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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 11, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. donald trump has given his first press conference for almost six months. he took the stage, gave a statement, and then took questions on obamacare, conflicts of interest, his proposed wall on the mexican border — and whether he is vulnerable to blackmail by russia. i saw the information, i read the information, it's all fake news, it's all phoney, it didn't happen. he also talked about vladimir putin. if putin likes donald trump, i consider that an asset, not a liability, because we have a horrible relationship with russia. he finished by using a phrase we all know. they do a bad job, i'll say, you're fired. we'll take you through all the key moments of that press conference. that will take some time. and then we'll turn to the confirmation hearing of rex tillerson, who donald trump wants to become secretary of state. that in itself has been riveting.
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we will play you clips and schedule analysis. we've correspondents in new york and washington, plus the bbc‘s north america editor jon sopel will be live with me in the bbc newsroom. and across the hour, if you have questions on what mr trump said, you can use our hashtag, my contact details and the e—mail address are on screen. send as your questions, we have live reporters through the hour to give you some answers. every part of donald trump's successful journey to the white house has been passionate, abrasive, different and divisive. it's also been riveting. the same can be said of his first press conference. i'm going to take you through it. this was from mr trump's opening statement. thank you very much, it is very
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familiar territory, news conferences, because we used to give them on an almost daily basis, i think we have probably maybe won the nomination because of news conferences, it is good to be with you. we stopped giving them because we we re you. we stopped giving them because we were getting quite a bit of an accurate news, but i do have to say, andi accurate news, but i do have to say, and i must say, that i want to thank and i must say, that i want to thank a lot of the news organisations here today. because they looked at that nonsense that was released by, maybe, the intelligence agencies, who knows? maybe the intelligence agencies, which would be age mendis blot on their record if they, in fa ct, blot on their record if they, in fact, did that. a tremendous blotter. what mr trump is talking about there are reports that russia's intelligence agencies hold compromising personal material about him. russia denies this. the claims are unverified. they come in a dossier believed to have been written by a former british intelligence agent. cnn reported that us intelligence had shown a summary of the dossier
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to donald trump and barack obama. buzzfeed published the whole thing. and donald trump is furious with both. as you'll see in this next clip from the press conference. i think it was disgraceful, disgraceful, that the intelligence agencies allowed any information that turned out to be so false and fa ke that turned out to be so false and fake out. i think it is a disgrace. and i say that, and i say that, and thatis and i say that, and i say that, and that is something that nazi germany would have done, and they do. i think it is a disgrace. but information that was false and fake that never happened got released to the public as far as buzzfeed, which isa the public as far as buzzfeed, which is a failing pile of garbage writing it, i think they will suffer the consequences, they already are. and as far as consequences, they already are. and as faras cnn
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consequences, they already are. and as far as cnn going out of their way to build it up, and, by the way, we just found out, i was coming down, michael cohen is a very talented lawyer, a good friend, he hasjust reported that it was not this one they were talking about. all night long it is him, i said, they were talking about. all night long it is him, isaid, i they were talking about. all night long it is him, i said, i want to see your passport, he brings it to my office, i say, wait a minute, see your passport, he brings it to my office, isay, wait a minute, he was not out of the country. they said that he was in prague. it turned out to be a different person with the same name. it is a disgrace what took place, it is a disgrace. i think they ought to apologise to michael, to start with. reporter: president—elect, since you are attacking us, can you give us a chance? not you, your organisation... go ahead. quiet. go ahead. she is asking a question, don't be rude. don't be rude. don't be rude. no, iam not
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don't be rude. don't be rude. don't be rude. no, i am not going to give you a question. you are fake news. the reporter not being allowed to ask a question by donald trump wasjim acosta from cnn. his question was eventually asked. not by him. on twitter he says... "fortunately abc's cecilia vega asked my question about whether any trump associates contacted russians. trump said no." lots of people were upset by the nature of that exchange. trump also says the incoming white house press secretary sean spicer threatened to kick him out of the press conference if he tried to ask questions. i apologise, iapologise,jim i apologise, jim acosta from cnn said that. what about buzzfeed? it editor ben smith said the decision to publish the dossier is, and this is from the statement he tweeted, oui’ is from the statement he tweeted, our presumption is to be transparent in ourjournalism our presumption is to be transparent in our journalism and our presumption is to be transparent in ourjournalism and to share what we have with reasons, we publish the dossier so that americans can make
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up dossier so that americans can make up their own dossier so that americans can make up theirown minds dossier so that americans can make up their own minds about allegations that donald trump... about the president that have circulated at the highest levels of the us government. he also mentioned the media and went on to say, publishing this document was not an easy oi’ on to say, publishing this document was not an easy or simple call and people of goodwill may disagree with oui’ people of goodwill may disagree with our choice. it is fairto our choice. it is fair to say that donald trump disagrees. it is worth emphasising that the story is not so much about the allegations, the bbc and other organisations have been aware of them and we simply can't verify them, the story is that us intelligence, having got this dossier, decided it was sufficiently important that they gave a summary bid to donald trump and barack obama, that is the story that the bbc is focusing on. —— gave a summary of it too. donald trump also spoke about those allegations that russian hacking attempted to influence the presidential election. here he is on matter.
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i think it was russian, but i think we will also hacked by other countries and other people —— we we re countries and other people —— we were also hacked. i can say that when we lost 22 million names and everything else that was hacked recently, they didn't make a big deal out of that, that is something that was extraordinary, probably china. we had much hacking going on. that's the first time mr trump has explicitly said that russia carried out hacking during the presidential election. which led him on to talking about his potential relationship with vladimir putin. if putin likes donald trump, i consider that an asset, not a liability. we have a horrible relationship with russia, russia can help us fight ices which, by the way, is, number one, tricky. this administration created isis by leaving at the wrong time. the void
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has created, isis was formed. if putin likes donald trump, guess what, that is an asset, not a liability. i don't know that i will get along with vladimir putin. i hope i do, but there is a good chance i won't. and if i don't, do you honestly believe that hillary would be tougher on putin than me? does anybody in this room really believe that? give me a break. let's bring in the bbc‘s anthony zurcher from washington, let's bring in the bbc‘s anthony zurcherfrom washington, dc. when donald trump won, the media in the us did a lot of hand—wringing about not seeing it coming, it has had quite a few weeks to get ready for this press conference but did not land many punches? it reminded me a lot of the ones he had during his primary campaign, all over the place, occasionally acrimonious, he would tend to pick out an enemy and beat that, in this case the enemy was cnn, buzzfeed and other members of the press, as well as calling
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into question the intelligence community, but part of the nature of these kind of conferences is it is very difficult to follow up questions, very easy for donald trump to turn those questions back on the questioner, to dodge or evade whatever he does not want to answer, particularly if the question is one of these four or five multipart questions that reporters like to do when presidential press conferences, donald trump would just pick the question that he wanted to say, a nswer question that he wanted to say, answer that and let the rest slide. i think we learned some interesting things about what donald trump intends to do with his business empire, some of the things about health care policy, a timeline on supreme court nominations, a little bit more on how he will try to get mexico to pay for the border wall through taxes, not some sort of check up front, but other than that, lots of it was sound and fury. when he was going for the nomination we sometimes discussed how things would
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change if he became the nominee. when he was the nominee there were suggestions about whether he would change as president—elect, it seems he is not changing at all, this is the man as he has always been a dozen americans voted for him? you are right, i think the talk of a trump pivot, whatever it was, we never saw that. donald trump is who he is, he has been the same donald trump on twitter over last few weeks as he was when running for president and even before he entered the political arena, that is donald trump and he will not change for better or worse, we will have to adjust and react to it. for the next four years, i think. you mentioned policy details, let's work through some of the more significant ones, what did you pick out as being, we did not know that before and we know now? the top line was what he said about the business empire, that he would hand over control of his
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sprawling financial domain to his sons, but he would not divest himself of ownership nor would he set up some sort of blind trust, he brought on a lawyer to talk about the details of this and she said that donald trump can't really forget that he owns trump tower, which is a ballad point. he knows where his golf courses and real estate holdings are so it'll be hard for him to operate without that knowledge, but lots of critic said he needed to take more steps to make sure he had no appearance of co nflict—of— i nterest sure he had no appearance of conflict—of—interest when he was taking actions for his presidency, and the things he announced, i am pretty sure they will not satisfy those critics. i mentioned the mexican wall, he said that instead of having some sort of upfront payment from mexico that there might be some sort of tax or border levy installed , be some sort of tax or border levy installed, maybe within a year, that there would be negotiations. the other key thing that he talked about was health care reform, talk about
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delaying and repealing obamacare, he wa nts to delaying and repealing obamacare, he wants to see some sort of action unappealing obamacare, which he says is ruinous, in the next several weeks after his human health and services nominee is confirmed, and as soon as it is repealed a replacement has to be brought up almost instantaneously. that is the heavy—lift, legislatively, and people in congress are probably getting nervous that donald trump is setting that deadline, it looks like thatis setting that deadline, it looks like that is what he will push for. thank you, anthony zurcher will be back with us later in the programme. now let's talk about the dossier is a more. “— now let's talk about the dossier is a more. —— some more. the bbc‘s paul wood has spent several months looking into this now—infamous dossier that has so angered mr trump and his colleagues. the bbc has known about it for some weeks but we have not been able to publish it or verify its contents. here's paul with what he found. this document has circulated for some time in washington, it was
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known about in the congressional leadership, senior intelligence figures, in september and october. some of the big american papers got hold of it, as did we in the bbc, in the last week of the election. many people felt they could not publish it because they did not know if it was true. i managed to pass on questions to the cia officers, or some of them, dealing with the case file. it would be illegalfor them to talk to me directly but i got a message back from them saying it was more than one table, audio as well as video, in more than one location, not just the as video, in more than one location, notjust the ritz—carlton in moscow but st petersburg as well, more than one data, material of the sexual nature which they regarded as credible. i spoke to a retired spy in august to tilt me quite independently of the mi6 officer, the only source in the american media, that he had been informed by the head of an eastern european intelligence agency of blackmail tate possessed by the russians with
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material of the sexual nature about mrtrump. material of the sexual nature about mr trump. none of this is to say that anybody is endorsing these claims, but there are certainly —— there is certainly sufficient credibility for the intelligence community to pass them onto mr obama, the congressional leadership and mrtrump, who is obama, the congressional leadership and mr trump, who is angry. some viewers would say wouldn't russia have an interest in mr trump thinking they had this kind of thing on him? they're all sorts of explanations, one of which, i spoke to an expert on russia who said that fsb officers like to boast that they have compromising material, they make a lot of use about as part of the tradecraft and they are always boasting about this or that public figure possibly being the subject of blackmail, we do not know unless we see the tape at the russians will not release it, so it comes down to whether these fsb officers are credible, we are getting it second
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through an mi6 officer who everybody saysis through an mi6 officer who everybody says is credible, has long experience in moscow, but these are allegations and hearsay evidence, nobody has seen the tape. that said, the allegations about the tape are not coming out in isolation, there has been an interagency task force comprising the fbi on one hand and the cia on the fbi on one hand and the cia on the other, looking at allegations that money was passed to mr trump was my campaign through some of his associates, a secret court warrant was granted a couple of weeks before voting, again, these are allegations, nobody is saying they are proven, but i would not be surprised to see congressional hearings on this. want you in the uk seesit hearings on this. want you in the uk sees it —— says that if these tapes we re sees it —— says that if these tapes were known about months ago, why was that not released ? were known about months ago, why was that not released? —— one viewer in the uk says. i can only speak about the uk says. i can only speak about the bbc, we were aware of the dossier but could not verify any of
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the allegations in it, which is why the allegations in it, which is why the story was taking a little while. cnn has reported the fact that us intelligence showed a summary of the dossier to donald trump and barack obama. as to why buzzfeed published the editor of buzzfeed who took a decision and has dealt with that on twitter throughout the day. later we will talk about donald trump usman business interests with the help of the mirror hussein. we will look in more detail about the measures he has taken to put distance between him and his businesses once he is in the white house. the former british ambassador to the united states, sir christopher meyer, says trump's rocky relationship with the intelligence agencies — even before he's taken office — is concerning for both us and world security. in this press conference, although
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he did not exactly underlined this coming hugely suggested that the intelligence agencies might be behind the publicly king of these allegations, such that they have appeared in certain news agencies —— the public the king. you might say this is a renewed war between himself and the intelligence agencies, you are quite right to say that for a president to start his term of office on bad relations, very bad relations, with the intelligence agencies, it is not brilliant for american security and not brilliant for world security or the security of the north atlantic treaty organisation. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... donald trump gave his first press conference as president—elect — facing questions on obamacare, conflicts of interest
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and whether he is vulnerable to blackmail by russia. his answer was no. it was his first press conference in almost six months. some of the main stories from the bbc world service... bbc china report that taiwan used militaryjets to monitor a chinese aircraft carrier as it sailed close to the island. china has said it was carrying out a standard naval drill in international waters. tensions between china and taiwan have been running high since donald trump chose to take a call from the taiwanese president late last year. a cold snap across southern and eastern europe is now thought to have caused 30 people to lose their lives. many of those who've died were migrants living in makeshift accommodation. we have a report from greece on this
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story later in the programme. donald trump knew he'd be asked about possible conflicts of interests. he took it head on — even had a huge pile of paperwork relating to his businesses up on the stage with him. here he is explaining what he will do. what i'm going to be doing is that my two sons, who are right here, don and eric, will be running the company. they are going to be running it in a very professional manner, they will not discuss it with me. again, i don't have to do this. they will not discuss it with me. and, with that, i will bring up cheri dillon, these papers are among many documents i have signed showing com plete many documents i have signed showing complete and total turnover of
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control to my sons. samira hussain has been looking into those conflicts in new york and sent this report. can you explain blind trust? mr trump has said he will turn over the management of the trump organisation to his two sons and another trusted advisor and he will completely step away from any sort of business decisions. in addition, he has said that the trump organisation will not have any international deals as long as he is in office, and with regards to domestic deals, that will be subject to the approval of their own appointed ethics advisers, so the ethics adviser will say to the trump boys whether or not the deal could go through and whether it is upholding the standards of ethics here in the united states. is that satisfying people concerned about this? that is the question. likely it will probably not satisfy everyone. there
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area probably not satisfy everyone. there are a few problems with what he has already established. first, he has divested anything. because he has not divest did anything, he still has a vested interest in how the company is run and its success. in that way he is not really providing enough distance between himself and the trump organisation. it is not a blind trust, because he has given management over to his two sons, the truest sense of the blind trust would mean it would have to be an outside adviser, someone that the trump organisation does not know what all, but that does not really exist with his two sons. finally, it is really ha rd exist with his two sons. finally, it is really hard to say that you don't ca re is really hard to say that you don't care how well your sons do, it is in his interest that they do well, and the sharing of information, it is such a slippery slope. thank you for taking us through that, we appreciated.
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mrtrump has mr trump has interests in 144 companies operating in 25 countries. we were talking about the ftse 100 yesterday. yesterday the ftse 100 index — the uk's leading measure of share prices — closed at a record high for the ninth day in a row. that hadn't happened before. we make that ten days in a row. as you can see, it continues to increase, in part related to the value of sterling, companies that operate abroad can make more money when they turn their foreign currency into sterling. let's get the analysis of the bbc‘s north american editorjon sopel on what we saw earlier from donald trump. he was on the front but, he was going to come up fighting, you would not have expected anything different. even from the extraordinary standards that one accepts as the new normal from donald trump, it was that on
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something beyond. —— and something beyond. what came out of it was the really fraught relationship he will have much as with the media, we expected that, but the intelligence services. it almost seems in the news c0 nfe re nces services. it almost seems in the news conferences that he thought the word of the cia and the fbi were somehow worth less than the word of vladimir putin, he quoted favourably. that will be a fraught relationship going forward. my other takeout was that donald trump was the geniusjury the takeout was that donald trump was the genius jury the campaign of using social media to bite, to hit at opponents, and whether this news is fake or not, you felt today that he has been bitten and you had his supporters and him saying that this fa ke supporters and him saying that this fake news is a disgrace and disgusting, you heard less of it when it was hillary clinton on the receiving end during the campaign.” receiving end during the campaignlj know receiving end during the campaign.” know you expect a tough relationship between the media and the president when he takes office, nonetheless i can't recall a press conference
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where a figure of the seniority in us politics was quite as abrasive with a couple ofjournalists. maybe you have been an press conferences where you have seen something like that? good god i have been an endless rallies where at some point during donald trump ‘s mike ‘s speech he says, the media, have you ever seen such a bunch of liars? a mole dishonest group you will never meet. i guess i thought it would be different. why, this is how he operates. an awful lot of the american public distrust and dislike the media. among his core supporters it will not make a lot of difference, but remember what donald trump said when he won, i will unite the united states of america, bring people together and be a healer. i think the people who love donald trump will still love him at the end of this, i think the people who hate donald trump will still hate him at the end of this. i think america remains as polarised on america's
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45t h remains as polarised on america's 45th president has ever before. he set out a very ambitious timetable, i will do this on day one, this update two, does he have the support on the hill to get those measures through? i think he probably will. i think congress, the house of representatives and the senate, which is what we mean by the hill, are scared of him, i think he is using that to great effect. i think he is very powerful in a legislative position. he is not omnipotent, he has to watch his step. if the perception comes about that foreign policy towards russia is in any way being dictated by something the criminal matt —— kremlin might have over him, dangerous. jon will be back in washington soon continuing his coverage of donald trump. i will speak to you in a couple of minutes. good evening and welcome to labour
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cut the weather elsewhere around the world. i will come back to the bitter cold weather we are experiencing across central and southern europe and i will start across thailand where, for some southern and central parts, it has been unusually wet. january is a dry month yet because we have an area of low pressure in the andaman sea, it has been very wet and rain will continue for longer yet, further flood problems anticipated. it is quite wet for southern china and this area of rape is a low pressure in the south china sea which could bring flooding of the nam. —— and this area is low pressure in the south china sea. there is a winter storm heading into the north and east, up into eastern parts of canada. behind it low pressure, the pineapple express keeps bringing more rain to california, nevada and quickly turning to snow across the c arun abbado and the rockies. it
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could cause issues with avalanches and flash flooding, but we need that moisture. cold air following and flash flooding, but we need that moisture. cold airfollowing behind that storm, temperatures falling away. temperatures dipping away through friday and into the weekend. you can see that dip for atlanta and montreal. further west, a succession and more showers for la. let's headed to the storms in europe, we have stormy weather in the north and west and very significant severe winter weather across central, southern and eastern parts of the rub, more heavy snowfall making its way across the aegean in two parts of the black sea resorts to turkey, potentially cyprus on thursday, blowing a gale so although temperatures are not as low it will be very much colder because of the strength of the wind. daytime temperatures group above freezing in some southern areas but by night it
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will be much colder indeed. we keep the frost, it becomes more widespread into the weekend mornings. no sign of temperatures lifting back to normal or above, u nfortu nately lifting back to normal or above, unfortunately the cold spell will continue with further bouts of rain around the coast, snow inland and more to come next week. the other point of note is the winter for parts of scandinavia and the low countries, they could be disrupted in the coming few days. back here in the uk the potentialfor in the coming few days. back here in the uk the potential for that awkward mix of rain, sleet and snow through the day on thursday, potentially the first snows of the season and southern areas and certainly more to come in the north with strong and gusty winds. winter returns, sleet and snow initially in the north but soon edging southwards. jay wynne will have more later. welcome back to outside source. these are some of our main stories.
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donald trump is furious. he has been denying claims that russian intelligence as compromising information about him. in his first press co nfe re nce information about him. in his first press conference since becoming president—elect he said the claims are entirely fake. that was the beginning of a statement in which he attacked the news, attacked the agenda of the media and generally pushed back very hard at suggestions the russians might have anything on him that he believes is true. his nominee for secretary of state has been before the senate. this is rex tillotson. we look at what he has been saying and target through in
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