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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 11, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. president obama says farewell to the american people. in his final speech as president, he warned of threats to democracy from inequality and racism — but after eight years in charge, says he's leaving the united stated "better and stronger". yes we can. yes we did. yes we can. good morning, it's wednesday, the 11th of january. also this morning: a 15—year—old girl is charged with the murder of 7—year—old katie rough in york. a warning from the royal college of physicians that lives are being put at risk by nhs underfunding — while experts in health and social care say mps from all parties need to tackle the problems together. a quarter of workers say money
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worries are stopping them doing theirjob properly because of sleepless nights and days off sick. and it's notjust affecting those on lower incomes. in sport, it's one step closer to a cup final for manchester united. they beat hull city 2—0 in the first leg of the league cup semi—final. and this is the incredible trick shot which has caused a sensation on social media. it's two minutes long and you really don't want to miss it. and carol has the weather. we are starting off with a very windy day. windy for all day for most of us. storms locally and severe gales for some. sunshine further south but tomorrow, parts of the south will also have sleet and snow. good morning. first, our main story.
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barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president, telling the american people he believes the country is in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. in an emotional speech in chicago, he thanked his wife michelle as well as his family and staff and said he still believed in the ability of people to deliver change. however, he admitted progress had not gone far enough as our us correspondent laura trevelyan now reports. barack obama ba rack obama returned barack obama returned to chicago, the place where his political career began, to deliver his long planned farewell address. the president used his platform to underline what he sees as his achievements. if i told you wait years ago that america would reverse a great recession, reboot our auto industry, and unleash the longest stretch ofjob creation in our history. cheering
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and applause. if i told you we would open upa and applause. if i told you we would open up a new chapter with the cuban people, shutdown iran's nuclear weapons programme without firing a shot, take out the mastermind of 911, if i had told you we would win marriage equality and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens... cheering and applause. ifi citizens... cheering and applause. if i told you all that, you might have said our sites were set a little too high. turning to his theme of what could undermine america's democracy. the american‘s first black president was frank about race relations. after my election, there was talk of a post— racial america. election, there was talk of a post— racialamerica. subdivision, election, there was talk of a post— racial america. subdivision, however well in tenanted, was never
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realistic. —— intended. race remains a potent and often divisive force in oui’ a potent and often divisive force in our society. paying tribute to his wife michelle and daughters, the president became emotional. for those who had lined up for hours to hear him speak in person, the effort was worthwhile. laura is still in chicago for us. laura, what has the reaction been to the president's speech? there was no direct reference to donald trump but there have been some developments involving the president—elect, haven't there? how has the speech gone down? supporters are still here, having a dream, mulling over it. they are depressed after the election of donald trump and felt that barack 0bama chartered a way forward for them —— like having a drink. but they need to defend american democracy against political apathy, fa ke democracy against political apathy, fake news, corrosive political culture. this speech was notjust
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aimed at barack 0bama's supporters but all americans and also the president—elect donald trump and the president—elect donald trump and the president said very clearly that progress has been made but we must protect our rights as americans. you mentioned donald trump that resident 0bama mentioned donald trump that resident obama did not mention him by name. the president elect is in the news again or is he would term, the fake news again —— president obama. again or is he would term, the fake news again -- president obama. us media are reporting that russian spy agencies have embarrassing information about the president—elect donald trump that is personally compromising. us media is reporting this quoting unnamed sources. they are also reporting that us intelligence agencies that done with mr trump privately and told them about this allegation is that apparently russian spy agencies have. mr trump has responded in his signature way, on twitter, he said fa ke signature way, on twitter, he said fake news and it's a political witch—hunt. remember that donald trump is in hot water in washington
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for disparaging us russian agencies that intelligence agencies that russian officials attempted to affect the outcome of the election. we'll be speaking to us political analyst eric ham from washington at 6:a0. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a 7—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates later this morning. senior doctors are warning that a shortage of resources may leave the nhs in england unable to cope with this winter's demand. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister — calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. here's our health correspondent robert pigott.
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the royal college of physicians said ambulances queueing outside hospitals were visual testament to the crisis in the nhs. the royal college, which represents 33,000 specialist hospital doctors, said patients based lengthening waits on lists, on trolleys, in accident and emergency departments and at home. —— patients faced. it blamed a shortage of qualified staff, stretched too thin lead to meet the increasing demands. our members fear that people's lives are at risk because they can't get round to see the patients that aren't yet in the emergency department or indeed are waiting for results to come back. members and fellows have been writing in and our council members specifically have said to me this is the worst they have ever seen. most urgent, said the doctors, is investment in social care to prevent medically fit patients being trapped in hospitals. in their own letter to the prime minister, 75 charities and individuals working
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in health and social care said there must be a long—term cross—party solution to what they called the crisis in funding. led by the charity independent age, they said: the department of health said it had invested £10 billion to develop health services and relieve pressure on hospitals. and, since last year, had recruited 3,000 extra nurses and 1,600 more doctors. robert pigott, bbc news. meanwhile, plans to extend access to gps in england are in "complete disarray" according to the british medical association. the comment follows a report by the national audit office which urges ministers to reconsider plans to increase weekend and evening access to family doctors in england. it says many gps are already struggling to provide existing services. the department of health says it's promised additional funding and 5,000 extra doctors.
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a white supremacist, dylann roof, has been sentenced to death for the racist killing of nine black men and women at a church in south carolina in 2015. the 22—year—old opened fire during a bible studies class. he rejected a final chance to plead for his life, telling the jury he felt he "had to carry it out". a pedestrian has died in brighton after being knocked down by a car being chased by police. it happened last night when police say a vauxhall astra failed to stop and was pursued by officers. the car hit a person on st james's street — the force is still trying to trace the driver. a 29—year old british woman has been killed and two others are seriously injured after a light aircraft crashed in australia. the plane came down on a remote beach in central queensland. the pilot, a man in his sixties, was taken to hospital in a serious condition and a 13—year—old boy has been treated for minor injuries. for the first time,
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the attorney general will set out the legal factors that need to be considered before military action is taken against terror suspects abroad. in a speech, jeremy wright qc will say the uk must have the right to use lethal force in self—defence in order to deal with the increased threat. ben bland reports. technology. in many ways it makes life easierfor us technology. in many ways it makes life easier for us but also easier for those who want to make —— do us harm to stop that is the warning from the government's top legal advice. spies like those at gchq can gather intelligence and worn if an attack is likely. the law all of the uk to use force and self defence if it is attacked but also to prevent an attack before it happens. 0n it is attacked but also to prevent an attack before it happens. on that basis, the uk used one of these, and unmanned drone, to kill a british jihadist in syria in september 20
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15. riyadh khan from cardiff was the target and the second uk national, also died. they said it was lawful because khan was involved in a plot to carry out a high—profile attack in the summer. there were demands of the government to clarify the legal basis for carrying out pre—emptive strikes against islamic state militants. the attorney general, jeremy wright qc, will now explain for the first time how such decisions are made. the considerations include how certain it is that an attack will happen, how soon it will be and on what scale. whether anything else could be done to prevent the attack and whether it is the last clear opportunity to do so. undoubtedly, the uk government has the technology to carry out effective and deadly strikes that it mustjustify doing so strikes that it mustjustify doing so within the limits of the law. ben bland, bbc news. the latest strike by southern train drivers has entered a second day with no sign of a breakthrough.
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the walk—out is due to finish at midnight but four further strike days are planned this month. yesterday only 16 of over 2,000 scheduled services ran. the dispute which has been going on for nearly ten months is about staffing duties on trains. this next bit of footage is pretty extraordinary. the pictures come from a camera attached to the neck of a female polar bear and shows two bears breaking through ice sheets in order to hunt for prey. the us geological survey hopes it'll help researchers better understand how the animals are responding to declining sea ice levels. you can kind of workout what is happening there. did you never polar bears only come together to make and it? and that's it? lonely life. not much you can say about that, is
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there? anyway, moving on. before you speak. could this be the best trick shot of all time? it's a beauty. a bar in bristol has pulled off an incredible feat involving a golf club, two flights of stairs and ten pool tables. it's around 500ft long, took 11 hours to set up and required pin—point precision. after travelling down the stairs, the ball is perfectly aimed to hit a succession of pool balls that cross between different tables by travelling across cues. over a million people have watched the clip online. we will have the man who created it on the programme later on so you will have to wait until then to find out if it was a hole—in—one. the best news is, we have them and who created it. there is a table set up who created it. there is a table set up over there. which i would like to
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keep forever. no, iwould like up over there. which i would like to keep forever. no, i would like to keep forever. no, i would like to keep it forever. and we have our own trick shot coming up. there is six balls to pot in each pocket and i have had one go, too goes and so far, i have got five out of six. improvement required, is the answer. anyway, we are excited about that. it's looking like a pub in the corner. low—level lighting and a pool table. very cosy and very nice indeed. mariana fellini having a late start, but doing his bit. it is coming to the business and now. they are on a bit of a run, finally. things coming good forjose mourinho. manchester united are a step closer to the league cup final. they beat hull city 2—0 in the first leg of the semi—final but wayne rooney missed the chance to become their all—time record scorer. fifa president gianni infantino has told the bbc he thinks the quality of an expanded world cup
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will improve as smaller nations get the opportunity to take part. 48 teams will contest the tournament from 2026. he said decision was not financially motivated. lord coe, the president of athletics world governing body the iaaf, will be asked to give more evidence to mp's as part of their inquiry into doping in sport. it's after a former athlete told a committee he had called and e—mailed coe to warn him about the scandal. and after almost 150 years of horse—racing, kempton park is set to be closed to make way for around 3,000 new homes. it's part of a plan to raise 500 million for british racing over the next decade. and jehanabad want to make —— jehanabad on —— johanna and jehanabad want to make ——
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jehanabad on ——johanna konta is playing at the moment in sydney. we will keep you up—to—date. you are the master! that have a look at the front pages of the papers this morning. the times, number 10 blames of the papers this morning. the times, number10 blames nhs of the papers this morning. the times, number 10 blames nhs chief as chaos grows in hospitals. we will have a look at that later today as we speak to a doctor. the picture is of the head of a gallery in manchester, who is to become the tate's first female director. the front page of the telegraph. they talk about jeremy the front page of the telegraph. they talk aboutjeremy corbyn. labour's migration policy in chaos. he reversed his position on free movementjust after he reversed his position on free movement just after saying his he reversed his position on free movementjust after saying his party would oppose uncontrolled migration to the uk. lots of things he said yesterday and the papers going through it. this is a rather lovely photograph. the daily telegraph reporter who broke the news, what an incredible thing to do, of hitler's 1939 invasion of poland. she has died at the age of 105. an amazing
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picture, an amazing journalist. inspirational. 0ne picture, an amazing journalist. inspirational. one more. the daily express has a picture of —10 at their main story, snow alert. army on standby as met office worn extreme weather on the way. they love the arctic blast! there is cold weather on the way. cani there is cold weather on the way. can i show you this? this is my favourite story. keeping with the call him. if you go down to eastbourne to the shopping centre you will find it is still in full christmas swing because they can't turn off the christmas lights. the company that has installed them has gone bust. they plugged them into the mains, so if they want to turn off the christmas lights they have to turn off all of the other lights
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ina to turn off all of the other lights in a shopping centre as well, so it means basically they are stuck with this christmas lights unless eve ryo ne this christmas lights unless everyone will shop in the dark. what an extraordinary story! isn't it bad luck to have the lights on after the 12th? i probably wouldn't wa nt to after the 12th? i probably wouldn't want to go down there in! i have maria sharapova in a lot of the papers. more accusations that the papers. more accusations that the world of tennis is giving her special treatment. you will remember she was banned for 15 months for taking a banned substance. that ban i’u ns taking a banned substance. that ban runs out on the 26th of april, which is midway through the tournament, she has been given a wild card. they say as belletti doesn't come to the site before april the 26th she can play her first match midway through the tournament. —— as long as she doesn't. so the schedule will be rearranged around her. that never goes down well. no, so a lot of complaints about how she did
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ta ke lot of complaints about how she did take a banned substance. she says she didn't know it was banned and she didn't know it was banned and she didn't know it was banned and she didn't need to do it and she has been banned for drugs cheating for 15 months. but there does seem to be a lot of... the organiser of this tournament has called it a fabulous present and a lot of the high profile sponsors have stood by her during the ban. i've lost my wedding ring on a beach and found it in a puddle, amazingly. horrorstruck husband found himself facing real—life needle in a haystack. he lost his wedding ring ina barn haystack. he lost his wedding ring in a barn full of straw and spent two weeks looking for it. and he found it! he used a metal detector. mine comes off on my issue a lot. you know, when you take it. i think i've lost
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weight on my fingers for some reason. all of that dancing! that is some vigorous arm action. quite a sight. this we need to see. there is so much interesting stuff to talk about in the weather. what's going on? for starters it is very windy. the highest gust we have seen very windy. the highest gust we have seen overnight is 120 —— 129 mph. todayit seen overnight is 120 —— 129 mph. today it is gales we are looking at. a very windy day, which could lead to some travel disruption. you can find out what's happening where you are on your bbc local radio station forced to there are some restrictions in places. we've got some wintry showers and sleet and slow across the moor of scotland, towards the central lowlands. some of that getting down to low levels. blizzards in the hills. hill snow in the pennines and very windy. windy
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across northern ireland, and wales. also windy in the midlands and into east anglia. further south also windy, especially along the coast, but not as windy as further north. in the far north we have storm force winds. elsewhere, severe gales or gales, to take extra care. the current drizzle we have will die out and we have sunshine coming through in england and wales, but we hang onto the wintry showers are ignored. 0vernight we get down to lower levels. some getting to lower levels in northern england and northern ireland. remember those showers. too much wind forfrost, ireland. remember those showers. too much wind for frost, but there will be ice to watch out for. then we have the next system coming in from the west. this will be causing us a lot of headache, as to the positioning. also pulling in strong winds from a cold direction, the north and north—west, so straight
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down from the arctic. where the cold airand rain in down from the arctic. where the cold air and rain in gauge is where we have snow. initially tomorrow you can see it coming through wales, the moors, towards salisbury plains, and towards the south—east. then eventually in evening it will push through the rest of east anglia and into kent. then clearing into the near continent. not all of us will necessarily see this. some of us could have up to two centimetres of snow, some of us locally up to ten centimetres. that's the south. in the north, if we go back in time a little bit, we continue with wintry showers again, sleet and snow, some to lower levels, under and lightning as well. we were talking about thunder and snow yesterday. entry showers across northern england and northern ireland. you will see some of those wintry showers also at lower levels as we mentioned. you will notice tomorrow in the wind it
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will notice tomorrow in the wind it will feel cold. despite the fact that temperatures are above freezing for most of us it will feel below freezing. so that's what tomorrow is like. you can see the back edge of this low pressure taking the snow with it. we then moved to a northerly wind. a cold direction for us. northerly wind. a cold direction for us. still bringing in wintry showers. the other thing you will notice it will be very windy, with gales down the east coast. any showers are likely to be wintry in nature again. but they are showers, so not all of us will see them. a mixture of rain, sleet and snow, but we have large waves and there is the risk of some minor coastal flooding. something else to watch out for. a lot going on with the weather in the next couple of days. thank you for that. very windy this morning on my way to work. idoif morning on my way to work. i do if you treat down on the roads as well. and we have some news about homes in newcastle. 2300 homes without power due to high winds.
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they won't be able to hear that because we won't have their televisions on. we will keep you up—to—date. thanks for being with us on this wednesday morning. more needs to be done to help families living with dementia in rural parts of the uk. that's the finding of the first academic study looking at how the condition affects those in the countryside. it's called for more support services and training and help from the local community itself, asjohn maguire has been finding out. the bucolic duty of our rural landscapes and communities often mask some of the challenges of living here. the isolation, the lack of services and the scarcity of support. in the first report of its kind, limit university has studied the impact of dementia in the countryside and what should be done to help. —— plymouth university. things like support networks with otherfamilies things like support networks with other families who are going through a similar situation would be enormously helpful. some of our
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family said, to help them cope. perhaps not in the local area, perhaps somebody else upcountry so you don't have that public sort of —— that confidential allergies maintained. it isn't your neighbours. it affects the whole family. we are meeting this farmer and his mother. her husband eric had dementia for the last ten years of his life. the old adage is that farmers never retire, they keep going, and he certainly wanted... he still wanted to do what he could, but still had quite an impact on us, particularly from the carer side of it, because you are providing the care, mum. it started about 15 years ago and when eric was diagnosed at least he went to daycare two days a
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week and that was a great help. the university report has several key recommendations, among them, where possible, farmers should plan ahead for serious illness. councils, health and other agencies should co—ordinate to offer support and there should be more dementia awareness training. this memory cafe in the town of ashburton is run by volu nteers in the town of ashburton is run by volunteers from the rotary club. it offers in relation for patients and respite for carers and, elsewhere, there is a specialist —— specialist help available. form filling, or farm inspections, just to make sure they aren't missing out financially as well, and we can also offer practical help on arms if they are struggling maybe to do tasks like tb testing. 0ur volunteers can make sure we can go on the farm and do practical things as well to help in the short term. ian chairs the rule
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dementia group. it is simple solutions. sometimes as a community or culture you go from radical strategies. strategies went change this world, prime ministers won't, we will in our rural community and we will in our rural community and we will in our rural community and we will have to do it ourselves. dementia can be cruel and devastating, this report says it doesn't have to be suffered in silence. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the american government has imposed sanctions against a man from west london who is accused of fighting with extremists in syria and executing and torturing prisoners. it's claimed alexanda kotey, a 33—year—old from paddington, has been involved in
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beheadings and waterboarding. he's thought to be part of a group of militants known as ‘the beatles', including fellow londoner mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn. a london council is to be prosecuted for breaching fire safety regulations, following the deaths of six people in a fire at a block of flats in camberwell. the blaze at lakanal house happened in 2009 and the charges include allegations that southwark council didn't carry out a fire risk assessment, and that suspended ceilings were in a poor state of repair. the action is being brought by the london fire brigade. there's a call for barber shops in london to be regulated. industry leaders are warning that more unqualified barbers are opening—up than ever before and poor health and safety standards mean many customers could be at risk from infection. something needs to be done. the councils i think need to get involved with health and safety and check. not shut down people, help people. tell them what the
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legislation is and people get a qualification, they understand everything else. if people think all it is knowing how to cut hair, what you need all of the other knowledge about skin conditions, skin complaints. let's have a look at the travel situation now. the victoria line is part—suspended between highbury & islington and walthamstow central, due to a signal failure. tfl rail is also part closed between brentwood and shenfield due to planned work until may. the circle line also has minor delays. that's just propped the circle line also has minor delays. that'sjust propped up. it's another day of strikes on southern trains. only 16 southern trains will run today on the caterham to victoria line. 8am in the morning, 8pm in the evening. so expect roads, the 0verground and underground to be busy. but at the moment, on the roads, a look at the a13 into town and busy at dagenham. not looking too bad. let's have a check on the weather now. a reasonably mild start but don't be
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full. the temperatures will slip away through the afternoon and feel much colder by the end of the day. a bit of cloud this morning, but that is moving away south—eastwards, accompanied by a fresh north—westerly wind. that wind will feel chilly later. we have bright and sunny spells but by the end of the day the temperature colder than this morning, 6—7. a cold night tonight, tomorrow we have rain sweeping across the south of the uk. falling in the most part as rain, but as we had through the afternoon into the evening it mixes with cold airand could in into the evening it mixes with cold air and could in turn fall as snow right about rush—hour. very difficult driving conditions. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for some snow, through tomorrow in the tomorrow evening. through the rest of the week it is going to get progressively colder, especially at night. potential for progressively colder, especially at night. potentialforsmoke. progressively colder, especially at night. potential for smoke. that's in the friday morning. —— fought snow. brightness for friday and saturday, it will get colder. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. if there is a reason why i am
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standing here, it is because of our maudy. so thank you, bafta. the incredibly moving moment when the actorjason watkins dedicated his bafta to the memory of his daughter. we'll be speaking to jason about bereavement and how he wants more support for families in the same situation. as barack obama says farewell to the white house we'll look at his legacy and how history will remember america's first black president. and, over a million people have now watched this epic trick shot. the man who set it up will be here, complete with pool table, so we can show off our skills. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the key thing is, they tried every single bit of that shot 120 times.
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we have tried powers... twice. -- ours. barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president. in an emotional speech in chicago, he said he believed the country was in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. the president admitted progress had not gone far enough but called on the american people to put aside their differences and help bring about positive change. iam asking i am asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents, the whisper by slaves and abolitionists, the song sung by homestead is and those who marched forjustice, the creed reaffirmed by those who planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon, agreed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. cheering and
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applause. killam yes we. -- yes, we can, yes, we did. we'll be speaking to us political analyst eric ham from washington in about ten minutes time. 0vernight, another tweak happened. it was donald trump tweeting about fa ke it was donald trump tweeting about fake news. donald trump says he is the victim of a "political witch hunt" after allegations against him were published in the us. unconfirmed reports have emerged in the american media that russian intelligence agencies have gathered compromising information on the president—elect. in a tweet, mr trump did not refer directly to the stories but complained fake news had been published. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder
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of a 7—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates later this morning. senior doctors are warning that the crisis in the nhs and social care is putting people's lives at risk. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said a shortage of resources means the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister — calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. the department of health says it's investing £10—billion to relieve pressure on hospitals. a white supremacist, dylann roof, has been sentenced to death for the racist killing of nine black men and women at a church in south carolina in 2015. the 22—year—old opened fire during a bible study meeting. he rejected a final chance to plead for his life, telling the jury he felt he "had to carry it out".
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a 29—year old british woman has been killed and two others are seriously injured after a light aircraft crashed in australia. the plane came down on a remote beach in central queensland. the pilot, a man in his sixties, was taken to hospital in a serious condition and a 13—year—old boy has been treated for minor injuries. the latest strike by southern train drivers has entered a second day with no sign of a breakthrough. the walk—out is due to finish at midnight but four further strike days are planned this month. yesterday only 16 of over 2,000 scheduled services ran. the dispute which has been going on for nearly ten months is about staffing duties on trains. this next bit of footage is pretty extraordinary. would you like to see what a polar bear seve? —— sees.
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the pictures come from a camera attached to the neck of a female polar bear and shows two bears breaking through ice sheets in order to hunt for prey. the us geological survey hopes it'll help researchers better understand how the animals are responding to declining sea ice levels. amazing. do you want a polar bear fa cts ? amazing. do you want a polar bear facts? it is about theirjaw strength. £1200 per square inch they can grip. might, goodness. they are big, cuddly things but do not mess. cat, good morning. manchester united has had nine games in a row now. an incredible run. jose mourinho in typicalfashion are incredible run. jose mourinho in typical fashion are saying perhaps he did not prepare the team properly last night and that he might have
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created changes will stop here is the most contrary man in full all. there are a few of them. —— football. manchester united will take a 2—0 advantage into the second leg of their efl cup semi—final against hull city. wayne rooney couldn't find the goal which would have made him united's all time top scorer butjuan mata put them ahead after the break. the second came late on when marouane fellaini headed in his first of the season. liverpool go to southampton for the first leg of their semi—final tonight. jurgen klopp was criticised for the young team he fielded in the fa cup but is expected to bring back his big players for this one. as long as you are involved, it is the most important cup, as you can imagine. that is how we see it and so, it is southampton, for example if you want to talk about intensity, they had a more intense time than we had so there is no advantage for one side. you have to find a way of playing. the fifa president says expanding the world cup will improve the standard of the game everywhere.
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after a vote yesterday, an extra 16 teams will take part in 2026, making 48 in total, and gianni infantino believes bigger will be better. it is time to open to the world competition for the world. a celebration like the world cup. it makes the world stand still and focus on an event. if we look at how football has developed in the last decade, the last years as well in particular, we can see that the quality of football has become higher and higher all over the world. 14—time pa ralympic gold—medallist dame sarah storey says paracycling's governing body was warned that seven weeks notice for the track world championships was not enough. the uci announced yesterday the event would take place in los angeles from march the second — and were widely criticised. storey says she's been pressing for a decision for a number of weeks and that athletes deserve a lot more time to prepare. uci president brian cookson has
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defended the decision saying that holding the championships for the first time in a post—paralympic season signifies "notable progress". the boss of team sky says his cyclists can be trusted 100%. sir dave brailsford has been criticised for some of his answers to those investigating wrongdoing in the sport, including questions over the medical records of one of his highest profile riders — sir bradley wiggins. it's regrettable, i think, it's regrettable, ithink, but equally i think over the test of time, we will continue to perform at the highest level in the right way and get people a reason to get behind us and feel proud of our achievements and give them a team they can be proud of and support. lord coe, the president of athletics world governing body the iaaf, will be asked to give more evidence to mp's as part of their inquiry into doping in sport. coe told a select committee in december 2015 that he was unaware of any specific allegations about the extent of russian doping
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but former athlete dave bedford told the same committee yesterday, that he'd called and e—mailed coe to warn him about the scandal. we're unlikely to ever see rory mcilroy compete at the olympics. the world number two in golf pulled out of the rio games, and has said he probably won't take part in tokyo 2020 either. the fact that he could represent either great britain or ireland means he has conflicting loyalties: more and more likely than not i won't be playing for the games in 2020. not the olympic games, i think they are great and i think golf included in the olympics is fantastic but for me, it's something i don't want to get into and that's a personal choice. after almost 150 years of horse—racing, kempton park is set to be closed to make way for around three thousand new homes. should the proposal go ahead, kempton's famous king george vi chase would move to sandown, located six miles away. course owner thejockey club says the proposal is "for the long—term good of british racing" and is part of plans to raise £500m to invest
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in the sport. and johanna konta has just one. and johanna konta hasjust one. has she? great news. we will bring you pictures of that in the next hour. from growing the economy to removing 0sama bin laden. barack obama used his farewell address to set out what he regards as his major achievements during his eight years in office. we will cross over to washington to assess his legacy in a moment, but first let's take a look at one of the key moments from last night's speech. after my election, there was talk of a post— racial america and such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. race remains a potent and often divisive force in
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our society. now, i potent and often divisive force in oursociety. now, i have potent and often divisive force in our society. now, i have lived long enough to know that race relations are better than they were ten or 20 or 30 years ago, no matter what some folks say. cheering and applause. you can see it notjust in statistics, you see it in the attitudes of young americans across the political spectrum. joining us from washington now is us political analyst eric ham. good morning. good to speak to you. i know you will have watched this closely. what do you think? very interesting speech. he touched on so many areas. what will be his long—lasting legacy? many areas. what will be his long-lasting legacy? it has to be that he was a trailblazer. i mean, we cannot deny the fact that he was the first african—american elected to the highest office in the land. you have two also remember that when he came into office, we were going through the greatest, i think, economic term that this country has
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ever seen economic term that this country has ever seen since the great depression. we were haemorrhaging over 800,000 jobs per month. barack 0bama came in and single—handedly saved the automobile industry. he actually took us from a majorjob loss to now where we are actually bringing in newjobs into this country. he actually tried to be a unifier but he did didn't get the support from congress. i think it will be seen as a trailblazer and make no mistake, history will be very kind to this president. he was also, in some ways, a call to arms. i have done this work and now it is over to you. it was. and also, too, one thing about barack obama, he has, i think, an amazing understanding and he believes in people. one thing about the speech today that came out very clear was that he believed democracy is on the
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brink and it needs to be pulled back. i believe that many of the state m e nts back. i believe that many of the statements he made were directed at donald trump and i do believe he wa nts to donald trump and i do believe he wants to see an america reach its highest ideals, reach its full potential. i believe he thinks that with donald trump at the helm, that might bea with donald trump at the helm, that might be a problem. i think that this was not only a farewell speech ata this was not only a farewell speech at a rallying of the troops to say, look, there is much more work to be done. let's also talk about the president elect. there is a breaking news, really, overnight, from america. it is about information that media reports have that the russians may have on him. can you explain to us what the latest revelation is? there is an intelligence briefing that he had last week with intelligence agencies and part of this briefing was a 2—page dossier memo that suggested
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that maybe not donald trump directly but surrogates and aides of donald trump have been working and had maybe provided information to these aids and that some of them interacting with russian embassies said they had damaging information on donald trump. none of this has been confirmed that it is something thatis been confirmed that it is something that is out there and i believe that given the fact the various intelligence agencies are long with the fbi are saying that russia played a role in our election process , played a role in our election process, these latest allegations are something you will begin to see more senators, more congressmen, from both the right and left, looking for and focusing more attention on and looking to investigate in a more in—depth and detailed way. thank you for explaining it. also donald trump,
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first thing donald trump tweets about is fake news. fellini yes and this is something you have to understand about trump and his team. any time we bring up russian hacking they see this as an opportunity to somehow dispute the notion that he's president or somehow that his is tainted. but many people accept that donald trump is the president—elect, but recognise that there are issues, there are problems, especially with russia that need to be addressed. so i think that something that lawmakers are looking... and i think the intelligence community would like to see donald trump take a more proactive approach to addressing and i think only time will tell if he will do that. thanks for your time, as always. you bet. fascinating. i love the way american guests finish their interviews with "you bet".
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it is one of those mornings where i could hear the weather before i saw it. yes, and over the next few days some of us will have sleek and snow. we could have some icy roads to look out for. gales is the story of the day. very strong winds through the night. we still have them and will carry on with them. these are the latest bus. so if you are travelling this morning, do take extra care. there is likely to be some disruption. there is already in places. you could find branches down, et cetera. across scotland it is windy. storm force in the north, severe gales. the black circles indicate the gust of wind come up plus wintry showers. we've got a rain showers and windy across northern ireland. some snow showers
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and fairly windy across northern england. india —— windy along the coastal approaches. still windy in the south of england, are not as windy as everywhere else. through the day as well as the wind the cloud will break up and we will have sunshine. as it turned colder through the day we will have wintry showers, even getting down to lower levels. the highest temperatures are coming down as we go through the day. in the evening and overnight there will be the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. wintry showers more prolific in scotland. then another batch comes in across northern ireland. a lot of this in the hills. sleet and snow at lower levels as well. then we've got the next system coming in across the south—west. this is problematic. the exact positioning is important because as it engages with the cold, arctic air that's where we are likely to see snow. this is what we think at the moment, as it could drift further south. tomorrow a lot
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of rain, the risk of flooding locally. it comes in across wales, the moors, towards the home counties, across london, the south—east and towards kent. but it could be a little bit further south. some of us see up to two centimetres of snow. locally, ten centimetres. variable. in the north we've got snow showers packing in across scotland, northern england and northern ireland. some of them at lower levels. blizzards in the mountains. but showers, so not all of us will see them. in between there will be sunshine, but it will feel cold. wherever you are, although temperatures are the freezing, for most of us it will feel more like low freezing. as we head on through the rest of thursday and into friday there goes the low pressure, taking the snow away from it. the wind moves to a northerly and with a north—westerly component. in the friday a lot of dry weather
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around. any showers are likely to be wintry in nature. the thing up large waves in the wind. some parts of eastern england could see some localised coastal flooding. eastern england could see some localised coastalflooding. so a lot going on. there really is. thank you. it is affecting things out and about as well. there was a lorry crash on a bridge. high winds reported in the area. drivers being asked to take alternative routes this morning. it will cause difficulty and traffic issues this morning. we will keep you up—to—date. also, many of you may have been kept awake last night worrying about money. i went straight to sleep, actually, but it is on many people's minds. i do concern myself with it on other occasions. straight, sound asleep. i was kept awake by the wind last night. yes,
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it is in the wind are good sleep thatis it is in the wind are good sleep that is worrying many people. it is money and it's a study from nearly 2000 staff showing it isn'tjust people on the waiting comes that are worried about money. charles cotton's team did this research and he's with me. you've done this study, looking at the fact that people have been kept awake last night, worry —— worrying about what they are earning. let's take a look at some of the main points coming out of the survey. a fifth of those worried about their money have lost sleep over as a result. it has got to that stage? yes, in total about one in four employees said that money concerns was impacting their ability to do their job, by the lack of sleep orjust not able to focus at work or taking time out of the office to deal with money concerns. t0 time out of the office to deal with money concerns. to be clear, these are people who are already working, so are people who are already working, so not someone worried about getting
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a job. people who are in work, worried about being paid enough? yes, being paid enough to kind of meet basic living standards and whether they are being awarded fairly, in comparison to their work collea g u es fairly, in comparison to their work colleagues or whether they have the opportunity to save for their futures. it had a look -- have a look at who is affected. a third of 18—24—year—olds are reporting cash—flow concerns. they are worried they aren't being paid enough. yes, it might be young people, some might be students so they are worried about student debts, also getting onto the property ladder or saving for a deposit, or saving for their future pension. and it isn't people who are just on low incomes that are most concerned, it is everybody and especially those who are earning a substantial amount of money are still worrying whether it's enough.
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even high earners have money problems, but there is a case of not so problems, but there is a case of not so much the amount of money but finding time to manage their finances, finding time to get the best deals and understanding how it has been used. we've seen a lot of initiatives, like the national minimum wage, all that sort of thing, to address people at the bottom of the scale. what can firms be doing? it isn'tjust a case of paying people more. obviously, especially at this time of economic uncertainty, any firms perhaps don't have the money anyway to increase salaries, but there are steps they can take. 0ne salaries, but there are steps they can take. one is to look at training and development opportunities for employees, to have skills to progress up the career ladder. it is looking at how they can make their employees be more financially sound by giving them access to financial advice and information and guidance and finally it is perhaps going around and doing local deals with
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firms in yourarea, around and doing local deals with firms in your area, yet discounts for your staff from hairdressers, from local clinics, the gym, things like that, the —— to help spread the money better. very interesting. rank you. more from me after 7am when we will get the results from sainsbury‘s. i will have the details in about minutes. thank you. later this morning we have a treat. at about 7:50am... pool cues in honour of what has been dubbed the best trick show ever. it has been watched online by the 1 million people and involves a golf club, two flights of stairs, ten ta bles club, two flights of stairs, ten tables and a roll along a bar. before you get to see us attempt out predict pretty full effort, here is a quick. —— pretty pitiful effort. did it go in?
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you will have to watch later. do you think they would be playing it if it didn't? the good news is that we are never short of ambition here on bbc brea kfast. short of ambition here on bbc breakfast. we will try the same. slightly more limited. we've got six balls and the white on the table. we will try to pot all of those later, but their effort was incredible. powers to set up, 120 times they tried each one of those and in the end they produced something that's been watched by millions of people. we will have one of the creators in later. i was hoping it might roll around the sofa. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the american government has imposed sanctions against a man from west london, who's accused of fighting with militant extremists in syria and executing and torturing prisoners. it's claimed alexanda kotey, a 33—year—old from paddington,
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has been involved in beheadings and waterboarding. he's thought to be part of a group of militants known as ‘the beatles', including fellow londoner mohammed emwazi, known asjihadijohn. a london council is to be prosecuted for breaching fire safety regulations, following the deaths of six people in a fire at a block of flats in camberwell. the blaze at lakanal house happened in 2009 and the charges include allegations that southwark council didn't carry out a fire risk assessment. the action is being brought by the london fire brigade. there's a call for barber shops in london to be regulated. industry leaders are warning that there are more unqualified barbers opening up than ever before. something needs to be done. the councils i think need to get involved with health and safety and check.
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notjust shut down people, help people. tell them what the legislation is and people get a qualification, they understand everything else. people just think all it is knowing how to cut hair, but you need all the other knowledge about skin conditions, skin complaints. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's another day of strikes on southern railways. only 16 southern trains will run today on the caterham to victoria line. 8am to 8pm. so expect roads, the 0verground and underground to be busy. the victoria line has severe delays because of a signal failure at seven sisters. the circle line has minor delays anti—clockwise because of a shortage of drivers, while tfl rail is part closed due to planned engineering work. one the roads, in bow, the a12 is slow southbound approaching the blackwall tunnel after an accident. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start
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to the day, but don't be fooled. the temperatures will slip away through the afternoon and feel much colder by the end of the day. we've got a bit of cloud this morning, but that is moving away south—eastwards, accompanied by a fresh north—westerly wind. that wind will feel chilly later. we've got some bright and sunny spells but by the end of the day the temperature colder than this morning, 6—7. a cold night tonight, but tomorrow we have a band of rain sweeping across the south of the uk. falling in the most part as rain, but as we head through the afternoon into the evening it mixes with cold air and could in turn fall as snow right about rush—hour. some very difficult driving conditions. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for some snow, through tomorrow into tomorrow evening. through the rest of the week it is going to get progressively colder, especially at night. potential for some snow thursday evening into friday morning. brightness for friday and saturday, but it will get colder. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. president obama says farewell to the american people. in his final speech as president, he warned of threats to democracy from inequality and racism — but after eight years in charge, says he's leaving the united stated "better and stronger". yes, we can. cheering and applause. yes, we did. cheering and applause. yes, we can. good morning, it's wednesday, the 11th of january. also this morning: allegations that russian intelligence agencies have ‘compromising' information about donald trump. the us president—elect has described reports as "a total political witch hunt". a 15—year—old girl is charged
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with the murder of 7—year—old katie rough in york. a warning from the royal college of physicians that lives are being put at risk by nhs underfunding — while experts in health and social care say mps from all parties need to tackle the problems together. i'm here at st marys hospital in london. in the run up to christmas, bbc cameras were allowed in to film the reality of everyday life on the front line. we'll be speaking to staff about that before 8:00. did supermarket sainsbury‘s have a cracker this christmas — or were sales a bit of turkey? i'll have all the figures when they break in just a moment. in sport, it's one step closer to a cup final for manchester united. they beat hull city 2—0 in the first leg of the league cup semi—final. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. today is a windy day for some of us. we have gales and four other people, severe gales. couple that with wintry showers in the war, blizzards in the mountains. further south, sunshine. tomorrow, it is not just further south, sunshine. tomorrow, it is notjust that part that further south, sunshine. tomorrow, it is not just that part that was the showers, some parts of southern england will have rain, sleet and snow. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president, telling the american people he believes the country is in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. in an emotional speech in chicago, he thanked his wife michelle as well as his family and staff and said he still believed in the ability of people to deliver change. however, he admitted progress had not gone far enough as our us correspondent laura trevelyan now reports. cheering barack obama returned to chicago, the place where his political career
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began, to deliver his long planned farewell address. the president used his platform to underline what he sees as his achievements. if i had told you 8 years ago that america if i had told you we would win marriage equality and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens... cheering and applause if i told you all that, you might have said our sights were set a little too high. turning to his theme of what could undermine america's democracy, america's first black president was frank about the state of race relations. after my election, there was talk of a post—racial america. such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society. paying tribute to his wife
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michelle and daughters, the president became emotional. for those who had lined up for hours to hear him speak in person, the effort was worthwhile. i thought it was very uplifting and it gave up a message of hope —— that gave us it gave up a message of hope —— that gave us a message. it gave up a message of hope —— that gave us a message. it was what we needed to hear right now. leigh we had a tough election and we just need to keep fighting for the courses. barack obama's supporters we re courses. barack obama's supporters were hardened by his uplifting message to night and he leaves office with his personal popularity ata office with his personal popularity at a high. but that did not stop the american voters from choosing donald trump to replace him and now barack 0bama must watch as republicans tried to dismantle much of his legacy. laura trevelyan, bbc news, chicago. earlier laura trevelyan told us how 0bama's supporters had reacted to his speech.
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i thought it was very uplifting and it gave us a message of hope —— it was aimed as well at donald trump. he was saying that progress has been made but we must project does not protect our rights. you mentioned donald trump that resident obama did not mention him by name. the president elect is in the news again or is he would term, the fake news again —— president obama. us media are reporting that russian spy agencies have embarrassing information about the president—elect donald trump that is personally compromising. us media is reporting this quoting unnamed sources. they are also reporting that us intelligence agencies that done with mr trump privately and told
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them about this allegation is that apparently russian spy agencies have. mr trump has responded in his signature way, on twitter, he said fake news and it's a political witch—hunt. remember that donald trump is in hot water in washington for disparaging us russian agencies that intelligence agencies that attempted to affect the outcome of the election. as the president gave his speech the hashtag farewell 0bama we'll be assessing president 0bama's legacy with a panel of experts on us politics and society at about 8:10. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a 7—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area.
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the teenager is due to appear before magistrates later this morning. senior doctors are warning that a shortage of resources may leave the nhs in england unable to cope with this winter's demand. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister — calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. the royal college of physicians said ambulances queueing outside hospitals were visual testament to the crisis in the nhs. the royal college, which represents 33,000 specialist hospital doctors, said patients faced lengthening waits on lists, on trolleys, in accident and emergency departments and at home. it blamed a shortage of qualified staff, stretched too thin lead to meet the increasing demands. our members fear that people's lives are at risk because they can't get round to see the patients that aren't yet in the emergency department or indeed are waiting for results to come back. members and fellows have been
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writing in and our council members specifically have said to me this is the worst they have ever seen. most urgent, said the doctors, is investment in social care to prevent medically fit patients being trapped in hospitals. in their own letter to the prime minister, 75 charities and individuals working in health and social care said there must be a long—term cross—party solution to what they called the crisis in funding. led by the charity independent age, they said: the department of health said it had invested £10 billion to develop health services and relieve pressure on hospitals. and, since last year, had recruited 3,000 extra nurses and 1,600 more doctors. robert pigott, bbc news. meanwhile, plans to extend access to gps in england are in "complete
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disarray" according to the british medical association. the comment follows a report by the national audit office which urges ministers to reconsider plans to increase weekend and evening access to family doctors in england. it says many gps are already struggling to provide existing services. the department of health says it's promised additional funding and 5,000 extra doctors. a white supremacist, dylann roof, has been sentenced to death for the racist killing of nine black men and women at a church in south carolina in 2015. the 22—year—old opened fire during a bible studies class. he rejected a final chance to plead for his life, telling the jury he felt he "had to carry it out". in the last moments, we heard about
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how supermarkets have done. today, sainsbury‘s. how supermarkets have done. today, sainsbury's. we heard about how they did over the important christmas period. bainbridge told us that sales were up by 0.1%. compare that to the 2.90 suggested they. you start to get a picture of it. same breeze, to be clear, up 0.1% over the christmas period. it also is at argus, they did very well. they did well at things like black friday and all the discounts before the christmas period. good news for them. if you look at sainsbury's, sales of clothing did well. it was up sales of clothing did well. it was up by sales of clothing did well. it was up by 10%. they have talked already a about the warning, a similar warning we got yesterday from morrisons and we have had it also from next, prices going up in the new year. they are worried about the devaluation in the pound and what it means for stuff we buy overseas. they say the market is very
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competitive and the devaluation of the pound. sales up 0.1% and up 4% at argus. more during the week as well. tomorrow is a big day. we have tesco as well. are you on tomorrow? your mac i tesco as well. are you on tomorrow? yourmac i am. tesco as well. are you on tomorrow? your mac i am. ——i am. for the first time, the attorney general will set out the legal factors that need to be considered before military action is taken against terror suspects abroad. in a speech, jeremy wright qc will say the uk must have the right to use lethal force in self—defence in order to deal with the increased threat. ben bland reports. technology. in many ways it makes life easier for us but also easier for those who want to do us harm. that is the warning from the government's top legal advisor. spies like those at gchq can gather intelligence and warn if an attack is likely. the law allows the uk to use force and self defence if it is attacked but also to prevent an attack before it happens. on that basis, the uk used one
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of these, an unmanned drone, to kill a britishjihadist in syria in september 2015. reyaad khan from cardiff was the target and a second uk national, rahulamin, also died. at the time, ministers said it was lawful because khan was involved in a plot to carry out a high—profile attack in the summer. there were demands for the government to clarify the legal basis for carrying out pre—emptive strikes against islamic state militants. the attorney general, jeremy wright qc, will now explain for the first time how such decisions are made. the considerations include how certain it is that an attack will happen, how soon it will be and on what scale. whether anything else could be done to prevent the attack and whether it is the last clear opportunity to do so. undoubtedly, the uk government has the technology to carry out effective and deadly strikes but it mustjustify doing so within the limits of the law.
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ben bland, bbc news. now some exciting ape news. these black—and—cream gibbons live high up in the tropical forests of south—west china. their distinctive white eyebrows and a faint beard are unlike the markings found on any other gibbons in asia. now a full physical comparison and genetic test have confirmed that this is indeed a new species. it's been named the "skywalker" hoolock gibbon, partly because the chinese translation of its name means heaven's movement — but also because the scientists are fans of star wars. the worries of health professionals in the nhs have been laid bare today. those letters, one from the royal college of physicians and
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another from the royal college of nursing and carers uk are pretty damning of the government's treatment of problems. the rcp says we are treating more patients than ever before and are nhs is underfunded, under doctored and underfunded, under doctored and under is —— overstretched. the independent age collective says "unless you adopt a bolder approach millions of older, ill and disabled people and their carers, will continue to be badly let down." the letters come after documents leaked to bbc news revealed record numbers of patients are facing long waits in a&es — nearly a quarter waited longer than the four hour target. this week the health secretary jeremy hunt suggested that target may have to be relaxed — it has not been met sincejuly 2015. the nhs and the prime minister have disputed claims from the red cross that there is a "humanitarian crisis" in its hospitals in england. theresa may acknowledged there were "huge pressures" on the health service and said no ten had provided the funding requested.
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we can talk to dr adrian boyle, who's an a&e consultant and a member of the royal college of emergency medicine. he's in our cambridge studio. good morning. thank you so much for your time. you work in this industry. tell us what emergency is like at the moment for you and your staff. it is very pressured. we have reports from all around the country, that people can't offload people from ambulances. people are working under huge pressure. they aren't able to give the care they want to. people are being treated in corridors and even when people are being assessed they have a long way to get into the hospital. how does it make you feel when you hear stories about people waiting on trolleys for 12 hours? when we hear them we think, how can that happen? when you as a doctor here that, how does that make you feel? it is demoralising. people want to be able to go to work and do the best
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possiblejob to go to work and do the best possible job they can. that means treating them in an environment that is dignified and supportive. if you are looking after someone in a trolley it is actually really demoralising if they are waiting there and you walk past them and they are still there all the time. it has a very corrosive effect on morale and resilience. giving the red —— given what you have said, do you think what the red cross have said is an over exaggeration?m you think what the red cross have said is an over exaggeration? it is certainly a crisis and this has been building for a number of years. it is particularly acute at this time of year when we have had accommodation of a cold snap, possibly some flu going around and all the pressures of the winter break. but this isn't something that has come out of the blue. we spoke tojeremy has come out of the blue. we spoke to jeremy hunt on has come out of the blue. we spoke tojeremy hunt on monday and later on that day he spoke about the four—hour waiting time at emergency. would you be in favour of the changes he has suggested? the thing thatis changes he has suggested? the thing that is a good way forward?
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absolutely not. we are generally very behind the four—hour target. just because you don't like the result doesn't mean you can't change the rules of the game. it isn't a perfect standard by any means, but it's a useful standard. trying to say you will only apply it to selected people wouldn't work. if you actually applied it to the people who need it most, the people coming to hospital, the sick, very ill and people with conflicts needs, the performance would drop very much. —— complex needs. people who shouldn't be there are actually treated very quickly and easily. we think they are a bit less than 30% of the workflow, but not 30% of the total work we have to give those people. it is more like 5%. what changes would you make if you could, especially to emergency? we need to
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create an environment where it makes it better for people to go to work and give good care. we need urgently to have more beds within the hospitals and within social care systems, so we don't... we can actually get patients promptly from an emergency department into hospital. where do those beds come from? is that extra funding, a change to the system? absolutely extra funding. with that letter today about the problems we are seeing in hospitals, they are spot on. we need more funding and also for social care. actually getting patients out of hospital, safely and properly into the right sort of care, will have huge benefits. we appreciate your time this morning. lots of you will have noticed it was pretty windy last night. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. in the next 2a hours
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what we are looking at is sleet and snow for some of us. some of us have this already. icy roads and also gables. gail is what we have today. it could lead to travel disruption. it could lead to travel disruption. it has already. some temperatures have restrictions. watch out for some branches of trees careering down the road. the black circles indicate the wind gusts. across scotland, storm force in the north, severe gales. blizzards in the hills. across northern ireland it is rain showers. very windy. northern england, especially the pennines. watch out on the m62 for example. windy around the coasts, with showers. windy in the midlands and into east anglia. southern england isn't as windy as it is further north. it will remain windy as we go through the day. the snow showers continue across scotland. sleet and snow, some in the lower levels. but
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they are showers, so not all of us will see them. maximum temperatures going down. through the evening and overnight there is the risk of some ice on untreated surfaces. if anything the snow showers become more prolific in northern ireland, more prolific in northern ireland, more than england and wales. then the next troublemaker comes in. the low pressure is moving from the west towards this. there is still an element of doubt as to how far north it grows and that's important because as the rain engages with the cold, arctic air that's when we are likely to see snow. before that happens a lot of rain will push across the south, which could lead to surface water, and then here comes the snow across south wales, the moors, heading eastwards across southern counties into the midlands, through london, east anglia and taught the south coast. later that will push away through kent. the snow might be further south. so don't make this the last weather forecast you watch. some could get
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two centimetres, some ten centimetres. at the other end of the country, for scotland, northern ireland and england, mostly showers. i'm getting into north wales as well. we will see the showers at lower levels. again, winds starting to ease, what atrocious conditions on the hills and mountains. in between that dry and relatively bright. wherever you are it will feel cold. the wind will accentuate that chilly feel, so for many it will feel freezing. then pushes into near continent on thursday. the wind moves to a northerly and then we have gales coming down and the risk of some localised coastal flooding. lots going on. a busy time. thank you. like you say, don't make that the last weather report you watch because it is changing all the time. we will have another one in half an hour. the duke and duchess of cambridge will today visit a centre run by a charity which supports
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bereaved parents. prince william is royal patron of child bereavement uk, which also offers help to children who have experienced the death of someone close. graham satchell has been to meet a family who the charity is supporting. you may find some of the details in this report upsetting. she was kind of like my lifeline. if i got moody with her dad, she would be like, come on, ma'am, snap out of it. she was headstrong. —— mum. she was full of life, full of smiles. she knew me better than any myself. 0livia died six years ago after an asthma attack at school. she was just eight. we both didn't know what to do or what to say to one another.
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it wasjust thinking to do or what to say to one another. it was just thinking why? why did it happen? ididn't it was just thinking why? why did it happen? i didn't want to cry in front of the wife and kids. i had to be strong for the rest of the family. such a cheeky smile. very cheeky smile. how do you cope with the death of a child, a daughter, sister? we were what i would call a normalfamily sister? we were what i would call a normal family and the biggest thing, it will always stick in my mind, is the fact that darren turns around to kayley and says it is ok to cry for your sister. and she says, no, it's ok for you to cry. it is very hard. for years you
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we re cry. it is very hard. for years you were two peas in a pod. the family has struggled. struggled to talk to each other, struggled with friends who didn't know what to say and then drifted away. but they have had hoped, counselling from the charity child bereavement uk. many of the families that we see at child bereavement uk do talk about the sense of loneliness and isolation that comes from grief and i think we have to chip away at this taboo and try and help decrease the isolation that bereaved families so often feel. i'm not one that likes to show my feelings, but coming here was a bit awkward at first. at the time my sister died i was going through at that stage myself, with getting bullied and self harming, invite that. —— things like that. me self harming was my way of coping, to ta ke harming was my way of coping, to take it out on me, not anyone else.
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lam take it out on me, not anyone else. i am slowly getting there, just trying to get my life back on track. when i think back to how everything was, even on the day of 0livia's death we weren't actually there for each other. when we started having sessions together, i mean, to be honest that was the only time we actually spoke to each other or actually spoke to each other or actually knew how each other felt. counselling has helped but their lives will never be the same. counselling has helped but their lives will never be the samelj still think i haven't really grieved properly. there's always song, there's always a film, or there's always something that said that you never forget. thank you very much to the family for sharing their story with us. that was graham satchell reporting there. and later in the programme the actor jason watkins will be here to talk
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about the challenges he and his family faced when they lost their daughter six years ago. clearly tough to talk about, but important to talk about. still to come on breakfast... what beds have you got? the minute we have bed problems, usually due to people not being able to leave the hospital at the other end, then we end up in this state. ata time of unprecedented pressure for the nhs, the bbc has spent six weeks filming inside one of the biggest and busiest trusts. we will be there throughout the morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the american government has imposed sanctions against a man from west london, who's accused of fighting with extremists in syria and executing and torturing prisoners. it's claimed alexanda kotey,
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a 33—year—old from paddington, has been involved in beheadings and waterboarding. he's thought to be part of the is group of militants including fellow londoner mohammed emwazi, who was killed in a drone strike. a london council is to be prosecuted for breaching fire safety regulations, following the deaths of six people in a fire at a block of flats in camberwell. the blaze at lakanal house happened in 2009 and the charges include allegations that southwark council didn't carry out a fire risk assessment. the action is being brought by the london fire brigade. there's a call for barber shops in london to be regulated. industry leaders are warning that there are more unqualified barbers opening up than ever before. which could lead to problems when it comes to the health and safety of customers. something needs to be done. the councils, i think, need to get involved with health and safety and check.
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notjust shut down people, help people. tell them what the legislation is and people get a qualification, they understand everything else. people just think all it is knowing how to cut hair, but you need all the other knowledge about skin conditions, skin complaints. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's another day of strikes on southern railways. only 16 southern trains will run today on the caterham to victoria line. 8am in the morning, 8pm in the evening. so expect roads, the 0verground and underground, to be busy in places. the victoria line has severe delays because of a signal failure at seven sisters. tfl rail is partly closed, due to planned engineering work which will ta ke planned engineering work which will take place until may. one the roads, in bow — the a12 is slow southbound approaching the blackwall tunnel after an accident. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start to the day, but don't be fooled. the temperature will slip away
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through the afternoon and feel much colder by the end of the day. we've got a bit of cloud this morning, but that is moving away south—eastwards, accompanied by a fresh north—westerly wind. that wind will feel chilly later. we've got some bright and sunny spells, but by the end of the day the temperature colder than this morning, 6—7 celsius. a cold night tonight, but tomorrow we have a band of rain sweeping across the south of the uk. falling in the most part as rain, but as we head through the afternoon into the evening it mixes with cold air and could in turn fall as snow right about rush—hour. some very difficult driving conditions. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for some snow through tomorrow into tomorrow evening. as we head through the rest of the week it is going to get progressively colder, especially at night. potential for some snow thursday evening into friday morning. some brightness for friday and saturday, but it will get colder. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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barack obama ba rack obama has barack obama has delivered his farewell speech. in an emotional speech in chicago, he said he believed the country was in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. the president admitted progress had not gone far enough but called on the american people to put aside their differences and help bring about positive change. i am asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents, that ideal whisper by slaves and abolitionists, that spirit sung by immigrants homesteaders and those who marched forjustice, that creed reaffirmed by those who planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon, a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written.
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yes, we can. cheering and applause. yes, we did. yes, we can. we'll be assessing president 0bama's legacy with a panel of experts on us politics and society at about 8:10. meanwhile, donald trump says he is the victim of a "political witch hunt" after allegations against him were published in the us. unconfirmed reports have emerged in the american media that russian intelligence agencies have gathered compromising information on the president—elect. in a tweet, mr trump did not refer directly to the stories but complained fake news had been published. these latest allegations are something that i think you will begin to see more senators, more congressmen, from both the right and left, looking for and focusing more
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attention on and looking to investigate in a more in—depth and detailed way. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a 7—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates later this morning. senior doctors are warning that the crisis in the nhs and social care is putting people's lives at risk. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said a shortage of resources means the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister — calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. the department of health says it's investing £10—billion to relieve pressure on hospitals. same breeze is the latest supermarket trip which is christmas results. —— sainsbury's. they reported growth
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in clothing but down in food. tesco's is publishing best tomorrow. —— theirs. the pictures come from a camera attached to the neck of a female polar bear and shows two bears breaking through ice sheets in order to hunt for prey. the us geological survey hopes it'll help researchers better understand how the animals are responding to declining sea ice levels. fantastic pictures. i then have any more polar bearfacts. i don't think you are very impressed with my last one. that's not true! i was going to say the one at about them being left—handed but that has been proved untrue. they use both hands. beattie goad! i loved that! i did not know
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that. —— is there you go. this is amazing. could this be the best trick shot of all time? a bar in bristol has pulled off an incredible feat involving a golf club, two flights of stairs and ten pool tables. it's around 500ft long, took 11 hours to set up and required pin—point precision. after travelling down the stairs, the ball is perfectly aimed to hit a succession of pool balls that cross between different tables by travelling across cues. millions of people have watched the clip online. we will have the man who created it on the programme later on so you will have to wait until then to find out if it was a hole—in—one. we will be doing our own trick later on. it is most likely to go wrong. i
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will hand it to you. this is my moment. in the meantime, cat. i think you should step up. there is the challenge. bbc breakfast presenters trying to pull trick shots. manchester united will take a 2—0 advantage into the second leg of their efl cup semi—final against hull city. wayne rooney couldn't find the goal which would have made him united's all time top scorer butjuan mata put them ahead after the break. the second came late on when marouane fellaini headed in his first of the season. liverpool go to southampton for the first leg of their semi—final tonight.
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jurgen klopp was criticised for the young team he fielded in the fa cup but is expected to bring back his big players for this one. as long as you are involved, it is the most important cup, as you can imagine. that is how we see it and so, southampton, for example, if you want to talk about intensity, they had a more intense time than we had so there is no advantage for one side. we have to find a way of playing. the fifa president says expanding the world cup will improve the standard of the game everywhere. after a vote yesterday, an extra 16 teams will take part in 2026, making 48 in total, and gianni infantino believes bigger will be better. it's time to open to the world a competition like the world cup, a celebration of football like the world cup. the competition that makes the world stand still and focus on an event. if we look at how football has developed in the last decades, the last years as well in particular, we can see that the quality of football has become higher and higher all over the world.
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england's cricketers will support alastair cook whether he decides to continue as captain of the test team or not. that's according to haseeb hameed who opened alongside cook 14—time pa ralympic gold—medallist dame sarah storey says paracycling's governing body was warned that seven weeks notice for the track world championships was not enough. the uci announced yesterday the event would take place in los angeles from march the second — and were widely criticised. storey says she's been pressing for a decision for a number of weeks and that athletes deserve a lot more time to prepare. uci president brian cookson has defended the decision saying that holding the championships for the first time in a post—paralympic season signifies "notable progress". the boss of team sky says his cyclists can be trusted 100%. sir dave brailsford has been criticised for some of his answers to those investigating wrongdoing in the sport, including questions over the medical records of one of his highest profile riders — sir bradley wiggins. it's regrettable, i think, but equally i think, over the test of time, we will continue to perform
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at the highest level in the right way and get people a reason to get behind us and feel proud of our achievements and give them a team they can believe in and support. lord coe, the president of athletics world governing body the iaaf, will be asked to give more evidence to mp's as part of their inquiry into doping in sport. coe told a select committee in december 2015 that he was unaware of any specific allegations about the extent of russian doping but former athlete dave bedford told the same committee yesterday, that he'd called and e—mailed coe to warn him about the scandal. johanna konta is through to the semi—finals of the sydney international after beating daria kasatkina in straight sets. the british number one had to come from behind in the second set to beat the russian world number 26. konta will play former wimbledon finalist eugenie buchard in the semi—final. after almost 150 years of horse—racing, kempton park is set
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to be closed to make way for around three thousand new homes. should the proposal go ahead, kempton's famous king george vi chase would move to sandown, located six miles away. course owner thejockey club says the proposal is "for the long—term good of british racing" and is part of plans to raise £500m to invest in the sport. do you know they will have to dig up dezzy? they will have to move him. history there. there's a big statue and we will miss the track inspection. but, we need more houses. 0n
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inspection. but, we need more houses. on such a historical piece of sporting landscape, isn't it? we both took a breath at the same time then. we've heard a lot about the pressures the nhs is facing this winter and the strain that doctors and nurses are working under. bbc cameras were allowed to film inside and to see the pressures they are under. she has had two lines of cocaine. unknown quantities. 28—year—old male, stabbed three times. seven men with guns have gone into a times. seven men with guns have gone intoa building times. seven men with guns have gone into a building and someone is not leaving. what beds have you got from it? the minute we have bad problems
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might usually due to patients not being able to leave the hospital at the other end, we end up in this state. oh. what have we got that can come out? so much. tim muffett is live this morning from st mary's hospital in paddington which features in the series. morning tim. this offers so so much insight. this is st mary ‘s in paddington. vascular surgeon, is st mary ‘s in paddington. vascularsurgeon, richard, is st mary ‘s in paddington. vascular surgeon, richard, weighty "a good idea to allow cameras inside? —— why did you think it was a good idea? it was good to give people an idea of how difficult
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decisions are made. we are working and challenging circumstances at the moment, throughout the nhs, it's fairto moment, throughout the nhs, it's fair to say. it hopefully offers people an idea that people take very considered, very careful decisions about how to make hospitals run when they are under a lot of pressure. we will look at another clip. in this clip with eu and another surgeon effectively competing to provide a bed to different patients. —— we see you. i think the thing is, we haven't got a lot of choice because we don't do it then,... 0k. haven't got a lot of choice because we don't do it then,... ok. this case has trumped a patient with cancer we we re case has trumped a patient with cancer we were going to do in the other theatre echoes that she has got a condition that will kill her —— because, sometime in the next
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three, four, five, six hours. if we don't do it now, there is going to be no five hours time for her. incredibly tense situation. how common are situations like that? they are more common than people might think. i think that they are becoming more common. recently, we are running into these issues more and more. the head of emergency says you are fire fighting to keep it afloat. she says the whole system countrywide has ground to a halt. can't speak to the rest of the country but from listening to colleagues, it sounds similar. there are robust plans to tackle the problems with supply but i'm not going to lie, it's very difficult at the moment. are you glad that people
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will have an insight into what you do? it's important that people do the how decisions are made, the kind of dishes that are brought to bear on clinical staff, doctors, of dishes that are brought to bear on clinicalstaff, doctors, nurses, andi on clinicalstaff, doctors, nurses, and i hope it is very reassuring for them to show that every decision is thought about. and 04 -- thank you so thought about. and 04 -- thank you so much. the night, we get that insight. it is unprecedented. it gives us insight into how decisions are made in our hospitals. we will be back with you later. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we said don't make the earlier weather forecast the last one you watch today because things are changing all the time. there's lots to keep hold of as people go to school and work today. yes, and especially with tomorrow's weather forecast. in the next few
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days we have sleet and snow for some, icy roads and gales. today we have gales. if you are travelling, bear that in have gales. if you are travelling, bearthat in mind. have gales. if you are travelling, bear that in mind. travel disruption is possible. storm force winds in the final of scotland, severe gales or gales in the rest of scotland, parts of northern england and northern ireland. adding that a mixture of snow. atrocious conditions on the mountains and hills, with blizzards. further south will be wintriness in the pennines. largely dry on higher ground. take extra ca re if largely dry on higher ground. take extra care if you are travelling, especially the m62. windy around the coast of the south—west of england. as we come coast of the south—west of england. as we come across coast of the south—west of england. as we come across other southern counties it is still windy, just not as windy as it is across other parts of the uk. showers becoming more prolific across scotland. even at lower levels we will have sleet and snow. we will have sunshine in parts
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of northern ireland, england and wales. there is the risk of some ice on untreated surfaces. we are not looking at the risk of frost so much because it is windy. winds coming down a little bit. snow showers becoming more widespread and heavier across scotland, northern england, northern ireland and a few across the hills of wales. this is what my change tomorrow. we have rain coming m, change tomorrow. we have rain coming in, associated with low pressure, moving towards west to east. there is the risk of surface water flooding. as it engages with the cold, arctic air that's when we will have snow. first thing in the morning we are likely to have snow on the hills and mountains of wales. through the day the snow will travel towards the south—east, even at lower levels we could have up to two centimetres of snow, locally up to ten centimetres, so very variable. not all of us will see it. this could push further south. the south midlands might not see it, but
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that's very much in the forecast at the moment. at the other end of the country we are looking at snow showers. again, prolific. some of them heavy. gusty winds. lizards on them heavy. gusty winds. lizards on the hills. the wind continuing to come down. —— blizzards. in between all of that we are looking at some dry weather, but wherever you are in this still cold. although temperatures are above freezing it will feel like it isn't for many of us. thank you so much. we will be watching closely. from today, if you take a short haul ba flight you won't get any free snacks on board. none of those little biscuits. instead they've teamed up with a well known retailer to sell sandwiches on board. this morning ben is looking at the last of the frills coming off no—frills travel. cheesy bites, is that what you look forward to? the ones that are shaped like fish.
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i don't think they are cheesy. at as people are pointing out that aren't free, you pay for it in your ticket price. it is a long time since air travel felt glamorous, but today is certainly the end of a era. not so long ago you could have expected to check in at an airport, get a complimentary snack, those cheesy bites, a film on board. even metal cutlery. now? you have to print your own boarding pass for many carriers. the cutlery is gone and increasingly airlines are offering services to watch films on your own devices, phone or tablet, rather than installing their own. and from today if you take a short haul british airways flight from heathrow or gatwick you won't get any free food or drinks. instead you'll have to pay or something provided by m&s. emma coulthurst from the website travelsupermarketjoins us. good morning. the end of an era. when does no frills become
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no—frills? when does no frills become no-frills? isn't it interesting that ba have come out and done this? they are the —— they aren't one of the main cost airlines, like easyjet, but there is little between them. at the moment from today that gin and tonic, that sandwich that you get, it is all gone. you will have to pay for it. it is interesting. the costs are about one third more than you would pay on the high street at m&s. but the best thing to do, take your own. take your own snacks. another tip, you water bottle, take it through security empty, then go to one of the bars and ask them to fill it upfor one of the bars and ask them to fill it up for free. there are so many extras and i think it is the case of making sure you understand the rules. if you understand the rules then you can get around some of
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those extras. but there is nowhere on the plane now which hasn't got some sort of potential charge attached to it. that's the point. the airline wants to save money. of course they are trying to increase the profit margin. so with the competition from the no—frills carriers will stop but will we see our ticket prices go down? i can't imagine it will get cheaperjust because we don't get a free meal. funnily enough, the new ba chairman said last year that they are doing this because the customers want more choice. he kind of suggested that their products warrant premium. but i can't their products warrant premium. but ican't imagine their products warrant premium. but i can't imagine you would find many ba customers saying they wanted to pay £2 34 cup of tea. really interesting. a lot of you getting in touch this morning on social media, saying it was one thing that gave ba the edge. another says, this is the reality. think of it with a flying
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bus and you won't be disappointed. another says, it's a bonus! more for me after 8am. thank you. in a moment, we'll trade our autocue for a couple of pool cues to try our hand at potting a few balls with the man behind what's been dubbed the best trick shot ever. millions of people have now watched the video of the stunt which involves a golf club, two flights of stairs, ten tables and a roll along a bar. wait for it! look at that! trick shot enthusiast shane 0'hara joins us now. thank you very much. you set that up and it took an extraordinary long time, didn't it? it did, quite sadly. it took an entire night of my life. how many sections were there? 20. and he practised every single section how many times? it failed
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multiple times as we went along. probably 100 plus takes. lots of people say they think it is either fa ke people say they think it is either fake or that it was done on different cameras, but it was one continuous shot. was it you who took the shot at the start? no, that was someone the shot at the start? no, that was someone else rolling in my 15 minutes of fame. even though he had the most limited input in it.|j minutes of fame. even though he had the most limited input in it. i am sure he wouldn't say that! yes, it is amazing. we were just really persistent. i understand you started from the last shot and then work backwards? yes, you work backwards. pa rt backwards? yes, you work backwards. part of the artistry is that you paint it as it goes. you just go with the flow. there is no still image that you see before you start. is it true that as frustration kicked in for the last two hours no one spoke to each other? that's true. we alljust wanted to go to
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bed. we were bashing our heads off each other. but it has worked and has been watched by millions. what would you do next? something more elaborate? you are going to do on here! you have set one up for us? this has a fairly high success rate. depends on your sporting pedigree. we don't know who will play this. let's toss the coin. i will go heads. heads i will do it. tails, it's you! 0k... can you talk me through it a bit? do it at medium speed. the plan is that all of the balls will go in. in between the two reds? what will happen if it is successful? if it is successful then you are much braver
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than i am to do something on live tv like this. and what will happen? supposedly on ball bilbo in each pocket. that is officially the worst trick shot ever. i don't want to critique you...i shot ever. i don't want to critique you... iwill take shot ever. i don't want to critique you... i will take some of the liability. can i have a go in on our? yes, i will set it up. -- in one hour? i believe the -- will leave the building before my credit he is any lower. i got five in. have one more go. that's fine, seriously. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. get in. come on!
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good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the american government has imposed sanctions against a man from west london, who's accused of fighting with extremists in syria and executing and torturing prisoners. it's claimed alexanda kotey, a 33—year—old from paddington, has been involved in beheadings and waterboarding. he's thought to be part of is terror group with fellow north—west londoner mohammed emwazi. a london council is to be prosecuted for breaching fire safety regulations, following the deaths of six people in a fire at a block of flats in camberwell. the blaze at lakanal house happened in 2009 and the charges include allegations that southwark council didn't carry out a fire risk assessment. the action is being brought by the london fire brigade. there's a call for barber shops in london to be regulated. industry leaders are warning that there are more unqualified barbers opening up than ever before.
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which could lead to problems when it comes to the health and safety of customers. something needs to be done. the councils, i think, need to get involved with health and safety and check. notjust shut down people, help people. tell them what the legislation is and people get a qualification, they understand everything else. people just think all it is knowing how to cut hair, but you need all the other knowledge about skin conditions, skin complaints. let's have a look at the travel situation now. it's another day of strikes on southern railways. only 16 southern trains will run today on the caterham to victoria line. 8am to 8pm. a signal failure at edgware road is causing major problems. circle and district lines have severe delays as a result. the hammersmith & city has severe delays between edgware road to barking. tfl rail is part closed due to planned engineering work. the overground
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the overg round has the overground has minor delays. massive problems there. one the roads, hanger lane — entry slip road from the a40 westbound to the hanger lane gyratory partly blocked following a crash. you can see it is being looked after. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start to the day, but don't be fooled. the temperature will slip away through the afternoon and feel much colder by the end of the day. we've got a bit of cloud this morning, but that is moving away south—eastwards, accompanied by a fresh north—westerly wind. that wind will feel chilly later. we've got some bright and sunny spells, but by the end of the day the temperature colder than this morning, 6—7 celsius. a cold night tonight, but tomorrow we have a band of rain sweeping across the south of the uk. falling in the most part as rain, but as we head through the afternoon into the evening it mixes with cold air and could in turn fall as snow right about rush—hour. some very difficult driving conditions. the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for some snow through tomorrow
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into tomorrow evening. as we head through the rest of the week it is going to get progressively colder, especially at night. potential for some snow thursday evening into friday morning. some brightness for friday and saturday, but it will get colder. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. president obama says farewell to the american people. in his final speech as president, he warned of threats to democracy from inequality and racism, but says he's leaving the united states "better and stronger". yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can. thank you. god bless you. good morning. it's wednesday, 11th january.
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also this morning, allegations that russian allegations that russian intelligence agencies have compromising information about donald trump. the us president—elect has described reports as "a total political witch hunt". a 15—year—old girl is charged with the murder of seven—year—old katie rough in york. it has been a challenging week for the nhs, with claims it's in crisis. in the run up to christmas, st marys hospital in london let bbc cameras in to film the reality of everyday life on the front—line. we'll be speaking to staff about that before 8. supermarket sainsbury's says sales barely rose over christmas, but argos did much better thanks to black friday and cyber monday. i'll have the details. in sport, it's one step closer to a cup final
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for manchester united. they beat hull city 2—0 in the first leg of the league cup semi—final. we'll be joined by the amateur sailor who has been voted yachtsman of the year after rescuing a man who'd got tangled up at the top of this mast. gavin reid had only learned to sail a year ago. the weather is well, interesting today. incredible stuff. carol has it for us. good morning, it is a windy day. the further north you travel, the stronger the gusts of wind will be. there is some wintry showers in the north so blizzards on the hills. further south, the drizzle will clear and we will see sunshine, but tomorrow it won'tjust be the north seeing snow. some parts of the south will as well. but i'll have more on that in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story.
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barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president, telling the american people he believes the country is in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. in an emotional speech in chicago, he thanked his wife michelle as well as his family and staff and said he still believed in the ability of people to deliver change. however, he admitted progress had not gone far enough as our us correspondent laura trevelyan now reports. cheering. barack obama returned to chicago, the place where his political career began to deliver his long planned farewell address. the president used his platform to underline what he sees as his achievements. if i had told you that we would win marriage equality and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens... cheering and applause. if i told you all that, you might have said our sights
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were set a little too high. turning to his theme of what could undermine america's democracy, the nation's first black president was frank about the state of race relations. after my election, there was talk of a post—racial america. such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society. paying tribute to his wife michelle and his daughters, the president became emotional. for those who had lined up for hours to hear him speak in person, the effort was worthwhile. i thought it was very uplifting and it gave us a message of hope and encouragement and it was what we needed to hear right now. we had a tough election and we just need to keep fighting for the causes that we believe in. barack obama's supporters
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were heartened by his uplifting message tonight and he leaves office with his personal popularity at a high. but that didn't stop the american voters from choosing donald trump to replace him and now barack obama must watch as republicans tried to dismantle much of his legacy. a little earlier laura trevelyan told us how 0bama's supporters had reacted to his speech. it was uplifting. they're depressed after the election of donald trump. they feel that barack obama chartered a way forward for them and told them that they need to defend american democracy against political apathy, against fake news, against a corrosive political culture, but this speech wasn't just corrosive political culture, but this speech wasn'tjust aimed at barack obama's supporters, it was for all americans and also, i think for all americans and also, i think for the president—elect donald trump and the president saying clearly progress has been made, but we must protect our rights as americans. you
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mentioned donald trump, but president obama didn't mention donald trump by name, although the president—elect is in the news again as he would term the fake news ain? as he would term the fake news again? well, that's right. us media are reporting that russian spy agencies have embarrassing information about the president—elect donald trump that is personally compromising. they are also reporting that us intelligence agencies sat down with mr trump privately and told him about the allegations that apparently russian spy allegations that apparently russian spy agencies have. now, donald trump responded as you mentioned in his signature way. he has taken to twitter and he said fake news, this isa twitter and he said fake news, this is a political witch—hunt. donald trump is in hot water in washington for disparaging us intelligence agencies, for their claim that russia interfered in the recent election to help mr trump. mr trump is supposed to hold a press conference today. if he does, you
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can be sure this will come up. we'll be assessing president 0bama's legacy with a panel of experts on us politics and society in a few minutes time. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a seven—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates‘ later this morning. senior doctors are warning that a shortage of resources may leave the nhs in england unable to cope with this winter's demand. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. the royal college of physicians said ambulances queuing outside hospitals were visual testament to the crisis in the nhs. the royal college, which represents 33,000 specialist hospital doctors, said patients faced lengthening
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waits on lists, on trolleys, in accident and emergency departments and at home. it blamed a shortage of qualified staff, stretched too thin lead to meet the increasing demands. our members fear that people's lives are at risk because they can't get round to see the patients that aren't yet in the emergency department or indeed are waiting for results to come back. members and fellows have been writing in and our council members specifically have said to me this is the worst they have ever seen. most urgent, said the doctors, is investment in social care to prevent medically fit patients being trapped in hospitals. in their own letter to the prime minister, 75 charities and individuals working in health and social care said there must be a long—term cross—party solution to what they called the crisis in funding. led by the charity independent age, they said:
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the department of health said it had invested £10 billion to develop health services and relieve pressure on hospitals. and, since last year, had recruited 3,000 extra nurses and 1,600 more doctors. a white supremacist, dylann roof, has been sentenced to death for the racist killing of nine black men and women at a church in south carolina in 2015. the 22—year—old opened fire during a bible study meeting. he rejected a final chance to plead for his life, telling the jury he felt he "had to carry it out". for the first time, the attorney—general will set out the legal factors that would be considered before military action is taken against terror suspects abroad. in a speech, jeremy wright qc, will say the uk must have the right to use lethal force like drone attacks in order to deal
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with the increased threat. he will argue the law must keep up with the technology that has made it easier for terrorists to evade capture and inspire attacks around the world. there is traffic disruption after a lorry overturned on the forth road bridge in the early hours of this morning. recovery cranes are at the scene, but drivers are used to use alternative routes. carol will have alternative routes. carol will have a full forecast in seven minutes time. there is so much going on that you must stay tuned. in the last hour we've heard from another one of the big supermarkets about how they did over christmas. ben, this morning it's sainsbury's. sainsbury's reporting a sales increase of 0.1%. so they have been
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really struggling with the turn around plan. you will know they got rid of discounts and buy one and get one free, all that sort of thing. they said it was to simplify what they offer, but it proved it didn't get the customers through the doors. they bought argos last year and they have had a better time. their sales are up 4%. they did well from black friday and cyber monday. so they have done particularly well, but as always, we've had the warnings that prices could rise over the coming year because of inflation and that could affect the price we pay for food in the supermarket. something we also talk about house prices and not good news from foxtons? this company is in london, but it deals with a lot of high—end property, but flat rentals, damning figures in their statement and i've done calculations. revenues down by 26%, that's just in the last quarter. they have said their full year
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earnings will be down by 46%. and that's because of what they call a significant fall in sales volumes, now we're looking at that closely. there has been a clampdown on the fees that the agencies can charge to people who are renting. things like renewing contracts and moving to a new house. but also, of course, after brexit, whether there has been an impact on people buying high—end property, so it's something we'll watch closely, but the early signs for a company like foxton's isn't good. a plane has come down in australia. a plane has come down in australia. a 13—year—old boy has been treated for minor injuries. the latest strike by southern train drivers entered a second day with no sign ofa drivers entered a second day with no sign of a breakthrough. the walk—out is due to finish at midnight. four further strike days are planned for
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later this month. yesterday, only 16 of over 2,000 scheduled services ran. the dispute is about staffing duties on trains. a new species of gibbon has been identified in china. these black and cream gibbons live high up in the country's tropical forests. a full comparison has confirmed it's unlike any other in asia. it's been named the skywalker hoolock gibbon, partly because the chinese translation of its name means heaven's movement but also because the scientists are fans of star wars. i think that's great! barack obama left the world stage with the same words he first used in the run—up to his election as president,"yes, we can." so what will his legacy be? joining us on the sofa now are scott lucas, professor of american studies at the university of birmingham, and elizabeth linder, the former politics
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and government specialist at facebook. thank you for your time. 0verall thank you for your time. overall the speech, scott, we'll start with you first. how do you think it went down? i've got really mixed feelings about it. he is always a raet or ra for. there is two things. one, i think the setting wasn't right. it felt like a pepper alley. i would rather that — he just addressed directly the american public and said we're in a tricky time. secondly, i think he did too much. i wish he had challenged the fact that this is a very divided country right now. it has been polarized in part, by media and in part by the campaign over the past year. he is a naturally cautious man and i think he was too cautious last night in saying folks, we might be great, but we have really got to tackle this head—on right now. we have really got to tackle this head-on right now. elizabeth. at the start, you know, it was the kind of the american dream, they were the
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golden family, the stakes were really high, but this many years later, have things changed, particularly to race relations. are they better or worse, do you think? i thought it was interesting that president obama directly addressed race relations in america which was a surprising move given that's one of the presiding questions we have today. a professor at a university in america who focuses on race relations has really questioned why it is that barack obama did not actually deliver on helping our country to progress further in that space, but what he did actually talk about, which was interesting, was the role of mill lendials in charting out our future which i think was interesting because after this election the country has been a bit hard on the younger people for not voting, for not being as politically active. so the fact that president obama actually went back to those people that helped get him in office eight years ago and pin his hopes for the future on them really meant, i thought, that he
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sees potentially more prosperous future for our country than he sees in the short—term. saying if youe wa nt to in the short—term. saying if youe want to moan, go and get a billboard and runfor want to moan, go and get a billboard and run for office. want to moan, go and get a billboard and runfor office. he want to moan, go and get a billboard and run for office. he didn't mention president donald trump, but there were a few silent digs and one of them you'll hear now. isil will try to kill innocent people. but they cannot defeat america unless we portray our constitution and our principles in the fight. rivals like russia or china cannot match our influence around the world unless we give up what we stand for. and turn ourselves into just another big country that bullies smaller he did not mention donald trump by name. there were some silent digs.
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he only mentioned his name once, in the peaceful transition of power. this was a vintage farewell address from a president. facts and figures, looking back, they were not the point, the key was looking ahead, and saying where do we need to go, what are the challenges ahead? viewpoint around russia and the chinese, reminded america we are in a fine balance between rugged individualism, which americans love, the entrepreneur, the kid with the idea, also the common set of values. america is one of the most patriotic countries in the world, that is our strength. 0bama countries in the world, that is our strength. obama has been criticised for not waving the flag. in this speech, he went further planting a flag in the ground, saying believing everything we stand for. again, i wish she had gone farther. i'm not sure he should have repeatedly said
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the name trump declared war with russia. we are in a middle ofan episode where russia interfered in the us election, a direct challenge to the us democracy. it has to be acknowledged. 0bama to the us democracy. it has to be acknowledged. obama is a very cautious man. we have a unique president coming in with a unique challenge. that needs to be recognised for fright. you mention technology, the threat from russia. 0vernight has been one of the stories of donald trump talking about fake stories, with allegations of the russians having a dossier with his financial and personal back story. how is that going to play out. that has bemoaned the bigger stories overnight? every reference to technology in his speech was a cautionary tale. really interesting. the first online president. president obama, on google,
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facebook, youtube, he's the president of social media, 21st—ce ntu ry president of social media, 21st—century technology, the viral video. he has dominated that space. the fact that every reference of social media was a reminder to get out of the bubble, meet people in real life, really telling where he is taking us. one other thing we talked about was 0bama care. that was really important to him. he admitted it did not go far enough, and could be reversed. it definitely could be repealed. what is more important, there is no sign of what it would be replaced with. this was an achievement. 20 million americans we re an achievement. 20 million americans were covered. sloth the increase in health care costs. republicans are alleging all those games are fake, and obama care is some sort of socialism. when we talk about
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technology and social media, we get overwhelmed by what is real and what is fake. we have health care reform, it should not be ripped up. a lot of stories save his greatest achievement was getting to the white housein achievement was getting to the white house in the first place. is that harsh, forgetting what he has done? that is an achievement we need to recognise in the united states. we had to go back to that speech by michelle obama, saying the white house was built by slaves. it is an achievement. ending with the change narrative is interesting. i thought the speech was going to be about hope, but it was about change, but not barack hope, but it was about change, but not ba rack 0bama's hope, but it was about change, but not barack obama's change, but how america needs to change to take ourselves forward. slightly less optimistic than they farewell address should have been from this president. we have to move on. thank you very much. we could go on for hours, fascinating.
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the mixture of sleet and snow in the next few days, icy roads, and today gales. if you are travelling take extra ca re. gales. if you are travelling take extra care. the further north you travel, the stronger the winds is likely to be, and actually are. wintry showers across scotland, across scotland, northern ireland and england we are looking at severe gales, with exposure. blizzards on the hills. treacherous conditions over the tops of the pennines. watch out on the m6 the to in high sided vehicles. coastal gales as well. wind pushing into east anglia, not as windy as it is further north. the drizzle in the south, that will fade, some sunshine coming through.
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wintry showers increasing across scotland, some of those at lower levels. some of us will see them. could see one or two overnight. if anything they will become more prolific in these areas. the risk of some ice on untreated surfaces. the wind will be too strong for frost. although that wind will start to come down. this next area comes in, this one is problematic. rain coming in from the west, moving east. engaging with the cold arctic air. where we have backlash we will see some snow. across the south, snow across the moors, into the south—east. in the north, wintry showers across scotland, northern ireland and northern england, even at lower levels. the wind is easing, but still some blizzards. tomorrow will feel cold. where we have the
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snow, this area could change, coming further south. keep in touch with the weather forecast tomorrow. in between, drier conditions. wherever you are, it will feel cold. in the wind, more like this, temperatures below freezing. the added hazard is also ice. not out of the woods at the end of thursday. losing low— pressure the end of thursday. losing low—pressure into the continent. the wind is veering to a northerly. along the east coast we're looking at gales, wintry showers again. also some big waves. there is the risk that locally down the east coast we could well see some coastal flooding. a luck in the weather forecast, today wind, tomorrow snow, then back to the wind again on friday. more in half an hour's time. more needs to be done to help families living with dementia in rural parts of the uk.
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that's the finding of the first academic study looking at how the condition affects those in the countryside. it's called for an increase in support services and training — and help from the local community itself, as john maguire has been finding out. the bucolic beauty of our rural landscapes and communities often mask some of the challenges of living here. the isolation, the lack of services and the scarcity of support. in the first report of its kind, plymouth university has studied the impact of dementia in the countryside and what should be done to help. things like support networks with other families who are going through a similar situation would be enormously helpful, some of our families said, to help them cope. perhaps not in the local area, perhaps somebody else upcountry so you don't have that public sort of... that confidentiality is maintained. it isn't your neighbours. it affects the whole family. we're meeting this
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farmer and his mother. her husband eric had dementia for the last ten years of his life. the old adage is that farmers never retire, they keep going, and he certainly wanted... he still wanted to do what he could, but it still had quite an impact on us, particularly from the carer side of it, because, mum, you were providing the care. it started about 15 years ago and when eric was diagnosed at least he went to day care two days a week and that was a great help. the plymouth university report has several key recommendations, among them, where possible, farmers should plan ahead for serious illness.
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councils, health and other agencies should co—ordinate to offer support and there should be more dementia awareness training. this memory cafe in the town of ashburton is run by volunteers from the rotary club. it offers memory stimulation for patients and respite for carers and, elsewhere, there is specialist help available. form filling, orfarm inspections, just to make sure they aren't missing out financially as well, and we can also offer practical help on farms if they are struggling maybe to do tasks like tb testing. 0ur volunteers can make sure we can go on the farm and do practical things as well to help in the short term. ian sheriff chairs the rural dementia group. it's simple solutions. sometimes as a community or culture you go for radical strategies. strategies won't change this world, prime ministers won't,
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we will in our rural community and we will have to do it ourselves. dementia can be cruel and devastating, but this report says it doesn't have to be suffered in silence. later you are going to try your hand at the snooker skills. i will try the trick shot. did you pot one or two ? the trick shot. did you pot one or two? two. a real mixture of weather and sleet and snow particularly over the hills, but icy roads. add to that some gale force winds. gusts of 60mph. some frequent wintry showers. further south, not as windy and largely dry and becoming brighter through the day. a little sunshine. temperatures may get up to seven or
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eight celsius. not as windy tonight, but for snow continuing on the hills and mountains of scotland. we could see snow at lower levels too. wintry showers coming into northern ireland and north—west england. a cold night. icy conditions across the north and then we've got an interesting set—up as we head into thursday. we have got this under cut of cold air. this weather system will bring rain, because there is every chance the weather system could turn to sleet or snow. there is uncertainty, but we could see sleet and snow developing across south wales, but then into the afternoon and for the evening rush hour across the south east of england and east anglia and maybe the south midlands as well. further north, where we have got the cold air, you're more likely to get snowy specially in scotland and northern ireland, but wintry showers across the north—west of england. again, it
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will be cold. look at those temperatures, but this is what it is going to feel like given the strength of the wind. and then as all that wintry mix moves away, this is what it could look like after dark. a widespread frost, but also some really icy conditions as well. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and susannah streeter. donald trump gets ready to tell us how he intends to separate his business interests from affairs of state, but can he really avoid conflicts of interest? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 11th january. the billionaire has business interests around globe. he'll try to reassure the world that they won't influence his policies. we will talk you through what's at
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sta ke. also in the programme, the heir to the samsung empire faces questioning over south korea's influence—peddling scandal. we'll be live in seoul for the latest.
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