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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 10, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more misery for hundreds of thousands of passengers as southern rail is hit by a fresh wave of strikes. more than 2000 trains have been cancelled on some of the network's busiest commuter lines. good morning. it's tuesday the 10th of january. also this morning: jeremy corbyn says britain can be better off after brexit. and for the first time, he says he's not wedded to freedom of movement of eu workers into the uk. a last—minute spending spree boosted retail sales this christmas, with more of us waiting til the last minute to snap up a bargain. but experts say it was our last big splurge before a difficult year ahead. in sport, a bigger world cup. but will it be better? fifa are set to approve
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plans to have 48 teams at the tournament in 2026. and carol has the weather. good morning. a breezy day ahead of us. for some of us, starting on a bright note with sunshine. it is cold. thicker cloud in the west will introduce rain going from east to west during the day. later the wind will strengthen. and i'll have more details on the weather for you in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. another strike is affecting services on southern rail. drivers belonging to the aslef union will stop work for three days this week. the dispute about the role of the guard on trains has been going on for nearly ten months. 0ur south of england correspondent, duncan kennedy, is at horsham train station. duncan, what is the mood like among passengers there? it has been crippling train lines for ten months. commuters are out
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there. you have to get up early. it ta kes there. you have to get up early. it takes longer. i am abandoning going out to town tomorrow. we will see how things go later in the week. out to town tomorrow. we will see how things go later in the weekli have managed to get a train but it is not good. it is really packed. have managed to get a train but it is not good. it is really packedm seems talks between the two sides have turned nasty. they have been malicious. at best they have been deceitful and at worst, spiteful. 0ur reality is that we are now experiencing a new type of industrial relations in our industry that we have not seen for some time. it isa that we have not seen for some time. it is a row over the on board guard. southern ones them to take over the safety critical job southern ones them to take over the safety criticaljob of taking over the doors. but the union says the guide should do it. a report by the regulator says their plans were safe as long as they provided the right equipment and training. all of the 2000 plus services in the company will be cancelled today, tomorrow,
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and friday. there will be huge disruption on thursday as well because the trains will be in the wrong place at. that is on top of an overtime ban cutting services daily. another three strikes are planned later this month. the issue of driver controlled trains is affecting southern today but it could easily transferred to other franchises through britain. duncan kennedy is at horsham. a really difficult time for so many people trying to travel. absolutely. the start of another dismal day for maybe 200,000 people. at horsham, 5— 10,000 people who would normally use this concourse. look inside. it is com pletely this concourse. look inside. it is completely empty. nothing running whatsoever. the difference compared to the strike last month is that southern, together with other coach companies, putting on coaches to run
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from here, about 200, and are saying it is very much a backup service. don't expect much from it. it will get people from central london to other train stations where they can pick up other services. very much picking up the slack. bradley will not take a coach or a train. how will you get to work in london? i am driving today to paddington to get some parking there. i will try that today and maybe buses later in the week. another frustrating today and maybe buses later in the week. anotherfrustrating day. not just a frustrating day, but a frustrating year. the strike today is just another day of no train. we are looking at something like 20% less trains over all on normal non— strike days. brighton to victoria during peak hours is limited. there is no express, there is nothing. this needs to end. it is all about who opens these doors, the driver, the guardunderstand the dispute. can you see why no one is talking to
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each other? it was interesting watching the debate last night. it is frustrating. what needs to happen is frustrating. what needs to happen is the government needs to step in and mediate. if there are questions over safety, why is this being pushed out so hard? it needs to be mediated and a truce needs to be reached. thank you. good luck trying to get into central london. another strike tomorrow and friday. forget the trains tomorrow as the trains will not be in right place. missouri for hundreds of thousands of people in the south this week. —— misery. thank you for that. we will speak to the director of souther rails at 710 this morning. a 15—year—old girl has been arrested after the death of a seven—year—old girl in york. the younger girl was found with life—threatening injuries in the woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon.
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she was taken to hospital but died a short time later. the teenager remains in police custody and is being questioned by officers from north yorkshire police. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement. but he will warn that the uk cant afford to lose full access to the single market. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson, is in westminster. iainjeremy corbyn has been under pressure to respond to labour voters concerns over immigration, hasn't he? good morning. today we will hear that. not just from good morning. today we will hear that. notjust from some of his own mps. has a tricky position. he has to talk about the remain voters. but he also has to reach out to those who backed leave in many parts of england outside london. we are hearing a shift in rhetoric from jeremy corbyn, saying that he recognises concerns about immigration in particular. he has indeed set for the first time that
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they are not wedded to the principle of free movement between european countries which seems to be significant. if you look at the policies, i don't think he has changed much. we have not seen any at all. he says it is important to get a ccess at all. he says it is important to get access to the european single market, rather than having controls on migration. his policy on that is the same as it was before. in addition to that, he is policy is basically to try to stop employers bringing in cheap labour to undercut people already here. no policy on limiting numbers. he does not want to give false promises so no target. he will say that today. and no restrictions like his mps are calling for on the numbers of people with no skill at all coming into britain to work. his opponents are attacking him for that. he will also talk positively about the benefits of brexit and the ability of a labour government for example in the future to intervene in the industry.
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the lib dems are saying this proves that he never really campaigned to keep britain in the eu in the first place. thank you. coverage of that speech a little later across the bbc. retailers are reporting a strong end to 2016, with sales up in december compared with the previous year. according to the british retail consortium, many of us left it to the last minute to splash the cash, and much of it was on festive food. ben's here to tell us more. are you responsible for this?” are you responsible for this? i left it until christmas eve. a lot of it was festive food. you are right. people left it late because they we re people left it late because they were expecting a bargain. all of those sales in the windows lit up. the sales are happening before christmas and not after as it always used to. the british retail consortium says overall there is a 196 consortium says overall there is a 1% rise on how much we spent this year rather than last year on christmas shopping. 0n year rather than last year on christmas shopping. on line sales have been good as well. 7.2% up. shop sales on the high street went down. the on line figures always
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look good, but not as good as last year. lusty was the real big arrival of on line shopping. —— last year. we have gotten used to it this year. not the sort of increase as we saw. there has always been a worry. how long before hand do you have to order to make sure you get it? that is why they go to shops themselves. they do well. there is a warning that this year could be a tough one for retailers because we know that inflation is starting to pick up. that is a result of the fall in the value of the pound after the vote for brexit. it has meant the value of the pound has fallen significantly. anything imported from overseas will cost us more. in the run—up for christmas we did not feel that much because retailers had already bought that stock. in the new year we will see prices going up. inflation should hit about 3% this year. it could mean writers start rising on the things we pay.
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we will not necessarily get a pay rise at work at the same time so it may mean the money in our pockets will get a squeeze. a tough year for retailers this year. morrisons as results at seven. we will hear from them and we expect them to do well. sainsbury, tesco, and others this week. an. boris johnson, who's visiting washington, says he's confident britain will be first in line for a trade deal with the new us administration. the foreign secretary has been meeting senior republican politicians who've promised to make a us—uk trade deal a priority, barack 0bama warned in april that the uk would be at the back of the queue if voters chose brexit. police in northamptonshire have closed a stretch of the m1 motorway after a body was found in the road in the early hours of the morning. the northbound carriageway between junctions 16 and 17, near northampton and rugby, was shut following the discovery and is expected to remain closed for most of today.
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police are investigating the circumstances of the death. the british and irish governments say they're going to work to try to find a solution to the most serious political crisis in northern ireland in a decade. yesterday, the deputy first minister, sinn fein‘s martin mcguinness resigned. it came after weeks of tensions between his party and their partners in the power—sharing government, the democratic unionists. an ancient giant sequoia tree, known for the massive hollowed—out tunnel at its core, has been knocked over during a series of storms in central and northern california. the historic pioneer cabin tree had survived for centuries, and allowed tourists to pass through it before it came down due to the heavy rain. it featured graffiti dating back to the 1800s, when visitors were allowed to etch their names into the tree's bark. look at it. it is quite amazing, isn't it? you can'tjust make stuff up. i don't know why i said three. i
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don't know. i was looking at the pictures. it seems even squirrels have a sweet tooth as they've been caught making off with chocolate bars. look at this. the owner of a grocery store in toronto, who filmed this unlikely thief, said the squirrels have stolen more than a0 chocolates. they've now to social media for advice about how to deter the animals. unbelievable. the obviousjoke, do the obvious joke, do you think they have gone for fruit and nut? amazing. go on. the same one again. he is not doing much to stop them. more gentle squirrel encouragement. that is what happens if you keep feeding them chocolate. it could be an olympic sport if it carries on. feeding them chocolate. it could be an olympic sport if it carries onlj would certainly watch it. we are
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talking about a big vote in fifa. this is one of the things that infantino campaigned about, a bigger tournament. it looks as though we'll be seeing more teams involved in the world cup in future. fifa are expected to agree plans later, to expand the tournament to 48 teams starting from the 2026 world cup. infantino thinks... well, a bit more money in that. 521 million profit in it. he says it will let other countries play on the big stage. critics say it will dilute the quality of the football. claudio ranieri has won fifa's first coach of the year award. the leicester city manager was in zurich to pick up the title,
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recognition of his achievement in leading the 5000:1 shots to the premier league title last season. cristiano ronaldo won the player's award. leeds united came from behind to make it through to the fourth round of the fa cup, beating cambridge united 2—1. they'll go to either non—league sutton united or afc wimbledon next. england's former captain chris robshaw will miss the whole of the six nations with a shoulder injury. the flanker is expected to be out of action for 12 weeks. i normally get excited when we talk about six nations because it means spring is on the way. but 12 weeks is still a long—time. spring is on the way. but 12 weeks is still a long-time. shall we have a look at the papers? yes. here is ben. he is running. let's have a look at the front of the times. we
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are talking about the golden globes and meryl streep has made front pages of the papers. that was after her public spat with donald trump. she had a go at him. he has had a pot back. and one in four a&e are on say. wigan warriors, people who don't exercise during the week. a p pa re ntly don't exercise during the week. apparently you can do at couple of sessions of exercise and you will live longer —— weekend warriors. that could be the way forward. britain's most seniorjudge mishandling the trial of a royal marine found guilty of killing a wounded fighter. this is a wonderful picture of the moon. the reason why the papers are talking about it is the papers are talking about it is the discovery that rather than the giant object striking earth and
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forming a cloud of debris they suggest multiple asteroid strikes created a moonlits, which merged. lots of little moon is making a big moon. 0k. .. let's lots of little moon is making a big moon. 0k... let's have a look lots of little moon is making a big moon. 0k. .. let's have a look at the front page... 0h, hold on. happy new year. the daily mirror, hunt scraps before our a&e, and it is your fault, and there again is rijal —— meryl streep and claire foy from the queen. i have enjoyed reading from the papers today, there is nothing exceptional in the sports papers, but there is a really long and lovely interview with sir andy murray, as we have to call him. someone sat down with him for the first time since we heard about the
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knighthood as he prepares for the australian open and he is talking about how he anguished over whether to a cce pt about how he anguished over whether to accept it, at the age of 29, the only second player in history as well, with more playing days in front of him, he was wondering if it was too soon or if he should say no. he had messages of congratulations from alex ferguson and jose mourinho, which he thinks is cool, asa mourinho, which he thinks is cool, as a massive fan. after tennis he fancies going to work in football. he isa fancies going to work in football. he is a big fan. he said he wants to coach a young player coming up or get involved in football. that would be interesting. he is quite good at keepy—uppy. be interesting. he is quite good at keepy-uppy. yes. you sent me to look at the tube strike siesta they and the pictures are of the chaos
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yesterday. crush hour in the sun. you can see the taxi queues and people trying to get on the buses. similar in the mirror with people trying to get onto the extra buses. even though the strike finished at six o'clock tom of the trains were not in the right place, and here is the evidence —— finished at six o'clock, the trains were not in the right place. it took people a long time. and for southern passengers, they will be facing disruption. the tube strike has ended but much more disruption for those on southern. thank you. this one on the inside of the sun, this is a homeowner nightmare. this young lady is trying to sell her house. she can't at the moment because of a dongle. 0ne to sell her house. she can't at the moment because of a dongle. one side of her bedroom officially belongs to
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her neighbour. 0h, of her bedroom officially belongs to her neighbour. oh, my goodness. officially she doesn't own half of the bedroom and so she can't sell it. extraordinary. i want the bedroom and so she can't sell it. extraordinary. iwant to the bedroom and so she can't sell it. extraordinary. i want to ask this later, thunderstorm? this is an official term, and active shower with thunder as well, turning into snow, so the water will fall as snow. i think carol would do a betterjob than me. thank you. plenty more from these guys through the program. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: further misery for commuters as southern rail drivers begin their latest walk out. britain can be better off after brexit, according tojeremy corbyn, who also says labour is not wedded to free movement. shall we try to get to the bottom of
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this? thunder snow? it is when the thunder in the snow is called thunder in the snow is called thunder snow. it is quite simple. this morning we have a chilly start for some with clear skies. as the weather front comes from the west it will turn milder and colder. this morning we have cloud around. we have some breaks. that is where it will feel nippy. the cloud is thick enough for the odd shower. some across the south—west, the midlands and northern england as well. into scotland, cloud, bright spells and some showers. the weather front coming from the west producing rain
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for northern ireland. it isn't particularly heavy. it is a warm front. as it pushes to the east the temperature will go up. you can see the cloud building ahead of it, raising the sunshine. then behind it we feed in cold air through the course of the day. heading into the evening and overnight you will notice the wind, the strength will pick up. northern and western scotla nd pick up. northern and western scotland will have casts to gale force, even scotland will have casts to gale force , even severe scotland will have casts to gale force, even severe gales, extending through the course of the night —— gusts. meanwhile, we have a plethora showers coming in, some will be wintry. here is the weather front continuing over to the new continent. the wind might cause disruption tonight. across the tops of the pennines we could have 70 mph, that might affect higher—level roots of the m62. tomorrow with the strong winds it could lead to some travel disruption. we are looking at
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strong winds from north wales, the north midlands, heading northwards. the strongest winds for the north of scotland. you will notice the winds elsewhere. if you're travelling in a high sided vehicle, light vehicle, a bike, buried in mind, it will be much colder with wintry showers in the north, increasingly pulling at lower levels as well. —— falling. another windy day in prospect on thursday. not as wind in the south. the next weather coming in, this from the south—west, this will bring rain but the problem is as it engages with the cold air it could fall as snow. it might fall to snow on modest hills and possibly at lower levels. we could be looking at a combination of rain, sleet and snow for southern counties. we over the next few days this area of low pressure will be giving us some trouble. norfor pressure will be giving us some trouble. nor for that and we have wintry showers. it will feel much
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colder than has done. some of those will fall at lower levels as well. that is thursday. those are the temperatures to expect, three or fourin temperatures to expect, three or four in the north. it will feel much colder. look at that, —2, —3, so get out your woollies. thank you. wolf whistles, car horns and concerns over safety — these are just some of the things women say they worry about when they go out for a run. according to research from england athletics, more than a third of british women have received some form of harassment while running on their own, as holly hamilton reports. # you can call me runner. it has quickly become one of the uk's most popular sports with the number of people in england this is —— is
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abating increasing. if you are a woman it is unjust cold weather that can be more than a little offputting. with a show of hands how many people feel they have been harassed while outrunning? that is pretty much all of you. it is people trying to make fun, have a joke and stuff, so it hasn't been harassment, but you could take it that way and feel intimidated by it. and it seems they are not alone. research from england athletics revealed more than a third of british women have been harassed in some way while running alone. more than 60% said they feel anxious and nearly half of those asked said that was due to personal safety concerns. i got shouted at by a couple of men as i was running around, and whistled at, that was quite intimidating. you get beat with horns. i was running through a village i know and a group of lads started running at the sight of me. it was a bit intimidating. i kept
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running and thinking, you won't beat me, crack on. you do get the odd car that beats its horn as we go past. races with cars. nothing else better to do then beat them all and wolfwhistle. but british women are fit for it with most insisting it wouldn't put them off altogether. running ina wouldn't put them off altogether. running in a group is a lot better thanif running in a group is a lot better than if you are running on your own. when you are in a group it is the support and everything that you go through with everybody around you so it doesn't feel as intimidating as if you are running on your own. these runners say it is about safety in numbers, so all that is left to worry about is keeping up. that is fantastic. do you run on your own? i do but i wouldn't at night. i run with a triathlon club at night because i don't feel safe. margaret said, fat comments shouted
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from the same car on several occasions. i took to running at night to avoid unknown individuals. leah says, that is why ijoined the gym, less comments from mindless thugs in cars. suzanne, cheering from youths in a van, it made me laugh andi from youths in a van, it made me laugh and i took it as an encouragement. that is the best way to approach it, isn't it, to laugh at it. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: this incredible footage has captured chimpanzees making straws to drink water. we'll speak to an evolutionary biologist about the discovery. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. after the disruption of yesterday's tube strike — let's start with the travel.
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and on the tube a normal service has resumed this morning — with just minor delays on the victoria line. 0n the roads, and in vauxhall, parry street on the one way system is part blocked following a building fire. the a1 holloway road remains closed until next week at upper holloway station. and in fulham, new kings road closed westbound at hurlingham road because of a burst water main. today is the start of a three day strike by southern train drivers. it means there'll be no trains running at all. but, for the first time, southern‘s parent company, govia thameslink rail, will use around 200 coaches to transport passengers to other stations. passengers are being advised to travel only if it's essential. further walkouts are planned for 24th, 25th and 27th january. some of british airways cabin crew go on strike today for 48 hours. heathrow passengers will have to amend their travel times as more than 2,000 air crew walk out in protest over pay. gatwick and london city airport will not be affected and ba says that all passengers will be able
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to complete theirjourneys. a special service has been held at southwark cathedral to mark the re—casting of two of its 12 bells. following a mediaeval practice, the two bells — called andrew and nicholas — were dressed, baptised, names were given to girls and they we re names were given to girls and they were baptised i think because they have a voice, so that there is something almost human ab out them —— bells. the re— casting and the sort of the re—engineering of parts of the bells only happens probably once every 100 years, so this is a once every 100 years, so this is a once in more than a lifetime event. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there are one or two brighter spells out there this morning but further if there is a potential of maybe a shower or two. they will clear away quickly to brighter spells and the day should be mostly dry. we've got this north—westerly breeze. it will feel more chilly than yesterday. the mild
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airwill more chilly than yesterday. the mild air will start pushing as we had to the end of the afternoon with some thick cloud moving on from the north—west. the maximum temperature around seven or eight degrees. as we head into the evening and overnight, outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. more mild a starting to work in. overnight the temperature is going to rise compared to today's daytime temperature. the minimum between eight and 10 degrees. again one or two outbreak of light rain and drizzle into dawn tomorrow morning but they will clear away quickly. the wind starts to strengthen tomorrow. we should see a little brightness through the day. you will start to feel the wind. the temperature is similar. we will start to notice the temperature drop, the cold air moving in wednesday night into thursday and we could see this area moving in as we head through thursday, and that could fall little wintry, especially the high ground, so it is something we are watching very closely. tomorrow, similar temperatures, much
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colder through thursday and friday and, likei colder through thursday and friday and, like i said, for thursday the potential for wintry showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello. this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's tuesday the 10th of january. coming up on breakfast today: prices at the pumps are going up, and soon, motorists could be paying 25% more forfuel than they were this time last year. ben will be here to explain why. also this morning, with class sizes on the increase in some places, we'll see how one secondary school copes with 46 children in a maths class. and the "worst witch" book series has enchanted children for decades, and it's now being turned in to a new tv series. we'll meet one of its stars later in the programme. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news. another strike is affecting services on southern rail.
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drivers belonging to the aslef union will stop work for three days this week. the dispute about the role of the guard on trains has been going on for nearly ten months. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, has this report. it is a dispute which has been crippling london's train lines for ten months. another strike today. commuters are at their wits‘ end. it is endless. you have to get up early to go underground or get a bus. it takes longer. i am abandoning going out to town tomorrow. we will see how things go later in the week. i have managed to get a train but it is not good. it is really packed. it seems talks between the two sides have turned nasty. the tactics they have used have been malicious. at best they have been dishonest, disingenuious, deceitful,
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and at worst, spiteful. 0ur reality is that we are now experiencing a new type of industrial relations in our industry that we have not seen for some time. it's a row over the role of the on board guard. southern wants drivers to take over the safety—critical job of closing the doors. but the union says the guard should do it. a report by the regulator says southern‘s plans were safe as long as they provided the right equipment and training. all of the 2000 plus services in the company will be cancelled today, tomorrow, and friday. there'll be huge disruption on thursday too because the trains will be in the wrong place. and that's on top of an overtime ban cutting services daily. another three—day strike is planned later this month. the issue of driver—controlled trains is affecting southern today, but it could easily spread to other franchises through britain. we will be speaking to southern rail‘s passenger services director at 7:10 this morning. nobody can hear you but we are going
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to carry on. carry on. the latest news. a 15—year—old girl has been arrested after the death of a seven—year—old girl in york. the younger girl was found with life—threatening injuries in the woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon. she was taken to hospital but died a short time later. the teenager remains in police custody and is being questioned by officers from north yorkshire police. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement. mr corbyn‘s critics have previously accused him of failing to heed the concerns of traditional labour voters who opted to leave the eu. he'll say that labour will demand "fair rules and reasonably managed migration" from any brexit deal. boris johnson, who's visiting washington, says he's confident britain will be first in line for a trade deal with the new us administration. the foreign secretary has been meeting senior republican politicians who've promised to make a us—uk trade deal a priority, barack 0bama warned in april that the uk would be at the back
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of the queue if voters chose brexit. police in northamptonshire have closed a stretch of the m1 motorway after a body was found in the road in the early hours of the morning. the northbound carriageway between junctions 16 and 17, near northampton and rugby, has been shut following the discovery and is expected to remain closed for most of today. the british and irish governments say they're going to work to try to find a solution to the most serious political crisis in northern ireland in a decade. yesterday, the deputy first minister, sinn fein‘s martin mcguinness resigned. it came after weeks of tension between his party and their partners in the power—sharing government, the democratic unionists. northern ireland secretary james brokenshire is expected to make a statement to mps today. concerns have been raised about the care of transgender prisoners following four deaths in just over a year atjails in england and wales.
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the prisons and probation ombudsman, nigel newcomen, called forjails to be more flexible and proactive in managing inmates who had changed gender. in the past few months, the ministry ofjustice has revised its guidance to ensure the "great majority" of transgender inmates are dealt with according to the gender they identify with. iam taking i am taking extra care with the time checks at the moment. it is 6:35. new year new you. if you are a cynic, you would think the plans to expand the world cup are about the cash. infantino expand the world cup are about the cash. infa ntino wants expand the world cup are about the cash. infantino wants to expand the already quite large team and mount up already quite large team and mount up to 48 teams. that would create millions more from the world cup but
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puts extra pressure on the host country. 16 teams will travel across the world to play one match and go back again. that is the nature of it. but infa ntino back again. that is the nature of it. but infantino says it is a good idea because it would mean more teams get to play at the world cup on the world stage and what better way to boost football across the world. it is not about the money. he says. it looks as though we'll be seeing more teams involved in the world cup in future. fifa are expected to agree plans later to expand the finals from 32 teams to 48 teams starting from the 2026 world cup. there'd be 16 groups of three, and then a straight knock—out stage. critics say it will dilute the quality of the football but one world cup winner disagrees. the african and asian continents will benefit. we should not be scared. the euros have shown that island, welsh, these are countries that know about football. ——
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ireland. now the world of football knows the techniques. the entertainment will be there for sure anyway. claudio ranieri has won fifa's first coach of the year award. the leicester city manager was in zurich to pick up the title, recognition of his achievement in leading the 5000:1 shots to the premier league title last season. i think what happened last season in england was amazing, it was something strange. the god of fools said leicester must win only this. 0nly said leicester must win only this. only this. and who else but cristiano ronaldo was player of the year. he added the fifa trophy to the ballon d'or award he picked up last month, after a season in which he captained portugal to the european championship and won the champions league and club world cup with real madrid. the fa cup holders, manchester united, have been drawn to play wigan athletic in the fourth round. but here's what the cup is all about.
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wycombe wanderers, from league two, see tottenham hotspur pulled out of the hat they quite like the idea of a trip to white hart lane. and that's what they get. you can see the full draw on the bbc sport website. look at those celebrations. we were talking yesterday about how some viewers were disappointed it was just premier league games on the television for free to view viewers over the weekend. look at that. that is what it is about. lower level tea m is what it is about. lower level team is going to white hart lane. you have to celebrate with your phonein you have to celebrate with your phone in your hand, don't you? jamie vardy‘s phone in your hand, don't you? jamie va rdy‘s party phone in your hand, don't you? jamie vardy‘s party all over the internet. leeds united made it through last night, though they were given a scare by league two cambridge united, who went ahead through 0ochay ikpeazu. but alex mowatt scored the winner for leeds. they'll go to either non—league sutton united or afc wimbledon next. england's former rugby captain chris robshaw will miss the whole
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of the six nations with a shoulder injury. the flanker damaged his left shoulder in harlequins' match with worcester on new year's day and is expected to be out of action for 12 weeks. joe root should be available for the start of england's one—day series against india. root will fly out tomorrow, having stayed in the uk to be with his partnerfor the birth of theirfirst child. the rest of the squad are already in india, including captain eoin morgan who was criticised by some for missing the tour of bangladesh because of security concerns. when things have been announced like that you can plan how to deal with them. my way of dealing with that was get away from things, which i did. andi was get away from things, which i did. and i did not see a great deal of it. i think my family has seen a lot of it and were very offended, but that is part and parcel of being in the limelight sometimes. but certainly standing here i do not regret my decision. johanna konta's preparations for the australian open continue to go well.
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the british number one is through to the third round of the sydney international after a comfortable straight sets win over australia's daria gavrilova. that was in the last few minutes. do you still have a christmas tree in your backyard? ours is right there. behind the camera. laughing. . this is the annual world christmas tree throwing competition held in germany. it includes three different types of borrowing, the highjump, which you can see there, the javelin, and this guy has a rope, i am not sure if that contravenes the rules, and spinning. that is one of the categories. it looks like it is allowed. christopher miloff went the service, 22.5 metres. that is a long way. miner still on the front garden. it fell over in the wind this morning. i saw it as i was
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heading out. at least i have something interesting to do with it. i have always thought the welly wack is the best. my dad broke the record. 641. breakfast. northern ireland is facing its most serious political crisis in a decade, following the resignation of deputy first minister martin mcguinness. the departure of the sinn fein politician from the country's power—sharing executive means democratic unionist leader arlene foster loses her position as first minister. to find out more, we're joined byjon tonge, professor of politics at university of liverpool, who specialises in northern irish politics. i suppose it is an interesting time for you but worrying times for others. this is about, just explain to us, renewable heat scheme bringing down the government. arlene foster, first minister, she was the
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minister in charge of the scheme for three years. she is being directly blamed by political opponents for what went on in terms of the scheme. basically, the difference between the skin, trialled on this side of the skin, trialled on this side of the waters, was to try to encourage people to go to more energy efficient ways of dealing with feel. —— scheme. arlene foster has been held responsible by her opponents by this watched scheme, find a lot of money. —— botched. this watched scheme, find a lot of money. -- botched. that is the base of the problem. martin mcguinness has stepped down. that means she has to ta ke has stepped down. that means she has to take over the role. she is in a difficult position. two resignations yesterday. 0ne voluntary from martin mcguinness. and another because arlene foster was stood down by him. you have to have a first minister for the groups respectively. what happens next, sinn fein has seven
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days to nominate a replacement for martin mcguinness. that will not happen. that is it. the ball is now in the secretary of state's court to get the parties around the table to come up with a compromise. it is difficult to see where that will lie because arlene foster says she will not step aside for a single day in advance of an enquiry taking place into what happened. if she sticks to that position, there is no reason to suggest she will move from it, we are looking at elections in northern ireland. what will happen in terms of elections, it looks like the dup and sinn fein will still be the largest parties. haps sinn fein could become the largest and provide the first minister. —— perhaps. but how do you restore this in northern ireland if you have the same problem and you have no enquiry into the heating scheme? fascinating. could this be the end of her political
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career? it would be if the dup is not returned as the largest party in northern ireland. if she is re—elected, the dup will make her claim she has a mandate to carry on as first ministerfrom claim she has a mandate to carry on as first minister from the electorate. thank you for your time. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: further misery for commuters as southern rail drivers begin their latest walk out. britain can be better off after brexit, according tojeremy corbyn, who also says labour is not wedded to free movement. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we are off to south ayrshire. good morning. it is a cloudy start. of us. morning. it is a cloudy start. of us. a beautiful picture here. —— it isa us. a beautiful picture here. —— it is a cloudy start for some of us. at the moment we have some clear skies. under the clear skies temperatures
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have dropped. there is quite a bit of clout around. here and there the clout is thick enough to be producing some showers, so the south—west england, the midlands, east anglia, northern england. and as we drift into scotland a very similar story. some clear skies and also some showers. perhaps heavier across scotland. then we run into this area of rain. it is a warm front which is coming our way. the rain on it will be substantial. what it's going to do is move from the west to the east through the day so the cloud will build a racing and eradicating the area of sunshine for most of us. and then behind it we've got a cold front on its heels. and behind the cold front you will find it will slowly start to turn colder through the day. the thing you will notice tonight is the strengthening win. now across the far north of scotla nd win. now across the far north of scotland we are looking at gus degale even severe gales. it will be a windy night across—the—board especially from north wales,
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norfolk, north was —— looking at gusts to gales. elsewhere, higher levels of the m62 might be affected, and through the course of tomorrow strong winds will be an issue and might lead to travel disruption. tomorrow it will be colder for us all. the weather fronts tomorrow it will be colder for us all. the weatherfronts pushing tomorrow it will be colder for us all. the weather fronts pushing to the new continent. there will be some sunshine but with the cold air we will see an increasing wintry showers. even at levels across scotland, and the hills across england, wales and northern ireland. it is still going to be windy tomorrow. as we head on into thursday you can see the strong wind from these isobars in the north of the country. first eight also brings low pressure. this area of low pressure is giving us such a headache. what we think of the moment will happen is as it comes across southern counties it will engage with the cold air. that
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combination means that some of us will see some sleet and snow. so if we look at the picture you can see in the north we have wintry showers. again at lower levels at times. and we have rain coming in across south wales in southern england. as eating gauges with the cold air we will see some of the snow on the hills and we might see some at low levels. we don't expect it to last for terribly long. but thejury don't expect it to last for terribly long. but the jury on this is out and it could change. it could go further north, it could also go further north, it could also go further south. don't make this the last forecast that you see. these are the temperatures. in the court airand wind it are the temperatures. in the court air and wind it will feel more like below freezing for many. —— in the cold airand wind. below freezing for many. —— in the cold air and wind. i like the way you work a little advert for the weather in as well. it was really good. it won't be the last one that we watch, we promise. motorists could be paying 25% more for petrol by the end of this month, according to one industry body. ben is finding out why. yes, sorry, iam
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yes, sorry, i am off the bearer of bad news. this is research from the petrol retailers' association, and we can speak to them in just a sec. but to understand what we pay at the pumps, we need to look at global oil prices. they've been much lower lately. take a look at this graph. oil prices have more than halved since summer 2015, and that meant cheaper fuel for us, even though much of what we pay at the pump is actually tax. this morning the petrol retailers' association says it expects oil to return to $60 a barrel. we've not seen since prices like that since june 2015. and back then, prices rose to 117p per litre. but today, many of us are already paying that, so its expected motorists will be paying over £1.25 a litre by february. brian madderson is chairman of the petrol retailers association. good morning. when we see these
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figures, we have a tendency to get caught up in the wholesale price. what the world oil markets are doing. how does it affect what we pay at the pump? a lot of it is tax. yes, we still have duty at 57.9 5p per litre, with 20% vat it works out at about 65% of what we pay at the pump is tax. we are lobbying the treasury very hard to try to reduce the duty by at least 3p per litre. that would be good for consumers around the uk. in the meantime, the other levers which are important for the prices are brent crude, the oil price standard, and that has almost doubled since last year. why is it rising? because opec at last seemed to have come to an agreement when
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they met in november to cut production from february. that production from february. that production cut is meant to stabilise and push prices up because all of the opec countries, indeed, russia has been included in that, have got their own internal economic problems and they are desperate to get a higher price. they have held the western world to ransom before and i think this is what they are doing a game. we are looking at the likelihood of $60 per barrel —— doing it again. the second thing is pound sterling against the us dollar because oil prices are in us dollars and yesterday we had a 10 week low of pound sterling when it collapsed. you may say it has come at the worst time with prices going up for everything else, even in the shops, we won't see wages go up this year and, you are right, inflation rising
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asa and, you are right, inflation rising as a result of the fall in the value of the pound, is there anything to avoid this? yes, pressure the chancellor to reduce duty. will he listen? it is a familiar tale. he never really does it. yes, because their own research, which they did in 2014, showed that reductions in duty have got a beneficial lock onto the whole economy. remember, the uk isa the whole economy. remember, the uk is a transport economy. 100% of our food moves by road and 80% of all goods. if you have got higher delivery costs, higher distribution, that will affect the whole economy and be negative. it is really good to talk to you. thank you for explaining that. i will have the figures from morrisons in 10 minutes. stay tuned. have a look at these incredible pictures. for the first time, scientists have
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captured incredible images of chimpanzees making straws to drink water. but what more does it tell us about the primate described as our closest relative? joining us in the studio now is susanne shultz, an evolutionary biologist from manchester university. it looks fantastically efficient, doesn't it, so what have they done? they have developed a strategy to get water out of trees. and what is nice is it shows another new behaviour that chimps have developed. there are other populations in africa where we see different solutions to the same problem. we can go from population to population and you see chimpanzees doing different hades. what have they done with the stick? —— different behaviours. they have chosen the stick, they chew on the end of it and basically it makes it something that soaks up water. sponge. they put it into a tree
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will, which they can access the water, then they suck on the end of the stick. essentially like you say, it is learning how to solve a problem, and i am sure i have seen footage of chimps trying to get honey out of nests, so it is about saying, what do i need to do, i will use a straw? that is what they do better than any other close relative. they develop a toolkit of things to solve problems in their environment. they can extract honey, they do termite fishing, and other population in central africa uses leaves, they chew up the leaves to use as a sponge. leaves, they chew up the leaves to use as a sponge. they look at the environment and solve problems. and they learn from each other. there is a baby chimp learning as well. that is another thing that is unusual. they use what we call social
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learning a lot. if one animal in the group solve the problem, another will come and watch them and go, i will come and watch them and go, i will try that as well. what does it tell us more broadly about intelligence? there have been a number of studies looking at the different kinds of behaviours primates use and what we know it is primates use and what we know it is primates with big brains like chimpanzees have bigger toolkit than primates with more brains. and if we wa nt to primates with more brains. and if we want to put this in the context of human abolition we can look at this as potentially an early springboard into our own use of technology and innovation. because what they do is they develop new strategies and tools but not to the extent that we do. obviously. really fascinating. and when you see pictures from your point of view, that is a breakthrough? i'm not sure it is a massive breakthrough. is very interesting. we have a lot of detailed information on chimpanzees from across africa and they do lots
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of interesting things, so this is another interesting thing that they do. have you ever tried drinking tea through a chocolate bar? you by the end of both and suck tea through the chocolate bar. 0h, end of both and suck tea through the chocolate bar. oh, you have to experience this. really? it is a life changer. thank you. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: the parents of actor peter davison used to own a sweet shop, so how did he do in an experiment to go without sugar for 15 days? we'll ask him later. no chocolate tea, that's the shore. i want you to show me this. —— that's for sure. i cannot name the chocolate bar that i use it with, but it has a waiter and it is covered in chocolate. —— wafer. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill.
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after the disruption of yesterday's tube strike, let's start with the travel. and on the tube a normal service has resumed this morning apart from tfl. 0n the roads, and in vauxhall, parry street on the one way system is part blocked following a building fire. the a1 holloway road remains closed until next week at upper holloway station. and in fulham, new kings road closed westbound at hurlingham road because of a burst water main. today is the start of a three day strike by southern train drivers. it means there'll be no trains running at all. but, for the first time, southern‘s parent company, govia thameslink rail, will use around 200 coaches to transport passengers to other stations. some of british airways cabin crew go on strike today for 48 hours. heathrow passengers will have to amend their travel times as more than 2,000 air crew walk out in protest over pay. gatwick and london city airport will not be affected and ba says that all passengers will be able to complete theirjourneys. in other news: a special service has been held at southwark cathedral to mark the re—casting of two of its 12 bells. following a mediaeval
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practice, the two bells — called andrew and nicholas. names were given to bells and they were baptised i think because they have a voice, so that there is something almost human about them. the recasting and the sort of the re—engineering of parts of the bells only happens probably once every 100 years, so this is a once in more than a lifetime event. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. there are one or two brighter spells out there this morning but further east there is a potential of maybe a shower or two. they will clear away quickly to brighter spells and the day should be mostly dry. we've got this north—westerly breeze. it will feel chillier than yesterday. but the mild air will start pushing as we head to the end
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of the afternoon with some thick cloud moving in from the north—west. the maximum temperature around seven or eight degrees. as we head into the evening and overnight, outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. the mild air starting to work in. overnight the temperature won't rise. the minimum between eight and 10 degrees. again one or two outbreaks of light rain and drizzle into dawn tomorrow morning but they will clear away quickly. the wind starts to strengthen tomorrow. we should see a little brightness through the day. you will start to feel the wind. the temperature is similar. we will start to notice the temperature drop, the colder air moving in wednesday night into thursday and we could see this area moving in as we head through thursday, and that could fall little wintry, especially over high ground, so it is something we are watching very closely. tomorrow, similar temperatures, much colder through thursday and friday and, like i said, for thursday the potential for wintry showers.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more misery for hundreds of thousands of passengers as southern rail is hit by a fresh wave of strikes. more than 2,000 trains have been cancelled on some of the rail network's busiest commuter lines. good morning. it's tuesday the 10th of january. thank you for turning the tv on this morning. also this morning: first, our main story. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time
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that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement. in sport, a bigger world cup. but will it be better? fifa are set to approve plans to have 48 teams at the tournament in 2026. and carol has the weather. good morning. a quiet day in terms of weather. some sunshine. a band of rain coming in from the west and going east through the day. tomorrow will be very windy with some of us in the south of england seeing gales. it turns colder with some snow. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. another strike is affecting services on southern rail. drivers belonging to the aslef union will stop work for three days this week. the dispute, about the role of the guard on trains, has been going on for nearly ten months. 0ur transport correspondent, richard westcott, has this report. it's a dispute which has been
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crippling one of britain's busiest train lines for ten months. another strike today from aslef. commuters are at their wits‘ end. it is endless. you have to get up early to go underground or get a bus. it takes longer. i am abandoning going out to town tomorrow. we will see how things go later in the week. i have managed to get a train but it is not good at all. it is really packed out. and it seems talks between the two sides have turned nasty. the tactics that they've used have been particularly malicious. at best they have been dishonest, disingenuious, deceitful, and at worst, spiteful. 0ur reality is that we are now experiencing a new type of industrial relations in our industry that we have not seen for some time. it's a row over the role of the on board guard. southern wants drivers to take over the safety—critical job of closing the doors. but the union says its safer for the guard to keep doing it.
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a report by the regulator says southern‘s plans were safe as long as they provided the right equipment and training. all of the 2000 plus services in the company will be cancelled today, tomorrow, and friday. there'll be huge disruption on thursday too because the trains will be in the wrong place. and that's on top of an overtime ban which is cutting services daily. another three—day strike is planned later this month. the issue of driver—controlled trains is affecting southern today, but it could easily spread to other franchises through britain. richard westcott, bbc news. we will speak to the director in just a few minutes. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement. but he will warn that the uk cant afford to lose full access to the single market. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson, is in westminster. iainjeremy corbyn has been under pressure to respond to labour voters
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concerns over immigration, hasn't he? it is good to speak to you again. that is right on a couple of fronts. first of all, he wants more scrutiny of theresa may's plans. even his mps are asking him what labour's plans are asking him what labour's plans are after brexit. he has always been pressed to do more to reach out to labour voters who voted to leave in the referendum outside of london. he is addressing the issue of immigration head on. he is showing he recognises concerns about the effo rts he recognises concerns about the efforts of immigration. he is also saying he is no longer wedded to the free movement within europe. but his policies do not seem to be changing much at all. his solutions on immigration are similar to what he put forward before. an impact fund to help those areas with high levels
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of immigration put forward by gordon brown. he will also say they will try to prevent unscrupulous employers bringing in cheap labour from the eu to undercut workers already in britain. elsewhere in his speech he is talking positively about some of the benefits of brexit, including that the future of the government could intervene on behalf of british industry. some old eu rules could be swept aside copies of his mps are saying privately that this proves his heart was not in the campaign to stay inside the eu in the first place. it is good to talk to you as ever. thank you very much. a 15—year—old girl has been arrested after the death of a seven—year—old girl in york. the younger girl was found with life—threatening injuries in the woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon. she was taken to hospital but died a short time later. the teenager remains in police custody and is being questioned by officers from north yorkshire police. boris johnson, who's visiting washington, says he's confident britain will be first in line for a trade deal with the new us administration.
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the foreign secretary has been meeting senior republican politicians who've promised to make a us—uk trade deal a priority, barack 0bama warned in april that the uk would be at the back of the queue if voters chose brexit. the british and irish governments say they're going to work to try to find a solution to the most serious political crisis in northern ireland in a decade. yesterday, the deputy first minister, sinn fein‘s martin mcguinness resigned. it came after weeks of tensions between his party and their partners in the power—sharing government, the democratic unionists. 0ur ireland correspondent, chris page, reports. hejoins us from he joins us from belfast. good morning. how serious is this and what happens next? this morning, the devolved government in northern ireland is without its leaders. that means the administration has stopped functioning. what happens next?
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after seven days under the westminster cabinet member should call a new election to the assembly. he might have flexibility over the timing of that giving them time to bring the parties together over negotiations. he says he will do what he can to restore stability. politicians are preparing for an election. say it happens as seems likely, the last election was eight months ago. the dup and sinn fein we re months ago. the dup and sinn fein were ahead of the other parties. if that happens again, they are unlikely to go back to each other straightaway because the disagreement between them was so serious. this was after a scandal of a green energy scheme. there were other issues that they disagreed on, like same—sex marriage. sinn fein wa nts to like same—sex marriage. sinn fein wants to bring it into northern ireland and dup said no. and sinn fein wanted to remain after the exit. they are going to see if they
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can resolve differences. northern ireland could be without a devolved government for quite some time under those circumstances. police in northamptonshire have closed a stretch of the m1 motorway after a body was found in the road in the early hours of the morning. the northbound carriageway between junctions 16 and 17, near northampton and rugby, was shut following the discovery and is expected to remain closed for most of today. police are investigating the circumstances of the death. there has just been an update on how morrison's fared over christmas. we have details. how did they do? they have details. how did they do? they have done really well for a change. expectations were a rise of 1.1%. but they are actually up by 2.9%. that is huge! a 2.9% increase but they are actually up by 2.9%. that is huge! a 2.996 increase in sales. that is over the really important lucrative christmas period, nine weeks that cover
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november and december. the best figures for morrison's incidentally in seven years. it is important because they have been a retailer that has really struggled of late because it is part way through a big turnaround plan. latency problems of its take over with safeway and all that. they say they are back on track. what is interesting if they are buying fewer items. shoppers are going into the supermarket but spending more on less items. maybe it is showing we are feeling better off and are trading off over christmas. that is the figure for morrison's. this week we will get figures for tesco and sainsbury is and jon lewis. and you have figures on how much we as a nation have been spending. not asked. laughing. . that is what people want to know, us. “—
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. that is what people want to know, us. —— us. it is a familiar tale. . that is what people want to know, us. -- us. it is a familiar tale. if it is on line you have to be more careful. but you can buy at the last minute on the high street. and big discounts of up to 40%. we are used to them coming after christmas but now they want more in the doors before christmas. british retail consortium says we spend 1% more over the year. that is important. and on line sales were up and high street sales were down but it really was a story of trying to shop for a bargain right before christmas to try to get people through the doors. i think this year could be a difficult one because inflation will start to filter through and prices, we believe, will start rising. you are always a bearer of bad news. but what about morrison's! ok. thank you. what began as a disagreement over staffing on modern trains has escalated into the worst disruption to british railways in more than two decades.
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as another strike by train drivers gets under way this morning, the ten—month southern rail dispute shows no sign of coming to an end. we will be speaking to the company in a moment, but first let's get the views of some of the passengers who will be affected. joining us from horsham train station now is angie doll, southern's passenger services director. thank you very much for coming on this morning. we have heard from some of your passengers already this morning calling the situation a nightmare. what is your answer to that and people who are sick of this disruption? we are deeply sorry we cannot provide a service today. we apologise to our passengers. the union are withdrawing labour today ona union are withdrawing labour today on a dispute that we think is totally unjustified. the action they are taking is totally disproportionate to the changes we are making. we might be struggling to hear it you but we will carry on. the drivers union say you are being inflexible and you are not making any movements or concessions. how
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ferries that? well, we have made concessions. the changes we want to make are not revolutionary. the drivers on strike today are doing what we are already doing. trains already operate with drivers closing the door. just last week the railway chief inspector said this is a safe way to operate on trains. safety is not the issue. we have been flexible and sat down at the negotiation table and have been prepared to negotiate but we need the unions to be prepared to negotiate a compromise as well with us to reach a solution. the same union came to a negotiation settlement with scot rail. why haven't you succeeded? the dispute has a slight difference. it is slightly more complex than the one here. our request to the union is your drivers are already doing this. it is not something new. we have also said that where we have
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had a conductor on the train we will have a separate person on the train who is safety competent going forward. to demonstrate that commitment to that we are treating 100 more people than today. this is not about losing jobs. nobody in this dispute is losing theirjob or salaries or anything about concessions. in fact they will be better off with salaries for people who have moved on to on board managers. and guaranteed pay passes. this dispute is about union steel and it is about an agreement they must have in order to operate the railway and we feel that what we are doing at the moment is reasonable because we already do it. 30% of trains across the whole of the uk operate like this and it is a perfectly safe way to operate. how long can this realistically go on for? do you not have a duty of care for? do you not have a duty of care for your passengers to resolve this
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as quickly as possible? absolutely. every opportunity our door is open to speak to the unions about a way to speak to the unions about a way to resolve this issue. we had said to resolve this issue. we had said to the unions that striking is not the answer. coming to the table and talking and listening and having an open adult conversation is what will bring this dispute to an end. thank you for talking to us this morning. apologies if you were struggling to hear her. hopefully you could hear some of that at home. she is trying to represent the southern rail side of things in this dispute which has been causing real chaos for so many commuters. so many people. big problems today as well. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: further misery for commuters as southern rail drivers begin their latest walk out. britain can be better off after brexit, according tojeremy corbyn, who also says labour is not wedded to free movement. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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she has had some foreboding clouds today and here is another. the grey, the grey. good morning. yes it is a lovely picture. today it will turn cloudy. for some of us we have a cold start with cloud breaks. we have a weather front coming from the west. along the weather front it will turn mild. this morning you can see where we have the breaks. where we have cloud it is producing showers for south—west england, the midlands, kent, east anglia, northern england, north—east scotland. these will fade through the morning and brighten up. this is a weather front coming in, the morning and brighten up. this is a weatherfront coming in, it the morning and brighten up. this is a weather front coming in, it is a warm front. it will turn milder as it pushes from the west towards the east through the day. there is the sometime first thing. here comes the rain with the cloud building. it is eradicating the sunshine. it will brighten up once again and we will see some sunshine to the west.
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temperature—wise, 7—10, and it will cool down through the latter part of the afternoon for northern ireland, more than expected for the course of the night. heading through the night it is going to turn increasingly windy. we are looking at severe gales for the north of scotland. it is going to be windy from north wales, the midlands, norfolk, northwards. by the end of the night, for the pennines, the southern uplands, we could have 70 mph, which might impact high your levels of the m62, for example, and tomorrow it will be a windy day anyway. even at lower levels we are looking at gusty winds, saint areas, lower levels we are looking at gusty winds, saintareas, north lower levels we are looking at gusty winds, saint areas, north wales, north midlands and norfolk northwards. tomorrow, across scotland, sleet or snow at low levels ever. that will come out of the showers at northern ireland, northern england and north wales in
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the hills. now, talking of turning cold, as we head on into thursday, wednesday into thursday, you can still see a squeeze of the isobars, so it will be windy in the north, and we have this low pressure area coming from the south—west, that will bring some rain and as it engages with the cold air there is the risk of snow falling. so we could see some snow across some of the hills across the south of england, but even at lower levels we could see some snow crossing even as far east as east anglia. the jury is out on this one, as you may have noticed, with the rain further north, but equally it might drift further south and we will sees no showers for the north of scotland. it is going to feel cold —— we will see snow showers. although the temperatures might be three or four, in the wind it will feel sub zero, so another day for wrapping up warmly. and as we head towards the
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latter pa rt warmly. and as we head towards the latter part of the week, the longest north or north—westerly, it is turning cold with some further wintry showers in the forecast. i am going to leave it at that and get rid of this frog. i wanted to ask you if you can, my favourite word of the day is thunder snow. it is the same as thunder in the rain shower but the air is cold enough for the shower to fall as a snow shower and with thunder and lightning it is thunder snow. i cannot believe you asked her another question. thunder snow. i cannot believe you asked her another questionlj thunder snow. i cannot believe you asked her another question. i know. i know. ithought asked her another question. i know. i know. i thought the answer was going to be yes. i know how you feel. live throat clearing. thank you. iam feel. live throat clearing. thank you. i am sure she will be fine once she has had a couple of tea. wolf whistles, beeping car horns and concerns over safety — just some of the things women say they worry about when they go out for a run. according to research
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from england athletics, more than a third of women have been subjected to some form of harassment while running on their own, as holly hamilton reports. # you can call me runner, # freedom is power. # run, run, run, run, run # it's quickly become one of the uk's most popular sports with the number of people in england increasing more than 70% in the past 10 years. but if you're a woman it's notjust cold weather that can be more than a little offputting. with a show of hands, how many people feel they have been harassed while out running? that is pretty much all of you. it's people trying to make fun, have a joke and stuff, so it hasn't been harassment, but you could take it that way and could feel a bit intimidated by it. and it seems they're not alone. research from england athletics has revealed that more than a third of british women have been harassed in some way while running alone.
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more than 60% said they feel anxious and nearly half of those asked said that was due to personal safety concerns. i got shouted at by a couple of men as i was running around, and whistled at, that was quite intimidating, yeah. you get beeps of horns. i was running through a village i know and a group of lads started running at the side of me. it was a bit intimidating. but i kept running and thinking, you won't beat me, crack on. you do get the odd car that pips its horn as we go past. races in cars. nothing else better to do than pip their horn and wolfwhistle. but british women are fit for it, with most insisting it wouldn't put them off altogether. running in a group is a lot better than if you're running on your own. when you're in a group it's the support and everything that you go through with everybody around you, so it doesn't feel as intimidating as if you're running on your own. who's gonna mess with us?!
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these runners say it's about safety in numbers, so all that's left to worry about is keeping up. we have had so many comments about that. it isn't just we have had so many comments about that. it isn'tjust women who have trouble. lots of men have the same thing. nick says, i have been punched by the imperial war museum and verbally abused as well. joining us now in the studio now arejenny o'brien from england athletics and sam mollaghan who is a runner. also part of this girl campaign — fantastic. i haven't experienced any problems or any verbal abuse. that is because i always run in a group setting. it isn't something i can talk about. is it because you want to run in a group setting? do you feel safer? there are so many
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benefits of running in a group. great friendships have been forged from running groups. i think it is the motivation and the encouragement. if i didn't run with other people i might find it easy to give up. that is why i run in a group setting. we have had lots of people saying they have experienced the sort of stuff we are talking about, cars beeping, people running alongside, shouting things as well, how big an issue is it? we asked 2000 of our ladies past of this campaign, they found 60% had anxiety around running on rhett —— running of their own. it could be just a look, if someone has low confidence and they are going out for the first time and somebody toots their horn, it cannot am off and mean they don't continue going up. that is why we have these groups, so we have a safe
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and friendly environment to get out and friendly environment to get out and enjoy running. you talk about safety, lots of people talking about that, specially at night, so your recommendation is to run with a group and not on your own? yes, as a group and not on your own? yes, as a group you are more visible. we have high visibility vests we recommend people wear. running with a group means you are going on a pathway thatis means you are going on a pathway that is already risk assessed. the safety elements are there. you have a trained and qualified leader taking you out. you know that it is a safe environment. some people say they don't really mind running on their own even at night with the headphones on and they see those beeps and comments as gentle encouragement and they laugh it off and get on with it. i suppose it depends on the individual as well. it isa depends on the individual as well. it is a real individual thing. i suppose i am a little thick—skinned. lam quite suppose i am a little thick—skinned. i am quite proud of myself or giving ita i am quite proud of myself or giving it a go. i am quite proud of myself or giving ita go. i i am quite proud of myself or giving ita go. lam i am quite proud of myself or giving it a go. i am lucky that i would be able to brush it aside and keep
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going. ifind running able to brush it aside and keep going. i find running quite able to brush it aside and keep going. ifind running quite hard. i would find it more motivating to keep going. i would say, come and join us. don't comment on what we are doing. come and find your group. don't you think it is a shame that we live in the 21st century and people are being put off or scared — going for a run isn't a big deal, and people shouldn't be put off by this behaviour? it is a shame. one of the messages is, if you are beating a horn making a comment, maybe you think it is a laugh and you don't realise the impact it has on the individual, and the message we want to put out is, think about that person. we want to integrate people to be healthy and happy and enjoy running and that behaviour doesn't help anyone. the number of people — what is encouraging is the number of people doing it. one woman says, i loved a good start to the
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day. my co—workers have in the past expressed concern about my safety when i run on my own. i always change my husband sometimes. i have my iphone on. i put my mind at ease. my my iphone on. i put my mind at ease. my safety is something i think about each time. that is the key, be aware. absolutely, be mindful. if you are walking, if you are on your own, make sure you are on a well lit path, tell someone where you are going, straightforward tips. we know how many people are running, 7.1 million people were running last year, so it is the second most popular sport in the uk and we want to make sure more people enjoy it. what would you say about your journey, has it changed your life? it has changed my life. has it? it isa it has changed my life. has it? it is a bit ofa it has changed my life. has it? it is a bit of a cliche but i cannot even begin to start with what this journey i have been on has given to me. i started running two years ago
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as an absolute beginner and then i got involved with this girl can, which wasjust, yes, the response from the campaign about getting women active. it was brilliant, wasn't it? on a personal note it was brilliant for me, i think my confidence and self—esteem has risen from that. and being part of the run together campaign, i from that. and being part of the run togethercampaign, ican from that. and being part of the run together campaign, i can pass it on to others and encourage people to come and reap the benefits. it is such... i feel great when i run. i find it really hard. when i finish i think, i find it really hard. when i finish i think, lam find it really hard. when i finish i think, i am superwoman.” find it really hard. when i finish i think, i am superwoman. i know that feeling. hating going out and eventually... it is like, when will this finnish? when i have done it, i think, yay! so many comments. thank you. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: with class sizes on the increase, we'll see how one secondary school copes with 46 children
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in a maths class. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we won't go for a run. back at 7:30am. got two minutes! good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. after the disruption of yesterday's tube strike, let's start with the travel. and on the tube a normal service has resumed this morning. apart from tfl's part closure. 0n the roads, the a13 is down to one lane coming in to town just after the beckton flyover. queues from rainham. today is the start of a three day strike by southern train drivers. it means there'll be no trains running at all. but, for the first time, southern's parent company, govia thameslink rail,
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will use around 200 coaches to transport passengers to other stations. some of british airways cabin crew go on strike today for 48 hours. heathrow passengers will have to amend their travel times as more than 2,000 air crew walk out in protest over pay. gatwick and london city airport will not be affected and ba says that all passengers will be able to complete theirjourneys. in other news: a special service has been held at southwark cathedral to mark the re—casting of two of its 12 bells. following a mediaeval practice, the bells were baptised, garlanded with flowers and even given godparents. the dean of southwark also explained why they were given names — andrew and nicolas. names were given to bells and they were baptised i think because they have a voice, so that there is something almost human about them. the recasting and the sort of the re—engineering of parts of the bells only happens probably once every 100 years, so this is a once in more than a lifetime event. let's have a check on the weather
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now with kate kinsella. good morning. there are one or two brighter spells out there this morning but further east there is a potential of maybe a shower or two. they will clear away quickly though to brighter spells and the day should be mostly dry. we've got this north—westerly breeze. it will feel chillier than it did yesterday. but the more mild air will start pushing as we head to the end of the afternoon with some thicker cloud moving in from the north—west. the maximum temperature today around seven or eight degrees. as we head into the evening and overnight, some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. that mild air starting to work its way in. overnight the temperature won't rise compared to today's daytime temperature. the minimum between eight and 10 degrees. again one or two outbreaks of light rain and drizzle into dawn tomorrow morning but they will clear away quickly.
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the wind starts to strengthen tomorrow. we should see at least a little brightness through the day. but you will start to feel the wind. the temperature is similar. you're gonna start to notice the temperature drop, the colder air moving in wednesday night into thursday and we could see this area moving in as we head through thursday, and that could fall a little wintry, especially over high ground, so it is something we are watching very closely. tomorrow, similar temperatures, much, much colder though as we head through thursday and friday and, like i said, for thursday the potential for wintry showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. another strike is affecting services on southern rail. drivers belonging to the aslef union will stop work for three days this week. the dispute, about the role of the guard on trains, has been going on for nearly ten months. just 16 trains will run today
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instead of the nearly 2,500 that were scheduled. every day, our door is open to talk to the union to resolve this issue. striking is not the answer. coming and sitting around the table and talking and listening in and having an adult conversation is what will bring this dispute to an end. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement of people across the eu. mr corbyn's critics have previously accused him of failing to heed the concerns of traditional labour voters who opted to leave the eu. he'll say that labour will demand "fair rules and reasonably managed migration" from any brexit deal. a 15—year—old girl has been arrested after the death of a seven—year—old girl in york.
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the younger girl was found with life—threatening injuries in the woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon. she was taken to hospital but died a short time later. the teenager remains in police custody and is being questioned by officers from north yorkshire police. police in northamptonshire have closed a stretch of the m1 motorway after a body was found in the road in the early hours of the morning. the northbound carriageway between junctions 16 and 17, near northampton and rugby, has been shut following the discovery and is expected to remain closed for most of today. the british and irish governments say they're going to work to try to find a solution to the most serious political crisis in northern ireland in a decade. yesterday, the deputy first minister, sinn fein's martin mcguinness resigned. it came after weeks of tension between his party and their partners in the power—sharing government, the democratic unionists. northern ireland secretary james brokenshire is expected to make a statement to mps today. boris johnson, who's visiting washington,
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says he's confident britain will be first in line for a trade deal with the new us administration. the foreign secretary has been meeting senior republican politicians who've promised to make a us—uk trade deal a priority, barack 0bama warned in april that the uk would be at the back of the queue if voters chose brexit. the owners of a convenience store in the canadian city of toronto have taken to social media for help after squirrels began stealing their merchandise. the grocery store owner says the squirrels have stolen more than 40 chocolate bars. the owners have tried closing the door to stop them from getting in, but the rodents manage to sneak in anyway. i wonder if that squirrel drinks his tea. you have drunk tea through
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chocolate bars. i don't know how we got to this conversation. i think that a kitkat is the best one to do. it started in australia with a tim tam and it is called the tim tam slam. i have lived a sheltered life. i will open your eyes. we need chocolate bars. can we do it live on brea kfast? chocolate bars. can we do it live on breakfast? it would be very unappealing. let us talk about massive world cups. they have taken it literally when we said we would talk about a big world cup. not talking talking about the treaty size but the size of the tournament. gianni has a big plant to expand the amount of teams to 48. —— infantino has a plan to. there has been
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criticism of whether that would dilute the skilled. i am in. me to. look at the euros. look at iceland. i question the reasons behind it. it is already massive and goes on for a long time with many teams involved. to expand it further is certainly money at the bottom of it somewhere. according to infa ntino money at the bottom of it somewhere. according to infantino that is not the case. 521 million extra. it looks as though we'll be seeing more teams involved in the world cup in future. fifa are expected to agree plans later to expand the finals from 32 teams to 48 teams starting from the 2026 world cup. there'd be 16 groups of three, and then a straight knock—out stage. critics say it will dilute the quality of the football but one world cup winner disagrees.
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the african continent will benefit. the asian continent will benefit. we should not be scared. the euros have shown that ireland, the welsh, these are countries that know about football. now the world of football knows the techniques. the entertainment will be there for sure anyway. claudio ranieri has won fifa's first coach of the year award. the leicester city manager was in zurich to pick up the title, recognition of his achievement in leading the 5000:1 shots to the premier league title last season. i think what happened last season in england was amazing, it was something strange. the god of football said leicester must win. only this. and who else but cristiano ronaldo was player of the year. he added the fifa trophy to the ballon d'or award he picked up last month, after a season in which he captained portugal to the european championship and won the champions league
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and club world cup with real madrid. the fa cup holders, manchester united, have been drawn to play wigan athletic in the fourth round. but here's what the cup is all about. wycombe wanderers, from league two, see tottenham hotspur pulled out of the hat they quite like the idea of a trip to white hart lane. and that's what they get. you can see the full draw on the bbc sport website. leeds united made it through last night, though they were given a scare by league two cambridge united, who went ahead through 0ochay ikpeazu. but alex mowatt scored the winner for leeds. they'll go to either non—league sutton united or afc wimbledon next. england's former rugby captain chris robshaw will miss the whole of the six nations with a shoulder injury. the flanker damaged his left shoulder in harlequins' match
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with worcester on new year's day and is expected to be out of action for 12 weeks. johanna konta's preparations for the australian open continue to go well. the british number one is through to the third round of the sydney international after a comfortable straight sets win over australia's daria gavrilova. that was in the last hour. the uk has becomes the first country in the world to officially recognise parkour as a sport. the home country sports councils have approved parkour uk's application for recognition of the sport and the national governing body. also known as freerunning or art du deplacement, is the non—competitive physical discipline of training to move freely over and through any terrain using only the abilities of the body. it is great to watch but how does it differfrom any it is great to watch but how does it differ from any other sport or physical activity in that you use only the abilities of the body? you
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might usea only the abilities of the body? you might use a bat. you will not use one to get over a wall, will you?m is interesting to see what athletes can do and the strength that they have declined and run and jump. it is brilliant. —— to climb. hopefully we have it in the olympics one day. drinking tea through biscuits and parkour. interesting. anyone who has ever tried to keep just a couple of teenagers in line will probably be in awe of secondary school teachers who can control a class of 30. but imagine being the sole adult trying to keep order among 46 young people. that's the reality facing maths teachers at one school, as research by bbc yorkshire has found that the number of children in england being taught in classes of 36 or more has almost trebled in five years. dave edwards reports. this boy is 13 and goes to a high
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school in west yorkshire. when he started his year 9 maths lessons, he noticed something different about the classroom. it looked more like a university lecture theatre with one teacher and 46 children. it was quite difficult because there are so many people around you and you are distracted to talk to them and are not focusing as much on the lesson. everyone agrees it is too much in one class. i am a maths teacher myself and i find it difficult. i understand they are good teachers but they would learn more if they we re but they would learn more if they were ina but they would learn more if they were in a smaller class. keeping control of them is more difficult. there is only one adult in the class with them and it is difficult to make sure they are all safe. the head teacher said the move was prompted by changes to the maths exa m prompted by changes to the maths exam and difficulties recruiting specialist maths teachers. it is a pilot scheme and the school says results so far are good. there is no
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legal limit to class sizes in secondary schools except in certain practical subjects. the government says school funding is at its highest ever level on record. bbc news. joining us now are david spendlove, who is an education researcher, and helen vickers, who is a mother of five children who is concerned about class sizes in her area. where do you live? halifax. what concerns do you have about your children and the classes they are in? the main concern is that currently education is in crisis a nyway currently education is in crisis anyway but over the next four years we will see even further cuts to spending and education. we are already, as you just saw, in that high school not far from me, 45 children in a class. that is not acceptable. 60,000 children in the country today have a class size of over 36. if you have such a large class size it will put more pressure
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on the teacher. with more cuts they will be less availability. and children with special needs will also suffer. that is of concern to me because i have a daughter with dyslexia who i have already experienced great difficulty in the application of the resources needed to help her education. from a personal point of view, you have five children, presumably, between them, they have experienced different class sizes. have you seen class sizes have an impact on learning? yes. because i am in a fortu nate learning? yes. because i am in a fortunate position because i have paid for my eldest son to go to private school. so he was in a class size of 15 in his secondary education. and the impact that had upon him as a child and the teacher understanding him as an individual and his need was significant. i remember going to the first actual sort of parents‘ evening and been
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reduced to tears because it was the first time a teacher spoke to me and knew my son. —— being. first time a teacher spoke to me and knew my son. -- being. is it that simple and impact? be class sizes means a poorer standard of teaching? —— big. not necessarily. teachers would say they want a smaller group and so would teachers, parents. the data is mixed. the foundation that do the research and look at the research suggest that it is not and do you get about a figure of 15 where it has an impact. 20—25 will not have the impact you want. larger class sizes will not necessarily have a detrimental effect. depends on the child and the needs of the charred. everything you said is absolutely correct. does it depend as well on the subject? are there
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some more suitable to be taught... certainly. maths, for example. interestingly, there is data to suggest that in asthmatics, there can be problems with large groups. it would be counterintuitive to do it in that style. every single matt teacher is shouting at the television this morning. but the reality is that it is about the nature of teaching. —— maths. the nature of teaching. —— maths. the nature of teaching. —— maths. the nature of the assessment as well. like you have said, personal relationships. what you often get in these circumstances, and i do not know what is happening in this school, but they may have learning support in addition to a teacher. it would be interesting to know what their reason for doing this is. if it is simply because of a shortage of teachers, which as i mentioned earlier, a global shortage of 5 million teachers, and nationally as well, then if they are doing it for
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those reasons it may be because they have no choice. if there is a national and global shortage of teachers, i know you have formed a campaign group to make a difference, but how can you make a difference if there is fundamentally not enough people to teach? it is important that we raise parent awareness. that is why i am currently setting up a pa rent is why i am currently setting up a parent network to raise awareness in pa rents of actually parent network to raise awareness in parents of actually what is going on inside schools. many parents find schools intimidating. they do not like to find out they have some idea of what is going on but not all of it. iam hoping of what is going on but not all of it. i am hoping this will put pressure on the government to reverse the changes to help the current education crisis because schools really are suffering and are struggling. it is having an impact on school standards and children. it isa it is a subject teachers and parents probably will watch on tv for various reasons today and do get in
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touch with us if you have something touch with us if you have something to say. i think there is a lot of cold weather on the way. good morning. there is a lot of weather on the way with a bit of everything through the course of the week. todayit through the course of the week. today it will turn cloudier and as the cloud and rain came in from the west it will turn milder. first thing there are some breaks in the cloud. it means they will be some sunshine and then the weather front comes from the west with some rain. eastwood is the cloud will built and as it gets to the east you will find the rain will turn light and drizzly. the likes of kent will hang on to the sunshine. the weather front affecting hampshire, the isle of wight, the channel islands, introducing splashes of rain and it is the same for south—west england. they will be a fair bit of clout around. the front will extend across south wales, brightening up with some drizzle longer coast. a dry
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afternoon for northern ireland, variable amounts of clout, bright spells and the same across western scotla nd spells and the same across western scotland with the wind picking up. here is the tail end of the weather front producing splashes of rain and the same across central path of england as it continues to drag its way across the east. overnight the wind will strengthen and become an overnight feature of the weather. we are looking across the west of scotla nd are looking across the west of scotland with severe gales possible. all areas north of that will notice the wind is going to be gusty and strong. across the pennines and southern opulently could have cast of up to 70 mph, which might affect higher routes. it might well lead to some disruption. it will be windy at lower levels as well. there it in mind if you are travelling on a high sided vehicle, that kind of thing. through the course of tomorrow it will be cold and windy with a lot of
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dry weather around, a fair bit of sunshine, the lightest wind in the south—east, and in the cold you will notice wintry showers across scotla nd notice wintry showers across scotland will fall as wintry snow at lower—level is, but they are showers, so we won't all see them. they will be a wintry element in the hills of northern ireland and elsewhere. into thursday it will be windy across the north, as you can tell from the squeezed isobars, then low pressure comes in from the west. this is a pessimistic view on where we think the rain will be but keep your eye on the weather forecast. as the rain engages with the cold air we are likely to see sleet and snow not just we are likely to see sleet and snow notjust on we are likely to see sleet and snow not just on the we are likely to see sleet and snow notjust on the hills but some could see it at lower levels. we don't think the rain will get this far north but it could, and we could also see some of it falling as snow or suite at lower levels. we expect that to be transient. at the other end of the country we will look at
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sleet and snow at lower levels and in between some dry and bright conditions. it will feel cold on thursday with a northerly, a north—westerly wind coming this way, so temperatures of three degrees will feel more like —3 or —4, so it isa will feel more like —3 or —4, so it is a day for wrapping up warmly. and as we head on into thursday night and friday the wind will move to a straight northerly across the whole of the uk. that is a called direction. it means there will be some lovely crisp and sunny skies to look forward to. the most likely areas for that are in the north and the west, particularly on some areas. as you set at the top,... (inaudible). are you still running? yes. (inaudible). lots of women don't want to run because of concerns about safety.
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about comment a lot of things. thank you for getting in touch. one woman says, i have been running all my life on my own. i wouldn't know if anyone is talking to me. i run during the day and i will never stop. these are, i have been shouted at and peaked at, i have been spat at, had stones thrown at me from a car bya at, had stones thrown at me from a car by a child and dan says this isn't a gender issue. i am a 38—year—old male and i have experienced it. yesterday we were talking about the golden globes, today it is the batters. british actors have been nominated at the batters. hollywood musical la la land has the latest. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, is at the princess anne theatre, where the nominations have just been announced. what can you tell us? good morning. a lot of excitement this morning. i am joined by the film criticjames
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king to discuss the nominations. la la land is in the lead with 11 nominations. no great surprises. la land is in the lead with 11 nominations. no great surprisesm is impossible to resist. if people go and see la la land and say, it didn't do much for me, there might be something wrong with you. it has so much charm. it is a modern, contemporary musical. it feels classic as well. wonderful performances. uplifting. it sticks with you. i saw this a few months ago and haven't stopped thinking about it. it is about an aspiring actress played by emma stone and ryan gosling, jazz musician. what do they bring to the movie that is so special? it is such a charming movie. they have worked together before. it is a cliche to talk about chemistry but they have certainly got that. they perform great together. it is out on friday.
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people might not have seen it. i think it will charm your socks off. now, these are the british academy film awards, i, daniel blake, it has done well in some of the big categories. best supporting actress nominations, actually, both are so authentic, something impossible not to react to. it is a little of a surprise. there are big hollywood movies out there. that is about a man struggling to support himself through the state system and all of the 30 has to jump through? yes, caused headlines, it is a ken loach move. he likes to make political statements. an independent film gathering pace, moonlight, the coming of age story of a boy growing up coming of age story of a boy growing up in miami. best supporting actress for naomi harris? she was 10 years
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ago a rising star and now she is up for the best supporting actress for the best role yet. she is known as miss moneypenny. she is so good. all of the performances are great. it is a really grown—up drama. it is the opposite of the hyperactive blockbusters. nothing for tom hanks in sully at other pilot landing the plane on the hudson in new york. it is surprising? we take them for granted. it is another great performance. we have seen many of them before. thank you very much. we will be here through the morning. the awards take place on the 12th of february at the royal albert hall. thank you very much. more on that later in the program. the tills were ringing out this christmas, and we even spent a little more money than last year, according to figures out today from the british retail consortium. this morning ben is looking at where we spent itm starting out with morrison's, who've just
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reported better—than—expected figures. yes, we will get results from the supermarkets. tesco's, sainsbury‘s, mms and the owner of waitrose. in the last hour morrison's has reported a 2.9% rise in sales. they're the first of the supermarkets to give us an update and this should stand them in good stead to claim a bumper christmas 2016. they have been struggling to win back customers. with me now is analystjulie palmer. good morning. it is interesting, 2.996, good morning. it is interesting, 2.9%, beating expectations, really beating expectations, they were thought to come in at 1.1%. what does it tell us about what we did over christmas? this combination of what we did and what morrison's did. what we did post brexit, there has been a malaise, it is christmas, let's enjoy ourselves, so we got back to spending and enjoying ourselves again. morrison is, what they did well was putting things on stores the customers want, i also strongly focusing on customer
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service. a turnaround plan at morrison's. it is interesting to see how we want to spend more money, the last hurrah before, we know things will be more expensive, with inflation, so maybe tighten the belt in the new year? i think that is fair. the supreme court decision is due out on the process of brexit fairly early this year. i think that will give a strong indication on timescale, what it's going to mean for people in terms of things like inflationary pressures, the exchange rate, difficulties are very real at the moment. i think there is pain to come down the line but christmas was a last hurrah. let's talk about morrison's. midway through a turnaround plan. certainly coming to the end of it. they have done well here. if you delve into the figures it shows we bought fewer items, putting less in the basket, but spending more. we have always talked about supermarkets making stuff cheaper and cheaper. in this case it
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isn't necessarily what happened. they are doing it a little bit, 400 lines are on special discount, so they are doing that to hold off the pressure for the discount retailers like lidl and aldi, and they have the best range, people are splashing out on a luxury items. conscious about food waste. less items in the basket. people are sporting out on lotteries. what does it mean for how we shop? retailers are having to change. there was a time when we talked about 24—hour opening. that isn't necessarily what we want. talked about 24—hour opening. that isn't necessarily what we wantm isn't. it is a smaller amount of items in the basket shopped for more frequently. we saw news yesterday that tesco was losing 1000 jobs at their distribution plan. that is indicative of the move away from 24—hour shopping in larger locations to visiting these stores more frequently. thank you. we'll have more on the major supermarkets in about 10 minutes with figures out showing
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where we bought our turkeys and tinsel out just after 8am. i'll be back with more. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we shall be back around 8am for you. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alex bushill. after the disruption of yesterday's tube strike, let's start with the travel. and on the tube a normal service has resumed this morning. all good services apart from tfl. 0n the roads, the a13 is down to one lane coming in to town just after the beckton flyover. in vauxhall, parry street is part blocked with a building fire. and in fulham, west kings road is closed. today is the start of a three day strike by southern train drivers. it means there'll be no trains running at all. but, for the first time, southern's parent company, govia thameslink rail, will use around 200 coaches to transport passengers
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to other stations. some of british airways cabin crew go on strike today for 48 hours. heathrow passengers will have to amend their travel times as more than 2,000 air crew walk out in protest over pay. gatwick and london city airport will not be affected and ba says that all passengers will be able to complete theirjourneys. in other news: a special service has been held at southwark cathedral to mark the re—casting of two of its 12 bells. following a mediaeval practice, the bells were baptised, garlanded with flowers and even given godparents. the dean of southwark also explained why they were given names — andrew and nicolas. names were given to bells and they were baptised i think because they have a voice, so that there is something almost human about them. the recasting and the sort of the re—engineering of parts of the bells only happens probably once every 100 years, so this is a once—in—more—than—a—lifetime event. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning.
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there are one or two brighter spells out there this morning but further east there is a potential of maybe a shower or two. they will clear away quickly though to brighter spells and the day should be mostly dry. we've got this north—westerly breeze. it will feel chillier than it did yesterday. but the more mild air will start pushing as we head to the end of the afternoon with some thicker cloud moving in from the north—west. the maximum temperature today around seven or eight degrees. as we head into the evening and overnight, some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. that mild air starting to work its way in. overnight the temperature won't rise compared to today's daytime temperature. the minimum between eight and 10 degrees. again one or two outbreaks of light rain and drizzle into dawn tomorrow morning but they will clear away quickly. the wind starts to strengthen tomorrow. we should see at least a little brightness through the day. but you will start to feel the wind. the temperature is similar. you're gonna start to notice the temperature drop, the colder air moving in wednesday night into thursday and we could see this area moving in as we head through thursday, and that could fall a little wintry, especially over high ground, so it is something we are
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watching very closely. tomorrow, similar temperatures, much, much colder though as we head through thursday and friday and, like i said, for thursday the potential for wintry showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. more misery for hundreds of thousands of passengers as southern rail is hit by a fresh wave of strikes. more than 2,000 trains have been cancelled on some of the rail network's busiest commuter lines. good morning, it's tuesday 10th january.
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also this morning. jeremy corbyn sets out his vision for brexit and for the first time he says he's not "wedded" to the principle of free movement for eu workers. a last—minute spending spree boosted retail sales this christmas, with more of us leaving it later to snap up a bargain. we'll get a sales update from supermarket chain morrisons in the next few minutes. they have reported their best figures in seven years. in sport, a bigger world cup, but will it be better? fifa are set to approve plans to have 48 teams at the tournament in 2026. the bafta nominations have been announced, la la land is up for 11 awards. we will talk to dominic cooper. and carol has the weather. a cold start, sunshine first thing,
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a band of rain is moving from west to east. tomorrow will be windy. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. another strike is affecting services on southern rail. drivers belonging to the aslef union will stop work for three days this week. the dispute about the role of the guard on trains has been going on for nearly ten months. just 16 trains will run out of 2500. cooper told the company were keen to bring an end to this dispute. every opportunity, our door is open to speak to the unions to find a way to speak to the unions to find a way to resolve this issue. we have said to resolve this issue. we have said to them striking is not the answer. sitting around the table, talking, listening, having an open conversation is what will bring this dispute to an end. 0ur south of england correspondent duncan kennedy is at horsham train station.
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so many people will be affected, what can they do? they reckon about 300,000 travel journeys what can they do? they reckon about 300,000 traveljourneys are affected on these strike days. it affects people in kent, sussex, surrey and bits of hampshire. here, between five and 10,000 people would normally be crowding around this concourse. i will show you what it is like today, absolutely deserted, no trains running whatsoever. the station manager looks after 32 stations in this area, he said it is the same across all of them, they are all deserted. there is one difference, compared with before christmas, they are putting on some coaches, not to london, but to dorking. that is to try to get them some of the way through their journey. about 200 buses have been
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put on by the rail company to try to ta ke put on by the rail company to try to take up some of the slack. they realise there will not be 300,000 people who will take these buses, but they say they are trying to do a little bit to help. the story is all about the doors that are opened or not by people like these, these are some of the drivers holding their ticket. they say it is not safe for them, they have a ten carriage coach, to open the doors themselves. people can get their limbs trapped, they cannot always see the doors on they cannot always see the doors on the rumoured stations, they should not do it themselves, the doors should be opened by the gods. southern say the drivers can open them themselves, it is now safe for them themselves, it is now safe for them to do so, and the guards should be doing other duties. it is not about getting rid of them, they should be helping passengers. 0n that argument, about who opens or
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does not open the door, the two sides are as far apart as ever. as one union official said last week, it still applies this week, not only are they not on the same planet, they are not even in the same universe of. no talks planned between either side, so the misery for passengers goes on. jeremy corbyn is to outline labour's approach to brexit in a speech later today, saying for the first time that he is not "wedded" to the principle of free movement. but he will warn that the uk can't afford to lose full access to the single market. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. many people will be waiting to see exactly what he has to say. yes, he has said time and again that theresa may requires more scrutiny over her plans for brexit, but even some of his own mps ask him what his plan is. they want him to address the
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issue of immigration and some of the concerns of labour voters who voted to leave in the referendum. he is speaking in peterborough today, 60% of voters decided they want to leave there. there is a change of tone from jeremy corbyn, he says labour is not wedded to freedom of movement. but in some ways he is prepared to cohabit with freedom of movement, because he says that there is an important economic decision to be made, and if access to the single market is at risk by putting restrictions on the free movement of labour, it looks as though he will come down in favour of getting access to european markets. but he says he has policies that will reduce eu migration, they are existing policies, but they are items to stop unscrupulous employers bringing in cheap labour to undercut workers who are here and to reinstitute something which the last labour government did, riding funds
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to those areas which are feeling the greatest impact from immigration. the conservatives say labour is too divided to bring about a successful brexit. jeremy corbyn says that there are some benefits to brexit, especially a future labour government could intervene to help british industry, something that is currently prevented by eu rules, but the liberal democrats say it proves that german corbyn has never fully committed to being in the eu in the first place, that is why his heart was not in the referendum campaign. you will be able to hear and see that speech from jeremy corbyn on the bbc later. a 15—year—old girl has been arrested after the death of a seven—year—old girl in york. police found the younger child with life—threatening injuries in the woodthorpe area of the city yesterday afternoon. she was taken to hospital but died a short time later. the teenager is being questioned by officers. police in northamptonshire have
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closed a stretch of the m1 motorway after a body was found in the road in the early hours of the morning. the northbound carriageway between junctions 16 and 17, near northampton and rugby, has been shut following the discovery and is expected to remain closed for most of today. we've just had an update on how the supermarket chain morrisons fared over christmas. they're good results for morrisons? the start of a busy week for the retailers, we will get an update on how they did over the christmas period. it is when they make most of their money. morrison's report a 2.996 their money. morrison's report a 2.9% rise in sales over christmas. that is the strongest performance in seven that is the strongest performance in seve n yea rs that is the strongest performance in seven years for them. it is also a big—time for the retailers, we will get tesco, marks & spencer, sainsbury this week, and waitrose. all of them reporting over the course of the week, telling us what
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we bought and how we bought it. it looks set to be a good christmas for them. figures from the british retail consortium say we spent half £1 billion more than we did at the same time last year, last christmas was not particularly strong for them, but also this time we have splashed out a bit before what we think could be a tough year in terms of inflation and prices going up. there is a warning that the prices we pay in the shops could start rising, because of a fall in the value of the pound. that makes things we buy overseas more expensive. for the first time in a long time we could see food prices going up. we have talked about price was bringing prices down, but they could start rising this year. the british and irish governments say they're going to work to try to find a solution to the most—serious political crisis in northern ireland in a decade. yesterday, the deputy first minister, sinn fein's martin mcguinness, resigned. it came after weeks of tension between his party and their partners in the power—sharing government, the democratic unionists. northern ireland has an uncertain
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future, the power—sharing agreement has lasted for almost ten years, but they have often disagreed. the latest disagreement was over a green energy scheme which went wrong. 0verly generous subsidies were paid to businesses who switched to environmentally friendly fuels. pool one £500 million over budget. sinn fein wanted the first minister, arlene foster, to temporarily stand down for an investigation, but she refused. yesterday the deputy first minister martin mcguinness announced he was quitting. because they have a joint office, that decision effectively puts arlene foster out of herjob as well. in a video on social media, she said sinn fein had been selfish. at a time when we are
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dealing with brexit, needing to create more jobs and dealing with brexit, needing to create morejobs and invest in dealing with brexit, needing to create more jobs and invest in our health and education system, northern ireland needs stability. but because of their selfish actions, we now have instability. martin mcguinness used to be an ira commander. arlene foster survived an ira bombing of her school bus. demolition should in government. going to be easy, but you thought it would down so quickly. the last stormont semi—election was eight months ago. now a fresh poll is looking likely. a humanitarian crisis, unprecedented demand or just winter pressures. those are just some of the contrasting headlines on the nhs over the last few days. 0n breakfast yesterday, health secretaryjeremy hunt admitted there was a serious situation in a number of hospitals. in 2000 the then—labour government set a target that every patient should be seen within four hours,
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a goal that hasn't been achieved since july 2015. since that target was announced, there are nine million more visits to a&e and the government claims 27th december 2016 was the busiest day in the history of the nhs. mr hunt told parliament 30% of people visiting emergency departments don't need to go. he also cast doubt on the future of the four—hour target for all patients. if we are going to protect the standard, it is a promise to sort out or urgent problems within four hours, but not all health problems, however minor. chris hopson, the chief executive of nhs providers, was quoted by mr hunt on breakfast yesterday. he agrees with the health secretary that there is not a humanitarian crisis in the nhs. hejoins us from our london newsroom. the humanitarian crisis came from
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the british red cross, what would you say is going on? we know a number of things. there is record demand coming into a&e departments. we know that many hospitals are struggling to cope with that extra demand. but thanks to the sterling effo rts demand. but thanks to the sterling efforts of over 1.2 million nhs staff, most are able to just about cope with that demand. 0n the one hand,it cope with that demand. 0n the one hand, it is notjust normal winter pressures , hand, it is notjust normal winter pressures, and that is an under exaggeration. but humanitarian crisis and the nhs in meltdown is an over exaggeration. we owe it to the staff and patients to try to avoid any hyperbole. 0n the one hand, let's be clear, we are really struggling to cope with this demand, but we are not in meltdown. let's nail down a few things, what about the impact on patients from those
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trusts which you have mentioned that just about coping? is it long waits on colleagues? we know there is a standard whereby the nhs would like to see and aims to see 95% of patients within four hours. we know that that performance measure was running at about 75% at the moment, so we have got a large number of people who are having to wait very long times. what we also know, and this is where we are nervous, is there are some places where we are having patients having to wait more than 12 hours, and where they are having to wait on trolleys. in those circumstances, the risk to them considerably escalate. there are a very small number of trusts who are seeing those kind of weight and where the risk to patient safety is significantly elevated. really to be
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careful, it looks like we are dancing on the head of a pin and playing semantics, but if you cut some of the media coverage, you get the sense that anybody who went into a&e was a huge risk. equally, it is important not to underplay what is going on, the nhs is under very significant pressure. it is notjust normal winter pressures. lots of detail that you gave. you are talking about patients waiting for more than 12 hours. if that is your mother or child and you said that the risk is seriously elevated, that is extremely worrying. yes, it is extremely worrying and that's why everybody in the nhs will do everything to avoid that and why by and large if you look at the vast majority of trusts, that's not happening, but we do know there are a very small number of trusts where for short periods of time that is happening and that is extremely concerning. but again, it is a function of the fact that we have
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got record numbers of people coming into a&e, equally though to be fair to nhs staff and we need to recognise their contribution, we are treating record numbers of patients within the four hour standards. so it is, wejust within the four hour standards. so it is, we just need to be careful about how we calibrate what we say here. ok, also. very concerning, what do you think needs to be done at that high end, at the end we have been talking about and i understand what you're saying about other parts of the nhs. what needs to be done to stop patients being put in potentially dangerous situations? well, so what happens is that because we have real—time information in each hospital, if a hospital starts to see the number of trolley waits escalating or the number of 12 hour waits escalating then clearly there will be a whole series of management actions are taken where everybody absolutely rallies round and ensures that those then get dealt with. so what you tend to see happening is again, i wa nt to tend to see happening is again, i want to stress it, a very small number of hospitals, you do see for
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a short to medium length of time you see a number of trolley waits and a number of 12 hour waits growing. management moves very, very quickly. that then gets dissipated and sorted out, but then there is a danger that as for example, what we see is a really good example is what we tend to see on a monday morning, as people as the weekend is over, people as the weekend is over, people then start to come into a&e ona people then start to come into a&e on a monday and what you tend to see in some of those places again the numbers start to rise again, but again, what! numbers start to rise again, but again, what i wanted to reassure your viewers is that, every single member of the nhs staff, who are working absolutely as hard as they can, will do all they can to manage this risk and as i said what is important to realise is that that very, very highly elevated risk is actually, is confined to a small number of hospitals and although the nhs is under huge pressure at the moment by and large, we arejust about keeping our head above water, but it really is in many places just about. which hospitals? i don't have the absolute. it changes from
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day—to—day, but it is a very small number. ok, briefly jeremy day—to—day, but it is a very small number. ok, brieflyjeremy hunt day—to—day, but it is a very small number. ok, briefly jeremy hunt was talking yesterday, wasn't he, in the house of commons about this four hours which this standard and saying to protect the four hour standard we need to be clear it is a promise to sort out all urgent health problems within four hours. is that a cce pta ble within four hours. is that acceptable that that needs to be changed that standard ? acceptable that that needs to be changed that standard? well, i think whatjeremy hunt has pointed to and i think he deserves credit for it is the fact that we have now reached the fact that we have now reached the point where the nhs simply can't do everything that it is being asked to do on the money available and we need a proper national debate about what the nhs, what service the nhs is going to provide and it seems to me notan is going to provide and it seems to me not an unreasonable question to ask is are we given, that we have got nine million extra people coming into a&e compared to six or seven or eight years ago, can we provide that four hour standard for absolutely every single patient? i think it is
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a legitimate question to ask, but it really hits that underlying point if you look at the demand for health and social care services in this country, it is rising very, very rapidly and we need a debate as a nation about either we spend more on our health and care services, in which case we can preserve everything that we've got and hopefully improve, but to be honest, u nless we hopefully improve, but to be honest, unless we spend more, then we're going to have to ask questions like that which is can we carry on providing absolutely everything to everybody, given the demand is going to be going up? chris hobson, thank you for your time on breakfast this morning. thank you. it's 8.19am. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. as we go through the day, you will notice the cloud will encroach from the west. so for many central and eastern areas, it is a chilly start, but there is some sunshine, but as the weather front comes in from the west, the cloud will build ahead of it. the rain will push eastwards. it
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will brighten up behind it, and by the time we see the rain in the east, it will be weakening in nature. so turning more drizzly. but even into the afternoon across northern england, the cloud will be building ahead of that cloud. the cloud building too across eastern scotland. just a few showers dotted around the west. but a lot of dry weather by afternoon and for northern ireland, you said goodbye to the weather front so drying up nicely, but starting to cool down. for wales, again, we've got the thicker cloud. some spots of light rain or drizzle and it is the same into south—west england. but for cornwall, particularly the further west that you are, it will start to brighten up too. this drizzly rain extends into the channel islands and you can see all the cloud around the weather front so it is the far east of england so east anglia and the south east that hangs on to the sunshine for the longest. through the evening and overnight, that drizzly rain continues to push away. we will see more showers fade in through the course of the night too, but the most notable feature will be the wind. touching severe gales,
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those are the gusts across northern scotla nd those are the gusts across northern scotland with wintry showers, so some atrocious mountain conditions, anywhere from north wales and the midlands and the wash will be windy through the night and through the course of tomorrow. it might well lead to disruption. across the southern uplands and the pennines, we could have gusts up to 70mph. no that could affect the higher level routes of the m62 for example. take ca re if routes of the m62 for example. take care if you're in a high sided vehicle a light vehicle, a bike, you know the drill. tomorrow, a fine day for many in the sense, it will be dry and sunniment wintry showers in the north. the lightest winds will be in the south east, but the same areas from north wales, north midlands, the wash, it is going to bea midlands, the wash, it is going to be a windy day. and it will feel cold as well. by the time we get to thursday, still windy as you can tell from the isobars across the northern half of the country, but not as windy. than we've got an area of low pressure scooting in from the south—west, it will be tracking eastwards. now, this really is
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giving us a headache as to how far north it is going to go. so depending on that, will depend on where we see some snow because it will engage with the cold air coming down. so what we think at the moment is across some southern counties and it may not be as pessimistic as this is showing, we will see rain, but some of us will see sleet and snow even at lower levels. we don't expect it to last and in the northern end of the country, once again we are looking at further snow showers. so as we go through the day, add in the factor of the wind, the three and four celsius that you can see will feel sub—zero. so a lot going on with the weather, dan and lou. you make me shiverjust thinking about it. parkour is the daredevil pursuit of jumping over walls, buildings and structures, and from today, it will be classed as an official sport by the government. the new status means it could be promoted within schools, but some have concerns over
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the safety of thrill seekers. let's take a look at parkour in action. music. eugene minogue is the ceo of parkour uk. lovely to talk to you this morning, eugene. there are concerns about the safety which we'll get to. what does parkour becoming a sport mean to you and to the sport? well, it means officially we get the recognition and acknowledgement that parkour is and acknowledgement that parkour is a sport. it has been around for approximately 30 years or so. it has beenin approximately 30 years or so. it has been in the uk for 12 to 15 years now. so it really means that it
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receives the same status alongside other recognised sports. so will we see our kids learning it in school? it is already been in schools. it is delivered in schools and colleges for over ten years now. we work closely with the association of physical education around how we deliver parkour running into schools safely and appropriately. we saw george there taking part. he is well into his 80s. i suppose it is done by young people, but it is not a sport exclusively for young people? absolutely. literally anybody can do it. a lot of people say to me, you know, when can i start parkour? my a nswer to know, when can i start parkour? my answer to them is when did you stop? we all do this instinctively as human beings, we move freely, as children and then society and norms around that tell us not to do stuff or tell us to move in places as opposed to spaces. so parkour is just really reminding that you have
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gotan just really reminding that you have got an obligation to play as a human being and all we're doing is reintroducing that and getting people to move in a way that we were built to. the brain sometimes tell you maybe i shouldn'tjump over those railings because there is a danger and there is a fear factor and that's a big element and people watching this this morning may have legitimate concerns about that. do you understand those? of course. with any sport, there are sporting risks. what we do at parkour uk is to better manage those risks through a very skilled, very qualified workforce, through our member organisations that deliver the activities, whether that's to older people and for parkour for mental health, or parkour physical literacy orfamily parkour health, or parkour physical literacy or family parkour sessions or just general parkour sessions and whether it is in schools, universities and hospitals and we manage the risk properly. eugene, best of luck and
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congratulations on parkour becoming a sport. mike bushell had a go. did he say we have an obligation to play as a human? yes. let's leave you with that short. it is time for the news, travel and weather wherever you are. a fairly cloudy day for many parts, but it is not all doom and gloom. there will be one or two holes. some western parts, your temperatures will get up towards double figures. there is the bulk of the cloud towards the west, it will organise
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itself into a fairly weak weather front, gradually easing the rain towards the east. after some early showers across eastern parts, it will dry showers across eastern parts, it willdry up showers across eastern parts, it will dry up for showers across eastern parts, it willdry upfora showers across eastern parts, it will dry up for a time, until the cloud begins to fold in from the west. behind the weather front, we may get the temperatures two double figures, and there could be some brightness to finish the day. until we get a new area of cloud and rain overnight, the wind really picking up overnight, the wind really picking up across the northern half of britain, where it will be a cold night. some of the showers will be wintry. the wind could be strong enough to cause some travel disruption. we are really concerned about the gusty nature of the wind coming up and over the hills of northern britain. some of the gusts could be 60 or 70 miles an hour. just watch out, there will be wintry showers aplenty across scotland. as we come further south, a bright enough day, but watch out for the strength of the wind. by the middle of the week, it will be noticeably
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colder right across the british isles, and then the problem is we will bring some moisture in the shape of these weather fronts into the southern half of written. where it meets the cold air, we mightjust see a conversion of rain into some snowfall. we are just keeping a close eye on that. further north, it isa close eye on that. further north, it is a blustery, cold, raw day, and there will be frequent wintry showers across the western side of scotland, but just watch showers across the western side of scotland, butjust watch out showers across the western side of scotland, but just watch out for the strength of the wind. this is business live from bbc news with rachel horne and aaron heslehurst. the leader of the world's biggest economy gets ready to make his farewell speech. what will the world make of the 0bama legacy? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 10th january. the us economy has grown, but wage growth has lagged behind.
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we'll assess the impact of the 0bama presidency. we also have news from the world's second—biggest economy. the goods it makes might be about to get more expensive. stay tuned to find out what that could mean for you.
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