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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 11, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello. it's wednesday. it's 9am. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. which top british pop artist tickets are being sent directly onto resale ticketing websites at higher prices? we will exclusively reveal who it is at 9.15am. we're guided by our morality and if there is no problem doing that, why don't we know who the artists are? also today, as president obama makes his farewell speech to the american people yet more revelations about his successor donald trump emerge. obama said he was leaving behind a better and stronger country but he warned there was more work to be done in tackling racism. after my election there was talk of a post—raceal america and such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. and in an exclusive interview the mum of a little boy who died because medical staff missed key warning signs of his condition, urges other parents to listen to their instincts when they feel something is really
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wrong with their child. hello and welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am. there's so much for you to get in touch with today. we are talking about sex education for children this morning, children's charity barnardos wants to see lessons being made age appropriate, what do you think? would they feel safer with compulsory sex education lessons? that's one of the suggestions from the survey by barnardo‘s. would you welcome extra help in the classroom particularly in the age of social media apps. and secondary ticketing websites, it
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isa and secondary ticketing websites, it is a huge issue for you. our exclusive story this morning. we really wa nt exclusive story this morning. we really want to hear what you think. ourfilm is coming to you at 9.15am. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today, donald trump has dismissed as "fake news" unconfirmed reports in the american media, that russian intelligence has gathered compromising information about him. he's scheduled to hold a rare news conference later today. from washington, barbara plett usher reports. mr trump posted an angry message on his twitter account written in capital letters. without referring to the media reports, he tweeted, "fake news, it's a political witchhunt." the unverified claims were broadcast by us networks quoting unnamed sources. they say russian spy agencies have embarrassing information about the president—elect that is personally compromising and that the us intelligence services have now informed him privately about the allegations, although they've said nothing publicly. mr trump had already scandalised washington by disparaging intelligence assessments
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that the kremlin ordered russian hackers to try to tilt the presidential election in his favour. he is due to hold a rare news conference today, called to address concerns about his business interests, but this topic will almost certainly dominate. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. good morning. barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president, telling the american people he believes the country is in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. in an emotional speech in chicago, he thanked his wife michelle, his family and staff, as our correspondent laura trevelyan reports. cheering. barack obama returned to chicago, the place where his political career began to deliver his long planned farewell address. the president used his platform to underline what he sees as his achievements. if i had told you that we would win marriage equality and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million
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of our fellow citizens... cheering and applause. if i told you all that, you might have said our sights were set a little too high. turning to his theme of what could undermine america's democracy, the nation's first black president was frank about the state of race relations. after my election, there was talk of a post—racial america. such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society. paying tribute to his wife michelle and his daughters, the president became emotional. for those who had lined up for hours to hear him speak in person, the effort was worthwhile. i thought it was very uplifting and it gave us a message of hope and encouragement
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and it was what we needed to hear right now. we had a tough election and we just need to keep fighting for the causes that we believe in. barack obama's supporters were heartened by his uplifting message tonight and he leaves office with his personal popularity at a high. but that didn't stop the american voters from choosing donald trump to replace him and now barack obama must watch as republicans try to dismantle much of his legacy. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a seven—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates‘ later this morning. let's go live now to york and our correspondent fiona trott. what can you tell us, fiona? that's right. as you mentioned there, this
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happened on monday afternoon about an houror happened on monday afternoon about an hour or so after the local schools finished. we understand that katie rough was found on or near a playing field. police say a woman, they believe to be katie's mother, was in the street, crying, calling out for help, asking people to phone foran out for help, asking people to phone for an ambulance. an ambulance had arrived. katie rough was taken to hospital, but died a short time later. north yorkshire police say overnight a 15—year—old girl was charged with katie rough's murder and because of her young age we're not able to name her, of course, for legal reasons. she has been charged with possessing an offensive weapon and due to appear at york magistrates‘ court in an hour‘s time. in the meantime, detectives are appealing for anyone who may have seen two girls in the area on monday afternoon to come forward with information. thank you, fiona. an investigation for this programme
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has found that the management team for a high—profile british singer has been placing tickets for their stadium tour directly onto a resale website. the artist‘s management team has previously called on the government to take stronger action against resale sites. secondary ticketing websites are routinely used by touts to sell tickets at inflated prices. we‘ll have more on this in a few minutes‘ time. senior doctors are warning that a shortage of resources may leave the nhs in england unable to cope with this winter‘s demand. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. here‘s our health correspondent robert pigott. the royal college of physicians said ambulances queuing outside hospitals were visual testament to the crisis in the nhs. the royal college, which represents 33,000 specialist hospital doctors, said patients faced lengthening waits on lists, on trolleys,
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in accident and emergency departments and at home. it blamed a shortage of qualified staff, stretched too thin lead to meet the increasing demands. our members fear that people‘s lives are at risk because they can‘t get round to see the patients that aren‘t yet in the emergency department or indeed are waiting for results to come back. members and fellows have been writing in and our council members specifically have said to me this is the worst they have ever seen. most urgent, said the doctors, is investment in social care to prevent medically fit patients being trapped in hospitals. in their own letter to the prime minister, 75 charities and individuals working in health and social care said there must be a long—term cross—party solution to what they called the crisis in funding. led by the charity independent age, they said: the department of health
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said it had invested £10 billion to develop health services and relieve pressure on hospitals. and, since last year, had recruited 3,000 extra nurses and 1,600 more doctors. you can put your questions about the state of the nhs to our health editor, hugh pym. please get in touch if you have got questions you wa nt to touch if you have got questions you want to put to him. text us or send an e—mail or contact us via twitter. a 29—year—old british woman has been killed and two others are seriously injured, after a light aircraft crashed in australia. the plane came down on a remote beach in central queensland. the pilot was taken to hospital in a serious condition and a 13—year—old boy has been treated for minor injuries. a jury in the us city of charleston has sentenced to death a white
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supremacist who killed nine black churchgoers. 22—year—old dylann roof opened fire during a bible study group. he showed no remorse, telling the court he believed he had to carry out the shootings. melvin graham, whose sister was killed in the shooting, gave his reaction to the verdict. this is a very hollow victory because my sister is still gone. i wished that this verdict could have brought her back, but it can‘t, but what it can do is just send a message to those who feel the way he feels that this community will not tolerate it. there is traffic disruption after a lorry overturned on the forth road bridge. it happened in gale force winds.
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let‘s go to our correspondent who is by the forth bridge. dramatic effect of the weather. tell us more. can you hear me? problem with sound no, ithink problem with sound no, i think we‘ve lost her. we will keep you updated and we will have a weather update before 10am. and now take a look at this amazing insight into the daily life of a polar bear. scientists fitted a camera to the neck of a female polar bear from the southern beaufort sea, just north of alaska. the footage gives a bear‘s—eye view of herfeeding, meeting another bear and swimming. the us geological survey hopes it‘ll help researchers better understand how the animals are coping with declining sea ice levels. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 9.30am. thank you very much. many messages from you about the secondary ticketing websites. paul says, from you about the secondary ticketing websites. paulsays, "the easy a nswer
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ticketing websites. paulsays, "the easy answer is don‘t buy the tickets from the sites then the sellers and artists wouldn‘t profit." richard, "many bands do this because they don‘t make the money from album sales. touring equals money." stephen says, "pure exploitation in my view. they are in the same category as back street loan sharks." 0ur category as back street loan sharks." our exclusive film is coming up. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let‘s get some sport with hugh ferris. manchester united won the first leg of their efl cup semi—final but the manager has had some words about what he wants from the fans. jose mourinho‘s side were 2—0 winners last night. second—half goals from juan mata and marouane fellaini were the difference between the sides. there were some interesting comments from mourinho after the match. he said he wants more from manchester united fans. they play arch rivals liverpool
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at old trafford on sunday and mourinho said he wants that to not be a "visit to the theatre", but instead has invited fans to "come and play with us". this is part of the management 101. now his counterpartjurgen klopp is known for this type of rallying call to liverpool fans — clearly mourinho wants a bit we‘ve had some news today from the family of the boxer nick blackwell. these comments from his family come after he was injured again in a sparring session in november. they‘ve told the bbc that blackwell is unable to walk and is a year away from making a full recovery.
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the british boxing board of control will hold a hearing today into the unsanctioned sparring session, where they‘ll hear evidence from the boxer who took part in the session and the trainer who oversaw it. but confirmation from nick blackwell‘s family that this will be a long road to recovery. we had jodie cunddy on the programme yesterday. there‘s been some criticism from one of our top paralympians. the event is due to take place in los angeles at the beginning of march. the 1a time paralympic gold medallist said the governing body the uci had been warned that such a short notice period would mean some athletes would struggle with finances and visas. the uci themselves have said that hosting these championships in a post—paralympic season shows just how far the sport has come.
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thank you. adele, eltonjohn, coldplay and iron maiden. just a few of the artists who have publically said they are anti those resale ticket websites, otherwise known as secondary ticketing websites. it‘s a really profitable industry, worth billions worldwide, and it makes lots of money for touts who routinely use them to sell tickets at inflated prices. but in an exclusive investigation for this programme, we‘ve found one british artist who‘s been putting tickets directly onto secondary ticketing websites at higher prices, for a stadium tour that hasn‘t sold out. 0ur reporter chi chi izundu reveals the identity of the singer in this report. we suck in this industry at being transparent and we suck at putting back in the business that we take from. artists are hiding the fact
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of these tickets and then putting them on secondary, also theyjust so they don't have to say that they're selling them for more than they're actually saying they are selling for. the whole thing is starting to go awry. it needs to be stopped, it needs to be stopped now. greedy people is a fantastic expression. arts, music and culture contribute billions to the uk economy every year. and that includes getting one of these to see one of these. and getting tickets at a reasonable price these days isn‘t always easy. they‘ve been around for a while — resale sites or secondary ticket websites where fans can resell a ticket. at the 0 awards back in november, james bay told the stubhub—sponsored
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event that secondary ticketing sites suck. jack garratt said at the same event that he was only interested in finding the best and cheapest way for fans to see his shows. and we actually can‘t repeat what bastille said. nowadays, a big artist can cut a deal where they get 100% of the ticket price and some of the fees added on for any gig that they perform at. but, if a tout resells those tickets at a higher price, then the artist doesn‘t get that added profit. good morning. welcome to this special session of the... the lack of transparency about the secondary ticketing market was highlighted by a committee of mps. like who is selling these tickets on these sites, and exactly where and how are they getting such large volumes? at the recent department for culture, media and sport committee hearing, there was an admission from ticketmaster that an artist is selling tickets
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directly on their secondary sites at higher prices. can we read into that, therefore, that if we see a ticket at a considerably inflated price, that the artists have approved that? have the artist actually allowed for, all given permission, for prices of their tickets at their revenge to be sold at significantly inflated prices? we do work with some artists where we offer a dynamic pricing model. a tad confused? we were, too. so we asked ticketmaster what they meant by dynamic pricing model. they effectively said that if the tickets are selling quickly, the price will go up. but if there isn‘t much interest in that gig, the price should fall. which we find has a major impact in terms of the number of tickets that are then resold through the resale sites. so, normally, we would take something like 10% of the best seats in the house and value them. and they can be purchased by the ticketmaster main website.
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so we maintain availability. another slightly confusing statement. so 10% of the best seats stay on the main ticketmaster website. and we're actually working with one artist at the moment whereby we're actually openly, transparently listing those tickets within get me in and seatwave, and saying these are official artist tickets, through there, because, in that way, you can actually affect the pricing within the resale marketplaces and capture the value from the resale sector, and that goes directly back to the industry. # let me entertain you... ticketmaster confirmed to me that that artist is in fact robbie williams. here‘s a ticket you can buy on ticketmaster‘s website. i‘m feeling flush, so let‘s get some good seats. level one, block 126 sounds good. £95 each. let‘s see on the secondary website. these tickets are direct from the event organiser.
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very similar seats, one block over from the stage at £160 each. this is not a resale ticket. it‘s being sold for the first time on a secondary site. ticketmaster say these platinum tickets are the best seats in the house, but confirm they come with no extra perks. but there is a £65 difference between these two very similar seats, even though they both come directly from the event organisers. now, robbie and his management aren‘t doing anything illegal. they‘re not breaking any laws or any rules. but some people have said that this is just greedy. in 2015, a number of promoters and artists‘ managers signed an open letter to the government asking them to take a harsher stance on the secondary ticketing market. harvey goldsmith, who has promoted acts like michaeljackson and madonna, signed it. and we‘ve pointed out another signature. on this letter is ie management, robbie williams‘ management. yeah. and they signed it.
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yeah. warning the government to take stronger action against secondary ticketing. however, would it surprise you to know that robbie williams is currently selling tickets directly on get me in and seatwave as part of a deal with ticketmaster, him and his management? no. it doesn‘t surprise me. a lot of managements are doing it. isn‘t it slightly hypocritical to sign a letter publicly saying, we want something to be done about secondary ticketing, and then go and put on tickets on a secondary platform at an increased price? i agree with you. i think it is wrong. but hopefully most of the people who have signed the petition are acting honourably and do everything that they can do to prevent tickets being sold on the secondary market. the temptation is real, according to arctic monkeys manager ian mcandrew. he talks about his band‘s tickets, or inventory, as it‘s called in the industry. i have been often approached by one
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of the big four resale sites asking to enter into an arrangement where i give them inventory in return for participation in the resale profit. that is a proposal i've refused on a number of occasions. but i can understand how that would be a temptation to some, who want to maximise profits for a show. we also got it confirmed that the company who plays capital‘s summertime and jingle bells balls put tickets directly on secondary ticketing site stubhub, but said they did not increase the prices. i just think artists should answer those to the fans more. there should be more accountability. but i guess when the artists get bigger, they are more removed from their fans, so i think you can more easily set aside your ethics. we‘re not always guided by legality. we‘re often guided by morality and if there is no problem doing that, why don‘t we know who these artists are? because they are keeping very quiet about it. ticketmaster said they are being
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transparent, but it does seem you are paying more for a ticket for no real reason, when you can get a similar one cheaper. and despite numerous requests for a statement, robbie‘s management team, ie music, haven‘t responded. the secondary ticketing industry is a very lucrative one. it‘s a multi—billion—pound market. so you can understand why people in live entertainment aren‘t happy when their cut of the pie gets smaller, ie, they don‘t get the resale profits. touts have been known to target high demand events that are likely to sell out quickly and one way they do that is through sophisticated computer software known as bots. most tickets go on general sale on a friday, a peak time for touts. whilst you‘re busy sticking in your details, touts have already nabbed all the available tickets with their powerful software
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and uploaded them onto resale sites. you as a fan lose out. get me in, seatwave and stubhub have all said they are very anti the use of bots on their platforms. and this programme has discovered that all those websites own specialist members—only software. now it helps touts sell, not buy, huge amounts of tickets. and to get access, touts have to show they‘ve shifted nearly £40,000 worth every year. with ticket utils, you don‘t have to sell loads to access it. stubhub‘s pro site is designed specifically for the volume seller and, on both, they allow you to sell in different currencies. get me in, seatwave and stubhub have all said they do not check exactly where people get their tickets from. so, if you are anti—bots, why provide specialist software assistance for touts to sell large volumes through your platforms? it is important to make sure that ticket brokers are managing their inventory
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in a good way. so they are not providing software for ticket brokers to go buy tickets, they‘re providing software ultimately that‘s going to give, from their perspective, their fans a better experience and eliminate problems. ticketmaster say this software is not available in the uk, while stubhub did not respond to our requests for a statement. the next part of our story comes from italy. an italian tv programme was given lots of invoices from live nation italy showing it was secretly selling tens of thousands of tickets at high prices directly on viagogo and pocketing most of that money. in a statement to billboard magazine, live nation italy said the allegations in the italian programme relates to a small number of tickets for a handful of international artists. we asked viagogo for a statement,
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but got no response. meet claudio trotta, he‘s a promoter in italy of lots of artists, like queen and bruce springsteen. it‘s not so easy to stop all of this. the way it should stop, by my opinion, is you clearly state by law that this type of sale is illegal. claudio is also the reason these recent headlines rocked the music world, because he took legal action against the unauthorised sale of bruce springsteen tickets on secondary sites. and, in italy, they are moving to ban the secondary ticketing industry. here‘s the ticket you can buy on ticketmaster‘s website. we showed what we found two conservative mp andrew bingham, who is part of the committee looking at whether the government should step in and legislate the market. if we had done this interview a couple of years ago, i would have taken a different view, because i was very supportive of the secondary ticketing market. i thought it was a great idea.
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but i think somebody, or somehow, people have worked a way round of abusing the system and, from the film you‘ve just shown me, it appears that the artists are now also complicit in it as well. so is it any wonder, with all this going on, why you as a fan find it really hard to get your hands on a reasonably priced ticket? and to watch that film again — and share it, you can head to our programme page bbc.co.uk/victoria. as you‘d expect we asked, robbie williams‘ management team for an comment or interview — so far no response. but robbie if you‘re watching robbie tweet me and we‘ll get you on. we also asked stubhub and viagogo for a comment — neither have so far responded . and ticketmaster tell us ‘platinum tickets are a very small percentage of the best seats in the house that are priced according to demand, in consultation with our clients, the event organisers‘. and after ten — we‘ll be talking to a band member who bought tickets to his own gig back from a secondary ticketing website and re—sold them himself to fans.
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let‘s raise these usages, adam kirk on twitter says ripping off your own fa ns on twitter says ripping off your own fans must be the lowest of the low. rebecca on facebook, shocking they are pleasing those loyal to them. too many artists and bands are guilty of this, shame on them. beyonce tickets were on sale for up to £900 on a sister site to ticketmaster, so frustrating. diane says this happened to me, tickets on sale at 9am, selling out immediately. redirected to another site, three tickets original price, £40, with extras, 370 quid. it was a massive mark—up. keep those coming in. your reaction to our revelations this morning. still to come... president obama has given his farewell speech, while his successor donald trump is facing claims that the russians have compromising material on him.
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we will talk about the latest developments with a member of trump‘s transition team. also a democrat and a leading social media guru. we will talk to a mum who lost her baby to meningitis. she is calling on parents to speak up about their instincts, when it comes to their instincts, when it comes to their child‘s health. time for the latest headlines. a spokesman for vladimir putin has denied allegations that the kremlin has collected compromising information about the president—elect donald trump. unconfirmed reports have emerged in the russian media that —— in the american media that russian intelligence agencies have gathered information on the president—elect. trump claims that fake news has been published. barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president.
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in an emotional speech in chicago, he said he believed the country was in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. the president admitted progress had not gone far enough, but he called on the american people to put aside their differences and help to bring about positive change. i am asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents, that idea of whisper by slaves and abolitionists, that spirit sung by immigrants and homesteaders and those who marched for justice. that creed, reaffirmed by those what planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon. a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a seven—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before
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magistrates‘ later this morning. senior doctors are warning that the crisis in the nhs and social care is putting people‘s lives at risk. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said a shortage of resources means the quality of patient care is under threat. charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister, calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. the department of health says it‘s investing £10 billion to relieve pressure on hospitals. 20 people have been rescued from the top of a rollercoaster in australia. they were trapped and helped down from the ride at movie world on the gold coast. local media said there were no reports of injuries. it‘s thought a mechanical problem with a chain on the ride was responsible. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. i‘ll have more at 10am. here‘s some sport now with hugh. manchester united have a 2—0 advantage after the first leg of their efl cup semi—final against hull. goals from juan mata
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and marouane fellaini at old trafford gave united their ninth win in a row. boxer nick blackwell is a year away from making a full recovery. blackwell suffered serious head injuries in a fight with chris eubankjunior in march last year, but was then injured again in an unsanctioned sparring session in november. dame sarah storey says athletes need to be given more notice, after the para—track cycling world championships were organised with seven weeks warning. the event is due to take place in los angeles at the beginning of march. british number one johanna konta is through to the semi—finals of the sydney international. she beat daria kasatkina in straight sets. konta will face former wimbledon finalist eugenie buchard in the semi—final. more on those stories after 10am. good morning.
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president barack obama said goodbye to the american people last night in a dramatic reinterpretation of a presidential farewell address. he discarded the oval office or east room for his last formal set of remarks choosing to travel to chicago, the city where he declared victory in 2008 and 2012, to address a sold—out crowd of ardent supporters. during the address in chicago, where he started his political career, mr obama began by saying it was the people who had made him a better president. my my fellow americans... cheering and applause michelle and i have been so touched by all the well wishes that we‘ve received over the past few weeks, but tonight, tonight it‘s my turn to say thanks. whether we have seen eye
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to eye or really agreed at all, my conversations with you, the american people, in living rooms and in schools, at farms, on factory floors, at diners and on distant military outposts. these conversations are what have kept me honest and kept me inspired and kept me going. and every day i‘ve learned from you. you made me a better president. and you made me a better man. as the president recalled his early political career in chicago, he brushed aside chats of "four more years" from the crowd. and in his only reference to his successor, he promised a peaceful transition to the new administration of donald trump. soi so i first came to chicago when i was in my early 20s and i was still trying to figure out who i was,
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still searching for a purpose in my life and it was the neighbourhood, not far from here where i life and it was the neighbourhood, not farfrom here where i began working with church groups in the shadows of closed steel mills. it was on these streets where i witnessed the power of faith and the quiet dignity of working people in the face of struggle and loss. four more cheers... i can't do that. four more cheers... i can't do that. four more years. four more years. in ten days, the world will witness a hallmark of our democracy. boo boo. no, no, the peaceful transfer of power from one freely elected president to the next. applause
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i committed to president—elect trump that my administration would ensure the smoothest possible transition, just as president bush, did for me. applause because it is up to all of us to make sure our government can help us meet the many challenges we still face. and he ended where he‘d begun. with a call for people to continue to believe in bringing about change — and to hold on to the values of the country‘s founding fathers. my my fellow americans it has been the honour of my life to serve you. i won‘t stop. in fact i will be right there with you as a citizen... applause for all my remaining days. but for now, whether you are young or whether you‘re young at heart, i do have one final ask of you as your
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president. the same thing i asked when you took a chance on me eight yea rs when you took a chance on me eight years ago. i‘m asking you to believe, not in my ability to bring about change, but in yours. i‘m asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding documents, that whisper by slaves into our founding documents, that idea of whisper by slaves and abolitionists, that spirit sung by immigrants and homesteaders and those who marched for justice. that creed, reaffirmed by those what planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon. a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can. thank you god bless you. may god continue to bless the united states of america. thank you. cheering and applause incoming president donald trump
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holds his first news conference later likely to be dominated by claims that the russians have compromising material on him which he himself has denied on twitter. so, how do mr trump and mr obama compare notjust in policy but style, management and the use of social media? let‘s talk now to a member of donald trump‘s transition team, jan halper—hayes, the former chair of democrats abroad margo miller, and social media guru kerry watkins. jan, you got donald trump to fill out a psychological assessment, why and what did it show? well, as a psychologist i was bothered that the media were saying he didn‘t have the right temperament and temperament we‘re born with and personality is what is shaped with our emotional
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life, our values, our social environment. and so, i asked life, our values, our social environment. and so, iasked him life, our values, our social environment. and so, i asked him to ta ke environment. and so, i asked him to take the presidential temperament assessment tool that is administered, objectively by another company... give me some questions that are on it? 41 presidents have been diagnosed by it. you know, it‘s more that there is a statement and then you have to choose between the words. 0k. and based on that it gives you an indication. what kind of statement, can you recall? no, i can‘t remember. of statement, can you recall? no, i can't remember. please, jan. ican tell you the results of it is that he fell into the same temperament as ronald reagan and bill clinton, jfk because they are action or rend tated and kennedy said, "do not ask what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country." reagan said mr gorbachev
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tear down the world and trump said, "ivm tear down the world and trump said, "i‘m going to build a wall. a big one with a nice door." how do you compare barack obama and donald trump as men first of all before we talk about policies?” trump as men first of all before we talk about policies? i look at president obama and the role model that he has been for people in america and people around the world. the relationship between president 0bama the relationship between president obama and his wife, michelle, the way in which he raised his daughters in the white house, the fact that he isa in the white house, the fact that he is a black man as president of the united states and what that represented, that michelle obama is a strong women and who is always looking at the positive and the quote that will go down in history, when they go low, we go high and always looking for the best in people and really trying to empower people and really trying to empower people and really trying to empower people and you look at the campaign that started in 2007 and it was very much from the grass—roots up and the way in which the campaign used social media and about empowering as many different people and communicating with as many different segments of the population as
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possible. let's have a word about policies before we talk about the social media side of things which is increasingly important. jan, in terms of donald trump, and the forthcoming domestic policies, what would you pick out as being really good domestic policies for the states that he says that he‘s going to implement? well, i'm hoping in the repealing of 0bamacare, they keep the good aspects of it and then create a more affordable, competitive market. he said he will keep some elements of it having had a conversation with barack obama, margo, what do you say about 0bamacare? president obama has said that if anything can come up with a better system and fix, that can get through congress, he would support it. it was the best piece of legislation and the most comprehensive piece of legislation to fix a serious problem in america. there were 44 millions americans who didn't have access to healthcare when obama took office. it is not perfect. no major piece of legislation is perfect. there are fixes that can be put into place.
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congress made that virtually impossible. donald trump has more likely congress on his side. but not necessarily the american people. there are 20 million americans who have health insurance now. there are all sorts of preexisting conditions that are covered. the insurance company has been silent because they wa nt company has been silent because they want certainty. we have a system in place now and we don't know what it's going to be replaced with.|j wa nt to it's going to be replaced with.|j want to talk about the relationship with the uk as well. i mean, we‘re told that the british prime minister will be visiting donald trump possibly in the spring. how do you envisage this relationship between donald trump and theresa may, the us, and the uk in the future? donald trump has shown that he‘s very forgiving of people that speak badly of him. such as considering romney for secretary of state. people have asked me because theresa may, you know, said perhaps some disparaging things, will that be an issue. no. when she was home secretary? the fa ct when she was home secretary? the fact that barack obama sent the
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winston churchill bus back to the uk, donald trump has come out and asked for it to be returned. and the meeting that he had with corker, sorry, borisjohnson meeting that he had with corker, sorry, boris johnson had meeting that he had with corker, sorry, borisjohnson had with senator bob corker that the uk will be at the front of the line for the by lateral trade agreements. how do you think the relationship will change, if you think it will between the us and the uk, marco?m change, if you think it will between the us and the uk, marco? it is an incredibly important relationship andl incredibly important relationship and i think both governments will do their best to ensure that it continues. kerry, let's have a look at some of the tweets from both barack obama as president and incoming president donald trump. let‘s look at this one from trump. this was during the campaign, the presidential campaign. it is about hillary clinton: president obama on hillary clinton: what do you think of those two?
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there is a difference between the way both trump and obama use social media. 0bama very quickly became digitally savvy and hired a team. so his tweets are very polished, very professional, but we feel he is somewhat removed from them. whereas trump's twitter presence, he put out 100% of his personality there and embraced the nature of twitter. so there is a sense of authenticity, and whether or not we like the content of what he shares, we really feel like it's, the american people really feel they get to know him. yes. here is another one from donald trump. again it is during the presidential campaign: this one from obama when he was
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re—elected. it is a tweet showing a photograph of him hugging his wife. four more years. i‘m not comparing the tweets as like with like. i‘m showing the difference in the way they tweet. president 0bama‘s could have been done by his team, as you say. a very different relationship each has the press. 0bama using social media as an extension of that. trump bypassing the press to dictate the headlines himself. i must told you about the claims that the russians have some sort salacious, compromising material on donald trump. denying it on twitter, describing it as fake news. how do you react? buzzfeed said they have this information prior, it is unsubstantiated. the part that i do
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believe is where they said there was some connection, speaking to russia, and trump's presidential campaign. 0ne and trump's presidential campaign. one member and trump's presidential campaign. 0ne memberwas fired and trump's presidential campaign. one member was fired because of his connections to the russians and ukrainians. that could be accurate. i find it very interesting that now it comes out that there is some disparaging and horrible things, but it had not been released before. why not? if it is verified, and that is a big if, and it turns out to be true, we find that the nature of these revelations, a lot of speculation online, as you might imagine, will it make any difference to donald trump is an incoming president? it depends on what it is. we‘re told it is of sexual nature.
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the voters are over that.|j we‘re told it is of sexual nature. the voters are over that. i am not over it. because you are a democrat. it is because of the respect of the office, and what we expect from the president of the united states was if these claims are verified, you are 60—year—old man from you again to have stuff you another proud of, as we to have stuff you another proud of, as we have seen. we have seen it, the information was out beforehand, it got lost in the noise in the final days of the election. why are you smiling? he did not get lost in the final days of the election. wikileaks have denied russia gave them information. the american people needed to have the truth of what was going on behind the scenes in the campaign. i ask, why was it chosen to reveal the clinton
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campaign information, and if they have this for so long, how come nobody brought it out with all the fa ke nobody brought it out with all the fake news issues? this tweet, it is fa ke fake news issues? this tweet, it is fake news, a political witchhunt, in capital letters. 0bviously coming from him. trying to squash the whole thing. because of the relationship he has built up with people on twitter, people will believe what he shares, as opposed to the press, he has managed to distance the press to people, through this fake news story. thank you very much all of you. you can watch donald trump‘s speech and news conference like this afternoon. live on the bbc news channel. coming up, we‘ll be speaking to peter lawrence, who‘s daughter claudia has been missing
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for eight years. he wants a change in the law, so families can look after missing loved ones affairs. gaynor mcconnell‘s baby boy cayden was born with spina bifida in 2010. at three months old, he was diagnosed with meningitis, which he survived. but a few months later the illness came back, and he died. his family discovered that he could have been saved, had doctors not missed vital signs about his condition, and listened to his mum‘s concerns. cambridge university hospitals, where cayden was treated, has accepted his care fell below the standard he was entitled to. we can talk to mum gaynor mcconnell, who is talking in an exclusive interview. she‘s never spoken publicly about this before. also alongside her is her solicitor renu daly from hudgell solicitors. thank you for coming on the
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programme. was it clear early on that something was not right when he was born? he was born with a red lump on the bottom of his back. diagnosed with spina bifida, seeing doctors, routine checks. he had a lung puncture, in the mri scan, you could see that at the bottom of his spine. we can show that the audience. you can see from the image. at the bottom of the back. you can see the open channel, a hole going from the bottom of the spine to the skin of his bottom. that is
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when alarm bells should have been ringing with somebody. when there is a tract, there is a 60% chance there will be a termite. —— dermoid.. hole where bacteria can gather. and they missed it. he recovered from meningitis. the utopian home. normal child. -- you took him home. in november he became very poorly, meningitis the second time, to be honest, it was way too late. he had already gone to that point. he was passed, there was no helping him.
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tell our audience how you discovered that vital signs had been missed from that earlier mri scan?” that vital signs had been missed from that earlier mri scan? i was asking a lot of questions, co nsta ntly i asking a lot of questions, constantly i felt i was fobbed off. i felt the only way i could get the a nswe rs i felt the only way i could get the answers i needed was through a solicitor. i went there to get the a nswe rs solicitor. i went there to get the answers i needed. from there, we have the scans, we have seen it all, we notice straightaway. if we noticed, the doctors should notice. tell us about the legal case you have brought against this particular trust. gaynor wanted answers, to know what happened to her son. the hospital did not ask any questions she had. we investigated the treatment she had, that he had. it turned out there or failings, and gaynor has described them perfectly. they failed to explore the tracks,
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and the fact there might be a dermoid. in all likelihood it was that dermoid that caused the second bout of meningitis. if that had been removed after the first episode, he would never have got the second episode, and would be alive today. the key point is that they missed the open channel on the mri scan. had they seen that, that would have set alarm bells ringing them that they would have done further exploratory surgery, and potentially found that dermoid juma, which could harbour bacteria and meningitis. how many years did it take to get that answer? it is taken four years of investigation, it is the determination of gaynor to stick with it. many people have said, it is time to move on. let go of your son. she has been absolutely determined from day one she wanted her answers. it was only a few weeks ago that the trust admitted liability, and that he would not
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have got meningitis second time around. had it not been for their failings. it is taken that long, and that level of determination from a mum to find out what happened to her son. in a statement, a cambridge university hospitals spokesperson said: "a formal apology has been made by the trust to cayden‘s family and we are working closely with the family‘s solicitor to reach a settlement. there was no letter directed to me or my family, they were sorry for what happened was at the bottom of the letter, not directed at me or my family, or anyone else involved. the letter, not directed at me or my family, or anyone else involvedm that something you want? yes, of course, i think i deserve that, my family deserve that. to know that my little boy went through so much pain, so many different things he went through. he deserves the apology. it is heartbreaking, not
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fair what he went through. the least we deserve an apology. after four yea rs, to we deserve an apology. after four years, to finally acknowledge that the sp standard of care your little boy received was way below what he should expected, how did you react? i always knew, that was the reason i wa nted i always knew, that was the reason i wanted to pursue it. a lot of pa rents a re wanted to pursue it. a lot of parents are constantly being fobbed off. getting told something, they have to take that as the final answer. no, they don‘t. nobody knows their child better than the parents or carers. if you have any questions, keep pushing, keep pushing until you get the answer you wa nt pushing until you get the answer you want this they be afraid to keep asking. that is your message to pa rents. asking. that is your message to parents. but you do keep pushing. you still did not get those answers. you still did not get those answers. you have them now. eventually i did. that is the most heartbreaking thing. it has taken going to solicitors, to get the answers i
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needed when they couldn‘t quite easily given me the answers themselves. how do you remember your little boy? he was a beautiful little boy? he was a beautiful little boy, happy, no matter what he went through, always smiling. a typical little boy. beautiful little boy. thank you for talking, in your first interview. we appreciate you coming on. thank you for your message to parents. still to come, more on our main story about secondary ticketing. we will speak to the lead singer of a band who has actually campaigned against the practice. let‘s get the latest weather update — with carol. there certainly is a lot of weather. very strong winds, gusting over 120 mph overnight over the cairngorms. even mph overnight over the cairngorms. eve n a cross mph overnight over the cairngorms. even across northern scotland we had gusts of 70 miles an hour. looking
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at over 50 odd as we push over southern scotland and northern england. still very gusty. forthe next few days, sleet and snow reintroduced into the forecast. already happening at the moment. icy roads, gaels three today. if you are travelling, bear that in mind, if you are in a high sided vehicles. we also have wintry showers packing in across scotland, not just also have wintry showers packing in across scotland, notjust the hills, but some getting down to lower levels. a wintry flavour across northern england and also northern ireland. coupled with the wind, some treacherous conditions, blizzards across the scottish mountains. sunshine in between the showers and as we come further south. maximum temperatures to date. as we go through the day they are going down. a risk of ice overnight on untreated surfaces. heavier and more frequent showers coming across scotland, northern ireland and northern
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england. some across the hills of wales. also looking at the next system coming in from the south—west. this system will bring us some snow as south—west. this system will bring us some snow as it engages with the cold air, pulling in the north—westerly wind, readily turning into snow for some even at lower levels. first thing in the morning bringing a lot of rain, as it drifts from the west to the east, some of the rain being heavy, leading to surface water flooding. hill snow across the hills of wales. the wind changes to a north—westerly, the cold air feeding changes to a north—westerly, the cold airfeeding in. from hampshire towards the watch, at all points south—east, at risk of sleet and snow. locally two, to five centimetres. as much as ten centimetres. as much as ten centimetres. that area could change. do not make this the last weather forecast you watch. in the northern half of the country, scotland, northern ireland, england, a lot of
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wintry showers, even at lower levels, some bright spells of sunshine. the winds slowly easing, still feeling cold wherever you are. a risk of ice. temperatures in aberdeen, one. manchester, three. adding on the wind—chill, minus four, or freezing. adding on the wind—chill, minus four, orfreezing. getting the message it is going to be cold. thursday night, frost. especially ice. travelling thirsting on friday morning, watch out for that. we‘re getting this little run bringing the risk of snow down the east coast of england, possibly into the london area while that clears away. left with a straight northerly, cold direction through friday, likely to see wintry showers across the east coast. that is whipping up some large waves. also the risk of some localised coastal flooding across some areas in eastern england. more tomorrow. hello.
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it‘s wednesday. it‘s 10am. i‘m victoria derbyshire. we‘ll have more on secondary ticketing websites, and we‘ll be talking tojosh franceschi from the band you me at six, as well as the music journalist lauren page. that‘s coming up. we will speak to peter lawrence, who‘s daughter claudia has been missing for eight years. he is calling for a change in the law to allow relatives of missing people to take legal control of their affairs. the charity banardo‘s is calling for the government to introduce compulsory age appropriate sex and relationships education. we‘ll be speaking to an mp who campaigns on the subject. here‘sjoanna in the bbc newsroom
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with a summary of today‘s news. good morning. the kremlin has dismissed reports that it has compromising information about us president—elect donald trump. unconfirmed reports have emerged in the american media that russian intelligence agencies have damaging information about mr trump‘s business interests and private life. in a tweet, mr trump denounced the reports as a "witch—hunt" and "fake news". barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president. in an emotional speech in chicago, he said he believed the country was in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. the president admitted progress had not gone far enough, but he called on the american people to put aside their differences and help to bring about positive change. i‘m asking you to hold fast to that faith written into our founding by slaves documents, that idea of whisper by slaves and abolitionists, that spirit sung by immigrants and homesteaders and those who marched for justice.
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that creed, reaffirmed by those what planted flags from foreign battlefields to the surface of the moon. a creed at the core of every american whose story is not yet written. yes, we can. yes, we did. yes, we can. a 15—year—old girl has been charged with the murder of a seven—year—old in york. katie rough died in hospital on monday after being found with serious injuries near a playing field in the woodthorpe area. the teenager is due to appear before magistrates‘ later this morning. an investigation for this programme has found that the management team for a high—profile british singer has been placing tickets for their stadium tour directly onto a resale website. the artist‘s management team has previously called on the government to take stronger action against resale sites. secondary ticketing websites are routinely used by touts to sell tickets at inflated prices. we‘ll have more on this in a few minutes‘ time. 20 people have been
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rescued from the top of a rollercoaster in australia. they were trapped and helped down from the ride at movie world on the gold coast. local media said there were no reports of injuries. it‘s thought a mechanical problem with a chain on the ride was responsible. now take a look at this amazing insight into the daily life of a polar bear. scientists fitted a camera to the neck of a female polar bear from the southern beaufort sea, just north of alaska. the footage gives a bear‘s—eye view of herfeeding, meeting another bear and swimming. the us geological survey hopes it‘ll help researchers better understand how the animals are coping with declining sea ice levels. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30am. thank you for your comments on secondary ticketing sites and our revelations about robbie williams‘ management team sending the tickets
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to resale sites. steve says, "supply and demand wins. people don‘t have to pay the inflated prices." lee says, "how many fans are happy to download albums for free?" brian says, "where does the ticket market make it awkward for everyone? let the main ticket sales do the selling, not the secondary sites." ian says, "those who pay the inflated prices have more money than sense." do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here‘s some sport now with hugh. jose mourinho has told manchester united supporters that wants them to "come and play with us", when his side take on liverpool on sunday. mourinho urged fans to not regard the match as a "visit to the theatre". he was speaking after his side‘s 2—0 win in the first leg of the efl cup semi—final against hull. goals from juan mata and marouane fellaini were the difference between the sides. liverpool face southampton in the other semi—final tonight. jurgen klopp was criticised
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for the young team he fielded in the fa cup, but is expected to bring back his big players for this one. as long as you are involved, it is the most important cup, as you can imagine. so that‘s how we see it and so, southampton, for example, if you want to talk about intensity, they had a more intense time than we had so there is no advantage for one side. we have to find a way of playing. the family of boxer nick blackwell have told the bbc he‘s unable to walk and it‘ll be a year before he makes a full recovery. blackwell was put in an induced coma after suffering severe head injuries in a fight with chris eubankjunior last march. he then went on to take part in an unsanctioned sparring session in november which left him in a coma and with swelling on the brain. 14—time paralympic gold medallist dame sarah storey says athletes deserve a lot more time to prepare for the pa ra—cycling track world championships. the uci announced yesterday the event would take place in los angeles from 2nd march —
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just seven weeks away. storey says she‘s been pressing for a date to be named for a number of weeks. uci president brian cookson has defended the decision saying that holding the championships for the first time in a post—paralympic season signifies "notable progress". we‘re unlikely to ever see rory mcilroy compete at the olympics. the world number two in golf pulled out of the rio games, and has said he probably won‘t take part in tokyo 2020 either. the fact that he could represent either great britain or ireland means he has conflicting loyalties. more and more likely than not i won‘t be playing at the games in 2020. just because of my personal feelings towards, not the olympic games, i think they are great and i think golf included in the olympics is fantastic, butjust for me, it‘s something i don‘t want to get into and that‘s a personal choice. johanna konta is through to the semi—finals of the sydney international
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after beating daria kasatkina in straight sets. the british number one had to come from behind in the second set to beat the russian world number 26. konta will play former wimbledon finalist eugenie buchard in the semi—final. dan evans came through three sets against marcel granollers in their second round match. joe marlow will miss the first of england‘s six makeses matches. the pf°p england‘s six makeses matches. the prop has been ruled out in the match against france after breaking his leg before harlequins match at sale at the weekend. the headlines are coming up later on. for now, victoria, it‘s back to you. robbie williams management team have yet to very respond to the fact that tickets are being sent to them to resale websites. robbie if you‘re
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watching, get in touch with us. 0ur reporter chi chi izundu‘s been looking into this one. there are more and more sites where you can get hold of a ticket for a gig or a show, but it seems it‘s getting more and more difficult to get one at a reasonable price. and that could be down to the proliferation of resale sites, or secondary ticketing websites where fans can resell tickets. have the artists actually allowed for, or given permission, for prices of their tickets at their events to be sold at significantly inflated prices? but it seems it‘s not just the fans uploading tickets on to these sites, as highlighted recently by a committee of mps. we‘re actually working with one artist at the moment whereby we‘re openly, transparently listing those tickets within get me in and seatwave, saying, these are the official artist tickets. # let me entertain you...# ticketmaster confirmed to me that that artist is in fact robbie williams. here is a ticket you can buy
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on ticketmaster‘s website. i‘m feeling flush, so let‘s get some good seats. level one, block 126 sounds good. £95 each. let‘s see on the secondary website. these tickets are direct from the event organiser, very similar seats, one block over from the stage, at £160 each. this is not a resale ticket. it‘s being sold for the first time on a secondary site. ticketmaster say these platinum tickets are the best seats in the house, but confirmed they come with no extra perks. but there is a £65 difference between these two very similar seats, even though they both come directly from the event organisers. now, robbie and his management aren‘t doing anything illegal. they‘re not breaking any laws or any rules. but some people have said that this is just greedy. in 2015, a number of promoters and artists‘ managers signed an open letter to the government asking them to take a harsher stance on the secondary ticketing market.
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harvey goldsmith, who has promoted acts like michaeljackson had madonna, signed it, and we pointed out another signature. i think it is wrong, but, hopefully, most of the people who have signed the petition are acting honourably and do everything that they can do to prevent tickets being sold on the secondary market. ticketmaster say they are being transparent, but it does seem you‘re paying more for a ticket for no real reason, when you can get a similar one cheaper. and despite numerous requests for a statement, robbie‘s management team, ie music, haven‘t responded. and to watch that film in full and share it you can head to our programme page bbc.co.uk/victoria. obviously we asked robbie williams‘ management team for an comment or interview and so far no response. we also asked stubhub and viagogo for a comment — neither have so far responded. and ticketmaster tell us, "platinum tickets are a very small percentage of the best seats in the house that are priced according to demand, in consultation with our clients, the event organisers". let‘s talk to josh franceschi, lead singer from the band you me at six and musicjournalist lauren page.
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welcome both of you. josh, your reaction, what do you think of robbie williams‘ tickets being placed directly on to resale websites by his team?” placed directly on to resale websites by his team? i am surprised to hear that, but you know, ifeel that maybe they thought they would get away with it, but i think robbie williams at the level he‘s at doesn‘t need the money, he doesn‘t need the extra money. i‘m surprised that he‘s going down that route, but at the same time, you know, that‘s their choice, but this is what this whole fight is about, if we were to eliminate the secondary websites then we wouldn‘t behaving this conversation anyway. when you say, they probably thought they could get away with it, they‘re not doing anything illegal? nothing illegal, but you are already charging £95 for a show as the promotional video revealed beforehand, this is only seats one block over, how can you charge an extra £60 for that? i
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don‘t understand. charge an extra £60 for that? i don't understand. how would you describe that behaviour then? greedy. simple as that? simple as that, it is greedy. your ticket is £95 and you‘re playing wembley stadium. you bought tickets back interest a secondary website and sold them yourself to the fans? the relationship between the artist and the fans need to be respected and i think it needs to be nurtured and i feel that, you know, without our fanbase i wouldn‘t be sitting talking to you with a number one midweek album. so, it is very important to us that our fans know we value their support. but more over than that, i think, for there to be transparency, this sort of engagement is really critical for the trust to continue to build and for everyone to move forward, you know, in a good way. lauren, what do you think of our revelations today? i'm really surprised to be honest. i
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mean like joshjust i'm really surprised to be honest. i mean like josh just said, i'm really surprised to be honest. i mean like joshjust said, you're robbie williams, you don't need the extra money. especially, what difference is what robbie's management doing any different to the ticket touts that are putting the ticket touts that are putting the tickets on other websites and charging considerably more? it can't be one rule for one and one for another. robbie and the touts are on the same level here. well, it is not robbie himself, it is the team. he may have no idea what his team are doing. it would be really to go to see how he reacts. we‘re on airfor another hour. i‘d love him to get in touch and we can talk to him, but even at these higher prices, this is what a lot of our audience are saying, even at the higher prices, there is a demand, so shouldn‘t we leave it to the market?” there is a demand, so shouldn‘t we leave it to the market? i guess you're always going to go and see your favourite artist fine sometimes i consider thinking i might have to pay a bit extra, but for the ex—at any time that this revelation that's come out today,
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£60 plus for a few rows away, the marred account, they want the tickets, but is it really 0k to be telling people that are true fans right, you can't go to this gig because you can't afford it, but we'll hike the prices and see if you're a proper fan or not. artists wa nt you're a proper fan or not. artists want true fans at their gigs and this isn't right. what do you think about the principle of secondary ticket sites. look, you are a fan, you‘ve got a ticket, you break your leg and you can‘t go, here is a website to help you resell it? whether it is maybe you're ill or broken your leg and you can't go, i understand when people need to shift their tickets and sell them on to someone else to save their tickets and sell them on to someone else to save like a really good ticket going to waste. but i think then if people are maybe charging £1 or £2 to cover the postage of the ticket, maybe some insurance so it can be tracked when it is sent to them, that's ok, but the secondary sites when they are telling tickets £50 or £60 more, i don't agree with that. let me read
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comments from people watching you talk about this. aaron says, "don‘t buy the resale tickets. if artists find themselves performing in half empty arenas, they will do something about it." is that true? empty arenas, they will do something about it. " is that true? that's fair. iagree about it. " is that true? that's fair. i agree that you know really, you know, genuine artists want genuine fans at their shows. all we wa nt genuine fans at their shows. all we want when we perform is to see, we‘re making a positive difference to and people are enjoying themselves and they are using it as a release, it is difficult when a show is half sold or not full capacity because it is more difficult to get the atmosphere going and yeah, i agree with that statement, definitely. if the show is half sold then you have to drop, as the artist, as the artist‘s team, you have to drop the prices, don‘t you? yeah, i mean, i guess so, but at the same time it is not fair on the people that have bought the
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tickets already. robbie williams tickets already. robbie williams tickets are £95 in stadium. we‘re talking about wembley stadium and we‘re talking about multiple nights. i went to some wembley stadium shows this summer which were not sold out, or because of the secondary ticketing market we have been discussing, you know, it has been suffering because of that, it was a shame because the shows the artists we re shame because the shows the artists were putting on were great, but when you look around, there is 30,000 empty seats, it makes a difference to the evening, definitely. this comment from matt on facebook, "i wa nted comment from matt on facebook, "i wanted to take my wife to see phil collins. tickets were gone in ten minutes. face value for front row seats were £150, you couldn‘t get a ticket on a sister site for less than £1,000." right, josh, what‘s your plan, your solution? what would your plan, your solution? what would you do about the secondary ticketing sites? my solution would be for the primary websites to put their name on this and say look, you know we
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understand that we need to understand that we need to understand our market and understand the sort of ethical and moral obligations that we have towards music lovers. and i would really encourage them to not work with secondary websites especially if they own them to shut them down. it is about access. we need to make it transparent and fair playing field for everybody. we can‘t have that when people can sell the tickets for phil collins for £1,000. that's the tickets for phil collins for £1,000. that‘sjust ridiculous. the money is not going to the artist. that‘s not what it is about, but it is because the money is leaving the industry and it is not being pumped back into it. what‘s the point really? this is due you have a solution, lauren? -- do you have a solution? yes, we need to get true fans of the gates, fans are desperate to see
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certain acts, they will go on to websites and buy the tickets. it is finding the good level between people using secondary sites, and abusing them to make a profit, and people who need to get rid of their ticket for a little bit more to cover the cost of postage and things like that. thank you for coming onto the programme. your views are welcome. so many m essa g es your views are welcome. so many messages from you. gareth says it is not so much the prices, but it is the autobox grabbing tickets on launch that spoiler forjoe public. why can‘t we go back to venue only selling tickets. does sex education in schools need an overhaul? we‘ll be speaking to an mp who believes it should be provided for children as young as five. families of missing people are calling for a change in the law so that they can take charge of their loved one‘s affairs
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while they‘re missing. hundreds of thousands of people go missing in the uk every year — many of them are found, but hundreds remain missing for months, even years. but have you ever thought about what happens to the life left behind by people who disappear? what happens to their home, their belongings? the father of york chef claudia lawrence says he was astonished to find he was blocked from managing his daughter‘s affairs after she went missing in 2009. he‘s spearheading the call for a change in the law to allow a relative to be appointed legal guardian of a missing person‘s finances. let‘s talk now to peter lawrence, the father of claudia lawrence, a chef at the university of york who went missing in 2009. and susannah drury from the charity missing people. peter, how are you? tawalo audience
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about the issue. can i start off when claudia, my daughter went missing in march 2000 nine. literally a few weeks after she went missing, i realise there is no law in this country which allows the families of those who go missing to deal with all the things you and i do every day. mortgages, insurance, bank accounts, direct debits. everything else we take for granted. you cannot do, the banks, the building societies, insurance companies quite rightly say i‘m sorry, you are not our customer. we cannot take instructions. they want to help, they have been supportive of this. they cannot at the moment. that is why i have been campaigning about this for a long time. in terms of the practical things you wanted
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to do on behalf of your daughter. she was 35 when she went missing. she was 35 when she went missing. she had mortgage, bank accounts, car, all the bills going with an aduu car, all the bills going with an adult life. you have to do with that. some things you can obviously cope with. i would not say deal with properly. some things you cannot. as an example, claudia had a savings account which matured a year after she went missing. it has been sitting there losing money because the bank cannot allow it to be reinvested in the reference in order for you to have access to areas of your daughter‘s life... for you to have access to areas of your daughter's life... you need this law or you could apply for a death certificate. we could, but
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we‘re not ready to do that. a lot of people are not in that position. about 2500 families who are suffering from this problem at the moment. at any one time. give us some insight why you do not want to apply for a death certificate? and we still have hope that claudia may be alone. that is why we don‘t want to go down the course at the moment. even though it i have very much promoted the presumption of death built into legislation two or three yea rs built into legislation two or three years ago. it was not personal, it was because i am able to speak for me and talk in public, which is the my whole life really. doing this largely for other people. sue, how much is this an issue for those who go missing in theirfamilies? much is this an issue for those who
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go missing in their families? at the charity missing people we know there are around 2500 families who can benefit from this guardianship powers, which we have been campaigning for. this law is needed so urgently, many families like peter have been waiting many years for the right to be able to step in and look after their loved 1's property. of course, with every month that passes, more and more families find themselves in this horrendous situation. in some cases it can be a part that goes missing, leaving behind someone with children, the arrangement weather has to be two signatures where you can has to be two signatures where you ca n a ccess has to be two signatures where you ca n access accou nts. has to be two signatures where you can access accounts. absolutely we have worked with a woman whose husband went missing, unfortunately she described it as becoming like single—parent overnight. still the same bills and mortgages. because it has been organising mortgage, without his signature she was unable
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to change the terms and conditions of the mortgage, payments, or sell the house. which understandably quite quickly became unaffordable. she was fortunate enough for her family to be able to step in and help her out financially. otherwise it would have been likely she would have lost her home for her and her son. are the family still helping her out? that is the only option for families to do. unless, the families wa nt families to do. unless, the families want to go down the line of apply to have the loved one presumed dead. when a have the loved one presumed dead. whena family have the loved one presumed dead. when a family hopes are believed —— hopes and believes they are still alive, it is not a path they want to take. tell us about the specifics in the change in legislation you would like to see? the idea is very similartoa like to see? the idea is very similar to a power of attorney, which a lot of people would be familiar with. once someone has been
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missing for 90 days, notjust a short thing, someone in the family will be able to apply to a high court judge, will be able to apply to a high courtjudge, and will be able to apply to a high court judge, and say will be able to apply to a high courtjudge, and say we really need to be able to look after our daughter‘s or husband‘s affairs. please appointed me as her guardian to enable me to do that. if the judge agrees, he will issue a certificate which can be produced to the bank, building society insurance company, or anybody else involved. they will then treat you as their customer. how would a judge make that decision? what sort of documentation would you have to provide? you have to show you are a member of the family, the person has been missing for 90 days, not difficult, almost inevitably it will have been reported to the police.
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you don‘t have to show you are suitable person. let me ask about safeguards. what kind of safeguards would there be so a judge could be sure they would be guardian was acting in the best interests of either the person giving missing or those left behind ? either the person giving missing or those left behind? absolutely very important, as you point out a judge making a decision can be sure that the guardian will act in the best interest of the missing person and the system detects the guardian as well. there are safeguards built into the system, anybody wanting to bea into the system, anybody wanting to be a guardian will have to tell the family it is their intention. if any family it is their intention. if any family members disagree they can tell the judge about their concerns. the judge will hear that, and make a decision based on that. when a guardian is appointed, there will be oversight. there is the office of the public guardian. the guardian
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will have to show them the decisions they have made, file their accounts, to be checked by the body. if they have concerns, they will report that facts of the court. telus you hope your daugbtg is still alive for your daughter is still alive for so —— tell us why you hope your daughter is still alive? it is hoped faith, it gets more difficult as time goes on. now nearly eight yea rs. time goes on. now nearly eight years. i remember very startlingly when the first police officer in charge announced they were treating claudia‘s disappearance as murder. he andi claudia‘s disappearance as murder. he and i were on the same media platform, and he was saying there is no evidence that claudia is alive. i was saying there was no evidence she
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is dead. giving along parallel lines, both trying to find her and what happened. we‘ll was hope she is still alive, and the police are treating it as a murder enquiry. no conflict in that. the hope is still there. the archbishop of york has been very helpful all the way through this. just occasionally saying peter, she is alive. the police have not been able to find out what happened to her. do you have a theory? i have always had a theory, right from the outset. because of how claudia‘s house looked when she went into it —— when i went into it. it looked as if she put her boots on, got her rucksack, and went off to work. i think she
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was picked up by someone on her way to work. very early in the morning, about 5:30 a.m.. clearly dark. although it is a residential district, there are areas where it is just parkland. i district, there are areas where it isjust parkland. i have district, there are areas where it is just parkland. i have a district, there are areas where it isjust parkland. i have a horrible feeling she was picked up and taken away. what happened after that, i don‘t know. away. what happened after that, i don't know. i'm grateful you spoke to us today. thank you very much peter. we will speak to an mp he believes age—appropriate sex education should be available for children as young as five. and a group of schoolchildren, and how they would feel about that. with the news here‘sjoanna in the bbc newsroom. the kremlin has dismissed reports that it has compromising information about us president—elect donald trump. unconfirmed reports have emerged in the american media that russian intelligence agencies have damaging
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information about mr trump‘s business interests and private life. in a tweet, mr trump denounced the reports as a "witch—hunt" and "fake news". barack obama has delivered his farewell address as us president, telling the american people he believes the country is in a better, stronger place than when he was first elected eight years ago. in an emotional speech in chicago, he thanked his wife michelle, his family and staff, as our correspondent laura trevelyan reports. cheering. barack obama returned to chicago, the place where his political career began to deliver his long planned farewell address. the president used his platform to underline what he sees as his achievements. if i had told you that we would win marriage equality and secure the right to health insurance for another 20 million of our fellow citizens... cheering and applause. if i told you all that,
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you might have said our sights were set a little too high. turning to his theme of what could undermine america‘s democracy, the nation‘s first black president was direct about the state of race relations. after my election, there was talk of a post—racial america. such a vision, however well intended, was never realistic. race remains a potent and often divisive force in our society. paying tribute to his wife michelle and his daughters, the president became emotional. for those who had lined up for hours to hear him speak in person, the effort was worthwhile. i thought it was very uplifting and it gave us a message of hope and encouragement and it was what we needed to hear right now.
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we had a tough election and we just need to keep fighting for the causes that we believe in. barack 0bama‘s supporters were heartened by his uplifting message tonight and he leaves office with his personal popularity at a high. but that didn‘t stop the american voters from choosing donald trump to replace him and now barack obama must watch as republicans try to dismantle much of his legacy. robbie williams team is placing tickets directly on to resale ticketing websites at higher prices. the artist‘s management team has previously called on the government to ta ke previously called on the government to take stronger action against resale sites. secondary ticketing websites are routinely used by touts to sell tickets at inflated prices. the front man of a band told us that
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he thinks that secondary websites need to be shutdown.” he thinks that secondary websites need to be shutdown. i would encourage them not to work with secondary websites and if they own them to shut them down. it is about cultural access. we need to make it transparent and a fair playing field for everybody. so, we can‘t have that when people can sell the tickets like you said for phil collins for £1,000. i mean, that‘s just ridiculous and the money is not going to the artist and that‘s what it is about, the money is leaving the industry and not being pumped back into it in any capacity, what‘s the point really? centre more doctors are warning that the crisis in the nhs and social ca re the crisis in the nhs and social care is putting people‘s lives at risk. in a letter to theresa may, the royal college of physicians said a shortage of resources means the quality of patient care is under threat.
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charities working with elderly and disabled people have also written to the prime minister — calling for a long—term solution to funding for health and social care. the department of health says it‘s investing £10 billion to relieve pressure on hospitals. at 11.30am on the bbc news channel, you can put your questions about the state of the nhs to our health editor hugh pym. please get in touch with us to ask those questions. you can text us or send an e—mail or contact us via twitter using the hashtag bbc ask this. police scotland say that a man has been charged, after a lorry was blown over on the forth road bridge, blocking both lanes. there has been major traffic disruption after the hgv was blown from the northbound lane onto the southbound carriageway in gale force winds. the bridge is not expected to reopen until lunchtime at the earliest. 20 people have been rescued from the top of a rollercoaster in australia. they were trapped and helped down from the ride at movie world on the gold coast. local media said there were no reports of injuries. it‘s thought a mechanical problem with a chain on the ride was responsible. that‘s a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. before the sport, we‘re going to
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talk, oh, i‘m going to tell you what we‘re going to talk about after the sport. we‘re going to talk to a group of schoolchildren, about a report from barnardo‘s, they are suggesting we need compulsory sex and relationship education in schools. because they say, it would make young teenagers feel safer. so we‘re going to talk to some pupils and a labourmp we‘re going to talk to some pupils and a labour mp who has been campaigning on this and a deputy head. it is a subject that comes up a lot. it would be really interesting to hear what your view is asa interesting to hear what your view is as a parent. do let me know. here‘s some sport now with hugh. manchester united have a 2—0 advantage after the first leg of their efl cup semi—final against hull. goals from juan mata and marouane fellaini at old trafford gave united their ninth win in a row. boxer nick blackwell is still a year away from making a full recovery. blackwell suffered serious head injuries in a fight with chris eubankjunior in march last year,
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but was then injured again in an unsanctioned sparring session in november. joe marler will miss at least the first of england‘s six nations games. the prop has been ruled out of england‘s match against france after breaking his leg in the warm—up before harlequins‘ premiership match against sale at the weekend. british number one johanna konta is through to the semi—finals of the sydney international. she beat daria kasatkina in straight sets. konta will face former wimbledon finalist eugenie buchard in the semi—final. more sport on bbc news throughout the day. but from me, that‘s all for now. cheers, hugh. one mum urged parents not to be fobbed off in they are worried about the health of their children. gaynor mcconnell‘s baby boy cayden was born with spina bifida in 2010. at three—months—old he was diagnosed with meningitis which he survived.
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a few months later the illness came back and he died. his family discovered that he could have been saved, had doctors not missed vital signs about his condition and listened to his mum‘s concerns. at five months he got men intis and had a lumbar puncture and mri scan where you could see the tract. the tract is an open channel at the bottom of his spine. i think we‘ve got that to show our audience and they will be able to see, you can see from this image there, is the actual mri scan. at the bottom of his back where the white arrow is you can see the open channel, this hole effectively which goes from the bottom of his spine to the skin of his bottom effectively. that‘s when alarm bells should have been ringing with somebody amongst the medical staff? there is a 6096
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with somebody amongst the medical staff? there is a 60% chance with somebody amongst the medical staff? there is a 6096 chance that it should be looked into. that means a mass of cells where bacteria can gather? yes, and it can cause meningitis. and other infections and it wasn‘t looked into. they didn‘t look into it. they missed it? completely. right. so he recovered from meningitis, didn‘t he? completely. right. so he recovered from meningitis, didn't he? the first time. you took him home, how was he getting on? he was a normal child, normal child. normal cold, like a normal child. yeah, and then in november, he became very poorly. really poorly. and then it was meningitis a second time, but to be honest, it was way too late then. was it? it was way too late, he had gone to that point where he was passed. there was no helping him then. tell our audience how you discovered that vital signs had been missed from that earlier mri scan?”
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was asking a lot of questions and i felt constantly i was being fobbed off, constantly felt constantly i was being fobbed off, co nsta ntly a nd felt constantly i was being fobbed off, constantly and ifelt felt constantly i was being fobbed off, constantly and i felt the only way that i could get the answers i needed was through a solicitor. so i went to the solicitors to get the a nswe rs went to the solicitors to get the answers i needed to do and from there, we knew we had the scans and we noticed straightaway and if we noticed the doctors should have noticed. tell us about the legal case that you‘ve brought against this particular trust? gaynorjust wanted answers to know what happened to her son because the hospital hadn't answered any of the questions that heed had and she had doubts in her mind so we investigated the treatment that she had, that he had, sorry, and it turned out that there we re sorry, and it turned out that there were failings and gaynor's described them perfectly. they failed to explore the tract. in all likelihood it was the der moud that caused the second bout of meningitis and if
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that was removed after cayden's first episode of meningitis, he would never have got a second episode and he would be alive today. oh my goodness. the key point is they missed the open channel on the mri scan. had they seen that, that would have set alarm bells ringing and they have done further exploratory surgery and found that der moud tumour which can harbour bacteria and cause meningitis? absolutely right. how many years did it take for you to get that answer? it has taken four years. gaynor has stuck with it. many people have said, you know, gaynor it is time to move on and let go of your son and she has been determined from day one, that she wanted answers and it is only been a few weeks ago that the trust admitted liability for the failings and he wouldn't have got meningitis a second time around had it not been for their failings and it not been for their failings and it has taken that long and that
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level of determination from a mum to find out what happened to her son. let me read what they say. cambridge university hospitals trust acknowledge, being at fault for your little boy‘s death and they say they have made a formal apology to your family? no, they haven't. there was an apology in the letter to my solicitor. there was no letter directed to me or my family. they we re directed to me or my family. they were sorry for what happened, it was at the bottom of the letter, not directed straight at me or my family or anyone else involved. is that something you want? yeah, of course, of course. i think i deserve that. i think my family deserve that. to know that, my little boy went through so much pain and so many different things he went through. i think he deserves the apology, it is heartbreaking of the it is not fair what he went through and i think the least we deserve is an apology from them. and after four years, for them
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finally to acknowledge that yes, the standard of care that your little boy received was way below what he should have expectedment how did you react to that? i always knew. it was the reason why i wanted to pursue t a lot of parents are being fobbed off. they‘re getting told something and they have to take that as the final answer. no, they don‘t. and they have to take that as the finalanswer. no, they don‘t. if nobody knows their child better than their parents or their carers. if you‘ve got any questions, keep pushing and keep pushing until you get the answer. don‘t be afraid to keep asking. that's your message to pa rents keep asking. that's your message to parents today? massively. massively. you know what, you did keep pushing and you still didn‘t get the a nswe rs. and you still didn‘t get the answers. you got them now? yeah. eventually i did. i think that‘s the most heartbreaking thing. it has taken to go to the solicitors and get the answers i needed when they could have quite easily given me the a nswe rs could have quite easily given me the answers themselves. how do you remember your little boy?
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oh, how do you remember your little boy? 0h, he was a beautiful little boy. he was happy. no matter what he went through, he was always smiling. he was a typical little boy. a beautiful little boy. you can see the full interview on our programme page. sex and relationship education in schools — a controversial issue with parents and teachers — and most schools don‘t have to provide compulsary sex ed. in fact, 2000 was the last overhaul of the curriculum that‘s before social media, before smartphones and before equal marriage or civil partnerships. sarah champion says younger people are more tolerant of violence. there
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are more tolerant of violence. there a re calls are more tolerant of violence. there are calls from barnardo‘s for the government to introduce age appropriate sex education. it is being debated in the commons this week. a poll by the charity show that children want the government to introduce compulsory education on sex and relationships and three—quarters believe they would be safer if they had classes on the subject. let‘s talk now to the labour‘s women and equalities spokeswoman saah champion, rebecca jennings, who runs sex education classes for children. mumin hamayun, deputy head from whitefield school in london who is here with some of his pupils, erizon, shakira, jamali and sebby. welcome all of you. it goes without saying, we‘re going to have a frank conversation. we will use the correct terminology. if anybody doesn‘t want to hear this conversation turn the sound down for
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the next few minutes. what kind of things do you learn? in year11... what what kind of things do you learn? in year 11. .. what age are you? 15. we have dropped down days, learning about certain myths, general... is it possible to become pregnant through anal sex. relationships, what are unhealthy relationships.” am 16. we don't have lessons like that anymore, we have down days. we mainly learn about when things happen, i don't know what to say. you were going to talk about nations about too much drink, you may be
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taken advantage of. one of our lessons, we covered, when you get intoxicated with alcohol, men can ta ke intoxicated with alcohol, men can take advantage of the women. consequences like rape, you can become pregnant. i am 14, what we currently learn about is when we can stay protected when having sex. how men should respect women, if they do not want to have sex, without consent. we learn about rape, how it is not good. so we should respect women if they don't want to have sex, we should keep the relationship balanced and equal. boys especially, we balanced and equal. boys especially, we should learn we should not take advantage of girls when they are drunk. if they say yes when they are drunk, it is classified as illegal. they are not fully functional.”
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drunk, it is classified as illegal. they are not fully functional. i am 14 coming year ten, we still have lessons, we covered things like exploitation, how it is not necessarily people trafficking people across countries, it could just be you in a relationship with your partner your partner could be exploiting new by different things, psychologically harming you, not letting you go out with friends, things like that. learning about relationships. what would you say the split is between the sexual side of things and the relationships i‘ve, i know they can be intertwined. mostly about diseases, condom is, the myths of getting pregnant. all relationships? pshe, the things we learn. physical social
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health and education. personal. we cover the social side of things, we also cover the physical sex and body parts. that is more biology and science. we get those lessons. the science. we get those lessons. the science curriculum will cover a lot of the biology aspects. reproduction. pshe is years seven, two—year ten. those lessons are built into the curriculum. covering age—appropriate material. that will come in in year seven, lessons on body parts, how to have healthy relationships. as they progress, by the time we get two—year ten, we're looking at questions about consent, the forms of consent. young people are aware of the dangers, also able to make the right choices for themselves. some people, some adults
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think if you teach your age group about sex and relationships, it will encourage you to have sex at an earlier age. what would you say about that? i disagree, if we‘re not getting the information in a controlled environment, with your friends, you will be forced to go online, there are no filters, you could come across the wrong information. that could cause you to wa nt to information. that could cause you to want to do these things even more, rather than learning from a teacher and professional, taught to teach us students. some of these are out there questions, but you were pretty honest, which is so helpful. have you been taught how to put a condom on? no. no. is that part of the lesson. the reason i am mentioning that. mike got in touch, saying i would rather my kids learned sign
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language orfirst would rather my kids learned sign language or first aid, would rather my kids learned sign language orfirst aid, then how would rather my kids learned sign language or first aid, then how to put a condom on? that is another discussion about the services schools her. we used to have access to nurses on a regular basis, coming into supporters, we're sharing information. showing students the dos and don'ts. a lot to do with teacher expertise and training. you have done, but you don‘t do now. sorry i interrupted, people saying having sex education leads to throwing into is an earlier age. when it should be 16. not necessarily, it gives you the confidence, if you do want to enter a relationship with someone, at least you know the dos and don'ts. if you are in an unhealthy relationship, at least you know that. i can see the signs. it equips you, when you do get into a relationship later on in your life,
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you know what not to do and what to do. let me bring in sarah champion, and rebecca jennings. you run sex education classes, and you would like basic sex education for five—year—olds. some people would freak out. what i want is relationship education for five—year—olds. they don‘t need to know the biology of sex. they need to know about respecting themselves and other people. the nspcc does a great campaign about what is in your pa nts great campaign about what is in your pants is private. i have been into primary schools, where there are teachers like rebecca, little children understand with kissing, there is appropriate kissing and inappropriate kissing. why does a five—year—old need to know that? sadly, because the level of child abuse going on in this country is at epidemic levels. what we ought to be doing is preventing it from
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happening, rather than freaking out after a child has been abused. this is anotherformer after a child has been abused. this is another former first aid. how we protect children. interestingly, what we find internationally and in this country, when children have good relationship education they have sex later, teenage pregnancy drops down. this is a form of protection all children need. drops down. this is a form of protection all children needm drops down. this is a form of protection all children need. it is about keeping children safe in terms of a five—year—old learning about sex education, that is not the case. about sex education, that is not the case saying that, young girls at the age of seven starting menstruation. going through changes. would you teach primary school children of that yes, in small groups. we have fun with it open and honest. some girls aged seven starting period. year three. i would
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not personally do that with a whole class. nurture groups, girls starting periods, explaining what is happening. it is ok, a natural thing. it is very young, of course giving them the right information. we need to be mindful, if we don‘t teach the children they will find out themselves. if your child has an ipad, a smartphone they can get onto the internet. by age 14, 95% of children have seen porn. do you want children have seen porn. do you want children to understand that is a fa ntasy, children to understand that is a fantasy, and have a good basis. that should come from the mum and dad.” ama should come from the mum and dad.” am a parent of a 12—year—old. over christmas, very difficult to talk to my son about sexual relationships. i'm hoping that school will pick up on that. i feel comfortable talking to my students about it. why not two—year reign 12—year—old ? to my students about it. why not two-year reign 12-year-old? the relationship is very different. i
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gave him a book to read. i am going to talk to them about changes. he school is doing a fantasticjob. if parents are not talking to children, schools are not talking to children, this is a reality of the world young people are living in. they are learning, from each other, the internet. there are no filters, as we internet. there are no filters, as we said. that is a concern. it has to be like a partnership between parents and teachers and the school. on educating us about sex and relationships. maybe from our parents we could get the fake side of things, how they have done it. have you had conversations with your pa rents, have you had conversations with your parents, how your faith have you had conversations with your parents, how yourfaith influences whether you get involved in a relationship? most definitely. what is your faith, and what your parents say? i'm a christian, they teach me things like no sex before marriage.
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they also teach me about diversity, the world, different sexualities was iremember my the world, different sexualities was i remember my dad and i, i could not sleep, he put on a dvd of our babies are made we had a fun conversation with gingerbread biscuits and tomato sauce. did it make you fall asleep? frank and open discussions. we spend ourtime at frank and open discussions. we spend our time at home and at school. which schools, with compulsory sex education, and which are not known why is that enough is enough? only 35% of schools where it is compulsory. state maintained schools. it may well be the rest are doing a fantasticjob, but when 0fsted goes in and measures the quality of the education, a lot of schools are failing on that. the other stat two thirds of child abuse
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happened in the extended family. just leaving it to the family, they may be fantastic, but it is running a risk. when i was talking to young people, they say what is good about doing it in a class environment everybody is at the same level. myth busting amongst themselves. one of the things i‘m concerned about. giving children resources; fatty have them finding themselves. giving children resources; fatty have them finding themselvesm giving children resources; fatty have them finding themselves. if we we re have them finding themselves. if we were having this conversation, and they did on the radio. it would have been through the prism of teenage pregnancies. it is reducing in this country. now we‘re talking about keeping children safe as a reason for sex education lessons. because of child sexual abuse, violence and relationships. teenagers are in relationships. teenagers are in relationships where one of the partnerships is being violent of the other. sometimes teenagers don‘t know that that is wrong. the saddest thing for me, the barnardos survey
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is showing young people are crying out for this help. we have the youth parliament, one of the things they‘ve asking for is statutory sexual education. young people are baking for advice and support. if you step away from that, you won‘t really failing them. do you agree? completely agree. a colleague i spoke to this morning talked about the importance of parenting classes for young people. these are the key things we are equipping young people to learn how to read and write, that is key, not necessarily the functioning reality of the world they are going to grow up in. they will be involved in relationships, but we're not having those conversations with them. it is key it is brought into the curriculum, and schools are tackling it. for any pa rent and schools are tackling it. for any parent nervous about the kind of conversation we are having now, what would you say? just to be open and honest. seek advice from schools,
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school governors, nurses, somebody there to support the conversation. it has to be part of the whole school approach. something embrace. that is taught in a fun way. that music means the programme is over. we have had a really good discussion i appreciate your time, thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning, we will get more sleet and snow in the next few days. to date is the wind strength causing problems. particularly in scotland and the northern half of the uk will see gales, more and more showers, increasingly winston reid, particularly in scotland. wales, southern england largely dry into the afternoon. some sunshine, feeling cold in the wind. continuing to get colder overnight. showers more wintry across the north. atrocious weather in the hills and
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mountains. with those sort of temperatures, icy conditions around. those wintry showers continue in the north tomorrow. rain coming across southern part of england, turning to sleet and snow initially across south wales, and the moors of the south—west. later in the south midlands, east anglia and the south—east of england, the navy disruption. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:00. the kremlin dismisses reports that it has compromising information about donald trump.
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senior doctors warn that a shortage of resources may leave the nhs in england unable to cope this winter. a teenager is due to appear in court charged with the murder of a seven—year—old girl in york. a lorry driver is charged after his vehicle was blown over on the forth road bridge, leading to its closure. also, president obama says america is "a better, stronger place" than when he took office. in his farewell speech in chicago, he calls on americans. to defend their democracy. protecting our way of life. that is not

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