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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 9, 2017 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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outside source, these are some of the main story is here in the bbc newsroom live. donald trump is planning to appoint his son—in—law jarrod kushner as a senior adviser at the white house. in turkey, president erdogan says he wants greatly expanded powers. parliament look set to agree. opposition figures said turkey's democracy is under threat. translation: will it bring freedoms, strengthen democracy, or will it bring in an authoritarian regime? here's meryl streep accepting a lifetime achievement award at the golden globes. she was pretty rude about donald trump. donald trump return the favour on twitter. we will get into that and quickly look at the golden globes as well. fifa has named ronaldo its player of the year. we will be live at the bbc sport centre to discuss that and also look ahead to a big announcement tomorrow about the future of the world cup. asi
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as i was just as i wasjust mentioning, president berdych man of turkey once extensive new “— berdych man of turkey once extensive new —— president erdogan once extensive new powers, the turkish parliament looks to agree, if it does the matter will go to a referendum. the president is saying these powers will bring stability and develop into turkey but not eve ryo ne and develop into turkey but not everyone is convinced. translation: will these changes to the constitution bring in price cuts? will there be free water, will it end terrorism, will it decrease taxes, will it strengthened pussy or will it bring in an authoritarian regime? do the people need this, you ever ask them? there had been some small protests. these were pictures from earlier outside parliament in ankara. if you hundreds people and they love the police as well. the crowd was eventually dispersed by the police, which used water cannon
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among various other tactics. this whole new push for new powers for the president needs to be seen in the president needs to be seen in the context of the failed coup of last summer. since then in turkey there has been a state of emergency. more than 50,000 people have been sacked or suspended from state jobs, media outlets have been shut, journalists have been arrested. we have been covering this on outside source and have also covered how turkey has a penal code which states that anybody who insults the president can face up to four years in prison. so the president is already a seriously powerful figure, but mr erdogan would like more powers. bbc turkish now on exactly what these new powers are. right now, the party who is in power right now, the party who is in power right now is making an offer of changes to the constitution. so with these changes if they will be approved in the parliament and then in the referendum, they will be offering, the system will be changed from a
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parliamentary one to a presidential one, so the president will be on top of the execution, so he or she will have more powers than the parliament. for example right now in turkey, parliament has more powers than the president. the president has been normally very symbolic role in turkish republic, but with this constitutional change, he or she will be having more powers, and also for example checks and balances, and the separation of powers, will be in danger. and it looks like the majority of parliament will agree with the president, but what about public opinion? do they like this shift in system? pro-government newspapers for example, they are saying it will be approved by the public, but some companies are making some public calls, so we can see that the margin is very small. some public opinion are saying it will be a no to the constitution in the public polls and some are saying
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yes, but it will be very close, so the public opinion polls are showing the public opinion polls are showing the margins are very small. is there a direct connection between the failed coup of last year and the suggestion of new powers now? actually yes, they are saying there will be more stability. so as the president will be gaining more powers, the stability will be constructive. those kind of event will be less in the future of turkey. we have had stories from turkey, from the us, and now one of the main ones in the uk. martin mcguinness is resigning as northern ireland's to be the first minister. this matters not only because it shows the depth of northern ireland's political crisis but because of the man himself. martin mcguinness was crucial to the ira ending its armed campaign to northern ireland to join the republic of ireland. this resignation is over the handling of the controversial energy scheme. more of that in a minute. mr
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mcguinness gave a statement, he says an election is needed, that seems likely by the way. this is more of what he said. we in sinn fein will not tolerate the arrogance. sinn fein wants equality and respect for everyone, and that's what this process must be about. so today i have told arlene foster that i have tendered my resignation, effective from 5pm today. so i believe today is the right time to call a halt to the dup‘s arrogance. is the right time to call a halt to the dup's arrogance. the bbc's stephen walker in our belfast newsroom has been helping me describe the controversy at the centre of this story. what is at the heart of this dispute is a story that has been going on in northern ireland for a that has been going on in northern ireland fora numberof that has been going on in northern ireland for a number of months. this
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renewable heating scheme was set up, the idea was it would move one form of energy to renewable forms of energy but the tariffs were set too high. it ended up potentially costing the executive £400 million, so costing the executive £400 million, soa costing the executive £400 million, so a big mistake was made. then there was lots of criticism over the way that that scheme was handled. here in northern ireland we have this power sharing executive, we have the dup as the lead unionist parties sharing power with sinn fein, so we have arlene foster as first minister and martin mcguinness as deputy first minister. that is the way the government has to work, and if you haven't got a first minister or and if you haven't got a first ministerora and if you haven't got a first minister or a deputy first minister, then the power—sharing can't work, and what we have seen today is martin mcguinness standing down as deputy first minister, because he wanted the first minister to step aside whilst an investigation took place. she refused to step aside, so he has now decided to step aside himself, which effectively means the
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end of power—sharing in northern ireland. and as such, stephen, is this sufficiently serious that it is a threat to the longer—term political process in northern ireland? it certainly means that power—sharing will end, unless there isa power—sharing will end, unless there is a replacement for martin mcguinness. under the legislation there has to be a replacement within seven days, but sinn fein has made it clear there won't be a replacement. then it. the british government, the secretary of state then would have to call elections. he has said today he will look at this in terms of a reasonable time period. people are potentially guessing that there could be elections to the northern ireland assembly potentially in march, so basically unless there is the romantic movement in the next few days, we are witnessing the end of this current arrangement between the dup and sinn fein, and then we would see those fresh elections to a new assembly. much more background on the situation in northern ireland available from bbc news online whenever you wanted. time for
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outside source sport. let's talk about cristiano ronaldo, who has won fifa's inaugural best player of the year award. will perry is live with us year award. will perry is live with us from the bbc sport centre. no great surprise here, i think the thing of more interest as this is a brand—new award when we already have one that does much the same thing. yes, we should explain that, because for the past six years the world's best player has received what was called the fifa cosmic ballon d'or award. a version of that prize has been awarded from france football's magazine since 1956. fifa end of the association of that, instead —— ended their association with that. 2016, what a year for cristiano ronaldo, as well as scoring that decisive penalty in the shoot out to win the champions league, he captained portugal to euro 2016 glory and was recognised with his fourth ballon d'or in december. in has something messi doesn't, which
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he will enjoy, the honour of being named best fifa men's player. the former manchester united forward had been the favourite in the weeks building up to this. 44 games, 42 goals, 14 assists, the top scorer in the champions league last coracle moustache macro classes and, and he's still only 31. the best men's coach today, claudio ranieri, the leicester city manager. what a yet it has been, recognised —— what a year it has been, taking leicester city to that and precedent it premier league title last season. city to that and precedent it premier league title last seasonlj also premier league title last season.” also want to talk about something else fifa is up to. we reported before about its plans to expand the world cup. this is a reporter with the wall streetjournal. this is what diego maradona thinks about the idea. translation:”
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this is what diego maradona thinks about the idea. translation: i am delighted by gianni's initiative, because it gives chances to teams that otherwise would start the qualifiers knowing they had no chance of getting to the world cup. it gives each country the dream, and it renews the passion for football. as faras i'm it renews the passion for football. as far as i'm concerned, it's a fantastic idea. diego maradona's keen. there are quite a few other people who aren't so keen. keen. there are quite a few other people who aren't so keenm keen. there are quite a few other people who aren't so keen. it is hugely controversial, this, but we have some fresh news from richard conway out in zurich for us tonight. fifa's council are expected as we understand to approve that expansion of the world cup to 48 teams tomorrow. they have considered five different options. this is the big new idea of the fifa president, gianni infantino, making his statement as president. europe's big clu bs,
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statement as president. europe's big clubs, which provide around 80% of the players at the world cup have objected to the reforms, believing that there are already too many games being played throughout the course of the season. but a confidential fifa report that has been seen by the bbc, it proposes that an enlarged competition could be staged in 32 days, a finalist taking part in seven games, and that is the same number as under that current format. that analysis also contends that the quality of football, and this is something that has been questioned, that the quality of football on display would not be watered down with the 16 extra teams. fifa would expect a 1 billion us dollar increase in revenue, the huge, and interestingly it lists how fifa are looking to make all games including qualifying b1 by winning or losing, now draws, so penalty shoot outs. this is a tweet from espn, telling us it is
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clemson against alabama, the rematch, a year in the making, the national championship is up for the grabs. i know this is american couege grabs. i know this is american college football, it is a big deal. when we asked anthony circa about us politics, he said he had spent his whole life gathering enough expertise to help us out on this. hello, let's leave donald trump to one side for a moment. for people watching who know nothing about couege watching who know nothing about college football, tekkers from the start of this game. all right, as you said, this is a rematch from last year, where alabama defeated clemson in a high—scoring shoot out. both teams are a year wider and clemson has a quarterback who is a junior, a runner—up for the highest level trophy in college athletics. alabama are still considered the favourite, they have won four national championships in the past eight years, but a lot of wags are picking clemson to pick an upset. this is only the third year that there has been a play—off in college football, so you are talking about
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the world cup going to 48 teams. well, three years ago there were no teams, just two teams playing in a quasi national championship. now it isa quasi national championship. now it is a four team two—game play—off, so iam going is a four team two—game play—off, so i am going to be watching tonight, i'm looking forward to it. where does college football fit into america's sporting pecking order? everyone knows the national football league is the most popular, most watched sport in the us, but number two isn't baseball or nba basketball, it actually is college football. last year, the national championship game, 35mm americans watched the year before when ohio state won their national championship. —— 35mm americans. it is very popular, the stadiums across the country regularly draw upwards of 90,000, 100,000 fans. my of box __ my of 90,000, 100,000 fans. my of box —— —— my hometown, they sell it out regularly in texas. across the south
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it isa regularly in texas. across the south it is a very big sport where professional sports are not quite as prominent, at least in austin, the university of texas longhorns where the game in town. it is the longhorns, i have been there once and everyone is wearing the t—shirt. enjoy the game, we have asked quite enough view on this programme. anthony live in washington, dc. in a feud minutes, actually we will be hearing from someone else based in the newsroom, becausejon sopel, the bbc‘s north america editor has made two special reports on president obama's legacy. i will play you the first of those in a minute. here in the uk, the girlfriend of a missing raf serviceman corey mckeag says he is due to become a father. he disappeared after a night out with friends in bury st edmunds. april oliver, his mother, had been speaking to the bbc. we started off seeing each other, and it was quite
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casual. we were both seeing other people at the time, and then we sort of lead on to have, stations whereby we thought it was getting serious, and what we going to do, and what plans we had. we know he disappeared at the end of september, how recently at the end of september, how rece ntly ha d at the end of september, how recently had you seen him before then? i had seen him near enough the same week that he had gone missing. apart from the raf boys, i think i was one of the last people to see him. which is quite hard. when he went missing you happen to be away abroad with your family, so when did you here had gone missing?” abroad with your family, so when did you here had gone missing? i had only been there literally a few days when i got a call from the raf boys, asking if i had seen him or heard from him, on the monday, i think it was. and then that's when i knew that he was obviously missing, and
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then i very quickly got a plane home. and then how long after that did you then discover that you were pregnant? i found out i was pregnant a couple of weeks after i came back, obviously after going through police interviews. u nfortu nately obviously after going through police interviews. unfortunately i have had to make a massive decision by myself. i mean i was hoping and praying that we would find out some information that he would come home so we could make the decision together. we have had, stations about children and what we wanted in the past, and it was something that i hope that he would be here to help me make the decision, but u nfortu nately me make the decision, but unfortunately he isn't. and this will be first grandchild? it will, yeah. should be a occasion for you. can you feel any joy yeah. should be a occasion for you. can you feel anyjoy about it at yeah. should be a occasion for you. can you feel any joy about it at the moment? i was at the scan with april the other day, and i don't think anybody could see that and not be affected by it. but it is incredibly
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difficult to bounce my head, as it is for april as well, from the excitement of a new baby, to what we're actually trying to focus on just now, and that is cory. our lead story comes from washington, dc. the us president elect donald trump intends to appoint his son—in—law jared elect donald trump intends to appoint his son—in—lanared cook schmid as a senior adviser to the white house. this is what you have got coming up after outside source. if you're watching outside the uk, world news america next with a report on brazil's government's plan to build dozens of huge hydroelectric dams in the amazon. if you are watching here in the uk, the news at ten with huw edwards, who will have more on northern ireland was mac deepening political crisis. barrett obama's presidency ends on
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january 20. our north america editor jon sobel has made two special reports to look at his legacy. tomorrow's will consider foreign policy. today's is about what the president has achieved at home. it wasn't just the hope when it wasn'tjust the hope when barack obama came to office, it was the wild expectation too. that the country's problems would be solved ata country's problems would be solved at a stroke. that the first african—american president would usherin african—american president would usher in a post—racial era. no more black america or white america, just the united states of america. but the united states of america. but the lingering vestiges of that dream disappeared in the summer of 2014, in clouds of tear gas in a nondescript suburb of st louis mazzarri called ferguson. an unarmed black man had been shot by a white police officer. it was a pattern that would become all—too—familiar. in charleston, south carolina, walter scott had been pulled over
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for a walter scott had been pulled over fora minor walter scott had been pulled over for a minor motoring offence. footage captures the white police officer who stopped shooting him in the back several times before he dies. the policeman claimed self defence. at his trial, which ended last month, thejury defence. at his trial, which ended last month, the jury was unable to reach a verdict. the court therefore must declare a mistrial. another symbol for the black community that things haven't changed.” symbol for the black community that things haven't changed. i think his legacy to him is more important right now to paint a picture that he did a real good job in america. but most black folks are very disappointed, because they feel otherwise. the issue of race and another of america must migrate intractable social problems, gun violence, came together to horrific effect inside this famous african—american church in charleston. a white supremacist who, with his string of drug convictions, should have never been able to purchase a gun, walked inside a
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bible study group and killed eight worshippers and the pastor in cold blood. barrett obama had always seemed reluctant to define himself asa seemed reluctant to define himself as a black president, preoccupied by racial issues, but after these shootings, that changed, as he came to charleston and showed how he felt the community's pain. # amazing grace, how sweet the sound, that saved a wretch like me. obama's two terms in office perpetuated by the crack of gunshots. i think there are some of a shooting in here. an endless series of random mass killings that started with the slaying of 20 children and six of their teachers at sandy hook elementary school. the
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president's famously cool demeanour was gone after this. every time i think about those kids, it gets me mad. and, by the way, it happens on the streets of chicago every day. i refuse to act as if this is the new normal. this is not something i can do by myself. such violence, such evil, is senseless. again and again, you wanted tougher legislation on gun control. but he failed to his evident consternation when we sat down and spoke. if you ask me where has been the one area where i feel that i've been most frustrated and most stymied, it is the fact that the united states of america is the one advanced nation on earth in which we do not have sufficient common sense gun safety laws. that
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there have been some legislative su ccesses . there have been some legislative successes. millions more americans now have health insurance than was previously the case, although obamacare previously the case, although obamaca re has created previously the case, although obamacare has created many losers too, and the economy, which was flat on its back eight years ago, is starting to bloom, and people are spending their money again. we have notjust come back spending their money again. we have not just come back stronger from the great recession, we have actually built an economy that is the envy of the world, and that is an important pa rt of the world, and that is an important part of president obama's legacy. hgppy part of president obama's legacy. happy new year! but it proved to be a fruitless recovery when it mattered, there will be no democrat succeeding him in the white house, so one of his final acts was to make a last journey so one of his final acts was to make a lastjourney to capitol hill to urge his party's lawmakers to fight off republican attempts to dismantle obamacare and the rest of his domestic legacy. lookout for the american people. jon sopel, bbc news, washington. we will finish outside source by
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talking about what meryl streep had to say about president obama's successor, donald trump. this was a speech he gave at the golden globes. she didn't mention donald trump by name but then she didn't really need to. disrespect invites the suspect, violence insides violence. when the powerful use their position to bully others, we all lose. so hollywood is crawling with outsiders and foreigners, and if we kick them all out you will have nothing to watch but football and mixed martial arts, which are not the arts. she might not have mentioned him by name but donald trump knew who she was talking about and was not going to let it pass of course. he took to twitter saying that this. queue a huge media storm and a
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stand—off between a very well—known actress and the president—elect. some say this is all a distraction from far more important issues. we spotted this from a law professor in minnesota. we have reported it, so we haven't ignored it, but we will leave it there. thank you very much indeed for watching. remember our lead story that donald trump intends to appoint his son—in—law, jared kushner, as a senior adviser in the white house. that is it for the first outside source of the week. see you tomorrow at the same time. hello, not a great start the week from any part of the uk, quite
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windy, fairly chilly. an interesting week ahead, it will get colder and colder and as the cold air becomes firmly in place across the uk, some snow showers developing, some of that later in the week could get the much lower levels. one to keep a close eye on. a chilly start but no snow, a bright start for many central and eastern areas. the best of the sunshine here, cloud by the afternoon as some patchy rain crypts from west to east. after a chilly start today most of us will stay in single figures. a few places out towards the west may get into double figures. through the evening, some patchy rain for a time, more rain comes into the north—west, it sinks its way south so that by dawn on wednesday there is a lot of cloud around. showers into the north and west of the uk, again quite chilly, most west of the uk, again quite chilly, m ost pla ces west of the uk, again quite chilly, most places starting off well into single figures. it will be a windy day on wednesday, very blustery winds bringing some snow showers
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into the north and west. the snow mainly over higher grounds but the further south and east you are, it should be fairly dry, and ten or 11 degrees but a good deal colder further north. it has been extremely cold for some parts of southern and eastern europe. staying very cold in the south of europe through into thursday but through germany, poland becoming a bit less cold over the next couple of days. act on our shores through thursday, the wind still coming in from the north or northwest, the air coming down from iceland and greenland, it will be a cold day on thursday, blustery as well with snow showers to the north and west of the uk, some of those getting down to lower levels. well into single figures, and the new factor in the winds and the many places it will feel like it is subzero. it will feel more like —2, minus three degrees. in glasgow, belfast, newcastle and manchester as well. so a cold day on thursday with some snow showers and then through thursday night into friday, a real squeezing the isobars along the eastern side of the uk as the winds continue to come from a long way north. very blustery for eastern
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scotland, england, and with that comes the risk of some snow showers. some of those could get down to quite low levels. again, we are in single figures across the board. again factor in the winds. the winds are now coming in from the northwest at the weekend, the weather systems on that wind will be bringing a mixture of rain, sleet and some snow. most of the snow on the leading edge of this weather system, which will work its way ever is to the minute turns back the rain. it will be rain drifting mostly across southern england and wales, maybe some snow across higher ground. the second part of the weekend looks equally cold with the winds coming down from the north, maybe a bit more from the northwest and the north—east but either way it looks like it will be pretty chilly with that northerly wind. then into the coming week it looks like we will change that wind direction to something more of a westerly wind. with that air coming from the middle of the atlantic, it should not be quite as cold but i think it will be u nsettled quite as cold but i think it will be unsettled in the north and west of the uk. there will be weather
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systems moving through, some spells of rain with areas of low pressure but further south it looks high pressure will be the dominant force. generally speaking, it looks a little bit milder into the coming week. a bit list windy too, the most of any week. a bit list windy too, the most ofany rain week. a bit list windy too, the most of any rain that we see is likely in the north and west of the uk, a good deal dry the north and west of the uk, a good dealdry in the north and west of the uk, a good deal dry in the south and east. another update tomorrow night. might be modified — as accident and emergency departments come under intense pressure. demand over christmas was unprecedented — ministers say that being seen within four hours might be restricted to the most serious a&e cases. it is clear we need to have an honest discussion with the public about the purpose of a&e departments. but doctors are warning that bigger budgets are needed to free up space in england's hospitals. we need money in order to allow patients who are fit to be discharged from hospital, back into the community. we'll be reporting on the latest pressures —
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and how hospitals are coping. also tonight: theresa may makes the case for a shared society — and promises more helps for mental health services. the political crisis deepens in northern ireland — as sinn fein's martin mcguinness resigns as deputy first minister.
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