'clock this evening. is there any hope of an agreement in this long—running dispute? any hope of an agreement in this long—running dispute ?|j any hope of an agreement in this long-running dispute? i hope so. i think it will be difficult to see because the unions are trying to projectjobs on the roald agreements. it is difficult to see how they will compromise was unless the employer agrees. good to talk to
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you. thank you for hanging with us while we thought about the technical problems. you heard it there. the strike is under way due went at six o'clock tonight but crucial if you are trying to get around london will be difficult and if you are coming into london, the network train stations will also be affected as far as the underground is concerned. paddington, victoria, they are expected to be busy. more from me a little later. thank you very much and we will speak to the unions at ten past seven. a few posh hotels around that part of london as well. staying in a 5—star hotel is supposed to be one of the indulgences of life. a rare treat in which the levels of comfort and service justifies the hefty bill that comes with it. but an investigation by the bbc‘s rip off britain: holidays programme found that a room in one luxury hotel was teeming with hidden bacteria while a two—star option
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was almost spotless. let's take a look. it was the last set of samples that we re it was the last set of samples that were received and they definitely stood out but not in a good way. the la st stood out but not in a good way. the last hotel, from all the hotels that we sampled is the dirtiest across—the—board. we sampled is the dirtiest across-the-board. almost all of the samples he had high or very high levels of bacteria. two of them in particular, with the first to spot no guest is likely to be able to avoid. the bathroom door handle, the levels were high and it stands out. door handles are important to clean. as you leave the toilet the handle is the area everybody has touched and not everybody has a robust handwashing technique and therefore the chances of contamination from the chances of contamination from the door handle are high. that has not fade as feel great this morning. —— not made us feel great this morning. liz smith—mills is from the british institute of cleaning. you would assume that a 5—star hotel
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would be as clean, at least, as any other hotel. the majority of hotels are other hotel. the majority of hotels a re spotlessly other hotel. the majority of hotels are spotlessly clean however there are spotlessly clean however there are differences in standards. sometimes you can get higher standards in lower star hotels. it is all down to the level of cleaning and the regimes that are put into place. as well is the training of the staff and how they put procedures in practice into place. it is not surprising that sometimes they are not always what you expect. it could have been one of us in that hotel but there are things to watch out for. those things are, like you showed, the remote—controls, often has the highest level of contamination, door handles, switches, anything that is a contact point that many people touch a lot of the time. and there are other things you would recommend that people would do. what do you recommend? this is the firing of the
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skull but you know people who take this with them into hotels. that is really the extreme where people are taking their own sanitiser with them because they are worried that they will pick up and affection. lots of people carry them these days because there is no water facility sometimes. i was in a hotel recently where the water was cut off because they had an issue. i was latter had hand sanitiser with me. again, these are extreme measures. i have actually come during the course of an inspection stayed in a hotel where the carpet has made vacuumed well. i have found old nail clippings. hence the carpet slippers. everybody, enjoy your cornflakes. again, you cannot tell about farming. you may assume, for example, that door handles may not be clean but one of the things that really made me not feel very good is about bed covers. yes. i must admit
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that the sheets and the pillowcases are changed daily but it is the throw when the cushion, sometimes they are thrown on the floor, sometimes the staff may inadvertently put them on the floor when they change the beds. so, yes... what can you do about that? we recommend that there is regular periodic cleaning of the duvet cover. that has all got to be plan. how long do stuff normally get to clean a room? the industry standard used to be 30 minutes, two rooms an hour. some companies have cut back and staff are under a lot of pressure and they do not have time to do things like high—level cleaning and attention to detail and thatis cleaning and attention to detail and that is how things get mist. these are things that you always do, ?|j
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like to keep my toothbrush covered because one never knows what is coming out of the toilet when you flush. also on the bathroom surfaces you never really know what has been put down on the bathroom surfaces. the go. it goes over the head. and you have a shower cap sometimes? yes. and an come —— i sometimes use a shower cap straight out of the packet and cling to cover my toothbrush. how about the tv remote control? what should i do? there are antibacterial wipes you can use but again it is all down to correct training of staff to carry out these functions. thank you very much in the meantime. rip—off british holidays is an immediately after brea kfast holidays is an immediately after breakfast this morning. get in touch
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with us as well. have you been concerned? any questions as well. bring your sanitiser with you. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. as we've been hearing, a 24—hour strike by some london underground workers is set to cripple transport in the capital today. you will finish at six o'clock tonight. the underground is warning of major disruption all day with most zone one stations likely to be closed. the victoria and waterloo and city line aren't running at all, and there'll be a severely reduced service on all other lines, especially in outer london. so let's see how things are looking at the moment. as you can see — a rather odd looking tube board. it's probably easier if i tell you what is running this morning. it's not clear from the board
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but the london 0verground, tfl rail and trams all have a good service at the moment. if you are trying to travel on the tube today the best advice is to check transport for london's website for details of your route. tickets are being accepted on buses and national rail services but they are expected to be far busier than usual. and if you're trying to use the trains instead today — great northern has no trains on the moorgate line. they're diverting to king's cross. of course the tube strike will mean lots of extra traffic on the roads as you can see here it's already looking very busy on the approach to the blackwall tunnel. and we will be keeping you up to date with the travel situation throughout the morning. bosses of southern rail and the rmt union have agreed they need to get round the table for talks following a heated tv debate on the crisis—hit network, bbc london understands. regular southern commuters in our audience spoke emotionally about the poor service.
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three days of action on southern trains are planned from tomorrow and you can see that debate, called southern rail crisis, tonight at 7.30pm on bbc one. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather grey and damp start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around and a little bit of drizzle here and there here and there as well. but significant rain on its way a little later on. not especially cold this morning, still reasonably mild as this cold front, however, this front pushes through, the rain becomes heavier and more persistent. maximum temperature today nine degrees. we are hanging onto a breeze so we shouldn't not see too much
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in the way of frost. minimum temperature is down in single digits. for tomorrow morning it is a bright and fresh start. we may get a little sunshine but gradually through tomorrow cloud will fit in and we will see outbreaks of rain. the colder air heads our way on wednesday and wind starts to strengthen. a strong north—westerly wind could see a couple of showers which potentially could turn little wintry as we head through thursday, friday and through saturday. i will be back with the latest travel in half an hour. the resplendent mora website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an overhaul of mental healthca re in england. the prime minister offers extra support to schools and companies saying she'll transform the way people with mental illness are treated. we speak with the health secretary before 8am.
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good morning. it's monday, the ninth of january. also this morning: a strike by tube staff closes much of the london underground for rush hour commuters. the walkout might cost the uk economy up to £50 million in lost business and staff who cannot get to work. unions say the walkout is vital to protect jobs. i work. unions say the walkout is vital to protectjobs. i will have the details live from london. a fantastic night for the brits at the golden globes. tom hiddleston, hugh laurie and olivia coleman pick up awards for their roles in the bbc‘s night manager. the film la la land breaks records by winning seven. good morning. and meryl streep has a swipe at mr trump. hollywood is full of outsiders and foreigners and if you keep them all out there will be nothing to watch button football and mixed martial arts. good morning. in sport, an excellent result for plymouth argyle, from the fourth tier
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of english football, earn an fa cup replay after drawing with liverpool at anfield. an icy blast hits large parts of eastern europe. these are the conditions on the beaches of greece. carol has the details of what it will be like here. good morning. by the end of the week some of us could well see some snow. not all of us, though. today we have a grey and damp start with rain moving south eastwards. behind it we return to some sunshine and blustery showers. and very windy in the north west. i'll have more details on all of that in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will outline plans which she says will transform mental health services in england. in herfirst major speech on health since becoming prime minister, mrs may will announce a review of services for children and teenagers as well as extra support for schools and businesses. labour says people are being let down by a lack of funding. our correspondent elaine dunkley reports. there are no words for what it does to a family.
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shock is not the word. it's just your whole reality is blown to pieces. in 2014, dr sangeeta mahajan's son took his own life. he was just 20 years old. he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. 10 weeks later he was dead. don't discharge patients with adequate information. the doors were closed for us. we were told to either go to a&e or your gp and that's the only way you can come back to us. we had no direct access back to the special services. that is wrong! today, the prime minister, theresa may, is expected to announce plans to reduce the waiting times for patients needing mental health services. the details also include more help from employers when staff need time off work, and schools will also be expected to play a bigger role in identifying mentally
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vulnerable pupils. one of the key concerns is funding. mental health is still very underfunded compared to other areas of medicine. it generates probably 20%—25% of the total disease burden of all diseases and yet the funding is 10%—12% in this country. he was just always making faces. sangeeta says talking about her son's life is so important but today she wants the government to take action that will lead to change in mental health services. our political correspondent chris mason is in westminsterfor us. lots of criticism of the nhs. we saw what the red cross said, a humanitarian crisis. this will bring more attention to mental health services. yes, good morning. real
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focus from the prime minister on mental health services. she will make a speech in the context of headline after headline on the broader state of the health services. the remarks from the red cross repeated by the chief executive of the organisation in an article in the times this morning, which says those who criticised him for completing the situation in the nhs with war zones around the world are mistaken and that he has looked at the definition as he sees it of a humanitarian crisis and he thinks it is an accurate label for the health service at the moment. the prime minister today will say what she will say in a broad context, talking about her philosophy for being prime minister. we have heard umpteen amounts of speeches and words about brexit and she is conscious she doesn't want to be defined by that. she will talk about the shared society. that is her big picture philosophy. it isn'tjust are setting out an agenda that is more
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than just brexit today. the foreign secretary boris johnson than just brexit today. the foreign secretary borisjohnson is meeting seniorfigures in the secretary borisjohnson is meeting senior figures in the trump administration and leading republicans as well. i think the government is conscious that, love it or hate it, brexit will dominate the coming months so we have to talk about other stuff as well. always good to talk to you. thank you. severe delays expected in london. —— severe delays are expected in london during this morning's rush hour because of a strike across the entire tube network. workers from the rmt and the transport salaried staffs' association are walking out for 24 hours in a dispute overjob losses and ticket office closures. ben is at piccadilly tube station for us this morning. it is really strange and quiet. yes, good morning. welcome to a cold, damp and frustrating start to the week for many here in london. you will know this is the heart of the
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west end, normally very busy here, four entrances and exits to piccadilly circus alone, but all are closed this morning as the tube strike yet under way. let me run you through the details. the strike began at 6pm last night when 4000 ticket office staff went on strike. they are objecting to job losses and the closure of a number of ticket offices closed by the former mayor borisjohnson. that offices closed by the former mayor boris johnson. that means offices closed by the former mayor borisjohnson. that means that here in central london and number of stations are closed. in fact, all of them within the central area. that includes stations you might use if coming into london, that includes euston, paddington, victoria, mainline stations. the tube connections are shut. this isn't just about london or the capital or the south—east, it is about the uk a economy, because estimates suggest this could cost the uk economy £50 million, and that has a big impact on the wider economy but also on the uk reputation. thousands of tourists
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would have passed through this spot trying to get around london, so they won't be able to do so. the strike is getting under way at 6pm, but as we often find out, the trains could be in the wrong place at the wrong time, so it might take much longer to get the services up and running. the unions for their part say the walkout is necessary to protect jobs. we will hear from walkout is necessary to protect jobs. we will hearfrom both walkout is necessary to protect jobs. we will hear from both sides of the debate over the course of the morning. more from me a later. thousands of british drivers hit by the volkswagen diesel emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker. vw admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests, leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide. a compensation scheme was approved in the united states last year, and lawyers want british customers to be offered a similar settlement. thousands of police officers in london are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed with a gun or taser. a survey by the metropolitan police federation will consult its members
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on the issue. a spokesman for the force said the number of officers carrying tasers has increased twice in recent years and that its weapons policy is regularly reviewed. more than 20 people have died as a result of freezing temperatures across much of central and eastern europe. the cold weather has caused major disruption to utility and transport networks while snow has been recorded as far south as the greek islands. we will have more on that later on. yes, snow on the beaches. amazing. not the ideal holiday destination. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night manager, which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards.
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tom hiddleston, olivia colman and hugh laurie all collected prizes for the bbc series. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama as the queen in the crown. the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land, which took home a record seven awards. our los angeles correspondent james cook reports. los angeles, california, where stories are spun and stars are born, a place of glitz and glamour, of gowns and gossip, the place they call... la la land. this is a film for dreamers, and i think that hope and creativity are two of the most important things in the world, and that's what this movie is about. in the television categories, it was a british invasion. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama for playing the queen in the crown, while there were three acting awards in the bbc production the night manager, allowing hugh laurie to have a go at donald trump.
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more amazing to be able say i won the last ever golden globes. i don't mean to be gloomy, it's just that it has the word hollywood, foreign and press in the title, ijust don't know what. .. receiving a lifetime achievement award, meryl streep also lambasted the president—elect and his plan to deport millions of immigrants. so, hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners, and if we keep them all out you'll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. well, hollywood can be fun and frivolous, but it also prides itself on tackling serious subjects. and many stars here on the red carpet are predicting a surge in political films this year following the most divisive of elections. great news for the night manager. and we'll speak to the creative minds behind the success of the night manager after 8am. that is your favourite tv series,
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isn't it? i absolutely loved it. i think there is another one. we will ask. widespread disruption is expected in central london during this morning's rush hour because of a 24 hour tube strike that started at 6pm last night. staff have walked out in a row over ticket office closures, after emergency talks broke down. john leach is the president of the rmt union. hejoins us now. thank you forjoining us. if you could just give us a picture of this morning. are their trains running at all? basically most of the london underground has been closed this morning as a consequence of this strike. just a slight correction. i am the rmt regional organiser, not the president. this strike has been called today because we are dealing with a hugely important safety issue across the london underground
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involving the removal of 834 frontline uniformed staff and the closure of a number of station control rooms. your introductory report was inaccurate on that. this has had a devastating impact on the safe running an operation of the london underground on a daily basis and commuters will be aware of this. everyday stations are closing, short staffing is a problem and it has impacted my members. the staff who are working there. ok, steve griffith, chief operating officer, says, you know this, there is no need to strike, we always intended to review staffing levels and had discussions with the unions. we agree we need more staff in the stations and have started to recruit 200 extra staff, so work has already started, so why strike? theyjust don't get it. the problem is, this is like putting a band—aid on a gaping wound. i am not making it as
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some kind of cheap shot. the london underground carries 4 million people every day. these passengers are entitled to a safe underground. 200 jobs by next summer is inadequate. we have a crisis here. and it is an emergency that needs attending to. that is a woeful response. it isn't good enough. thousands of tube staff are under immense pressure to deliver this service every day. they walk out, we will be back tomorrow and we can get around the table. this is a safety issue, safety strike and it is about a safety issue. they are entitled to travel as well. there will be thousands of people affected by the strike. do you have sympathy with them and will you have sympathy with them and will you try to get back to talking for them? absolutely. they are the heart of this dispute. the running of the safe underground. you need staff to runa safe underground. you need staff to run a railway. it is the oldest part
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of running railways. you have to have people in place to have a safe system. it cannot be self—service. they need to put back in a task force response to putting this say. and of course we have sympathy with the travelling public and we regret the travelling public and we regret the strike. we have been in weeks of talks but we are up against a brick wall. let's talk about timing. we know there are strikes planned later on this week. just a question about timing, why do it now, why in a week when you know commuters will be badly affected? the timing for the strike, the announcement of it, was before christmas, that was sometime ago, and the reason we did that, we give time between now and when we have the ballot result. it was to enable everyone to get around the table. weeks, if need be, that was the reason for the timing, nothing else. this next part of the story
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must be that we get back around the table and the tube management, who privately agree with us on safety, are empowered and resourced to make the london underground safe. what are you suggesting, more staff, presumably costing more money, which means a rise in ticket prices, so what kind of rise would you think is acceptable? i don't think it should result in a rising ticket prices, they are high and. the resources need be realised by the mayor and the powers that be. the passengers shouldn't have to suffer this. they are at the heart of this dispute. their safety is a major concern. that is not a solution we would want to see at all. thank you for your time this morning. and i should of course correct myself that he is not the president. correct, yes. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. theresa may will use a major speech today to encourage schools and employers to do more to help those with mental health problems.
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up to four million commuters face significant disruption this morning because of a strike across the entire london underground network overjobs and ticket office closures. let's get some weather with carol. it is looking a little grim out there, carol. murk sums it up beautifully. it is a murky start and a wet start for some. a lot of cloud around and rain spreading across parts of scotland and northern ireland. that is courtesy of this weather front continuing its journey moving south—east at. behind it you can see that it will be windy in the north—west. a little rain already this morning coming in from scotland
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and northern ireland heading into the west of england and wales. watch out for surface water and spray on the road. behind that, showers. the same full ireland. they will return to showers and brighter skies. down into the south—west, the rain. low cloud ahead of it with dampness in the air. brightness across southern counties but it will not last because here is the weather front heading south—east was as we go through the day. behind each we see a return to bright skies, sunshine, showers coming in wintry above 500 metres in the hills in scotland and increasing wind strength. 65 mph. the rain will clear kent in the evening with clear skies behind it.
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here we could see a touch of frost but showers gathering in from the west. some merging for lovely spells of rain. very slowly what you will find is you see the wind start to ease in the north—west. through tomorrow, still a blustery day. where there is frost we will begin with clear skies so some sunshine but out towards the west another weather front will introduce more cloud and rain and that band is moving from west to east through the day. again brighter skies behind it. still mild in the south hull as we push south with the colder conditions come in. a lot of dry weather around for wednesday. with colder coming in again across the north the showers will increasingly turn in the north and west and it will feel cold. temperature is in
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edinburgh five degrees celsius. as we push towards the south it turns into eight and nine. then the cold blast coming from the arctic. what that will do by the end of the week is introduce some snow. at the moment we think, and it could change, that will be across north scotland, north—west england, wales and the moors in the south—west. a huge dash of doubt with that because it could change through the course of the week. thank you very much, carol and we will see you later. and arctic blast later in the week. prepare yourself. lastjuly, on the day theresa may became prime minister she addressed the problem of mental health provision, pledging to make sure there was more help for those in need. today, she intends to make good on that promise by announcing a set of reforms she says will "transform" those services. labour's shadow health secretary jon ashworthjoins us from westminster now. good morning to you and thank you
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for your time this morning. when you look at some of the measures she will announce today, support for schools, a partnership with employer, alternatives to hospital care, it is hard for you to argue that any of those do not need to be changed. are they not good measures? yes. that is why we announced that they would be our policies a few months ago. yes, we welcome but what i would say it is good that theresa may has woken up to the crisis but her government has presided over a situation where we have 6000 plus fewer nurses working in mental health, fewer mental health beds and in deed, budgets have been raided in this country and the money shifted to trying to fill gaps in the wider nhs. so, yes. we welcome the initiative. we have been calling for them. the reality is that mental health provision in this country has
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been severely cut back over the last six years. is it a question of funding then? how much it would labour spend on mental health and where does the money come from? what we say is that the nhs as a whole is going through the biggest financial squeeze in its history. by next year, money per head will be cut across the entire country for the nhs. huge cuts to social care budgets as well and mental health provision has been cut back severely. that is why we are now seeing a big crisis facing the nhs this winter. i as to where the money would come from. where you would spend it. a priority we have made is that the reason the nhs is in a crisis this winter is because of cuts to social care. for example, pounds that will come in, we are asking the government to put that into social care today. on mental
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health provision more generally, when we get closer to the next general election we will come forward with our balance for mental health provision. what we shouldn't haveis health provision. what we shouldn't have is what we currently have at the moment, children's mental health budgets being cut and that money being allocated to the wider nhs because of the wider underfunding in the nhs. that is not acceptable. it isa the nhs. that is not acceptable. it is a disgrace and is theresa may wa nts to is a disgrace and is theresa may wants to shine a light on mental health provision in this country she should shine a light on her own budget decisions and ask the chancellor to bring forward money so that these budgets do not have to be cut. the money is a massive issue across the nhs, notjust in mental health. do you feel that these issues and changing money, putting some he ran some but, essentially all you can do is move cutlery around a broken table. there are fundamental issues with the health
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service. one big issue is that we have an ageing population who live longer. as we live longer we have more complex needs. that is a good thing but it means you have to put the money into community health and social care to deal and support elderly and vulnerable people. the government have cut back social care sector by 4.5 billion which is why we have a situation today in the nhs where increasing numbers of very elderly and vulnerable people are trapped in hospital with nowhere suitable for them to go in the wider community. that is why we see these huge pressures now. it is why we see people on trolleys for over 24 hours in hospital corridors. it is why we see ambulances backed up. it is why we see accident and emergency is turning people away. it is why we see several hospitals say that they cannot provide comprehensive care. u nless
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cannot provide comprehensive care. unless you deal with the social care crisis in this country, you will not deal with the wider pressure on the nhs. we will put some of those points tojeremy nhs. we will put some of those points to jeremy hunt nhs. we will put some of those points tojeremy hunt in the next half—hour or so. and for people watching this morning who agree that the nhs is in trouble. if you were in power tomorrow, what is one concrete plan you have to make a change? we would not go ahead with a corporation tax cut. we would stop that tax cut and we would reallocate some of that money to the pagers so there would be an immediate cash injection which will relieve some of these pressures. thank you for your time. we will speak tojeremy hunt later on this morning. 25 past seven at the moment. you watching brea kfast at the moment. you watching breakfast and still to come this morning... what should happen to your pet if you go into a care home? we'll speak to the charity calling for a clear policy on older people taking their dogs and cats with them.
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many of you getting in touch about that. we will speak about that little bit later. right now let us get news travel and weather from wherever you are watching. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. as we've been hearing, a 24—hour strike by some london underground workers is set to cripple transport in the capital today. it will finish at six o'clock tonight. the underground is warning of major disruption all day with most zone one stations likely to be closed. london bridge station is one of many hubs around london where people will get off the train and find that they cannot get on the tube. it is also on the piccadilly line where their staff are saying they are striking just to save but also for safety. for people of london in mainstream to find another way around town this
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morning. there are no stations open in zone one. what that means is the buses and roads will be busier. as you can see — a rather odd looking tube board. the victoria and waterloo and city line aren't running at all, and there'll be a severely reduced service on all other lines, especially in outer london. if you are trying to travel on the tube today the best advice is to check transport for london's website for details of your route and remember, tickets are being accepted on buses and national rail services but they are expected to be much busier than usual. so if you use the trains, greenalls and has no trains on the moorgate line. they're diverting to king's cross. of course the tube strike will mean lots of extra traffic on the roads as you can see here it's already looking very busy on the approach to the blackwall tunnel.
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and we will be keeping you up to date with the travel situation throughout the morning. good morning. it is a rather grey and damp start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around and a little bit of drizzle here and there as well. but significant rain on its way a little later on. not especially cold this morning, still reasonably mild as this cold front, however, this front pushes through, the rain becomes heavier and more persistent. breeze will strengthen, switching to north—westerly overnight. maximum temperature today nine degrees. we are hanging onto a breeze so we shouldn't not see too much in the way of frost. minimum temperature is down in single digits. for tomorrow morning it is a bright and fresh start. we may get a little sunshine
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but gradually through tomorrow cloud will thicken and we will see outbreaks of rain. the colder air heads our way on wednesday and wind starts to strengthen. a strong north—westerly wind could see a couple of showers which potentially could turn little wintry as we head through thursday, friday and through saturday. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. approaching 7:30am. thank you for being with us. theresa may will outline plans that she says will transform mental health services in england. in herfirst major speech on health since becoming prime minister, mrs may will announce a review of services for children and teenagers as well as extra support for schools and businesses. labour says people are being let down by a lack of funding. our correspondent
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elaine dunkley reports. we'll be speaking to the health secretaryjeremy hunt at 7:50am this morning here on breakfast. borisjohnson has held talks with some of donald trump's key advisers during a visit to new york. the foreign secretary has become the first british minister to hold face—to—face meetings with members of the president—elect‘s incoming administration. the exchanges were described by officials as positive but frank. up up to upto4 up to 4 million commuters face significant disruption this morning because of a strike. workers from the rmt and the transport salaried staffs' assocition are walking out for 24 hours in a dispute overjob losses and ticket office closures. the strike is due to finish at 6pm tonight. thousands of british drivers affected by the volkswagen diesel emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker. vw admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests, leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide. a compensation scheme was approved in the united states last year,
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and lawyers want british customers to be offered a similar settlement. police in tyne and wear have arrested a man suspected of taking hostages at a bookmakers in an armed seige. northumbria police were called to a branch of coral bookmakers injarrow on sunday evening following a report of a man with a loaded firearm. four people were thought to have been held in the incident, with three being released before police ended the standoff and a 39—year—old man was taken into custody. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night manager, which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards. tom hiddleston, olivia colman and hugh laurie all collected prizes for the bbc series. the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land, which took home a record seven awards. claire foy, star of netflix's the crown, dedicated her win to the queen. i really, really, really wouldn't
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be here if it wasn't for some extraordinary women. i am going to thank them. one of them is queen elizabeth ii. she has been at the centre of the world for the past 63 years and i think the world could do with a few more women at the centre of it, if you ask me. coming up, carol will have the weather in 10 or 15 minutes. it is going to be really cold later in the week. that is your sneak preview. now, the sport, and no sneak preview is going on. we are starting off with plymouth argyle and the draw against liverpool at anfield, and we we re against liverpool at anfield, and we were talking about the confidence that results like that in the fa cup for a team like plymouth argyle, and the managers said it was one of the
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best displays anfield has seen, and some awkward from him, he was asked what liverpool could expect on the south coast and he said, welcome to the real world. it is south coast and he said, welcome to the realworld. it is going south coast and he said, welcome to the real world. it is going to south coast and he said, welcome to the realworld. it is going to be feisty. league two plymouth argyle have earned a replay with liverpool in the third round of the fa cup after a goalless draw at anfield. it was the youngest starting line—up in liverpool history and manager jurgen klopp was forced to send for the likes of england striker daniel sturridge from the bench. even he couldn't find a way through the stubborn plymouth defence. they will now welcome the premier league giants home. it causes us an extra headache, as it does for liverpool. it is great for the city. we are still in the next round of the fa cup as well. frustrated by the percentages. i knew before the game, actually, with the other line up it could have been exactly the same. we could have encountered the same problem. it is not really likely, but possible. that is a very important experience for the boys. i am happy for this.
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obviously they want another game, they deserved it. and now we will go there and try to do that. premier league leaders chelsea had no such problems against league one peterborough united. chelsea registered 35 shots on goal in their 4—1 victory at stamford bridge, spanish striker pedro scoring twice. tottenha m overca me a stubborn aston villa. after a dreadful first half, they ground out at 2—0 win. ben davies scoring his first goalfor spurs. middlesbrough and fulham also went through to tonight's draw. wasps are confident that england flanker james haskell will make a quick recovery from the head injury he suffered during his comeback match last night. after a seven—month absence, haskell lasted just 35 seconds in their win over leicester, which took wasps back to the top of the premiership table. he appeared to be knocked out
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after a tackle but he was able to walk off the pitch. three british tennis players have been in action overnight, in the run—up to the australian open. dan evans won his match in sydney, but kyle edmund was knocked out. and johanna konta beat arina rodionova in straight sets. konta reached the semi—finals at the australian open last year and she's had a pretty good start to the season. in the bdo world darts championships, three—time champion martin "wolfie" adams came from behind to beat fellow englishman ryan joyce 3—2, and reach the second round. there was no dividing the pair so the fifth set went to sudden death and adams finished with a double nine to take the match. england's lisa ashton beat sharon prins of the netherlands to reach the second round in the women's draw. ashton has won this title twice, and she looked comfortable in a 2—0 victory. there's often talk about football clubs giving back to supporters but here's an example of fans literally giving back to their club.
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morecambe managerjim bentley was recently fined £1,000 after being sent from the touchline against cheltenham. but with the league two side struggling financially, supporters have clubbed together and given bentley the cash to pay the fine. he looks quite stoic about it to begin with. the emotion of the occasion gets to him in the end. a p pa re ntly occasion gets to him in the end. apparently the club was struggling to make ends meet. yes, he is a bit ofa to make ends meet. yes, he is a bit of a legend. it is nice to see, isn't it, a bit of charity in football as well. pets can make a huge difference to our lives... if you're a pet owner you'll know that and they can offer companionship particularly for older people who feel isolated. but for elderly animal owners, a change in circumstances can pose difficult questions. a leading pet charity has told us they're helping more and more people decide what to do if they can't take their pet into a care home
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or sheltered accommodation. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. two years ago, bob's wife died. while grieving, the bond has deepened. he has been everything to me, that dog. everything. he's my life, you know. home for bob, margaret and their pet schnauzer was this retirement village near lockerbie where bob still lives. but the owners have told him that his dog can no longer stay. we met at a nearby hotel. they don't like the dog. i will have to be on my way. he is my life. here's my comfort. my chief companion, that's what that little dog means to me. i just love that little dog. the owners of the
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retirement village did not wish to be interviewed but they said they made a difficult decision because the dog had barked and run and visitors, had fouled in hallways and was sometimes left unsupervised. they said they bought in a social workerfor bob and others had offered to look after his beloved pet so bob could still see him. ultimately they had to take the views of staff and other residents into account. he does bark but it soon dies off. i admit that he has made a mess because i have cleaned it up. but i don't think he has ever annoyed visitors to any great extent. he loves company. when elderly people go into care, the prospect of saying goodbye to a much—loved pet can be devastating. according to one piece of research, 40% of uk care homes describe themselves as pet friendly. but that expression is open to interpretation and there are calls for greater clarity and consistency. an online petition backing
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bob now has around 80,000 signatures. the owners of his retirement village say they've received threatening e—mails. a sign of how difficult and emotive situations like bobs can be. he's not leaving me. he very loyal to me. i would like to pay him back. well, it is a difficult subject. we're joined now by diane james from the blue cross pet bereavement support service, and rob martin from the not for profit care provider the anchor group. thank you both indeed forjoining us. thank you both indeed forjoining us. you can see he is clearly upset and it is really difficult for him. i know you deal with people facing problems like these. it can be
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really upsetting for people. problems like these. it can be really upsetting for peoplem problems like these. it can be really upsetting for people. it can, losing their pet, their last connection to a loved one or family, and it gives them a sense of routine, so the change is huge. talk us routine, so the change is huge. talk us through the discussion you had a bout allowing pets into care homes? the first thing to say it is it is important care home providers have a pet friendly policy. because we have a pet friendly policy in place, that discussion would usually look at different things. so, the first one would be the characteristics and behaviours of the pet. so, how does the pet behave? and the second would be looking at potential for infections. so, are they immunised, well groomed, looked after? the third is, does it have the potential
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for impact on anyone else in the home's so, for example, if someone has an allergy or a fear of attack. if someone is going to one of your ca re if someone is going to one of your care homes, it is not a given they will be allowed in? i think that is why it is important to have clear policy guidelines in place. it is important to make the right decision each time. it is really important to write to these people to explain why we would go and accept or reject a pet ina we would go and accept or reject a pet in a home. a pet for one person isa pet in a home. a pet for one person is a friend for life and for others it would be a real nuisance. we understand that and we know that not all pets would be suitable, that is why we want a pet policy introduced so everyone knows the
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responsibility. what are the options for those who cannot take their pets into the care home? the charity blue cross has a couple of options, pets into ca re cross has a couple of options, pets into care scheme, free to register, but you need to register before going into care. if the pet outlives you, we can free —— free home it. looking at the numbers, there are big numbers of pets having to be rehomed. yes. as a charity we have found that with the ageing population there is an increase in the call line from distressed people and other lines about the need to ta ke and other lines about the need to take pets into care. in your care homes, where are the pets, are they running free, what are they doing? it isa running free, what are they doing? it is a case—by—case basis. in some cases where appropriate they are ke pt cases where appropriate they are kept in rooms. advanced planning is put in place to make decisions about where they can go. more often than not it is —— there are good examples
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where pets become part of the whole home. they are widely accepted by everyone and everyone sees the benefit of the pet. they are allowed into the lounge areas. going back to making sure that prior to admission, robust plans are made and that we consider the needs of the other residents as well. and the wishes of the other residents and the decisions made. looking at the comments we have been getting today, there have been loads, one says, each case has to be considered on the merit, i would never leave mine behind. ken says, no, they shouldn't behind. ken says, no, they shouldn't be allowed, most cannot look after them, leaving the staff to look after them. this could be a difficult subject to approach will stop some pets don't take to living ina home stop some pets don't take to living in a home with other people and become territorial. and some of those things are very true and that is why we have a pet policy. the responsibility is on people to look after the pets, walk them, and if the person is ill, a member of family can take care, that
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registration, lots of things. we work with blue cross and rspca and various other charities and we take advice from them when we have these situations. of course they will at times be troubled with settling new environments. i think it is being aware of that. what is the most interesting? we have ducks, chickens, we have a parrot in one home, yes. so, we have a huge variety. absolutely. oh, ok. there you go. it was good to talk to you. it is coming up to 7:45am. theresa may will use a major speech to encourage schools and employers to do more to help those with mental health problems. up to 4 million commuters face significant disruption this morning because of a strike across the entire london underground network over jobs strike across the entire london underground network overjobs and the closure of some ticket offices.
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there is a lot going on with the weather but luckily carol can tell is all about it. good morning to you both. if it is not raining where you are neither has rained or it is going to rain. there is a band of rain heading south eastwards. that will cross the whole of the uk. that is courtesy of this weather front thatis is courtesy of this weather front that is crossing scotland. it is getting in across northern england and also west wales and the south—west. it is accompanied by dusting winds. you can see what we have already had. if you are travelling, watch out for xs surface water. as we go through the rest of the morning this will continue to sink, lifting the low cloud that we currently have. we will see transient rain is in the south—east big we have all this rain coming our way. bright skies behind it but still some showers. a special across parts of scotland and northern ireland. we are also looking at
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strengthening winds across the north—west touching gales forth with —— touching dour force with exposure. a love of dry weather here as well with the sunshine. here is the rain continuing to push down towards the south—east leaving a legacy of cloud in its wake. generally speaking, for most it will bea mild generally speaking, for most it will be a mild day but cold air feeding in. that will clear by teatime allowing some clear spells to develop. here tonight there could be a touch of frost and we will see a lot of showers, some of them merging and coming in across the north—west. by and coming in across the north—west. by then the strongest winds will transport towards the north—east. that is how we start the game tomorrow. another blustery day we showers. in the east where we have the frost we also have clear skies first thing so we look at some sunshine. but another weather front coming in from the west will introduce some rain as it pushes from the west towards the east. the
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cloud building ahead of that rain and an arena will rise. behind it bright skies with sunshine and a few showers. for most of us are still it is mild but especially in the south. temperatures are starting to change across the far north. that will happen even more so on wednesday. again we have some showers and some will be wintry across the northern western scotland. for most of the uk it will be a dry day. some sunshine, a little bit of cloud at times and it will also be breezy. looking at the temperatures are coming down. the top ten pressure in aberdeen is —— top temperature in aberdeen is four. as we go through the rest of the week the milder air is pushed away by colder blues seeping all the way across the uk. it is going to turn much colder. and for those of you asking if we will see snow, the a nswer you asking if we will see snow, the answer is yes. possibly later on thursday in the north stopped during
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the course of friday and saturday further south. not everyone will see it, by any stretch but we think at the moment and this could change, the moment and this could change, the most likely areas will be the north and west. north—west england, north and west. north—west england, north scotland, north—west wales and the moors in the south—west. so watch this space. what is interesting about our possible snow. if it is not connected to what is going on in southern europe, is it? that is right. temperatures of this morning in moscow are —30 and in athens, minus three. that is 10— 15 degrees lower than it should be this time of yearand degrees lower than it should be this time of year and they are pulling their wind from the arctic comes down from the east. i will tell you more about later on in the programme. a lot of golden globes talk from last night. one of those desperate moments were you cannot get the winners because you don't know who they are when you go to print. the front page of the telegraph as meryl
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streep who received a lifetime achievement award. she had a bit of achievement award. she had a bit of a poke at donald trump as well. she has more oscar nominations than any other actress. on the guardian, their main story is about boris johnson and this flight to new york last night for the first formal face—to—face meetings with donald trump. amy adams and natalie portman, they are contenders for the golden globes. we note that the night manager has done incredibly well. this 30 years... they all won best actors, best supporting back to. a fantastic night. later on we will speak to the executive producer of the programme. i know it is your favourite programme of the year. i wa nt to favourite programme of the year. i want to know if there is going to be a second series. ijust hope areas. we will can clear that up later. and the queen is on the front page of many papers as well. a front page of
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the times newspaper getting better. the queen ventured out in the public are the first time in a month a heavy cold kept indoors. there is one little story on the inside pages here. i would like to mention it. a little golfing gadget that has been made. patterns in all areas. for yea rs we have made. patterns in all areas. for years we have known about brainwaves and things that can disrupt the way of thinking and the smoothness and calmness. scientists have tested a number of golfers and what they have done is put a programme ahead that plays a bass tone when you are concerned about taking a putt and/or putt improves by 42%. isn't there? a big night for the night manager, storming to success at the golden globes awards. tom hiddleston, olivia colman, hugh laurie, collecting prizes to the bbc series and we also won best actress for her
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portrayal of the queen in off the crown. our correspondent reports. los angeles, california, where stories are spun and stars are born, a place of glitz and glamour, of gowns and gossip, the place they call... la la land. this is a film for dreamers, and i think that hope and creativity are two of the most important things in the world, and that's what this movie is about. in the television categories, it was a british invasion. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama for playing the queen in the crown, while there were three acting awards in the bbc production the night manager, allowing hugh laurie to have a dig at donald trump. more amazing to be able say i won this at the last ever golden globes. i don't mean to be gloomy, it's just that it has the word hollywood, foreign and press in the title, ijust
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don't know what. .. receiving a lifetime achievement award, meryl streep also lambasted the president—elect and his plan to deport millions of immigrants. so, hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners, and if we keep them all out you'll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. well, hollywood can be fun and frivolous, but it also prides itself on tackling serious subjects. and many stars here on the red carpet are predicting a surge in political films this year following the most divisive of elections. the good news is we will be talking about that little later. we have not yet had a call from hugh laurie, we we re yet had a call from hugh laurie, we were hoping to hearfrom him. you we re were hoping to hearfrom him. you were desperate, won't you? we will be speaking to jeremy
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were desperate, won't you? we will be speaking tojeremy hunt shortly. earlier we were discussing the high price of working in an office. you know the whip around, getting tea or cake. christmas presents, alcohol. over your working life time it is likely that a typical worker can expect to spend £40,000 to purchase all those extra things. but, december is the coolest months. december is the coolest months. december costs the average employee £96. and this is what amazes us. £42 goes to secret santa. not in our office. we only say it because we set a limit, don't we? that is the whole point. you would spend that on afamily whole point. you would spend that on a family member. it is an awful lot of muggy. talking cash, would you ever ask for a discount? i think you
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would. a survey suggests that nearly two thirds of us who tried to get a bargain have managed it. do you try? i tried. but when they go silent i get worried. we have been asking customers where they have tried haggling and, most importantly, work for them? a furniture store. buying a car. anywhere like that, yeah. recently i have. i got £100 from haggling. most prices are fixed. you wouldn't haggle with them.|j haggling. most prices are fixed. you wouldn't haggle with them. i don't try and department stores but places like this. i have had good here and it has paid off. maybe with a carbon would not hear. it is all home made. i feel like that would be taking their muggy a little bit. i think i
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would have to be feeling quite brave. other than that, would have to be feeling quite brave. otherthan that, probably not, no. i've tried for a bargain. the best haggle i have ever had... coconuts. coconuts. i got comprised half down. i took 12 coconuts home to my family. so, yeah. halfprice coconuts. £800 off a car. so, would you ask? i might. i might ask if there was any chance of a discount. even ina there was any chance of a discount. even in a high—street shop. sometimes, you do get a discount. it is worth a try. let us know. are you a haggle as to not e—mail us at our website or share your thoughts with other viewers on facebook. i'm going to see is being silent works. this
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will work now, watch. you are watching breakfast and he will speak eventually. still to come this morning... how clean is your hotel room? from dirty door handles to bacteria on the bedspread. find out why a tv remote control could harbour hidden danger. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. silence is a great tactic. people like me feel you have to fill it. they're good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. as we've been hearing, a 24—hour strike by tube station staff is under way — and is expected to cripple transport in the capital today. it'll finish at six o'clock tonight. most stations in zone one are closed. from london bridge station here's our reporterjonathan savage. london bridge station is one of many
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hubs around london where people will be getting off the train and finding out that they cannot get on the tube. it is one of the stations for the piccadilly line as well we staff are saying that they are striking not just to save jobs are saying that they are striking notjust to save jobs but are saying that they are striking not just to save jobs but also for safety. for people in london means trying to find another way around town this morning. there are no stations open in zone one. what that means is that the buses will be busier as too will the roads. not looking very promising. very little information on there currently. no service on the circle, hammersmith. more lines out than we we re hammersmith. more lines out than we were expecting. a severely reduced services on most other lines, especially in outer london. but despite what the board may say i'm being told the district line, dlr, london 0verground, tfl rail and trams all have good services at the moment. if you are trying to travel on the tube today the best advice is to check transport for london's website for details of your route and remember tickets are being accepted on buses
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and national rail services — but they are expected to be much busier than usual. so if you are using the trains instead — a warning that great northern has no trains on the moorgate line. they're diverting to king's cross. and c2c services are not stopping at west ham. of course the tube strike will mean lots of extra traffic on the roads. as you can see here it's already looking very busy on the approach to the blackwall tunnel. don't forget you can get travel updates every 15 minutes on our radio station — bbc radio london. right, well, let's hope the weather's looking a bit better! here's kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather grey and damp start to the new week. there is a lot of cloud around and a little bit of drizzle here and there as well. but significant rain on its way a little later on. not especially cold this morning, still reasonably mild as this cold front, however, pushes through, the rain becomes heavier and more persistent. breeze will strengthen, switching to north—westerly overnight. maximum temperature today nine degrees. we are hanging onto a breeze
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so we shouldn't see too much in the way of frost. minimum temperature is down in single digits. for tomorrow morning it is a bright and fresh start. we may get a little sunshine but gradually through tomorrow cloud will thicken and we will see outbreaks of rain. the colder air heads our way on wednesday and wind starts to strengthen. a strong north—westerly wind could see a couple of showers which potentially could turn a little wintry as we head through thursday, friday and through saturday. i'm back in half an hour with all the latest travel information. there's also plenty more on our website. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. an overhaul of mental health care in england. the prime minister offers extra support to schools and companies
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saying she'll transform the way people with mental illness are treated. good morning, it's monday 9th january. also on breakfast: a strike by tube staff closes much of the london underground. it is thought the walk—out could cost u p it is thought the walk—out could cost up to £50 million in lost business and staff who cannot get to work. the union said the strike is necessary to safeguard jobs. a great night for the brits at the golden globe awards. tom hiddleston, hugh laurie and olivia coleman all pick up awards for the bbc‘s night manager — the film la la land breaks records — and meryl streep takes a swipe at donald trump. so hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners.
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and if we kick them all out, you'll have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. cheering. in sport, a brilliant result for plymouth argyle, from the fourth tier of english football, they hold liverpool to a draw at anfield, so the two sides will replay in the fa cup. an icy blast hits large parts of eastern europe with temperatures dipping below minus 20 in some places. carol has the details of what it will be like here. good morning, later this week some of us will see snow but today across england and wales it is a cloudy and murky start with rain in the north and west crossing all areas. in scotla nd and west crossing all areas. in scotland and northern ireland we have the rain moving away leaving a mixture of sunshine and showers that the wind strengthening in the north—west. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. in herfirst major speech
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in her first major speech on in herfirst major speech on health, theresa may will announce a review of services for children and teenagers as well as extra support for schools and businesses. neighbours say people are let down by lack of funding. our correspondent reports. shock is not the word, your whole reality is blown to pieces. in 2014, this 20—year—old took his life. he had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. 10 weeks later he was dead. they don't discharge patients with adequate information. the doors were closed for us. we were told to either go to a&e or your gp and that's the only way you can come back to us. we had no direct access back to the special services. that is wrong!
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today, the prime minister, theresa may, is expected to announce plans to reduce the waiting times for patients needing mental health services. the details also include more help from employers when staff need time off work, and schools will also be expected to play a bigger role in identifying mentally vulnerable pupils. one of the key concerns is funding. mental health is still very underfunded compared to other areas of medicine. it generates probably 20%—25% of the total disease burden of all diseases and yet the funding is 10%—12% in this country. he was just always making faces. sangeeta says talking about her son's life is so important but today she wants the government to take action that will lead to change in mental health services. we can get more now from chris mason
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in westminster. there is criticism and concern about the nhs voiced over the weekend, how significant is this speech? it is significant, because of the specifics the prime minister is talking around mental health but also the bigger picture. she will be aware of the headlines about the nhs and a suggestion from the red cross there is a humanitarian crisis. a claim repeated in an article by its chief executive in the times this morning. theresa may wants to paint on a broader canvas. she is aware there will be plenty of talk about brexit in the coming months and she does not want the government talking of nothing else but brexit, simply defined by that. today we will get a sense of her philosophy for government. she will talk about the importance of the shared society and
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dealing with the burning injustices as she sees them that undermine society and she says mental health provision is one of those. notjust talking about brexit today. boris johnson in the united states has met senior members of the incoming donald trump administration and he will head to washington to meet senior republicans. the government making the case that there is plenty to be getting on with as well as getting out of the european union. we are expecting to speak tojeremy hunt shortly. he has been delayed, i think. in the next half an hour. up to four million commuters in london face significant disruption this morning because of a strike across the entire underground network. members of the rmt and tssa unions walked out last night in a row aboutjobs and ticket office closures. the 24—hour strike is due to finish at six o'clock tonight. we have been speaking to commuters.
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it takes me 20 minutes but it has taken an hourand it takes me 20 minutes but it has taken an hour and 15 already. the buses are mental, so i would rather walk. it is what it is. they have their cause. you work around it. a lot of people having to work around it. thousands of british drivers affected by the volkswagen diesel emissions scandal are taking legal action against the carmaker. vw admitted using software that would cheat emissions tests, leading to a recall of millions of cars worldwide. a compensation scheme was approved in the united states last year, and lawyers want british customers to be offered a similar settlement. thousands of police officers in london are to be asked if they want to be routinely armed with a gun or taser. a survey by the metropolitan police federation will consult its members on the issue. a spokesman for the force said the number of officers carrying tasers has twice increased in recent years — and that its weapons policy is regularly reviewed.
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it is thought up to 15 people have been arrested in connection with the robbery of reality star kim kardashian. she was held up in her apartment in paris and master men left with millions in jewellery. apartment in paris and master men left with millions injewellery. it is believed to trace is a dna were found at the scene. more than 20 people have died as a result of freezing temperatures across much of central and eastern europe. the cold weather caused major disruption to utility and transport while snow has been recorded as far south as the greek islands. our central europe correspondent nick thorpe joins us from the banks of the river danube in budapest. good morning. we can see the situation behind you with 20 of ice on the river danube. how bad has it been? it has been very cold indeed,
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-28 been? it has been very cold indeed, —28 registered in the north of hungary, yesterday, the weather has grown milder this morning which means more snow is grown milder this morning which means more snow is threatened in different parts, not only in hungary but romania, bulgaria and the balkans. schools closed in romania and bulgaria today because of these extreme conditions. thanks. you can see the ice flowing down the river. extraordinary pictures. the weather will get colder here but nothing to do with the weather currently in central europe. we have an arctic blast coming south. you have been listening. i have been listening to carol. it was a big night. it was a big night for the british television spy drama ‘the night manager‘ which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards. tom hiddleston, olivia colman and hugh laurie all collected prizes for the bbc series. the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land, which took home
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a record seven awards. claire foy, star of netflix's the crown, dedicated her win to the queen. we will be speaking to one of the people behind the night manager. i think the actors are probably celebrating still. enjoying themselves, the official term. we will speak to them later. commuters in the south of england face a difficult week ahead, there's the current 24—hour tube strike, which ends at six o'clock tonight, and then tomorrow drivers at southern rail are set to walk out for three days. today's industrial action on the london underground is because of a dispute overjob losses and ticket office closures. ben is at piccadilly tube station for us this morning. the doors remaining closed. good morning, these are very firmly closed with no one going anywhere
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fast in central london. the 24—hour walk—out well under way which began at 6pm last night and it means places like this in the heart of the west end theatre land, we are at piccadilly circus tube station and you will recognise it from scenes like that. it means people cannot get around. 4000 staff walked out in around over the closure of ticket offices and where these staff will be placed in the stations. are there enough staff to protect front line services? the union said not and they called the strike due to end at six o'clock but more pressure on the bus network and the roads. it is thought it could cost the economy up to £50 million because people cannot get to work. and tourists cannot get around. why are they on strike? earlier we spoke to the rmt union. it cannot be a self—service
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underground, they need to put back ina task underground, they need to put back in a task for response almost to put this safe and we have sympathy with the travelling public and regret the strike stop it had been avoidable, we we re strike stop it had been avoidable, we were in weeks of talks put up against a brick wall. that is the view of the unions. what about the cost to london and the rest of the country? colin is from the london chamber of commerce. we talk about putting a figure on strike action, it is difficult. what will it cost london and the uk? tens of millions of pounds. it is difficult to know whether if you are coming on a shopping trip to london, when you come later in the week or not at all but what deal you might lose because you cannot get there. what is more important in some ways is the message it sends around the world. we are dealing with brexit. london voted to stay in the eu and we are coming to terms of making a success
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of being out of the eu. we cannot have this message going around the world at this time that london somehow is closed, it is difficult to do business in london, or it is difficult as a tourist. london is the engine of the economy and the first destination for tourist visits going to scotland, northern england, wales, wherever, so it is a big deal for london and ms. to the week stop the unions say it is vital to protect the network and they want staff to be on trains and platforms to help passengers, be them tourist, shoppers and workers. is there sympathy in the business community for the london underground staff? we wa nt for the london underground staff? we want to make the underground as safe as possible and london underground said they will bring in more staff, they are recruiting 200 extra staff. there was a report by travel watch
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which talked about problems understaffing might be causing. they we re understaffing might be causing. they were not talking about safety but access to ticket machines. what we cannot do is penalise londoners in the way we are penalising them at the way we are penalising them at the moment. as the mayor of london said, it is misery for londoners and london business and the uk economy. you are used to talking to business and dealing with changing times, modernisation comes with challenges the business and london underground is no exception. fewer of us queueing at the ticket office, cards, is it an element of needing to change with the times and london underground leads to improve its system ? underground leads to improve its system? we need to change the. many do not use a ticket machine any more. we need to see staff if we feel we are more. we need to see staff if we feelwe are in more. we need to see staff if we feel we are in danger or need help. i use the tube every day and at my
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station i feel safer because i can see the staff, they are not behind a glass window. my wife recently had a problem late at night with a fight she saw and could not find anybody to come out of their office to deal with that and she had to deal with it. now there are people open to people coming up to them and saying, you have to do something about whatever is happening. that is the current situation. the strike due to end at 6pm today. it will be the roads and the trains and all the other support services on public transport that will bear the brunt until the system is up and running because it is not guaranteed the trains will be in the right places to suddenly begin again at six o'clock. it's 8. .15am. you're watching breakfast. the main stories this morning: theresa may will use a major speech today to encourage schools and employers to do more to help those with mental health problems. up to four million commuters face
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significant disruption this morning because of a strike across the entire london underground network overjobs and ticket office closures. i was told off earlier for trying to do amateurish weather forecasts. told off? i got the impression that was not good enough. thankfully we have got a professional in the house. carol is here with a beautiful picture. this morning we have a murky start. there is a lot of low cloud and dampness around, but that will be replaced in the south by rain which is spreading south—east wards. it is courtesy of this weather front. now, south—east wards. it is courtesy of this weatherfront. now, as it moves south—east wards, look at that squeeze on those isobars. later on, it will be windy across the north—west with gusts up to gale force. a cloudy, damp start. a little bit of brightness, but that
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won't last because as this weather front approaches, the cloud will proceed it and the rain will move in. behind it, the skies brighten and the sun comes out. however, there are still showers in the forecast especially across northern and western scotland, some rain coming in through the course of the afternoon and here is where we are likely to see gusts to gale force. for northern ireland, you have got a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers and it is the same across northern england and north wales, but there will be a lot of dry weather around and sunny skies. now, as the rain pushes into the south east, it will leave a legacy of cloud, there goes the rain, but not the temperatures. still mild. it isa mild not the temperatures. still mild. it is a mild start to the day. as we head on through the evening and overnight, there goes the rain. clearing kent around about tea—time. some clear skies in central and eastern areas mean in sheltered parts there will be a touch of frost. meanwhile the rain continues to come in across scotland and northern ireland and parts of north—west england and showers across west wales and the south—west. so that's how we start the day tomorrow. where we've got the day tomorrow. where we've got the clear skies and the frost, we
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will start with sunshine. there will bea will start with sunshine. there will be a few showers dotted around, but it will brighten up before the next weather front comes in across from the west, crossing northern ireland, the west, crossing northern ireland, the cloud building ahead. the rain gets into the east. behind it, brighter skies and some sunshine. and then for wednesday, well a drier day, a blustery day, some bright spells, just a few showers, and also some sunshine, but the showers turning wintry across the far north of the country and temperature wise, well, again, feeling cold. the temperatures coming down across the land. so as we head on through the latter pa rt land. so as we head on through the latter part of the week, for us, we start to pull in northerly or north—westerly winds across our shores meaning it will turn colderment for some of us, we will see snow. at the moment we could see the snow almost anywhere. however, the snow almost anywhere. however, the most likely areas are going to be across parts of the north and the west of the uk. but i'll keep you posted as we go through this week.
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the conditions are nothing like they are in europe. we have seen the pictures in the news. this morning, we are looking at temperatures minus 30 celsius to start the day in moscow. as we come further south, minus three in athens is minus three celsius in belgrade. we are looking almost tropical with our seven celsius in london. the reason is we have got what would be a siberian high aning orred across siberia. the airaround a high high aning orred across siberia. the air around a high moves in a clockwise direction. it is moving around, sucking up the cold air and coming back down from the north—east, a different direction to us. there is a low pressurejust north—east, a different direction to us. there is a low pressure just out to the east here and the opposite happens with low pressure. the air moves in an anticlockwise direction so moves in an anticlockwise direction so it is doing the same moving around and sucking in the cold air down towards the mediterranean. i love it when the weather is like there, dan and lou. i probably shouldn't because it has adverse effects, but it is so exciting. you
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have made me shiver even though it is not with us yet. it was a big night for the british television spy drama the night manager which stormed to success at the 74th golden globe awards. tom hiddleston, olivia colman and hugh laurie all collected prizes for the bbc series. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama as the queen in the crown. the night belonged to the hollywood musical la la land which took home a record seven awards. our los angeles correspondent, james cook reports. los angeles, california, where stories are spun and stars are born, a place of glitz and glamour, of gowns and gossip, the place they call... la la land. there were seven golden globes for
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the film. this is a film for dreamers, and i think that hope and creativity are two of the most important things in the world, and that's what this movie is about. in the television categories, it was a british invasion. claire foy was named best actress in a tv drama for playing the queen in the crown. i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for some extraordinary women. i'm going to thank them. one of them is queen elizabeth ii. she has been at the centre of the world for the past 63 yea rs centre of the world for the past 63 years and i think the world could do with a few more women at the centre of it if you ask me! there were three acting awards in the bbc production the night manager. the night manager is about arms dealing.
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hugh laurie's arms were also digging. receiving a lifetime achievement award, meryl streep lambasted the president—elect. award, meryl streep lambasted the president-elect. violence insights violence. when the powerful lose their position to bully others, we all lose. hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners and if we kick them all, you will have nothing to watch, but football and mixed martial arts which are not the arts! what an honour, thank you thank you for acknowledging me in this way.
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tom ford thank you for this opportunity. creating this role and collaborating on this journey was an immensejoy. collaborating on this journey was an immense joy. moonlight. complex coming of age movie moonlight had been tipped to bring diversity to an industry criticised as too white, but it won just one award, best drama. to my mum, mum you gave me my life. elle picked up an award. thank you for making me win in a french film directed by a dutch director here in america. oh my god! thank you. well, hollywood can be fun and frivolous, but it prides itself on tackling serious subjects and many stars here on the red carpet are
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predicting a surge in political films this year following the most divisive of elections. after an evening of success for the night manager, we're joined by two of the creative minds behind the hit series. executive producer stephen garrett and director susanne bier are speaking to us live from los angeles. how are you feeling today? thank you. no, it was a thrilling night. i apologise from the strange surroundings. i'm in an underground hotel where there was a party. this was the only place i could find that i wouldn't get drenched and provide unwarranted entertainment for your viewers. i would rather you were in the party. thank you very much for joining us. well, i can show you bits of it. go on then! why do you think the night manager was a success around the world?|j
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think the night manager was a success around the world? i think it was, it just touched success around the world? i think it was, itjust touched so many buttons really. at one level there was this fantastic travel log. you were in the company of these exotic brilliant entertaining people and there was a hope that richard roper would be someone what everyone would wa nt to would be someone what everyone would want to not just would be someone what everyone would want to notjust have dinner, but sit next to and there is something heady and intoxicating however despicable his lifestyle and ambitions about the world he lives in. so there was something aspirational about that, but i think it was also to your correspondent‘s point earlier, it touched something about the world. it touched a kind of moral ambiguity that crept into politics and to everyone's lives and it deals with a world where our governments, the governments of friends of ours, sanction arms deals, the consequences of which are
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hideous and we have seen in the middle east as we speak. tell us about the actors, tom hiddleston, olivia coleman and hugh laurie won awards which is fabulous news. what made them stand out as well?” think... go on. try one more time. problem with sound i think they were all excellent. apologies for that. we saw glimpses from that party. are we able to show the pictures of the awkward hug? this was an eventful ceremony and this is emma stone. this is when the screenwriter this is emma stone. this is when the screenwriter won this is emma stone. this is when the screenwriter won the award. can we see it again? it is worth watching again. this has been described by many as the most awkward moment. she
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goes in. he is already hugging his girlfriend. that's painful. this has happened to all of us, hasn't it?” once went to kiss somebody on the cheek and their nose went in my eye. i'm still embarrassed about it now. time for the news, the weather and the travel where you are now. maybe your weekends looks like this. leaden skies, rain. there is more rain on the way that it hails the change to slightly different weather. this weather front, change to slightly different weather. this weatherfront, quite change to slightly different weather. this weather front, quite a bit of rain. isobars on the chart,
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wet and windy sweeping its way across all parts. following behind, brighter skies, but a raft of showers. bees ganging together later to bring about the spell of rain into central and western parts of scotla nd into central and western parts of scotland and may be northern ireland. turning windy. gusts up to 55, 16. fewer showers further south, certainly the eastern side of the pennines doing nicely. the rain will not get away from parts of east anglia and kent until after dark and we pick up the winds again. gusts could get onto 60—65 mph, and maybe a touch of frost to the eastern side of england and scotland. tuesday, dry enough to start but another weather feature clouding things up from the west. spreading the threat of some rain. probably as not as
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much as we might see on monday. but again, not getting till to east anglia till late in the day. we begin to see the wind cranking around north of west and quite a bit of wind. a chilly day, a bright one, a blustery one and a scattering of showers across northern and western parts later this week, a change into something more wintry and notjust for northern britain. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. with jamie robertson this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson fiat chrysler says it will invest a billion dollars in the united states as the detroit motor show gets underway. live from london, that's our top
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story on monday 9th, january. the detroit motor show is underway, and the world's car—makers are looking to try to steer the way ahead, amid big changes for the industry. plus, we look back at the birth of a revolutionary product — it's ten years since the launch of the iphone.
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