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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 13, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. thousands of people along the east coast of england are told to leave their homes, as gale—force winds combine with high tides. seven severe flooding warnings, meaning a risk to life, are in force. in the next hour, more than 1,000 people will be moved to safety in the village of jaywick, in essex. thousands of people have been told to evacuate. i will have the details live in jaywick. good morning, it is friday 13 january. also this morning: more men are in low—paid, part—time work than ever before, according to a new study of those aged between 25 and 55. almost 5 million people switched their energy supplier last year, according to the industry. we will find out how you could save money on your bill. good morning. more people took their first step on the housing ladder last year than since 2007, and research for breakfast says it is also getting cheaper for first—timer buyers to have a mortgage than to continue renting. in sport, football mourns the loss of one of its true gentlemen graham taylor, the former watford, aston villa and england manager, who died after a heart attack yesterday at the age of 72. frost, ice and more snow on the way.
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and sarah has the weather. good morning to you. lots to talk about in terms of the weather. snow and ice warnings as well as strong winds and potential flooding around the east coast. a full forecast in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the army is on standby to help evacuate communities along the east coast, where a tidal surge is expected to hit. the environment agency has issued seven severe flood warnings, meaning there is a danger to life. andy moore reports. all along the east coast, floodgates have been closed in preparation for the storm surge. gale force winds are combining with high tides to threaten coastal defences. in jaywick, in essex, there is a severe flood warning, meaning a risk to life. the emergency services have arrived in force. the residents are
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being urged to leave. evacuation centres a re being urged to leave. evacuation centres are on standby. we've got exceptionally strong winds, between 40 exceptionally strong winds, between a0 and 50 miles an hour, potentially with gusts stronger than that going to coincide with a high tide just after lunchtime, so that's why we've put in place this operation to evacuate safely the people of jaywick. evacuate safely the people of jaywick. some have already heeded that warning. 0thers jaywick. some have already heeded that warning. others are waiting to see. we have had the text messages, saying have you evacuated yet? the neighbours next door get all panicked, because she is not very well next door, and things like that. so i think a lot of people are actually planning to stay. on the lincolnshire coast on at skegness, the military have been brought in to help if needed. about 100 soldiers have been based at the police station. along the coast, those most vulnerable are doing what they can to protect their businesses. there will be a significant rise in the water. but whether it will be enough to top the defences depends on mother nature, i suppose, really.
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and mother nature is said to bring more wintry weather today, causing even more travel disruption. nearly all the uk is covered by weather warnings for snow or ice or. —— or both. in a moment we will get the latest on the snow, but first we can speak to our correspondent leigh milner, who is in clacton—on—sea in essex, where residents are being moved from homes at risk of flooding. what is happening at the moment? ican i can see a couple of people behind you. that's right. i'm currently standing ina you. that's right. i'm currently standing in a very warm rest centre. approximately 17 people here, as you can see, six are resting behind me. i have unfortunately woken up this morning but they are very warm, very safe, and that is what the police have been telling them all throughout the night. they were told approximately at apm yesterday
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afternoon when they received a knock on their door telling them they had to leave their home because they we re to leave their home because they were in fact at risk of flooding. 0vernight here this centre has been open, providing hot drinks, lang gets, lower beds. some safe haven for these people. this isjust the beginning, the first of 2500 residents who are being told that they are at risk. the fear is that they are at risk. the fear is that the strong winds during the high tide will break the defences, and flood the village, destroying thousands of homes. it is of course a very anxious time for notjust these people but for people along these people but for people along the coast throughout the country. we have already seen the army over in lincolnshire. there are also serve rural weather warnings and flood warnings around the east coast —— several weather warnings. the advice is to pack a bag of clothes and have essential medical items as well, ensure that valuables and expensive electrical items are put in high places, and if you have any concerns
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please do contact the police on the 101 number. thank you, we will get back to you throughout the morning. the weather caused some problems for commuters at rush hour yesterday, with long delays, including queues in both directions on the m25. there are warnings of similar problems today. 0ur correspondent simonjones is in a very snowy canterbury for us this morning. we had some snow in a few places last night. i can see some around where you are. the snow started coming down here at around 6pm yesterday evening, and it snowed heavily for around three hours. we are told at was about five centimetres, which is an unusual amount in this part of the world. and down there you can see some of the snow. but because it has been freezing overnight it is actually largely turned to ice, and that means it is pretty grim as you are trying to walk around. very, very sleepy. we've got more snow down here, and it is not really very nice at all. now the roads largely have been greeted. this one isn't too bad, the gritters have been out and
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about throughout the night. this one down here is pretty much sheet ice so down here is pretty much sheet ice so not nice to drive on. the advice is if you are driving go very slowly. we have had a few incidents, pa rt slowly. we have had a few incidents, part of the 20 is closed because the lorry has blocked that road —— and 20. we are told there could be more snow today, starting in scotland, heading for the north of england and then heading for the east. so we have a situation of snow, we have ice, we have strong winds. the advice is take care and stay indoors if you don't have to be out on this. thank you very much. simonjones is in canterbury for us. we will be taking a look at the weather as it develops throughout the morning. the number of men in low—paid, part—time work has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. new research by the institute
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for fiscal studies has found that one in five low paid men aged 25—55 now work part—time. that means wage inequality for men has risen over two decades. but for women, the opposite is the case, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. top earning men in the professions normally work full—time. in fact, only 5% of them work part—time. but in comparison, amongst the lowest paid men, often in areas like catering and hospitality, 20% now work half—time. and that number has increased fourfold in the last 20 yea rs. increased fourfold in the last 20 years. that has meant that wage inequality for men has increased, as higher paid, full—time staff have done far better than low paid, part—time workers. but for women, the opposite is the case. for women, earnings growth has been consistently higher than that for men over the last 20 years, and more of them are in work. for men, particularly the lowest paid, they've actually seen falls in the numbers of hours of work, which has
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suppressed the amount of pay that they get. it is far from clear why low paid men are increasingly working part—time. it might be because they want to, although that seems unlikely. the fact that 60% of the low paid and part—time jobs are either in retail, wholesale, restau ra nts either in retail, wholesale, restaurants or hospitality might suggest that men who previously worked in low paid but secure and full—time jobs, worked in low paid but secure and full—timejobs, in sectors worked in low paid but secure and full—time jobs, in sectors like manufacturing, have lost that work, and instead have been forced into the traditionally poorly paid and less secure services sector of the economy. a week to go until the new american president is sworn in, and donald trump seems to be at odds with some of his key cabinet nominees on some of the vital questions facing the new administration. his choice for the cia leader has endorsed the work of the us intelligence community, hours after it was criticised by the president—elect. also, the potential defence secretary said moscow posed a threat in europe, after mr trump called for warmer relations with russia. 0ur correspondent laura bicker reports from washington.
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the nation's capital awaits a new commander—in—chief. but, as the gates go up for expectant crowds, donald trump is still facing questions about intelligence, suggesting moscow tried to help put him in washington. the president—elect‘s choice for cia director's said that he valued the judgement of the staff he hopes to lead. it's pretty clear there was russian involvement in efforts to hack information and have an impact on american democracy. i'm very clear—eyed about what the intelligence report says. that view on russia is more hawkish than what donald trump has said so far. his fiercest criticism has mostly been aimed at spy agencies. he accused us intelligence agencies
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of leaking unverified reports that the kremlin gathered compromising material on donald trump, with an intent to blackmail him. the dossier is supposed to have come from a british spy, christopher steele. donald trump announced it as fake news. but christopher steele's former colleague says he is reliable. chris was a strong, middle—ranking sas officer. i do not quite agree this was a subpar report. he has been careful to find as many sources to back it up, but also to make it clear these are stories, and the intelligence report lacks killer evidence. this controversy is likely to continue long after inauguration day, and has cast a shadow over donald trump's administration before he has even taken the oath of office. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. and it has emerged overnight that christopher steele, the british man who wrote a dossier of lurid claims about donald trump, was hired by the england
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2018 world cup bid team. it is believed he was brought in to provide information on world football's governing body, fifa. emotional scenes during a ceremony at the white house last night, as president 0bama surprised his vice—president with the country's highest civilian honour. mr 0bama said he was awarding the presidential medal of freedom tojoe biden for his faith in his fellow americans and a lifetime of service. mr biden said the honour had been a complete surprise. more needs to be done to protect patients from incompetent locum doctors, according to a review by the general medical council. the regulator says a reluctance to share information weaknesses in checks is allowing some poorly performing stand—in doctors to go undetected. 0ur health correspondent elaine dunkley has more. the carmaker fiat chrysler has been accused of violating pollution laws in the united states. the us environmental protection agency says the manufacturer
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equipped tens of thousands of diesel jeep and dodge vehicles with software that regulates emissions results. the firm has denied doing anything illegal, but has seen its share price fall by more than 15%. meeting the target of resettling 20,000 vulnerable syrian refugees in the uk by 2020 remains a significant challenge, according to a group of mps. around a,500 refugees have already been resettled, but the public accounts committee says it is not yet clear whether survivors of torture or violence are getting the specialist help they need. the number of people changing who they buy their electricity from reached a record high in 2016. research from the industry body energy uk shows that nearly five million people changed their electricity supplier last year, and a fifth of those who switched in december went to a smaller supplier rather than one of the big six. it is the highest number of switches since energy uk began publishing their data in 2013. we will be speaking to energy expert
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stephen murray about the figures in around 30 minutes. killer whales and humans have something in common, according to research. they are two of only three mammals that go through the menopause. a a0—year study of a population of orcas has shown scientists why any species would evolve to stop having babies early in life. the research uncovered the crucial role grandmother whales play in theirfamily pod, and that their daughters‘ offspring has a higher chance of survival once the grandmother stops reproducing. yesterday we spoke about a nine—year—old british boy who melted hearts while competing in the spanish version ofjunior masterchef, after his fish and chip dish didn't quite go to plan. well, all was not lost. 0scarjefferson, who moved to spain with his family two years ago, was invited to cook for the british ambassador to spain the following evening. let's hope it wasn't a repeat of his nightmare moment in the masterchef kitchen.
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moat! that was the moment when it all went wrong for him. he had a bit ofa hug, all went wrong for him. he had a bit of a hug, and anyway, he has a lot of a hug, and anyway, he has a lot of attention, and as we say, he has gone on the other people. hopefully it'll be right. we have all done that in the kitchen, spilt the source, have a bad moment. graham taylor, one of the nicest people you will ever meet. the sort of person you want to be your brother or your dad. you can imagine what it was like for young players asa what it was like for young players as a football manager. reassuring, so warm. as a football manager. reassuring, so warm. no ego. these days of press conferences for football managers, he was always asking about you. can i get you a cup of coffee? don't worry, you are far too busy. but a great club manager as well. but he was haunted. i remember reassuring
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him here that what happened when he was manager shouldn't taint his reputation, it was that moment redefined the way the press deal with england managers, when he was depicted as they turn it on the back page of the sun. he said it stayed with him forever and it to find his four years in charge. he was a fantastic and dumber manager in terms of watford and aston villa. —— he was a fantastic manager. sir eltonjohn, who brought graham taylor to watford at the start of their rise to the top, said it was like he had lost a brother. the former watford, aston villa and england manager is believed to have suffered a heart attack at the age of 72. his family say it was totally unexpected. there was a minute's applause in memory of graham taylor ahead of last night's championship match between qpr and reading. qpr made it three league wins in a row, thanks to jamie mackay‘s first—half winner. andy murray will start his australian open campaign against illya marchenko.
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murray is the top seed for a grand slam for the first time, and he is chasing a first title in melbourne. in the women's draw, johanna konta will face kirsten flipkens. and a sellout crowd at london's o2 arena saw the denver nuggets comfortably beat the indiana pacers in basketball‘s nba. it is the seventh regular—season game to be played in the capital. not surprisingly he is all of the —— all over the front pages. the table lookup the daily mail. a lot of interest in this. an ex— mi6 man, who has corn into hiding to make —— gone into hiding. questions over what he knew about the dossier. it is said he shared the information with quite a lot of people in the run—up to the renovation by one of the websites more recently.
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a lot of speculation about that. the express has a story about what's going on with the weather at the moment, saying britain will be plunged back into the deep freeze next week. of course we will be talking to sarah to find out what's going on. send us any pictures if you are affected. these are some of the pictures on the front of the daily telegraph. that was cumbria. some places having up to six centimetres. the trump dossier on the front page here. have you got anything? the front of the ft, the emission scandal. we talked about volkswagen before. fiat is getting dragged in. if you are one of the a000 jeep grand cherokee owners, you might wa nt to grand cherokee owners, you might want to keep an eye on this story cause they are getting accused of having software installed by fiat that may have allowed those cars do not have as much... sorry, to have more pollution than they were allowed. so fiat say they have done
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nothing illegal and in fact the boss says it is absolute nonsense. it sounds very similar to the scandal with volkswagen. we have another one. we have been talking a lot about housing. we are talking about how it is getting cheaper to have a mortgage if you are first—time buyer. the telegraph a different spin. lucky for home buyers. if you are willing to get involved today, the demand isn't quite as high as you might think. so if anyone is actually buying a house today, on the 13th... actually buying a house today, on the 13th. .. we have all of the coverage on graham taylor. and we have eltonjohn, coverage on graham taylor. and we have elton john, who coverage on graham taylor. and we have eltonjohn, who looks like he is tickling his ears, that's at watford in the early years. and he gives a moving tribute to his great friend and, as he says, his brother. deeply saddened and shocked to hear
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about his passing. we shared an unbreakable bond since we met. he says it will stay with him forever because he took watford from the lowest division to the top of the game and they are back there today. and you will speak to some of the people... well, he did so much to tackle racism. we will be speaking to someone racism. we will be speaking to someone at 8:30am about that. let's get the latest on how that severe weather is developing. sarah is here with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. lots going on in terms of the weather today. still feeling wintry. we have ice around this morning and snow, but it isn'tjust the wintry weather, also strong winds and the potential for that postal flooding. low pressure winds and the potential for that postalflooding. low pressure moving south around the east coast, ringing the fleet, snow as well. —— ringing the fleet, snow as well. —— ringing the fleet. there are strong winds blowing. at about 8am for scotland a
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windy picture. a few showers for northern ireland through the day. as we head down the east coast we will see the low pressure bringing sleet and snow, as well as the strong winds. later in the day with the strong winds in the east, combined with high tide, we could see severe in packs around the east coast, especially around east anglia. plenty going on. we have the strong winds for many of us. coastal flooding in east anglia and eastern england. this area of sleet and snow will clear the south—east of england by about lunchtime and then it's a quieter story as we had through the afternoon, in terms of the weather. in cooking dry, with wintry sunshine. temperatures about 2— five degrees. —— temperatures looking dry. towards the west of scotland, northern ireland and wales, some of the sleet and snow showers will turn back to rain. things milderfrom the west. for most of us another cold
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night. under clear skies we could have a sharp frost and icy stretches heading into saturday morning. subzero temperatures to stop the weekend. some calls, icy weather and again snow, aditya lelia round the east coast, where we will have further snow showers. towards the west some of that will turn back to rain and sleet in —— sleet, but not a bad day. temperatures one or two for eastern areas, but towards the west more like six or seven. things continue to turn mild from the west through the weekend. saturday night and into sunday you can see the yellow colours returning to the map. through the day on sunday, wet weather. a cloudy picture. drizzly on sunday and moving eastwards across the uk. temperatures 5— ten degrees by the time we get to
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sunday. watch out today for the ice and snow and strong winds which could lead to travel disruption. thank you. a record number of households switched to a different electricity company last year. that's according to the industry body energy uk. their findings, out today, show that almost five million customers changed their electricity supplier in 2016. this is the highest recorded number of switches since energy uk started publishing their data back in 2013. and not everyone moved over to one of the big six, a fifth of electricity switches in december were to a smaller supplier. but the regulator 0fgem says that two thirds of all households are still on standard variable tariffs, which tend to be more expensive than fixed deals. joining us now to talk through these findings is stephen murray, an energy expert from money supermarket. good morning. thanks forjoining us. this is something i've talked about loads. people can save money if they switch and for a long time lots of
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people haven't been bothered, what it sounds like the tide is turning? it isa it sounds like the tide is turning? it is a little bit. as you say it has been nearly 20 years in the market was deregulated and nearly 19 million customers are still the standard variable tariffs of the big six suppliers. but we have seen a shift. ely 5 million people have shifted this year, nearly four —— a00,000 this month, which shows the market is opening up. clearly the best incentive for people to changes that they will save money. what sort of savings are people making? this —— last year prices were lower than a long time, so people were previously paying 300 pounds or than they needed to. towards the end of they needed to. towards the end of the year the prices were rising. for those who use more, savings are significant. one of the things people say to me is it's a hassle,
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they are all the same, i know you say i could save this money but it isn't worth the hassle. what do you say? isn't worth the hassle. what do you 7 i isn't worth the hassle. what do you say? i think that might have been a reason a while back, but there is an excess of a0 current suppliers. so customers have a choice of a0 suppliers, they can't all be the same. a lot of them are new and are offering green tariffs. energy switching guarantee makes it very simple. the advocacy is nearly 90%, which means it only takes about three weeks to go through and while there are couple of horror stories there are couple of horror stories the vast majority of customers can save those £150 — £200 almost immediately. why is the onus on the consumer? if i am someone who is sitting at home and i am thinking, i don't think about my energy, itjust comes in and i pay the bill, why is there no pressure on the supplier to offer a better deal? if they've got a better deal and you are their
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customers, why did they offer it to you? they do now. ofgem has put in a lot of regulations over the last few yea rs lot of regulations over the last few years and on energy bills the energy supplier must now come but it is called the cheapest tariff regulation. they must put it on their bill. the regulations don't allow suppliers to review onto anything other than a variable tariff. the regulator is looking at how to best give customers choice, but if customers aren't happy with where they are it's a simple process to switch away and get a cheaper deal. people are moving to smaller suppliers as well, as some companies ended up going into administration. do people need to worry about that? six months ago people may have said they were worried, but previous cases were dealt with seriously. no customers lost money or supply. so
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that was a great move to show that people can have confidence moving to a smaller suppliers because there are protections in place. many of us are protections in place. many of us are —— the small suppliers are doing well. thanks very much. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. shopkeepers across the capital have been fined hundreds of thousands of pounds for selling illegal skin whitening treatments. london trading standards says fifteen shops have been fined more than £160,000 each and some business owners given suspended jail sentences. the treatments include poisonous chemicals like mercury and can cause organ failure and even cancer. the courts are looking at this as criminal activity, poison for profit, and it is the not —— it is
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not the kind of business where people can sell things legitimately and sell them as products. there's more misery for southern rail commuters today as drivers go on another 2a hour strike. it means there'll be no trains at all, apart from a very limited peak service between caterham and london victoria. around 200 buses will run on some other routes. let's get the rest of the travel now and of course we have had some snow, so we'll look at how that's affecting things in a moment. the district line has severe delays because of a signal failure. and of course there's no tfl rail service between brentwood and shenfield for works. let's take a look at the roads, because we've still got snow around in places. this is the a21 at farnborough, driving conditions could be difficult at times. in fact ice is causing a problem for buses on some small roads at biggin hill and new addington. and, aside from the weather, we've still got roadworks on the a1 holloway road — it remains closed. now we've had some snow, but, despite that, more than 6,000
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tropical butterflies are to go on display this weekend at rhs wisley in surrey. they'll be inside a glasshouse, of course, and there'll be 50 different species from places like central and south america and southeast asia. 0rganisers hope the event will inspire visitors to encourage butterflies into their gardens as the uk population is in decline. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we saw plenty of snow around last night, especially toward southern home counties. here are couple of the weather watcher pictures. a lot of this has melted away, there could be a few more wintry showers for a time this morning, mostly falling as sleet and rain. it will feel cold all day and there will be a war feeling with the north—westerly wind about. temperatures about freezing. ice will be a big issue this morning. so watch out for slippery surfaces and if you wintry showers around through the morning. perhaps a bit of snow at times. a very warm north—westerly wind about as well. —— very brawl.
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temperatures between 2— five degrees, but there will be brightness at times. 0vernight tonight we will probably see temperatures dropped to —2 or —3 celsius. clear skies, the smallest of if you wintry flurries as we head into the first half of tomorrow morning. 0therwise, tomorrow should be mostly dry day. still very cold, with the wind. there will be some sunshine. by the time we get to sunday it is looking milder and more grey. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to charlie and steph. bye for now. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment.
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but also on breakfast this morning: as thousands of people are advised to leave their homes in preparation for storm surges and heavy snow, we will be speaking to the environment agency about the latest weather warnings affecting the uk. why buying a home could be cheaper than renting. as research shows that in some areas monthly rents are outstripping average mortgage payments, we ask what it means for the housing market, and for those struggling to get on the property ladder. we are discussing a controversial documentary featuring a leading psychologist, who was sacked after questioning whether children should be allowed to decide if they want to change their gender. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: the army is on standby to help evacuate communities along the east coast, where a tidal surge is expected to hit. the environment agency has issued seven severe flood warnings, meaning there is a danger to life. andy moore reports. all along the east coast, floodgates have been closed in preparation for the storm surge. gale—force winds are combining with high tides
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to threaten coastal defences. injaywick, in essex, there is a severe flood warning, meaning a risk to life. the emergency services have arrived in force. the residents are being urged to leave. evacuation centres are on standby. we've got exceptionally strong winds, between a0 and 50 miles an hour, potentially with gusts stronger than that, and going to coincide with a high tide just after lunchtime. so that's why we've put in place this operation to evacuate safely the people of jaywick. some have already heeded that warning. others are waiting to see. we've had the text messages, saying, have you evacuated yet? i said, the neighbours next door get all panicked, because she's not very well next door, and things like that. so i think a lot of people are actually planning to stay. 0n the lincolnshire coast, at skegness, the military have been brought in to help if needed. about 100 soldiers have been based
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at the police station. along the coast, those most vulnerable are doing what they can to protect their businesses. there will be a significant rise in the water. but whether it will be enough to top the defences, that depends on mother nature, i suppose, really. and mother nature is set to bring more wintry weather today, causing even more travel disruption. nearly all the uk is covered by weather warnings, for snow, or ice, or both. the number of men in low—paid part—time work has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. new research by the institute for fiscal studies has found that one in five low—paid men aged 25—55 now work part—time. that means wage inequality for men has risen over two decades, but for women the opposite is true. and it has emerged overnight that christopher steele, the british man who wrote a dossier of lurid claims about donald trump, was hired by the england 2018 world cup bid team. it is believed he was brought in to provide information on world
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football's governing body, fifa. there were emotional scenes during a ceremony at the white house last night, as president 0bama surprised his vice—president with the country's highest civilian honour. mr 0bama said he was awarding the presidential medal of freedom tojoe biden, for his faith in his fellow americans and a lifetime of service. mr biden said the honour had been a complete surprise. hospitals are failing to pass on their concerns about incompetent locum doctors, according to the general medical council. the report for the doctors regulator found some hospitals take no action when they see poor practice among stand—in doctors, who often cover staff shortages in surgeries and hospitals. the department of health said further progress in monitoring locums was needed. the carmaker fiat chrysler has been accused of violating pollution laws in the united states. the us environmental protection agency says the manufacturer equipped tens of thousands of diesel jeep and dodge vehicles
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with software that regulates emissions results. the firm has denied doing anything illegal, but has seen its share price fall by more than 15%. meeting the target of resettling 20,000 vulnerable syrian refugees in the uk by 2020 remains a significant challenge, according to a group of mps. around a,500 refugees have already been resettled, but the public accounts committee says it is not yet clear whether survivors of torture or violence are getting the specialist help they need. the number of people changing who they buy their electricity from reached a record high in 2016. research from the industry body energy uk shows that nearly five million people changed their electricity supplier last year, and a fifth of those who switched in december went to a smaller supplier rather than one of the big six. it is the highest number of switches since energy uk began publishing their data in 2013. those are the main stories, and mike
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is here with the sport. paying tribute to one of the true gentleman of football. 0ne tribute to one of the true gentleman of football. one of the nicest men you would ever meet. came onto the brea kfast sofa you would ever meet. came onto the breakfast sofa to talk about england games on numerous occasions. always had a great sense of humour, self—deprecating as well. no ego, which is rare. he was haunted by his u nsuccessful which is rare. he was haunted by his unsuccessful time for england, which changed the way the press dealt with football managers, after england lost to sweden. that troubled him for many years afterwards but he should be remembered forfar more than that. just a great man. it is ha rd to than that. just a great man. it is hard to remember so much genuine love for a foot or manager. ——
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football manager. tributes have been paid to the former england manager graham taylor, who died yesterday at the age of 72. sir eltonjohn appointed taylor as watford manager in 1977, and he led them from the old fourth division to runners—up in the top flight within five years, and reached the 198a fa cup final. he also managed lincoln, aston villa and wolves. taylor has been described as one of football's true gentlemen. a guy who was so passionate, who was so in love with the game of football, and who was straight and who was honest, and who would tell you as it was. and he wasn't afraid to do that, whether you are a young player or whether you are a very experienced player and i think that is the way he will be remembered. you always talk about people's contribution within football, but you rememberthem contribution within football, but you remember them most contribution within football, but you rememberthem most is contribution within football, but you remember them most is people and he was somebody that had time for everybody and was generous with that time. andl everybody and was generous with that time. and i think they are the human
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qualities that you remember the most. there was a minute's applause in memory of graham taylor ahead of last night's championship match between qpr and reading. qpr made it three league wins in a row thanks to jamie mackay‘s winner, scoring against his old club. andy murray will start his australian open campaign against illya marchenko. murray is the top seed for a grand slam for the first time. he has reached the final in melbourne five times, but never won it. in the women's draw, johanna konta will face kirsten flipkens. and a sell—out crowd at london's o2 arena saw the denver nuggets comfortably beat the indiana pacers in basketball‘s nba. it is the seventh regular—season game to be played in the capital, 1a0—122 the final score. it was a great night to be in the crowd, because there was a lot of football stars in the crowd. it seemed like half of the team, and henry, the great legend. you can often look across at the fans and
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get selfie with those behind you. britain's east coast is bracing itself for coastal flooding, seven severe flood warnings for parts of suffolk and essex. in a moment we will get the latest from areas where flooding is expected. let's find out how heavy snow has been affecting travel. 0ur correspondent is in canterbury for us this morning. what has happened there? lots of snow around on the ground. it came down yesterday evening for about three hours, and it was very happy. if you ta ke hours, and it was very happy. if you take a look down there you can see how snow is still on the ground, but because it has been freezing overnight it is actually largely turning to ice and it is really i see on the foot path. you have to be careful to remain on your feet. see on the foot path. you have to be careful to remain on yourfeet. and still a lot of snow down here as
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well. as regards the roads, the gritters were out and about in force during the night and that means these main roads are largely not too bad, but the side roads have been problematic. there is a lot of ice, a lot of black ice, and it can be difficult driving around. the advice is if you are heading on to the roads, take things easy. as regards other travel issues, yesterday we had a number of flights cancelled at heathrow, and some at gatwick. we have been told today that airports have been told today that airports have been told today that airports have been hoping things are going to be as normal as possible but the advice is still check before you travel, and at the moment we are being told that things are ok on the ra i lwa ys being told that things are ok on the railways but if you are trying to travel on southern it is a strike day so there will be no trains despite the weather. as regards the situation we are being told it is actually a large amount of snow which came down in one go for this pa rt which came down in one go for this part of the world, in the space of
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just about three hours. 0n part of the world, in the space of just about three hours. on this road last night i saw people pushing cars up last night i saw people pushing cars up the road because it was so icy and the conditions were so difficult. we are expecting more snow from scotland, heading down to the north of england and the east of england. so snow, ice and heavy winds. it is not very nice out there. thank you very much, we will talk to you again later on. kate sweeting is in hessle, where there is a severe flood warning in place. how are people reacting? well, it is a cold but calm morning, which will come as a relief to residents because tidal surges have happened with a combination of high winds and high tides. i am keeping a close eye on the water behind me because the pinch point is at high tide in the next hour here and again this evening. people are preparing with sandbags, there are council workers on standby and police but in lincolnshire the army was brought in to help evacuate people. more than
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3000 residents were told to leave their homes or move upstairs and special rest centres were set up for them. here, the threat of a tidal surge is especially worrying because in 2013 it happened. the water came over more than 1a00 properties, which were flooded. the last severe tidal surge before that was in 1953, when hundreds of people died. when it happened in 2013 here, people we re it happened in 2013 here, people were told, or believe, that it was a once in 60 year event and yet three yea rs on once in 60 year event and yet three years on here we are on high alert. thank you very much, the situation in hessle this morning. a lot of people worried about the danger of flood warnings. let's get the big weather picture this morning. we have concerns about the snow in some places, and it is pretty cold in a lot of places as well. that's right. there is plenty going on in terms of the weather today. we have the ice and the snow around as well but the combination of those strong winds
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and high tides in the east may well lead to some coastal flooding. if you are heading out this morning be prepared to encounter some icy conditions on untreated surfaces and as we had to the day we have this low pressure frontal system moving south, around central and eastern parts of england in particular, bringing with it a mix of rain, sleet and snow and we are seeing those very strong winds towards the east. gales at times across northern and eastern scotland, further wintry showers here. much of southern scotla nd showers here. much of southern scotland says predominantly dry through the morning but as we move down the east coast we see those winds picking up in combination with the high tides. we could well see coastal flooding problems, combined with this band of rain, sleet and snow. the environment agency have seven severe flood warnings currently in force, mainly around pa rt currently in force, mainly around part of east anglia but watch out around the east coast for the potential for coastal flooding. as we head through the course of the
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day this band of rain, sleet and snow will push its way gradually south eastwards, clearing the south of england by about lunchtime. further west we will see showers for northern ireland, northern and western scotland, parts of wales and the south—west as well. temperatures around two to five degrees but colder than that if you are exposed to the brisk northerly winds today. many of us having quite a good deal of dry weather as we had through the afternoon and on into the evening the winds start to ease a little but we will have some blustery wintry showers around the east coast, west coast as well, parts of northern ireland and wales. under clear skies, another very cold night ahead so that will be icy stretches once again to start off your weekend. through saturday, eastern parts of scotla nd through saturday, eastern parts of scotland and eastern england will be prone to seeing further sleet and snow showers. towards the west some rain and sleet showers pushing in as well but many of us again having a lot of dry weather through the course of saturday. lighter winds than today and temperatures slightly milder. two or three in the east,
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six or seven celsius in the west. that milder air will start to creep in through the weekend, especially as we head into sunday. the yellow colour starting to displace the blues, living into sunday with a cloudy day and fun outbreaks of rain washing eastwards across the uk. the wind coming in from the westerly direction, so a different feel to the weather by the time to get to sunday. temperatures back at around five to 10 degrees so we will have lost the wintry weather by the time we get to sunday but at the moment if you are heading out the moment if you are heading out today, be prepared. there are strong winds, ice and snow, and coastal flooding in the east. keep tuned to your latest forecast. for first-time buyers mortgage payments are lower than rent in over 10% of the uk. that's according to research carried out for us on breakfast. forecasters suggest rent will continue to rise. is looking at ——
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sean is looking at what it means. of course it can build up a little bit over time. there were more people getting on that first rung of the housing ladder last year than since the financial crisis began. but why is that? well, some research done for us on breakfast says that rising rents —— the gap is narrowing. in fact in some places, it is cheaper each month to own a home than rent one. i caught up with james in his lovely new home to hear why he persevered with trying to buy his own place. it isn't a small thing, eyeing the house, so you have to go through the whole saving process, go through the whole saving process, go through the whole sacrificing holidays and things like that and then itjust ta kes a things like that and then itjust takes a while to find the right
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place. you can't go out as much as you would like, you can't enjoy yourself as much and you have to bring prepacked lunches in the work and things like that. silly things, but they adult. you stuck at it in the end? -- they add up. we want our walls be —— the colour we want, and you do smile every time you walk through the front door. with me now is jamesjones, from experian, the organisation who undertook this research. people like james, why are they looking more and more at trying to get housing quicker, when rent seemingly shouldn't be that high in the long run. this buyer index shows that many tenants can save money simply by buying a home instead of renting. we have seen historically high rent payments at the moment in the third quarter of 2016. we measured a 10% increase in average rents. at the same time mortgage
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deals are historically cheap, so many people can save money, especially places like glasgow and manchester. but for people who can save money, to buy any house you need a deposit. what can you get by with a 100% mortgage and still get cheaper mortgages than rental payments? the challenge for many te na nts payments? the challenge for many tenants is saving up that all—important deposit, so it is important that people take advantage of incentive schemes, like help to buy, whether government will help you. but at the same time we know many people have no idea what their credit score is, so we are trying to help people by giving them access to their credit score for free and we will help you use it to save money on things like mortgages and other types of credit, to show you things you are likely to be accepted for and take away the guesswork. when you rent that is often the limit of what you can pay that month plus a few of your bills. when you own a home if the boiler goes you've got to pay for it. surely that's a big
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difference and it could be more expensive to have a mortgage? you have to factor these things in. our research shows that in some parts of the country there are significant savings to be had. in manchester te na nts savings to be had. in manchester tenants could save up to £50 a month will stop that can make all the difference. but you still need all of that cash in the reserve for that rainy day. if something went wrong with james's house, he has to cough up, even if he feels month by month he is ina up, even if he feels month by month he is in a better situation. that's right and that's why you need to factor these things in, to make sure you are financially secure. for many people the best way to get financial security is to get on the mortgage ladder. many people are on short—term tenancies are they don't know what the lie ahead in terms of property security. so there is a great opportunity for many people right now. how much of these lower the mortgage payments forfirst—time buyers is actually first—time buyers looking at houses that are cheaper now and may be setting their sights lower, the whole mortgage they pay
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backis lower, the whole mortgage they pay back is less? i think over the last few years we have all had a reality check. there's been a squeeze on real incomes. poverty prices have generally been increasing, so i think people are getting savea and research in the market, taking their credit score and putting themselves in the right position to get a deal when they have that deposit. mortgage interest rates are starting to sneak up again. do you think this might be as good as it gets in terms of the difference and it might not be quite as good for those who are on mortgages as they have been? no one has a crystal ball. mortgage rates right now are at historical lows. i think the most popular mortgage product is a two—year fix. people are looking to lock in and security, so they know what they are paying in the future. we've seen the rising popularity of longer term fixtures and they are at great rates historically. so there is a great opportunity for people. and she very
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much. we will be talking all morning about first—time buyers getting on the ladder. is it better value or not to get a mortgage, or to keep renting and keep saving? more on that later. a lot of questions people are asking themselves when they are deciding whether to buy a house. and if you do have any questions, we might be able to answer them. get in touch. thank you. the chap that sean spoke to was saying he feels good everytime he walks into the house. this story might make you smile even more. you move into your house, i think one of the first things you do is check everything. maybe even check out the floorboards. check under the floorboards! you never know what will be hidden. that's borderline creepy. iam that's borderline creepy. i am gradually getting around to it. so these people bought a piano. that comes into their home. they were checking the back of the piano. lo and behold they found gold coins hidden inside the piano! my point
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being, if they haven't looked they wouldn't have found it. this is in shropshire. now they have to determine whether they own them, or whether they belong to someone who owned the piano before. have they had been valued yet? we haven't got a number yet, but they are thought to be worth an enormous amount of money. when you move into place, have look around. maybe not under the floorboards! idid. how funny. right, let's talk about disney films. snow white, cinderella, sleeping beauty, disney animated films have brought many a fairy tale to life. but only one disney princess has ever been based on an actual person. the film pocahontas, released in 1995, was inspired by a native american woman who died a00 years ago. this week special events marking her extraordinary life have got underway, although the location might surprise you. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. # have you ever heard the wolf cry...
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it took a quarter of £1 million at the box office, but of the millions who have seen the 1995 film pocahontas, few in all likelihood could tell you where she is actually buried. just outside the m25 in gravesend, in kent. pocahontas was a native american who married an english settler. they became virginia's first tobacco farmers. they travelled to england and mixed with the movers and shakers of the day, including king james and queensland. but on their return, as their ship passed through gravesend, pocahontas, or rebecca, took ill and died. this is where she is buried and this is her great, great, great, great, great, great... great—grandson. also called john.
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great, great, great... great—grandson. also called johnlj am very proud to be a descendant of pocahontas, 17 times down the line. very frustrating at times. many people growing up had never heard of her. it was like saying, i am related to cinderella or sleeping beauty. as the 400 anniversary of her death approaches there is a chance to honour her brief but extraordinary life. it is one of the first recorded instances where two very different cultures were formally married and formally celebrated. and they were celebrities when they came over? indeed. very much so, because many people had never met a native american, so the young pocahontas was fated as a celebrity. she died with king james —— dined with king james and queensland and ifeel proud to be part of this amazing very true story, and this very powerful woman. the very true story, and this very powerfulwoman. the pocahontas very true story, and this very powerful woman. the pocahontas 2017 festival is under way at stjohn's school in gravesend, special lessons
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and a special visit. i am an art historian and the cultural ambassadorfor historian and the cultural ambassador for my tribal nation. i definitely feel a connection with pocahontas. i feel like i definitely feel a connection with pocahontas. ifeel like i am part of the story, i am following in her footsteps. i married an english person and changed my culture and became an ambassador for my people, which is what i think she was. she was such a strong lady and she did lots of things before she died. she influences most of us in how she lived and how brave she was. some historians believe pocahontas heard this song during her trip to england. special performances in schools are planned. a remarkable life, a remarkable story, but no
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fairy tale. that's fascinating. if you were related to a disney character, which one would be yours? you've got to give me time to think about that! probably the beast. i think probably the beast. ithinki probably the beast. i think i would be related to # 0h death —— related to goofy. no comment! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. shopkeepers across the capital have been fined hundreds of thousands of pounds for selling illegal skin whitening treatments. london trading standards says fifteen shops have been fined more than £160,000 each and some business owners given suspended jail sentences. the treatments include poisonous chemicals like mercury and can cause organ failure and even cancer. the courts are looking at this as criminal activity, poisoning for profit,
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and it's not the kind of activity where people can run a business and sell things legitimately. there's more misery for southern rail commuters today as drivers go on another 2a hour strike. it means there'll be no trains at all, apart from a very limited peak service between caterham and london victoria. around 200 buses will run on some other routes. let's get the rest of the travel now and of course we have had some snow, so we'll look at how that's affecting things in a moment. the district line has severe delays because of a signal failure. and of course there's no tfl rail service between brentwood and shenfield for works. let's take a look at the roads, because we've still got snow around in places. this is the a21 at farnborough, driving conditions could be difficult at times. in fact, ice is causing a problem for buses on some small roads at biggin hill and new addington. and, aside from the weather, we've still got roadworks on the a1 holloway road — it remains closed.
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now we've had some snow, but, despite that, more than 6,000 tropical butterflies are to go on display this weekend at rhs wisley in surrey. they'll be inside a glasshouse, of course, and there'll be 50 different species from places like central and south america and southeast asia. 0rganisers hope the event will inspire visitors to encourage butterflies into their gardens as the uk population is in decline. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we saw plenty of snow around last night, especially toward southern home counties. here are a couple of your weather watcher pictures. a lot of this has now melted away, but there could be a few more wintry showers for a time this morning, mostly falling as sleet and rain. it will feel cold all day and there will be a raw feeling westerly wind about. temperatures about freezing. ice will be a big issue this morning. all of it refrozen on pavements. so watch out for slippery surfaces and a few wintry showers around through the morning.
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perhaps a bit of snow at times. a very raw north—westerly wind about as well. temperatures between 2—5 degrees, but there will be some brightness at times. 0vernight tonight we will probably see temperatures dropped to —2 or —3 celsius. winds lighten. clear skies, the smallest of a few wintry flurries as we head into the first half of tomorrow morning. 0therwise, tomorrow should be a mostly dry day. still very cold, with the brisk wind. there will be some sunshine. by the time we get to sunday it is looking milder and more grey. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. mcgovern.
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thousands of people along the east coast of england are told to leave their homes, as gale—force winds combine with high tides. seven severe flood warnings, meaning a risk to life, are in force. more than 1,000 people are now beginning to be moved to safety in the village of jaywick, in essex. it is brea kfasttime it is breakfasttime at this rest centre where 17 people have stayed overnight. more than 2500 residents have left their homes after being told to evacuate. and snow is causing disruption. these are the images of kent where they have already been delays on the m20.
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there has been snow and ice as well as those winds, the full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning, it is friday 13 january. also this morning: more men are in low—paid, part—time work than ever before, according to a new study of those aged between 25 and 55. we take a rare look inside a children's home, as one charity warns that not all young people are getting the support they need, and that is costing the uk billions. good morning. more people took their first step on the housing ladder last year than since 2007, and research for breakfast says it is also getting cheaper for first—timer buyers to have a mortgage than to continue renting. in sport, football mourns the loss of one of its true gentlemen, graham taylor, the former watford, aston villa and england manager, who has died of a suspected heart attack at the age of 72. and sarah has the weather. good morning.
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first, our main story: the army is on standby to help evacuate communities along the east coast, where a tidal surge is expected to hit. the environment agency has issued seven severe flood warnings, meaning there is a danger to life. andy moore reports. all along the east coast, floodgates have been closed in preparation for the storm surge. gale—force winds are combining with high tides to threaten coastal defences. injaywick, in essex, there is a severe flood warning, meaning a risk to life. the emergency services have arrived in force. the residents are being urged to leave. evacuation centres are on standby. we've got exceptionally strong winds, between a0 and 50 miles an hour, potentially with gusts stronger than that, and going to coincide with a high tide just after lunchtime. so that's why we've put in place this operation to evacuate safely the people of jaywick.
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some have already heeded that warning. others are waiting to see. everyone in the text messages, saying, have you evacuated yet? i said, the neighbours next door get all panicked, because she's not very well next door, and things like that. so i think a lot of people are actually planning to stay. 0n the lincolnshire coast, at skegness, the military have been brought in to help if needed. about 100 soldiers have been based at the police station. along the coast, those most vulnerable are doing what they can to protect their businesses. there will be a significant rise in the water. but whether it will be enough to top the defences, that depends on mother nature, i suppose, really. and mother nature is set to bring more wintry weather today, causing even more travel disruption. nearly all the uk is covered by weather warnings for snow, or ice, or both. in a moment we will get the latest from simonjones on the travel disruption being caused by snow and ice affecting some parts
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of the country. but first we can speak to our correspondent leigh milner, who is in clacton—on—sea, in essex, where residents are being advised to leave properties that are at risk of flooding. what is happening at the moment? as you can see behind me, we have residents who have stayed here overnight. this is the rest centre which has been set up and i have been told that 17 people stayed here overnight, and also the police are now moving the remaining 2500 residents, that is half of jaywick‘s population, out towards safety. lawrence has been evacuated, and you have been through this before, in 2013. how worried are you this time around? it sounds a bit more urgent this time, as last time they gave us a choice, but this time i had a knock on the door and they said you have got to get out now. and basically ijust left, and i didn't
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bring my medication, it was quite urgent. and you have left your home, and everything in there? and my medication as well, so i have to try and get some from the chemist if we're not let back in soon. it seems like it was quite a rush to get out. there was banging on the door, and my friend who lives near me was on the phone to me telling me we might have to get out tomorrow, and they said we have to get out straightaway. hopefully you are in good, safe hands. it is great, they have really done us proud. as i say, half the population injaywick, that is 2500 people, has been evacuated. red and yellow warnings have been issued around the east coast, severe weather warnings here in essex and suffolk. that is the highest alert possible, to see if you are affected please check the environment agency website. thank you very much, we will be back with you a little bit later on. the weather caused some problems for commuters at rush hour yesterday, with long delays, including queues in both directions on the m25.
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there are warnings of similar problems today. 0ur correspondent simonjones is in a snowy canterbury for us this morning. that is one of the places which has had quite a bit of snow during the last pa rt had quite a bit of snow during the last part of yesterday evening. absolutely. very cold this morning, after a very cold night. the snow started falling at around 6pm yesterday evening and came down for around three hours very heavily. we got around five centimetres of snow, and a lot of it has settled. down there you can see some of the snow, but it has largely turned to ice because it has been so cold overnight. and then here on the path of very, very icy situation so tricky getting around at the same can be said for the roads. this one has been gritted a number of times, so not too bad at the moment. the gritters have been out and about but overnight in kent there were some problems when the snow came down very heavily in a short space of
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time and the number of drivers said they had to spend several hours in their cars as they tried to get up and down that hill in pretty treacherous conditions. the main roads not too bad at the moment outside roads are causing problems, and we are told so far this morning we have had a number ofjackknifed lorries and also a number of crashes and trees down. the advice is, if you are going out onto the roads, drive slowly and drive gently. accelerate and break very gently, because the driving conditions are rather different. as well as snow and ice we also have the winds starting to whip up, talk of potentially more snow showers here during the morning. scotland, the north of england and the east of england, so still some pretty treacherous conditions out there this morning. thank you for that, and we will of course keep you right up—to—date with any transport problems on the roads. let us know if you are affected, and send us your pictures, too. the number of men in low—paid, part—time work has increased
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dramatically over the last 20 years. new research by the institute for fiscal studies has found that one in five low—paid men between the ages of 25 and 55 now works part time. that means wage inequality for men has risen over two decades. but for women the opposite is the case, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. top—earning men in the professions normally work full—time. in fact, only 5% of them work part—time. but in comparison, amongst the lowest—paid men, often in areas like catering and hospitality, 20% now work part—time, and that number has increased fourfold in the last 20 years. that has meant that wage inequality for men has increased, as high—paid, full—time staff have done far better than low—paid, part—time workers. but for women, the opposite is the case. for women, earnings growth has been consistently higher than that for men over the last 20 years, and more of them are in work.
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for men, particularly the lowest—paid, they've actually seen falls in the numbers of hours of work, which has suppressed the amount of pay that they get. it is far from clear why low—paid men are increasingly working part—time. it might be because they want to, although that seems unlikely. the fact that 60% of the low—paid and part—time jobs are either in retail, wholesale, restaurants or hospitality might suggest that men who previously worked in low—paid but secure and full—timejobs, in sectors like manufacturing, have lost that work, and instead have been forced into the traditionally poorly paid and less—secure services sector of the economy. there is a week to go until the new american president is sworn in, and donald trump seems to be at odds with some of his key cabinet nominees on some of the vital questions facing the new administration. his choice for the leader of the cia has endorsed the work of the us
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intelligence community, hours after it was criticised by the president—elect. also, the potential defence secretary said moscow posed a threat in europe, after mr trump called for warmer relations with russia. 0ur correspondent laura bicker reports from washington. and it has emerged overnight that christopher steele, the british man who wrote a dossier of lurid claims about donald trump, was hired by the england 2018 world cup bid team. it is believed he was brought in to provide information on world football's governing body, fifa. there were emotional scenes during a ceremony at the white house last night, as president 0bama surprised his vice—president with the country's highest civilian honour. mr 0bama said he was awarding the presidential medal of freedom tojoe biden for his faith in his fellow americans and a lifetime of service. mr biden said the honour had been a complete surprise. yesterday we spoke about a nine—year—old british boy
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who melted hearts while competing in the spanish version ofjunior masterchef, after his fish and chip dish didn't quite go to plan. he has melted the spanish nation's heart. 0scarjefferson, who moved to spain with his family two years ago, was invited to cook for the british ambassador to spain the following evening. we wish him well, and there he is with his apron on, and recovered from his ordeal. we all have bad daysin from his ordeal. we all have bad days in the kitchen. and to be fair the british ambassador has done well, getting potentially a
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professionally cooked meal by that lad, because to get on the masterchef itself. there is a week to go until the new american president is sworn in, and donald trump seems to be at odds with some of his key cabinet nominees on some of the vital questions facing the new administration. and at the heart of it is the former british spy christopher steele, who has reportedly gone into hiding, fearing for his safety, after allegedly preparing memos claiming russia has compromising material on president—elect trump. so what do we know about the former mi6 officer? we can talk now to dr rory cormac, from the university of nottingham, who is a specialist in secret intelligence. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. tell us a little bit about christopher steele, and what do we know about him? what we know is he was a mi6 officer, a
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russian specialist to spend a lot of time in m16 headquarters in london, but also spent a bit of time abroad and the moscow embassy as well. and he spent about 20 years in m16 before starting his own private consultancy company. one of the problems he is facing immediately, as we understand he is in hiding at the moment, is that people in that line of work, and he is a retired intelligence officer, you are never retired if you work for mi6, they like to work in the shadows and now there is a great deal of scrutiny on him about other work he has been doing. in this, the suggestion this morning he may have worked to get information for the england 2018 world cup bid so there is a great deal of spotlight now on him and what he has done. intelligence officers by their very nature don't like the spotlight. they like to work in the shadows, as you say, and this will be undoubtedly very uncomfortable for him but it is probably unwise to speculate as to
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his safety, the russians being after him. asa his safety, the russians being after him. as a russian specialist he will know the retribution that russia pays out to critics of the regime but at the same time he is not a russian dissidents, he is a british citizen so it is probably unwise to speculate as to his welfare. the big issue here i think adds to this level of intrigue, suspicion and paranoia and conspiracy just level of intrigue, suspicion and paranoia and conspiracyjust a week before the inauguration and whether thatis before the inauguration and whether that is true or not, it plays into putin's hand. what putin and the fsb have wa nted putin's hand. what putin and the fsb have wanted all along is to dent american self—confidence, to question the american political process. america is a city on the hill, it likes to boast proudly about its free and fair elections and now for the first time in a long time we're all talking about corruption, russian agents, impeachment, the dreaded watergate
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word has been mentioned. it is a win—win for putin, really. word has been mentioned. it is a win-win for putin, really. one of theissuesis win-win for putin, really. one of the issues is donald trump's relationship with the intelligence service in the us now and how that has to be rebuilt. as we mentioned earlier, we've got his potential chosen people to be the head of the cia or the defence secretary who are saying things at odds to what he has said about things like the intelligent services and the relationship with russia. that will bea relationship with russia. that will be a tough and important role. that is very crucial. intelligence is crucial in the decision—making process. it informs the most important, serious decisions that a president has to make and that trump may have to make in a week. have a healthy scepticism isn't a bad thing, but do not trust their very motives is dangerous, and to disregard intelligence as a whole is equally dangerous. the incoming cia
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director will have to tread a very fine line between sticking up for his organisation, when morale is very low in american intelligence after trump has been so publicly hostile. so the new director has to stick up for his organisation while also not alienating the president. it will be a crucial role and it's a very fine line to tread.|j it will be a crucial role and it's a very fine line to tread. i bet you love this sort of story, in your line of work, this intrigue? it is very intriguing. i am a cold war historian by training and there are some intriguing parallels. thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the army is helping to evacuate thousands of people from the east coast of england ahead of an expected tidal surge. people across britain are preparing for the worst, with warnings of wind, snow and ice covering large parts of the uk.
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here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. the worst of the snow seems to have been late into the evening last night? that's right. this was the scene taken that's right. this was the scene ta ken yesterday that's right. this was the scene taken yesterday evening. this was in london. you can see the snow. we had about three hours of heavy snow across parts of the south—east through the course of yesterday, but much of the country has seen wintry showers. we have this frontal system moving south across central and eastern parts of england at the moment. that's bringing further sleet and snow, a bit of remixed in a lower levels as well. for scotland this morning we are continuing to see for the snow showers. perhaps a bit of rain at lower levels. strong winds, especially around the east coast. where the strong winds combined with high tides, that's where we are concerned about seeing
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coastal flooding, especially in east anglia. this sleet and snow as well. several severe flood warnings have been issued around the east coast, so here is the flood line number if you are concerned. this area of rain, sleet and snow will gradually clear from the south—east by about lunchtime. further west there will be sleet and snow showers for northern and western scotland, parts of ireland and wales as well. but much of the country by the afternoon is looking dry, with cold and wintry sunshine. by degrees the top temperature. but it will feel subzero for many. that's when we add on the windchill. moving into the evening we still have the chance of a few wintry flurries towards the east and for western fringes of the uk also some rain, sleet and snow showers. clear skies for many and winds for light, so a cold night tonight. sub zero widely. we are
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likely to see quite an icy start to saturday morning again. through the day on saturday we are likely to see further snow showers across parts of eastern scotland, down to east anglia. many areas having a dry day. there will be more cloud moving in from the west, bringing in rain and sleet showers later in the day. temperature 6—7 in western areas. still about in the east. looking pretty chilly to start the weekend. as we had through saturday and sunday we will start to draw in this much milder airfrom the sunday we will start to draw in this much milder air from the west or the north—west, which brings with it more cloud by the time we get to sunday. patchy outbreaks of rain on the frontal system working gradually eastwards through the country and winds coming in from a westerly direction. by the time we get to sunday we've lost the wintry weather for now. back to about 5— 10 degrees. but certainly the day the weather is causing some disruption. likely to have ongoing problems with
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ice, snow and strong winds that could lead to coastal flooding in the east. would you like to see some pictures of snow right now? yes, i love a snow picture. people have been busy sending in pictures from various places. david in gateshead has taken a picture of his back garden under a blanket of snow. it makes everything look really pretty. john from stoke on trent has captured this picture of his road. lots of people, like me, spent part of the morning removing the ice from the car. we saw quite a few of the problems in south—east london particularly. this pictures been sent in by lydia in sidcup. quite a lot of bad snow late into the evening yesterday. paul in macclesfield snapped this lovely winter wonderland pic. it looks very pretty. 0f it looks very pretty. of course we will keep you up—to—date with everything going on with the travel
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situation and also flood warnings. let's go over to sean. news about emissions. we are familiar with vw and the ongoing story on what we have a new name? another one dragged into it. volkswagen is the only one that has admitted wrongdoing, but other companies have been accused. good morning. today it's fiat‘s turn in the headlines. the car manufacturer has been accused of not telling authorities about software in some of its cars that is there to regulate emissions in more than 100,000 of its diesel vehicles. it involves ca rs it involves cars like this, thejeep grand cherokee. fiat chrysler boss sergio marchionne said the firm had done nothing illegal. but this will continue with those american authorities. we are talking housing this morning. the gap
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between average mortgage payments and average rent is narrowing. in fa ct, and average rent is narrowing. in fact, in 10% of places in the uk it is cheaper to own a house each month thanit is cheaper to own a house each month than it is to rent one. also this morning the lenders at halifax have said there were more first—time home buyers last year that has any time in the start of the financial crisis. the stock market is hitting records again. it's getting boring! the ftse100 closed at a record 11th day ina the ftse100 closed at a record 11th day in a row top levels, all—time records. something it has never managed before. we will keep an ionic. will it get to a 12th? —— an eye on it. i bet next week we will talk about a low record! thanks very much. shall we have a look at some of the front pages? i think we will move straight onto the weather. the main worry this morning is the severe flood warnings. there are now 1a severe weather
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warnings in place. emergency services are on standby and an evacuation centre has been set up at clacton—on—sea in essex. let's get the latest from the environment agency. good morning. thank you for your time. i know it's a busy time. just bring us up to date with the latest information. thank you. we are continuing to warn about high tides right across the east coast, a particularfocus in sussex and ethics. 0ur concerns for the morning tide, it stretches through the morning, through mid—day. and also the evening tide. levels could be even higher. how many severe flood warnings are in place at present? seven are issued at the morning. there is the potential that more could be issued through the day. i encourage people to keep up—to—date either by using our flood line, to keep up—to—date either by using ourflood line, or by looking on the website, really getting the latest information they can. you are in one
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of the centres set up to help people and we were talking to some of them earlier. what are they experiencing? what are they being advised? the advice we are giving people here, where we issued flood warnings yesterday afternoon, is that high tide warnings are expected about midday. people should to the evacuation centre or get everything ready so they can work with the emergency services who are leading the evacuation. we really strongly advise people to stay away from high tides, and not just advise people to stay away from high tides, and notjust people being evacuated, but more generally. people should be sensible about not wave watching, not driving through floodwater and focusing on keeping themselves say. it is very important today. you will know from previous experience that some people are relu cta nt to experience that some people are reluctant to leave their homes in this galatians, aren't they? absolutely. —— in these circumstances. when we issue floodwater warnings we do it because
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we consider it a danger to life. people need to heed the evacuation warnings that we can keep them safe. you try to do your calculation to anticipate what levels the floods will be out. what's happening so far this morning? are they know are all more than you expected? what we are seeing this morning is that the levels are coming in slightly below what was forecast, which hopefully will be good news for most communities, but we need to still stay vigilant. it is still serious and the winds can change and rip up to the water at any point, so people need to stay focused. this evening we are looking at levels potentially above forecast. some very high tides indeed. really important people stay focused on warnings throughout the day and are ready to take any action they need from there. and you are from the environment agency. when you have a lot of your staff working on itand you have a lot of your staff working on it and we've seen a military on standby to help. give us an idea of
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the level of staffing available. significant numbers of staff. we've been moving equipment and staff all week in preparation for this. and also working closely with partners and emergency services, local authority and the military as you say are on standby. a huge number of temporary barriers. they are in place and ready to protect and we are all standing by to do anything additional that is needed today and we will continue to work around the clock to do everything we can to minimise impactand clock to do everything we can to minimise impact and keep people safe. thank you very much for your time this morning. that was coming from one of the centres set up to help. some people have already being evacuated. we will keep you up—to—date. problems with the floods and also the roads. just to get you up—to—date on the national projects, there are now 17
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severe flood warnings. that means a risk to life in 17 areas now. that's a number that has been increasing throughout the morning. we will of course keep you up—to—date about which areas they are and what is happening in those areas. more on that later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. shopkeepers across the capital have been fined hundreds of thousands of pounds for selling illegal skin whitening treatments. london trading standards says 15 shops have been fined more than £160,000 each and some business owners given suspended jail sentences. the treatments include poisonous chemicals like mercury and can cause organ failure and even cancer. the courts are looking at this as criminal activity, poisoning for profit. it is not the kind of activity where
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people can think they can run of jute —— run a legitimate business and sell these kinds of products. there's more misery for southern rail commuters today as drivers go on another 2a hour strike. it means there'll be no trains at all, apart from a very limited peak service between caterham and london victoria. around 200 buses will run on some other routes. let's get the rest of the travel now. of course we have had some snow, so we'll look at how that's affecting things in a moment. the district line has severe delays because of a signal failure. and of course there's no tfl rail service between brentwood and shenfield for works. let's take a look at the roads. we've still got snow around in places. this is the a21 at farnborough, driving conditions could be slow and difficult at times. ice is causing a problem for buses on some small roads at south croydon, purley, new addington and biggin hill. and, aside from the weather, we've still got roadworks on the a1 holloway road — it remains closed. now we've had some snow, but,
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despite that, more than 6,000 tropical butterflies are to go on display this weekend at rhs wisley in surrey. they'll be inside a glasshouse, of course, and there'll be 50 different species from places like central and south america and southeast asia. 0rganisers hope the event will inspire visitors to encourage butterflies into their gardens as the uk population is in decline. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we saw plenty of snow around last night, especially toward southern home counties. here are a couple of your weather watcher pictures. a lot of this has now melted away, but there could be a few more wintry showers around for a time this morning, mostly falling as sleet and rain. it will feel cold all day and there will be a very raw feeling north—westerly wind about. temperatures about freezing to start the day, so ice will be a big issue this morning. all of it refrozen on pavements. so watch out for slippery surfaces. a few wintry showers around through the morning. perhaps a bit of snow in the mix at times. a very raw north—westerly
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wind about as well. temperatures between 2—5 degrees, but there will be some brightness about at times. a cold feeling day, though. 0vernight tonight we will probably see temperatures dropped to —2 or —3 celsius away from towns. winds lighten. clear skies, the smallest of a few wintry flurries as we head into the first half of tomorrow morning. 0therwise, tomorrow should be a mostly dry day. still very cold, with the brisk north—westerly wind. there will be some sunshine. and much more grey. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. coast, where a tidal surge is expected to hit.
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the environment agency has issued 1a severe flood warnings, meaning there is a danger to life. andy moore reports. all along the east coast, floodgates have been closed in preparation for the storm surge. gale—force winds are combining with high tides to threaten coastal defences. injaywick, in essex, there is a severe flood warning, meaning a risk to life. the emergency services have arrived in force. the residents are being urged to leave. evacuation centres are on standby. we've got exceptionally strong winds, between a0 and 50 miles an hour, potentially with gusts stronger than that, and going to coincide with a high tide just after lunchtime. so that's why we've put in place this operation to evacuate safely the people of jaywick. some have already heeded that warning. others are waiting to see. everyone in the text messages, saying, have you evacuated yet? i said, the neighbours next door get all panicked, because she's not very well next door, and things like that. so i think a lot of people are actually planning to stay. 0n the lincolnshire coast, at skegness, the military have been
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brought in to help if needed. about 100 soldiers have been based at the police station. along the coast, those most vulnerable are doing what they can to protect their businesses. there will be a significant rise in the water. but whether it will be enough to top the defences, that depends on mother nature, i suppose, really. and mother nature is set to bring more wintry weather today, causing even more travel disruption. nearly all the uk is covered by weather warnings for snow, or ice, or both. kate sweeting is in hessle, near the humber bridge, where there is a severe flood warning in place. how are people reacting there? ican i can see there is pretty heavy snowfall. indeed, it is very cold
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here but relatively calm, and that will come as a relief to residents. tidal surges are caused by a combination of high winds and high tide, and the winds haven't been as high as predicted. and so high tide has passed here this morning without event, but we are not part of the woods yet, because there is another high tide this evening at around 6pm, which is expected to be more severe. there are still flood warnings in place along the east coast, which means that flooding is expected. people here are on standby, with sandbags, there are council staff and police ready for this evening and in lincolnshire the army was called in to help evacuate people. more than 3000 residents we re people. more than 3000 residents were told they should leave their homes or go upstairs, and special rest centres have been set up for them. but for the people hear the warning of a tidal surge is particularly worrying because in 2013 one happened in the water came
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over. it flooded more than 1a00 homes. the last time there was a serious tidal surge was in 1953, when hundreds of people died. the people here were told, and believed, when it happened in 2013, that this was a once in 60 year event and three years on here we are on high alert. we will bring you up—to—date on the weather picture across the uk a little later in the programme. the number of men in low—paid, part—time work has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. new research by the institute for fiscal studies has found that one in five low—paid men aged between 25 and 55 now works part—time. that means wage inequality for men has risen over two decades, but for women the opposite is true. there were emotional scenes during a ceremony at the white house last night, as president 0bama surprised his vice—president with the country's highest civilian honour. mr 0bama said he was awarding
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the presidential medal of freedom tojoe biden for his faith in his fellow americans and a lifetime of service. mr biden said the honour had been a complete surprise. this is a remarkable man, and ijust hope that the asterisk in history thatis hope that the asterisk in history that is attached to my name when they talk about this presidency is that i can say i was part of, part of the journey of a remarkable man. the carmaker fiat chrysler has been accused of violating pollution laws in the united states. the us environmental protection agency says the manufacturer equipped tens of thousands of diesel jeep and dodge vehicles with software that regulates emissions results. the firm has denied doing anything illegal, but has seen its share price fall by more than 15%. the number of people changing who they buy their electricity from reached a record high in 2016.
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research from the industry body energy uk shows that nearly five million people changed their electricity supplier last year, and a fifth of those who switched in december went to a smaller supplier rather than one of the big six. it is the highest number of switches since energy uk began publishing their data in 2013. that brings you up to date. sarah will have the weather forecast in around five minutes. lots going on, of course, with the weather. time to talk about sport with mike, and lots of tributes coming inforgraham with mike, and lots of tributes coming in for graham taylor. yes, a shock to all and football is morning loss of a great human being. kind, courteous and totally without ego. that is my big memory of him, when he came on the sofa for breakfast or when he was still managing and i interviewed him, it was like talking toa interviewed him, it was like talking to a friend. 0ften interviewed him, it was like talking to a friend. often with football managers, you worry about saying the
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wrong thing, will they stormed out? not him at all. he had a great sense of humourand not him at all. he had a great sense of humour and could laugh at himself. so many stories about how humble he was, right at the end. he agreed to be best man at watford fan's wedding after meeting him only once. and i am mindful, looking at the image behind us and the pictures in the papers, a very infectious smile he had. everyone who paid tribute to him said he had a great sense of humour. as i say, he could laugh at himself, self—deprecating, but he was interested in you. you would offer to make a cup of tea, and he would say no, i will do it, you're fine. it is hard to remember so much genuine love for a football manager, but graham taylor was a top—class coach at club level, and a true gentleman inside and outside of the game. sir eltonjohn appointed taylor as watford manager in 1977, and he led them from the old fourth division to runners—up in the top
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flight within five years, and they reached the 198a fa cup final. he also managed lincoln, aston villa and wolves, and he was england managerforfour years. a guy who was so passionate, who was so in love with the game of football, and who was straight, and who was honest, and who would tell you as it was. and he wasn't afraid to do that, whether you are a young player, or whether you are a very experienced player. and i think that is the way he will be remembered. you always talk about people's contribution within football. but you remember them most as people, and he was somebody that had time for everybody, and was generous with that time. and i think they are the human qualities that you remember the most. there was a minute's applause in memory of graham taylor ahead of last night's championship match between qpr and reading. qpr made it three league wins in a row thanks to jamie mackay‘s winner, scoring against his old club.
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west ham united manager slaven bilic says they will not sell dimitri payet, even though he is refusing to play for the club, in a bid to secure a transfer. payet‘s former club marseille have reportedly already had a bid for him rejected. bilic said payet is out of the team, and won't be training until he changes his attitude, but he is not for sale. we don't want to sell our best players. we want to keep them. here's definitely one of the more... 0ur here's definitely one of the more... our best player. that is why we gave him such a long contract. i informed him such a long contract. i informed him of that, and he refused to play for us. andy murray will start his australian open campaign against illya marchenko. murray is the top seed for a grand slam for the first time. he has reached the final in melbourne five times, but never won it. in the women's draw, johanna konta will face kirsten flipkens.
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england's test captain, alastair cook, will meet director of cricket andrew strauss today, but no decision on his role as skipper is expected to be made. cook admitted to having questions over his position during the recent a—0 series defeat in india, but still has the backing of his teammates. you questioning a guy that's got 11,000 test runs, the most decorated english test match player that we've ever had. and to be questioning him so much about whether or not he should stay on as captain, and this, that on the other, i think it is up to him whether he wants to stay on. i think he has got to make that decision and i'm sure that when he makes that decision it will be the right one for him and the team. the man who twice rode red rum to victory in the grand national, brian fletcher, has died. he was 69. fletcher won the national as a 20—year—old in 1968, on board red alligator, but will be best remembered for his back—to—back wins at aintree
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on red rum in ‘73 and ‘7a. the popularity of nba basketball in this country shows no sign of waning. and a sell—out crowd at london's o2 arena saw the denver nuggets comfortably beat the indiana pacers in basketball‘s nba. it is the seventh regular—season game to be played in the capital, 1a0—122 the final score. the crowd included many arsenal and chelsea players as well. a final word about graham taylor, and his reign change the way it the press treated english managers because there was that vilification of him on the back page of the sun, when he was depicted as a turnip, with the headline swedes two, turnips, one. that one headline defined his spell in charge of england, which didn't go according to plan for him but we
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mustn't forget what he did for those clubs, for aston villa, watford and lincoln, and he was overseeing a lot of comings and goings, so he can't totally be blamed for what happened with england. but it got quite sour at times. and you will talk to one of the players later on. yes, because he also did a lot to tackle racism and again, one of the first pioneers to tackle it head on. he signed john barnes for watford for just a signed john barnes for watford for justa pairof signed john barnes for watford for just a pair of shorts and a football kit. he has overseen it all. a public health crisis on a par with obesity and diabetes. that could be the result of not properly assessing the needs of children in care, according to the head of a young people's charity. mark kerr from the institute of recovery from childhood trauma says the failure of successive governments to properly care for looked—after children could cost society billions of pounds a year. we will hearfrom him in a moment. but first, brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to a children's home in yorkshire, to see what life is like for those who live there. it is rare for a camera to be
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invited inside the children's care home. here in yorkshire, and struck i how normal it all is. and it feels really homely. everything in the whole house is picked by the young people as well. this is their house, this is their home, this is where they live. nothing he feels institutional. 0nly they live. nothing he feels institutional. only two young people live here, looked after by eight specially trained staff. we have one young man who was 1a, and the young lady who is 17. those who live here will probably have suffered serious neglect, trauma or abuse. to understand how happy he feels or how angry he feels, it can feel like anger but it is not the same,
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anxiety, and we have to do a lot of work with them about that. that is one of the sleeper is just over there, and this is one of our other young people's rooms, who is most co mforta ble young people's rooms, who is most comfortable in clutter! we will leave well enough alone. i give you permission to read this out. i asked him to tell me what kind of things he is into, and he says looking at cars, going to school, playing football, playing on the xbox. can you say thank you to all my foster pa rents you say thank you to all my foster parents in the past? clearly he has had lots of connections with people in the past. but he feels more settled here. yes, the bounce to about six or seven different placements but he has been here now for over two years now, doing really well. there are no timetables. friends are welcome to visit. day trips and holidays are taken. this is... this is christmas day. yes, so we like to take pictures. a lot of
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them we've got memory boxes that we keep for the young people but a lot of them do go up around the house. because the plan is always for a young person to eventually move on from here, hopefully back to their own home, not always possible. what is the relationship like with neighbours, people in the area?|j think neighbours, people in the area?” think the majority of the time it is really good. i think when things go wrong in the community we are the first ones that get the knock on the door, because unfortunately our kids are perceived as being bad kits, and thatis are perceived as being bad kits, and that is not the case at all. they have been through a lot in their lives, a lot of trauma, theyjust need that help and support from us. that is what we are trying to give them. we will talk about a couple of those issues now. joining us now is dr mark kerr, chairman of the institute for recovery from childhood trauma and liam hill who's the director at the charity voice for children and was himself a child in care. this is very personal for you, cause
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you spend a lot of time in many, many different elements of care. what the brief outline of what happened to you ? what the brief outline of what happened to you? at the age of five i was put into care, and over my timei i was put into care, and over my time i was put into 6a different placements. these were roughly around a0 to foster placements and the rest was residential. given your own experience, i speak on behalf of those brought up in this, what progress or any has been made? where do the problems lie now? this reporter says clearly there is a problem right now. the problem for me is around the timescales of children and young people and whether they get the help they need. as mentioned before i had a2. 0wns and that was a lot of the time because foster the people weren't trained properly. so residential
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places that have facilities to help with the trauma and affects. i do independent inspections in kids' home. there are smaller homes now, less institutionalised. there's more emphasis on the voice of the and young people. but there are still issues in terms of homes actually being well—equipped with staff who can manage this behaviour. criminalisation sometimes with young people, displaying aggressive behaviours. that's one of the issues for me. and obviously it is about keeping consistent people for those young people and getting the best care. you've done a lot of research in this area, mark, and you can tell us in this area, mark, and you can tell us about the scale. i was surprised by how many children there are in ca re by how many children there are in care homes and the impact it has. now we are down to... the number has gone down the vividly. historically
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the residential homes in england, therapeutic, were viewed around the world as leading. but that has eroded over the years as politically they've been out of favour in terms of moving away into care in the community. lots of focus now on the symptoms around the causes. so we talk about offending, for example we already know that between trauma and mental health problems and offending there is a link. and we know that for example adverse child experiences, which is the common symptom and cause of what happens to these children, before care. it is difficult to deal with that in foster care. so as much as foster ca re rs have lots foster care. so as much as foster carers have lots of care and love to give, they don't have the psychological skills. mental health services have cuts as well. is it your opinion that a lot of children
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are put into force the care, when what they need is a different kind of approach? absolutely. because if we keep tackling the symptoms, the amount of movement and different foster placements, we pass it on into adulthood and that's cost shunting. you speak to people who are caught up into this and that's what you are hearing? all the time. the difficulty is that children and young people, a lot of the people we speak to, have more trauma due to all of the different placements moves. not getting the right support and help. as people know if you have beenin and help. as people know if you have been in care bears and 80% chance that if you have a child it will go back into the system. so therapeutic residential setting can cost of £80,000 a year... the stories are very moving. was there a moment, and
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we haven't got much time, sorry, was there a moment for you that changed things for you sit negatively? in terms of... progress. whether there was a moment where you were on one path and then something changed?” was placed in a therapeutic setting after a ll was placed in a therapeutic setting after all of my foster home brea kd owns after all of my foster home breakdowns and they did real therapy, worked with me to help me get back to my local area, get back into mainstream education. then i was once again placed in a foster placement and that placement broke down because they still couldn't manage, so after all of that great progress i sort of took a step back. very interesting to talk to you both. thank you very much for your time. so much to talk about. it is snowing heavily near the humber bridge this morning. have a look at this picture. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. we have got a lot of
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wintry weather around this morning. many of us will be waking up to scenes like this for top but it is not just the scenes like this for top but it is notjust the ice and snow that scenes like this for top but it is not just the ice and snow that will be causing problems, but also strong winds and the chance along the east coast that we could have coastal flooding problems. lots to tell you about. we have a band of sleet and snow pushing across northern england, lincolnshire, down into east anglia and across scotland further wintry showers, especially towards the north and west. we have strong winds towards the east coast. flooding could be a problem. coastal flooding in particularfurther south, where strong winds are combining with high tides. we have sleet and snow pushing across east anglia, east midlands. that will clear later in the day. if you are concerned about the risk of flooding where you live here is the flood line number. the environmental agency has several severe flood warnings in force. as we move through the day we've got the band of sleet and snow gradually clearing
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the south—east by about lunchtime. further wintry showers towards the west, the northern and western scotland, northern ireland and wales. set to see more snowfall in here. for many of us as you can see in the afternoon with got clear skies and sunshine. it will feel cold when you add on the windchill, isa cold when you add on the windchill, is a feeling sub zero, with temperatures about 2—5. temperatures dip away through this evening and overnight under clear skies. we continue to see sleet and snow showers, potentially around the east coast, but also some moving in from the west. in between under clear skies a sharp frost. iciness and subzero temperatures first thing saturday morning. it will be a wintry start to the weekend and we are like to see further snow showers across the east of scotland, perhaps down to east anglia. towards the west the showers turning back to sleet and rain, increasingly through the course of saturday. but there will be sunshine for many central parts. temperatures 1—2 towards the east coast. milder towards the west.
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soa east coast. milder towards the west. so a change in the weather through the weekend after the cold snap. sta rt the weekend after the cold snap. start to draw in the milder air, working in from the west and north—west, especially through sunday, where we have a weather front bringing outbreaks of rain. the weather fronts move east across the country, bringing patchy rain for many. quite a bit of cloud by the time we get the sunday and a different feel to the weather after the cold and with the weather. back to about 5— ten degrees in the second half of the weekend. so things eventually turning milder, over the next 2a hours or so watch out for the snow, ice, strong winds and coastal flooding. lots out for the snow, ice, strong winds and coastalflooding. lots going on and coastalflooding. lots going on and we could see further disruption. thank you very much. the 9095 film pocahontas was inspired by the native american woman who died a00 years ago. —— 1995. this week special events marking her extraordinary life have got underway, although the location might surprise you.
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breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. # have you ever heard the wolf cry to the blue corn moon...# it took a quarter of a billion pounds at the box office, but of the millions who have seen the 1995 film pocahontas, few in all likelihood could tell you where she is actually buried. just outside the m25 in gravesend, in kent. pocahontas was a native american who married an english settler, john rolfe. they became virginia's first tobacco farmers. they travelled to england and mixed with the movers and shakers of the day, including king james and queen anne. but on their return, as their ship passed through gravesend, pocahontas, or rebecca rolfe as she was now known, took ill and died. this is where she is buried and this is her great, great, great, great,
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great, great, great... ..great—grandson, also called john rolfe. i am very proud to be a descendant of pocahontas, 17 times down the line. very frustrating at times. many people growing up had never heard of her. it was like saying, "i'm related to cinderella or sleeping beauty". as the a00th anniversary of her death approaches, there is a chance to honour her brief but extraordinary life. it's one of the first recorded instances where two very different cultures were formally married and formally celebrated. and they were celebrities when they came over? indeed. very much so, because many people had never met a native american, so the young pocahontas was fated as a celebrity. she dined with king james and queen anne and i feel proud to be part of this amazing very true story, and this very powerful woman. a fantastic story. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning
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from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. shopkeepers across the capital have been fined hundreds of thousands of pounds for selling illegal skin whitening treatments. london trading standards says 15 shops have been fined more than £160,000 each and some business owners given suspended jail sentences. the treatments include poisonous chemicals like mercury and can cause organ failure and even cancer. the courts are looking at this as criminal activity, poisoning for profit. it is not the kind of activity where people can think they can run a legitimate business and sell these kinds of products. there's more misery for southern rail commuters today as drivers go on another 2a hour strike. it means there'll be no trains at all, apart from a very limited peak service between caterham and london victoria. around 200 buses will run on some other routes.
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let's get the rest of the travel now and of course we have had some snow so we'll look at how that's affecting things in a moment. now we've got a few problems on the tube. none of them weather related. all down to a signal failure. the circle line has minor delays clockwise. minor delays on the district line between barking to upminster and earls court to richmond, ealing broadway and wimbledon. the hammersmith and city line has minor delays eastbound. and of course there's no tfl rail service between brentwood and shenfield for works. let's take a look at the roads. we've still got snow around in places. this is the a21 at farnborough — driving conditions could be difficult at times. it's very icy on some routes, too. around biggin hill, coulsdon, new addington, tatsfield and westerham. now it's been cold outside, but more than 6,000 tropical butterflies are to go on display this weekend at rhs wisley in surrey. they'll be inside a glasshouse, of course,
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and there'll be 50 different species from places like central and south america and southeast asia. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. we saw plenty of snow around last night, especially toward southern home counties. here are a couple of your weather watcher pictures. a lot of this has now melted away, but there could be a few more wintry showers around for a time this morning, mostly falling as sleet and rain. it will feel cold all day and there will be a very raw feeling north—westerly wind about. temperatures about freezing to start the day, so ice will be a big issue this morning. all of it refrozen on pavements. so watch out for slippery surfaces. a few wintry showers around through the morning. perhaps a bit of snow in the mix at times. a very raw north—westerly wind about as well. temperatures between 2—5 degrees, but there will be some brightness about at times. a cold feeling day, though. 0vernight tonight we will probably see temperatures dropped to —2 or —3 celsius away from towns as the winds lighten. clear skies, the smallest of a few wintry flurries as we head into the first half of tomorrow morning. 0therwise, tomorrow should be a mostly dry day. still very cold, with the brisk north—westerly wind.
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there will be some sunshine. by the time we get to sunday it is looking milder and much more grey. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. thousands of people along the east coast of england are told to leave their homes as gale force winds combine with high tides. there are now 13 severe — meaning a risk to life — flood warnings in force. more than 1,000 people are being moved to safety in the village of jaywick in essex. and the snow caused disruption overnight — especially in kent where there were delays on the m20. we've got more disruptive weather on the cards today, notjust the snow
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and ice around, but also strong wind and ice around, but also strong wind and the potential coastal flooding in the east. we will have a full forecast in about 15 minutes. good morning, it's friday 13th january. also this morning: more men are in low—paid, part—time work than ever before according to a new study of those aged between 25 and 55. good morning. more people took their first step on the housing ladder last year than for 10 years and research for breakfast says it's also getting cheaper for first—time buyers to have a mortgage than to continue renting. in sport, football mourns the loss of one of its true gentlemen — graham taylor, the former watford, aston villa and england manager, who's died of a suspected, heart attack at the age of 72. good morning. the army's on standby to help evacuate communities along
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the east coast where a tidal surge is expected to hit. the environment agency has issued 17 severe flood warnings, the environment agency has issued 13 severe flood warnings, meaning there is a danger to life. andy moore reports. all along the east coast, floodgates have been closed in preparation for the storm surge. gale—force winds are combining with high tides to threaten coastal defences. injaywick, in essex, there is a severe flood warning, meaning a risk to life. the emergency services have arrived in force. the residents are being urged to leave. evacuation centres are on standby. we strongly advise people to stay away from high tide, notjust those being evacuated but more generally, people be sensible about not watching the waves or driving through floodwater and focusing on keeping themselves safe. it's very important day with this weather. some have already heeded that warning and others are waiting to see. had a text message, the
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neighbour next door is all panicking, because she's not very well. things like that. i think a lot of people are planning to stay. 0n the lincolnshire coast at skegness, the military have been brought in to help if needed. about 100 soldiers are based at the police station. along the coast, those most vulnerable are doing what they can to protect their business. there will be a significant rise in water, whether it's enough to top the defences depends on mother nature, i suppose. and mother nature is said to bring more entry weather today, bringing more travel disruption. nearly all the uk is covered by weather warnings for snow or ice or both. we will bring you up—to—date with the problems with storm surges and
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quite a bit of snow falling. this is a live shot from hull, people waking up a live shot from hull, people waking up to quite a bit of style, replicated in many parts of the country. in the south—east, particularly in kent, there was heavy snowfall into the evening last night. we will have a full look at the forecast and some of the images. some pretty treacherous conditions. this was later in the evening last night. we will bring you right up to date with weather conditions and the problems on the roads throughout the programme this morning. the number of men in low—paid part—time work has increased "dramatically" over the last 20 years. new research by the institute for fiscal studies has found that one in five low paid men between the ages of 25 and 55 now works part time. that means wage inequality for men has risen over two decades, but for women the opposite is the case, as our business correspondent jonty bloom reports. top—earning men in the professions normally work full—time. in fact, only 5% of them work part—time.
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but in comparison, amongst the lowest—paid men, often in areas like catering and hospitality, 20% now work part—time, and that number has increased fourfold in the last 20 years. that has meant that wage inequality for men has increased, as high—paid, full—time staff have done far better than low—paid, part—time workers. but for women, the opposite is the case. for women, earnings growth has been consistently higher than that for men over the last 20 years, and more of them are in work. for men, particularly the lowest—paid, they've actually seen falls in the numbers of hours of work, which has suppressed the amount of pay that they get. it is far from clear why low—paid men are increasingly working part—time. it might be because they want to, although that seems unlikely. the fact that 60% of the low—paid and part—time jobs are either in retail, wholesale, restaurants or hospitality might suggest that men who previously worked in low—paid but secure
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and full—timejobs, in sectors like manufacturing, have lost that work, and instead have been forced into the traditionally poorly paid and less—secure services sector of the economy. a week to go until the new american president is sworn in, and donald trump seems to be at odds with some of his key cabinet nominees on some of the vital questions facing the new administration. his choice for the cia leader has endorsed the work of the us intelligence agency, hours after it was criticised by the president—elect. also the potential defense secretary said moscow posed a threat in europe, after mr trump called for warmer relations with russia. and it's emerged overnight that christopher steele, the british man who wrote a dossier of lurid claims about donald trump was hired by the england 2018 world cup bid team. it's believed he was brought in to provide information on world
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football's governing body, fifa. there were emotional scenes during a ceremony at the white house last night, as president 0bama surprised his vice—president with the country's highest civilian honour. mr 0bama said he was awarding the presidential medal of freedom tojoe biden for his faith in his fellow americans and a lifetime of service. mr biden said the honour had been a complete surprise. best vice president america has ever had, mrjoe biden. applause this also gives the internet one last chance to talk about our bromance. the car maker fiat chrysler has been accused of violating pollution laws in the united states. the us environmental protection agency says the manufacturer equipped tens of thousands of diesel jeep and dodge vehicles with software that regulates emissions results. the firm has denied doing anything
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illegal, but has seen its share price fall by more than 15%. more needs to be done to protect patients from incompetent local doctors says the general medical council. the review says a relu cta nce council. the review says a reluctance to share checks allow some poor doctors to go undetected. the nhs is increasingly relying on local doctors in order to deal with staff shortages in our hospitals and surgeries. with some charging up to £115 per hour, questions have been raised about the cost. but that isn't the only concern. the general medical council says more needs to be done to ensure that all local doctors are properly vetted. the report has highlighted a number of problems and found it wasn't clear which organisation was responsible
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for the appraisal of doctors on short—term contracts. hospitals were also criticised for failing to share information and feedback when a locum was not up to the required standard. the general medical council also warned that some agencies that supply staff are not carrying out checks and ensuring adequate paperwork can support. there was also evidence that some patients were afraid to give negative feedback about their doctor in case it impacted on their care. in response the department of health said, making sure doctors are up—to—date is vital to providing high quality patient care and further progress was needed. the number of people changing who they buy their electricity from reached a record high in 2016. research from the industry body energy uk shows that nearly 5 million people changed their electricity supplier last year, and a fifth of those who switched in december went to a smaller supplier rather than one of the big six. it's the highest number of switches since energy uk began
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publishing their data in 2013. that brings you up to date. all the sport is coming up in a few minutes. back to the main story now. let's get the latest on the flood threats. there are 13 severe weather warnings now in place. in skegness on the lincolnshire coast around 100 soldiers from the catterick army base have been deployed to help 3,000 residents leave their homes. transport in central london has been affected by snowfall over the last a8 hours, with delays on trains, long delays on the roads and flight cancellations at both heathrow and gatwick airports. residents of jaywick in essex are currently being moved to an evacuation centre in clacton—on—sea. and heavy snowfall in scotland has caused road closures and a number of schools are likely
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to stay closed. further disruption is expected as the met office warns of up to 20cm of snow in some areas. the environment agency says people need to stay vigilant. we really strongly advise people to stay away from high tides, notjust those being evacuated, but more generally of people can be sensible about not wave watching, not driving through floodwater, and focusing on keeping themselves safe. it's very important today with this weather. in a moment we'll get the latest from our reporter in canterbury on how the weather's affecting travel. but first let's go to the essex coast, where emergency services have opened for people who have had to leave their homes. leigh miler is there for us. you are with some of the people who have been sent to the centre. what's going on this morning? quite a lot
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has changed in the last hour. it has got busier at this rest centre, 17 people stayed overnight after they we re people stayed overnight after they were told to evacuate their homes. in total, 2500 residents have been told to leave their homes, that's half the population of jaywick. after 7am, police have transported people out of jaywick and surrounding areas to places like this. also, the environment agency within the last hour has said they have that news and good news. to start with is the good news, at the moment the tide, or the level of water, is lower than expected. so good news at the start. but the bad news is yet to come. in the evening the actual levels are expected to be much higher. what that means for residents and their homes is unknown as yet. the tide, the high tide, is expected at one o'clock. these residents are in a warm and safe
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environment. if i was to ask you if you are happy or sad, what would you say? very happy to be here and safe. a silver lining around every cloud. a silver lining around every cloud. a real change in picture. thank you. let's head to canterbury now where there's plenty of snow. simonjones is there. it looks rather beautiful, i can see the sunrise behind you, but pretty treacherous conditions. the sun is coming out but it's very, very cold. we've had a lot of snow overnight and that snow has now turned to ice. looking down there, you can see that ice that has begun to settle. and you also have ice on the footpath in, making it pretty difficult to remain on yourfeet. in, making it pretty difficult to remain on your feet. stowe still on the ground here. as a result, difficult conditions on the roads. —— snow is still on the grounds. the roads have been gritted. we see
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people driving slowly and carefully. 0n the corny here, it's very icy. some cars have been struggling for traction as they try to come past that side road. we have had a number of accidents already this morning, jackknifed lorries and cars that crashed last night on bluebell hill in kent. treacherous conditions where some people were trapped on ca rs where some people were trapped on cars for two or three hours trying to get up and down hills. we are told things are looking better at the airports. yesterday there were a large number of cancellations, particularly at heathrow, but they hope things will run more smoothly today. what we have is a combination of snow that has become ice. wind will whip up during the day making some pretty grim combination. more snow forecast, particularly for scotland, heading into northern england and eastern england. possibly more snow showers here in
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kent. the advice is to check before you set out. it's pretty grim on foot and on the road. the situation in canterbury. sarah will have the full weather forecast in a second. before that, we will show some of the pictures you have sent us this morning. a snow topped car sent in bya morning. a snow topped car sent in by a weather watcher from near newport. alfred sent this image of snow—covered roads in the early hours of the morning in north shields. it really is a winter wonderland in this picture sent in by david in reigate. the dog pickle at the bottom of the picture out for at the bottom of the picture out for a snowy walk. and in maidstone overnight, we know there were a few problems last night, in the evening and in rush hour on the roads. important to take care if you are
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out and about in that weather. let's find out more about what's happening across the uk. what does it mean and what's happening, what should we expect in the next few days? we're not 0ut we're not out of the woods yet in terms of the wintry weather. the scene behind me was taken in wales in the early morning. more in the way of snow and ice as well as strong winds as well as the risk of coastal flooding along the east coast. low—pressure heading south down the east coast bringing sleet and snow through parts of northern england, lincolnshire, east anglia. north and west, we are set for wintry showers. scotland at 9am, snow showers in the north and west. brisk wind around the east, so they could be some coastal flooding problems across eastern scotland and certainly down to east anglia where strong winds have combined with a high tide, so we could see a surge coming to bring flooding to the
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coast. the environment agency have issued several severe flood warnings. the flood line number if you are concerned about flooding where you live. four seasons in one day today. sleet and snow across east anglia and the south—east that should clear by lunchtime. many of us should clear by lunchtime. many of us seemed a good deal of dry weather and sunshine, but plenty of showers coming in from the north—west. parts of scotland, northern ireland and wales will see a further covering of snow throughout the day. temperatures above freezing but will feel subzero, especially when you are exposed to the cold northerly wind. into the evening, the wind will become lighter with clearer skies for many central and eastern areas. notjust a widespread frost overnight tonight, but we also expect to see further icy stretches, particularly where you see snow accumulations. subzero temperatures for all of us heading into the weekend. saturday shaping up with
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more snow showers across eastern scotla nd more snow showers across eastern scotland and down to east anglia. 0utbreaks scotland and down to east anglia. outbreaks of rain, sleet and snow moving in from the west. but much of the country is looking reasonably dry with cold, wintry sunshine on offer. temperatures on the face of it looking around one or two max towards the east, in the wind. towards the west, things turning milder. those showers turning back into rain in the west on saturday. 0vernight into sunday, milder air spilling in from the north—west. weather fronts also bringing some outbreaks of rain that will push slowly east across the country. a grey day to come on sunday. breeze coming in from the west, it will be. temperatures back at 5—10d on sunday. but here and now, the weather is likely to cause disruption today with ice and snow to co nte nt disruption today with ice and snow to content with as well as strong wind and coastal flooding to content with as well as strong wind and coastalflooding in to content with as well as strong wind and coastal flooding in the east. we hear a lot about women
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working part—time. but figures suggest one in five men on low wages are now working part—time. 20 years ago it was one—in—20. and it's said to be a growing trend, highlighted in a new report on inequality by the institute for fiscal studies. so what do these figures say about the changing nature of work in britain? we spoke to one young worker in london who does a part—time deliveryjob. my my name is declan, and 25, originally from manchester, i now live in london and i'm in part—time work that is not well paid. i am currently doing my masters at an institution that is once—in—a—lifetime opportunity so the idea of having flexible work to fit around what should be my priority is something i had to give the go. being in low paid work, you don't particularly have any responsibility, it is pretty brainless. these are both pros and cons. it is manual labour based, so
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it can be tiring, but it is not really sustainable. i am yet to see how it is financially viable. i don't think i do like the job, how it is financially viable. i don't think i do like thejob, you don't think i do like thejob, you don't particularly feel like you are of any value, you do just feel like... you know, like a piece of meat, really. that was declan talking to us. with us to talk about this is robertjoyce, from the ifs, who is one of the report authors. good morning to you, declan was describing the circumstances in which he ended up in a part—time low—paid job. what is the big picture? the big picture is there are many more low—wage men doing that kind of work now than they used to be, so there is growing association between low hourly wage and doing low hours of work, and that increases the disparities in what lower earning and higher earning men are taking home. take
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the lowest wage fifth of men, 20 yea rs the lowest wage fifth of men, 20 years ago one in 20 of them worked part—time, now that has risen to one in five amongst prime age men, 25 to 55, not including stu d e nts age men, 25 to 55, not including students or the semi retired. it is a striking, surprising trend. on the face of it, you would assume no one wa nts to face of it, you would assume no one wants to get low wages, but they might want to work part—time? indeed, so there is a big question which we have not yet definitively been able to answer, it is difficult to describe what is going on, which is, is there an element here of choice, maybe there are some low—wage men who would have wanted to work part time 20 years ago but those kinds of flexible jobs perhaps we re those kinds of flexible jobs perhaps were not available and now they are? 0r were not available and now they are? or is it another plausible story, more about lower skilled men finding that the demand for their labour in
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the labour market means that they would like to work full time but they actually can't? those explanations have different implications. 0ne explanations have different implications. one of the things we need to do next is understand which of those is the dominant force. traditionally we talk about women in low—paid work, part—time, flexible working. are they levelling up now? for women, the trends have been com pletely for women, the trends have been completely different, they are better understood and have been commented on before so we know many more women are in the labour market and used to be the case and many more work full—time, particularly true amongst those on the lowest hourly wages, the increase in full—time work in that group has been particularly big. traditionally it is men who have been viewed as more boring in this sector, in the middle of a life, the traditional view is that theyjust middle of a life, the traditional view is that they just work full—time and what we are showing is that assumption is not as reliable as it was at the low—wage end. that assumption is not as reliable as it was at the low-wage end. you
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mentioned before that it is harder to know why, but who tries to work that out? yourjob is to compile the figures, ina that out? yourjob is to compile the figures, in a way, what do you do next with these figures? we also do very much want to understand what is going on. we have looked at various possible explanations, some of the obvious things that might have been going on that are easier to test have not turned out to be the explanation that works, so for example you might think it is about the recession but that is not true, it was happening before the recession. you might think it is some specific policy change that has changed the nature of who is working and doing different kinds ofjobs, that does not seem to be the case because it isa
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does not seem to be the case because it is a long—running gradual trend, not one that appeared at a certain point in time. one more positive story would be that because more women are working full—time, their partners feel the need to do less work, but that does not seem to explain it either because we see the same trend amongst single men as men in couples, so there are things we have been able to rule out but the key is to find the things which were, and that is the important work were, and that is the important work we need to do. robert joyce, thank you very much for your time, from the iss, one of the report authors. more men working part—time and in lower paid employment. you probably saw me leaning over the sofa earlier to reach the printer, that was so that we could give you the latest on the weather situation, the latest on the weather situation, the number of severe warnings now down to 12, meaning there is a risk to life. in terms of the homes affected, 5000 homes directly affected, 5000 homes directly affected, this is police in norfolk saying that, 1100 properties at high risk in suffolk, police saying there. we heard from our reporter in j wick there. we heard from our reporter in jwick in there. we heard from our reporter in j wick in essex earlier, 3000 to 5000 people and essex police say it will be evacuated, so thousands of people being affected by the flooding situation at the moment, but do get in touch with us if you
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have any thoughts or comments on that. the other thing to note this morning is the weather situation with the snow, we know there is heavy snowfall during the evening yesterday, very heavy snowfall in scotla nd yesterday, very heavy snowfall in scotland as well so we will bring you right up—to—date with the weather situation as well. killer whales and humans have something in common — according to research, they're two of only three species that go through the menopause. scientists who have studied a population of orcas for a0 years now have an idea why some species have evolved to stop having babies so early in life. 0ur science reporter victoria gill reports. chasing an evolutionary mystery. these researchers have been documenting the lives of killer whales here for four decades. there we go. and their findings have revealed new insight into something that we humans share with a mammal so very different from us. 0rcas and humans are two of only three mammals on the planet that stop reproducing partway through our lives. and this a0—year study of killer
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whale society has already shown that grandmothers play a crucial role, leading their pod and helping theirfamilies survive. but scientists have now used this unique dataset that's recorded births and deaths in every orca family here to prove that when grandmothers stop having babies of their own, their daughter's offspring have a significantly higher chance of survival. the benefits of grandmothering are not enough to explain why human menopause has evolved. it's only when you consider the conflict and competition within the family group you can actually understand and explain why menopause has evolved. avoiding this so—called reproductive conflict between the generations seems to give babies the best possible chance. really interesting just how important that bond is. and that's something that could finally explain the evolutionary story of human menopause. like us, these highly—intelligent now—endangered animals have close family bonds.
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and this long and careful observation of killer whale society could change our perspective on our own. victoria gill, bbc news. interesting, that, to see the commonalities we have with different species. let's see what is coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel, business live. here on breakfast, the hollywood musical la la land is due to big up a raft of awards. last night there was a big uk premiere. we seem to be showing a clip of some people sitting at a desk, which does not seem relevant! we will celebrate musical and all that comes with them later, but now the news, travel and weather where you are. it's been a snowy and icy start. it
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will stay windy with coastal showers still an issue in the far north—west of scotland. snow inland, a mix of rain and snow to the coast. the strength of the wind running down the north sea coast is the real issue this afternoon. it might will drive in some showers but more importantly, be strong to gail force winds combined with high tides could lead to flooding across eastern england. we have seven severe flood warnings out at the moment. keep abreast if you want with this telephone number on the screen. it will feel cold out there. especially in the wind. temperatures staying on the plus side of the thermometer but you will feel much colder. snow showers set to return across the far north—west. filtering down through the cheshire gap. it will be a cold and frosty start to saturday morning with town and city centres seeing the sunshine, but in more rural spots, it could be as low as —9 or
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-10 spots, it could be as low as —9 or —10 in places. cold and icy start yet again. a relatively quiet day. a decent slice of sunshine through the spine of the country. a scattering of showers, one or two out of to the north sea. the milder air will arrive as we move into sunday. no noticeable change in the story. weather front moving from the atla ntic weather front moving from the atlantic will bring some wet weather. as well as milder weather. the rain continues to push its way steadily east. top temperatures feeling milder still. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and jamie robertson. fiat chrysler has been accused of not telling authorities about software that cheats emissions in thousands of its diesel vehicles. live from london, that's our top story on friday 13th january. a dodgy situation?
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dieselgate 2? or just a misunderstanding? us watchdogs accuse fiat chrysler over its emissions software. the boss calls it "absolute nonsense". plus — is it a console, or a handheld? nintendo takes on sony, microsoft and mobile phones with its new hybrid device. but the questions is, can it convince gamers to switch?
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