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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 14, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the prime minister says gps in england must extend their hours to ease pressure on accident and emergency services. theresa may says funding to doctors will be cut if they don't provide a 12 hour, seven day service or prove that it isn't needed. good morning. it's saturday, 14th january. also ahead, thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes, but towns and villages along the east coast escape serious flooding. mps call for the government to publish its brexit plan by mid—february at the latest. in sport, questions are asked as chelsea drop costa. so is he just not fit, or is it the great haul of china. and bringing motocross, to the great indoors, i've been meeting some of the people
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involved in arenacross to find out how it works. and louise lear has the weather. good morning. it's a cold and frosty start to the day. but it is a slightly quieter story in comparison to of late. there will be coastal showers around, but further inland there will be some sunshine. thanks, louise, see you in a bit. good morning. the prime minister has said gps in england should keep their surgeries open for longer to ease pressure on accident and emergency departments. downing street says too many family doctors are closing early and failing to open at weekends, forcing patients to seek treatment in hospitals. our political correspondent chris mason reports. for days, the government has faced a blizzard of criticism about its management of the nhs in england. targets missed, major alerts declared. seniorfigures in the health service sounding doom—laden about the future.
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now the prime minister is turning her attention to family doctors and what they can do to help. a downing street source said, "most gps do a fantasticjob. however, it's increasingly clear that a large number of surgeries are not providing the access that patients needs and that patients are suffering as a result because they are then forced to go to a&e to seek care". the doctors' union, the british medical association, said the remarks amounted to scapegoating during what it called "a very serious crisis." there are thousands of gps out there visiting patients at home. we provide a 21w, 365 days a year service, and it's almost an insult to all of those hard—working gps that are propping up the nhs on a daily basis. the association added that a third of gp surgeries in england had unfilled vacancies because the existing workload put doctors off wanting to go into general practice. let's talk to our political correspondent, tom barton,
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who is in our london newsroom. so tom, we're hearing gps reacting angrily to theresa may's suggestion that it comes off the back of a week in which the nhs has very much been in the spotlight? yes, charlie. it has been a very tough week in the nhs. earlier in the week we heard that during november more patients than should have waited longer than four hours to be seen at a&e. the target was quite badly missed and then on friday, we heard that during then on friday, we heard that during the first week of this year, four out of ten hospitals declared a major incident at some point. so today's announcement is an attempt by downing street to show that they are dealing with this issue. officials say as many as a third of patients who show up at a&e would be dealt with better elsewhere in the
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nhs and ministers see gps as being key to reducing demand on hospitals and so, they‘ re key to reducing demand on hospitals and so, they're planning on asking gps to stay open for longer. there isa gps to stay open for longer. there is a threat built that that. if they don't do, they could see some of theirfunding reduced. don't do, they could see some of their funding reduced. the don't do, they could see some of theirfunding reduced. the language we've heard from number ten overnight is strong. they say that patients are suffering because surgeries are not providing the access that they need and there is an accusation that some gps who already offer extended opening hours aren't telling their patients about it. doctors are furious. you heard from the bma during chris' report. we've heard from the conservative mp, sarah wollaston who accused number ten of attacking overstretched and demoralised gps. tom, we'll leave it there for now, thank you. the east of england has escaped major flooding, despite fears that storm surges could hit towns along the coast. thousands of people were urged to leave their homes as the environment agency issued 17
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severe flood warnings for yesterday evening. but by the early hours of the morning the threat had subsided. simon clemison reports. after all the words of warning, just the sight and sound of a huge display of strength by nature. within five or ten minutes it was coming over the walls and it was just flooding straight in. it just started running all the way down the street. it was awful. about 30 homes were inundated here in hornsey. businesses too. into the evening, people in the path of the storm surge were still trying to protect their properties. many had been advised to leave, but some in great yarmouth were keen to stay put. we saw this all happen in 2013. but you have to take precautions at the end of the day. all we are doing is putting sandbags near the doorways. others found comfort however they could as special rest centres opened up. but when high tide arrived in each town, conditions appeared to ease. the environment agency had sent in pumps and more than five miles of temporary barriers.
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officials insist the emergency response was not over the top. the worst appears to be over. the defences have held. the rest centres will be laid off now. to be honest with you, if that had of breached, we would have been in a lot worse situation in these centres would have been needed. it's wise to say that we followed everything by the book as far as the environment agency and emergency services were concerned that. for those of you who want to go home, get out of here! some are now beginning to return home. but with storm warnings still in place, people are being urged not to take chances. in the next hour, we'll be hearing from the environment agency's director of operations about the planning for this week's storms. the government should publish its brexit plan by mid february at the latest, according to a cross party group of mps. the exiting the eu committee also says parliament should be given
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a vote on the final deal. here's our business correspondent, joe lynam. next week, theresa may will give a major speech on britain's future outside the eu which could give us more detail on what kind of brexit she'll be seeking. but she is under pressure from key parties in the commons, including leavers such as michael gove. the brexit committee says: it should set out its planned by mid—february. it should press for a transitional arrangement with the eu if it cannot get a full deal in the two—year time frame. and banks in the city should have continued unfettered access to eu markets. crucially they said the government should offer mps a vote on whatever is agreed at the end of the negotiation. it isa it is a matter of principle. this is the most significant change. that
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parliament should have a right to say what it thinks of the daesmt of course parliament will have to weigh up course parliament will have to weigh up at that point, is there any chance of getting anything better from the 27 member states or is this the only thing we're going to get? the government said: but this report by cross—party mps is likely to be seized upon by those hoping for a softer and certainly more transparent exit from the eu. jeremy corbyn will defend his leadership of the labour party today after claims by a centre—left think—tank it was too weak to win an election. the fabian society warned labour would lose out on returning to power unless it could secure a coalition. at a speech in london, mr corbyn will say his party offers "a complete break from a rigged system". he'll also outline labour plans to bring care homes into public ownership. president—elect, donald trump, has said he's willing to work with russia and china, providing they co—operate. mr trump said the recently imposed sanctions on russia would remain
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in place for the coming months, but could be lifted if moscow helped washington in the war against islamic extremism. he said the one china policy, under which the us no longer acknowledges taiwan, was up for negotiation. the us house of representatives has voted to begin the process to abolish president obama's health insurance laws known as obamacare. the senate approved the measure on thursday. the law provides medical coverage for more than 20 million americans, but president—elect donald trump has tweeted that obamaca re "will soon be history". banks still need to do more to improve their day—to—day services, particularly when it comes to being clear about fees and charges, according to a customer satisfaction survey. which? found several of the biggest banks such as rbs, natwest and hsbc came out bottom. the consumers' association say banks are doing better with mobile banking, but could improve in other areas. well, banks need to do much
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better when it comes of their fees and charges. it is really important so that people know how much they're being charged for their bank account. so they know how much they could save if they move to another account and so they don't get hit with unexpected fees and charges. police in the united states say a girl who was stolen as a newborn from a hospital in florida 18 years ago has been found alive in south carolina. this is kamiyah mobley as a baby. until friday, she was living under another name. authorities say she's in good health but overwhelmed. her kidnapper, who posed as a nurse at the hospital where she was born has been charged. an unprecedented humanitarian crisis or simply a busy winter week for hospitals? the national health service in england has come under huge scrutiny in the past few days
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as the war of words between doctors and the government becomes increasingly bitter. and that tension will not be eased by theresa may saying gps who fail to operate a full seven—day service are partly to blame for the pressure on hospital a&e departments. the bbc‘s peter marshall went to visit one of those busy casualty wards to see how they are coping. daily life is non—stop. more and more patients are coming through the doors. any temperatures or fevers? its con stul tant‘s paul grout‘s job is to treat them. every got every single cubical bar one full of patients. you have got ambulance staff here. they are waiting to get their patients transferred so they can get back out on the road again? the problem we have at the moment,
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we haven't got anywhere for the ambulance patients to be put, ambulances are backing up here waiting to be able to hand over their patients. you have a paediatric cubical as well? we have had to put an elderly patient in because we ran out of suitable cubicals for them. just an indication of how busy things are? just an indication of how busy it is and it is only 11.15am. that was from inside out, which is on bbc one on monday evening at 7.30pm and wherever you are in england, inside out will reflect the situation for the nhs there. john appleby is chief economist from the independent healthcare research charity the nuffield trust, and dr taj hassan is president of the royal college of emergency medicine. thank you very much forjoining us, doctor. can you just paint the picture at the moment of what life is like in a hospital? we saw a bit of it there in that hospital, but what is it like? what are the
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pressures doctors are under at the moment? the pressures that are affecting doctors, nurses and other staff in our hospitals and in our emergency departments are incredible. we have the worst situation in over 15 years. all independent numbers suggest that crowding is significant. we've had fourin crowding is significant. we've had four in ten hospitals declare black alerts in the last week or two. and that affects staff. it affects our patients. there are delays to pain relief and delays to giving antibiotics. there is a significant compromise in the quality and the dignity of care that we are able to provide for our patients. we have been saying this unfortunately for a number of years. it's a slow moving train crash almost and every now and then we have these acute episodes such as the present situation which quite rightly attract media attention. and i think there is some good things that are coming out of
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this. i think in the last week we have picked up anecdotal reports that hospital trusts and executive boards are doing great things in terms of cancelling waiting lists and being able to redeploy staff to support emergency departments which is really important. we've had very good recognition from the prime minister and also the secretary of state around the importance of measuring performance and the four hours, how important that is. and i think the other good thing that i've recently in the last week had good discussions with simon stevens, chief executive of the nhs, and jim mackay about some medium—term solutions so we're not wasting money on locum fixes which are short—term and not really helping us and burning scarce resources. simon stevens, who you mentioned a moment
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ago, theresa may's response is interesting, isn't it? on the one hand she reminded everyone that more money is going to the nhs than ever before and then today, we have this call to gps, well, it is not a call, is it, it is an order to gps that they should be open seven days and week and linking that with the crisis within a&e. what do you make of this reaction? i think that's, i think we've got to diagnose the problem properly here. i mean, there is an increase in the numbers of people coming in the front door it a&e. it's more or less in line with the increase in the population generally over the last couple of years. that's not really where the big problem is. the problem is the flow of patients from a&e through into the hospital. so patients who need to be admitted into the hospital, into a bed, that's where we're seeing the blockage. so what we're seeing the blockage. so what we have is a problem of people not being able to get out of hospital at the other end. so there is acute pressure on beds. we have talked
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about lekive surgery being cancelled. why are we having to cancelled. why are we having to cancel work to accommodate other types of work? perhaps it shouldn't be like that. one of the issues is not really people going to a&e because they can't go to see their gp. it is people not being able to get out of hospital. it is things to do with packages of care and care and so on. the news today, as we have been talking about increasing the work that gps do, what do you think would better support hospital staff? would it be something like that? what else could we do? well, i think earlier in the week i identified both in the media as well in discussions with simon stevens that there were three things we need to do acutely to stabilise our systems. we need urgent funding to support community beds so that patients who are fit to be discharged from hospital can get out. exactly as john says to create flow back into the system. it's a
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bad indictment of a system that we're having to cancel patients who have been waiting for weeks, months, yea rs, have been waiting for weeks, months, years, for hip operations, and a range of other cancer operations, so we need to create stability in our systems and create flow. sorry, can i pick systems and create flow. sorry, can ipick up systems and create flow. sorry, can i pick up on that word community. did you say community beds? community beds. what does that mean? patients who have been treated for their acute hospital episode, but need some further care. so they need some care packages back in the community either in their home or they need a community bed in intermediate care bed. so not a hospital bed as such? somewhere between, either in their own home? it isa between, either in their own home? it is a step down. either a care package in their home or a care bed. the other important feature is we have probably amongst the lowest bed base in the oecd countries. bed base
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meaning the number of beds. base in the oecd countries. bed base meaning the number of bedsm base in the oecd countries. bed base meaning the number of beds. it is recognised we need to find more beds and the third feature which i would say, but which is important, we need more staff in our emergency departments to cope with the increased demand. john is right, there has been an incremental change around minor illness and primary care, but that's not our main problem. our main problem is being able to care for the patients who are able to care for the patients who a re really able to care for the patients who are really ill. and those are the features i identified to simon stevens features i identified to simon steve ns a nd features i identified to simon stevens and oh but more importantly, the medium—term solutions that we need to find in order to stop wasting the money that we are at the moment. you talk about funding. john, just, you know, put this in context the funding situation at the moment because the government say they have invested, there has been this big argument with the chief executive of information england over whether they have enough, what are your thoughts on it? well, over are your thoughts on it? well, over a year ago,
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are your thoughts on it? well, over a yearago, when are your thoughts on it? well, over a year ago, when the government announced it's spending plans for the next five years, back in november 2015, my organisation and others pointed out then that the money was not as much as was being advertised by the government. it certainly wasn't ten billion, it wasn't eight billion, possibly {4.5 billion, anyway these are big numbers, anyway, but it wasn't the huge amounts advertising. i mean what we know now is what the nhs will get this year and the next few years is more or less what it was being given overthe years is more or less what it was being given over the last five years. so, just over a smidgen over inflation. sojust covering price and pay rises and so on. but not much more than that. to put that in connection, that's way less than the nhs is used to historically. so money is very tight and you know, there is no denying that. and i think that's actually the root cause of these issues here, whether it is numbers of bed, staff and so on, the money is the issue. john appleby,
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chief economist, and doctor, thank you. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. a quieter day. it will still feel cold, but look at this, across the south—west, we have got beautiful blue sky and sunshine now. this is torquay. it is glory and temperatures around four or five celsius. it isa celsius. it is a colder story across east anglia with temperatures around freezing, but you've got blue sky and sunshine as well. a north—westerly wind bringing nuisance showers through the north sea, stretching down through the irish sea, so stretching down into the isle of man, across the north—west of england and affecting manchester and liverpool and they will drift towards the west midlands and further south through the day. soa and further south through the day. so a scattering of showers, but generally speaking to the east of that line, through the midlands, we'll keep some sunshine. a bit more ofa we'll keep some sunshine. a bit more of a breeze across the norfolk
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coast. but if we keep this milder air, seven or eight celsius, dry, sunny and cold across south—eastern areas. a few showers, but milder for northern ireland and perhaps the western isles, but for the bulk of scotland, it stays pretty cold particularly where you've got some lying snow. not as windy, but the temperatures will struggle. now, as we go through the early evening, under the clear skies, we will see a frost, but a change to come as a weather front comes in. frost, but a change to come as a weatherfront comes in. on frost, but a change to come as a weather front comes in. on the leading edge as it bumps into the colder air, there will be sleet and snow for a time, but it will turn back to rain as we go through the second half of the night. six, or five celsius, but to the east of the clearer skies we will staomp tures close to freezing. so it is going to bea close to freezing. so it is going to be a pretty cold day across lincolnshire and east anglia and the south east of england and there
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could be wet snow as the front makes its way eastwards. it will be a cloudy, grey day. the rain not too heavy, but fairly persistent through the day with outbreaks of drizzle. mild into the west if you haven't already cottoned on to that one! but across the east and east anglia where the low cloud and drizzle, only two celsius. that will be disappointing. charlie and steph. thank you very much. time now for a look at the newspapers. helen pidd the guardian's north of england editor is here. we are starting on a new word, flex tarian? i am a flex tarian which means i'm trying to eat a lot less meat and trying to save it for the weekend and it was going well until i had weekend and it was going well until ihada weekend and it was going well until i had a little cheeky cheese burg on cheeseburger on tuesday afternoon.
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this category of consumer, the flex tarian has grown by 2.2 million people in britain over the past two yea rs. at people in britain over the past two years. at the same time, the number of households eating a large amount of households eating a large amount of meat, which is nine or more portions a week, that includes a ham sandwich at lunch, it is not having a big chungy steak, that category makes up 14% of the population. what's the point? well, it is better for your health and better for the environment, extensive rearing of cattle and the methane they produce and greenhouse gases. that's why i decided to do it. you don't have to share with us your personal reasons. what was the driver for you? partly, it was health. the evidence that i have read about particularly intensive farming did really make sense to me. ijust thought, i could be more inventive with my diet. my other new year's resolution is to try two new recipes a week. two
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weeks in, apart from the cheeky cheeseburger, how has it gone? not too bad. but i've gone for it at the weekend. we had lamb shanks last weekend. we had lamb shanks last weekend. one the fascinating stories about the cost of travel. it is a comparison effectively because of a moment in time with a group of friends between planes and trains?|j chose this partly because the headline made me laugh, the plane to spain is cheaper than our trains. two pals from newcastle and birmingham who are going to have a meet up and they were aghast at the cost of getting the train. it was going to cost £105. they went on the internet and they found they could fly to malaga in spain cheaper. itnded up costing them £80 between them to go 1500 miles instead of just the 206 miles between birmingham and newcastle. they got a hostel for £10 a night and had a magic time. that exposes the lunacy of the train prices in britain. i live in manchester and if i want to get to london before 11.30am it
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costs £170, walk up, single. i can almost fly cheaper. a lot of people sympathise with what you say. the train operators will say if you book early and don't want to travel in peak times then there are good deals available? yeah, they'll say that, but many people can't book a month in advance and sometimes if you do look weeks or a month in advance, the cheap tickets are gone and everybody agrees we should drive less and use public transport more. so surely we should be encouraging that, rather discurbleging people. the prices are the prices, but the real cost, how do you get from the airport to the city centre and how do you get to the airport. there is a cost attached to travelling by plane? if you want to check-in a bag, that's got enough things in for a long weekend, you might have to
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end up paying. you have got to master the art of carrying it all on your body! i wore a cycle helmet through the detectors. were you allowed ? through the detectors. were you allowed? you are not allowed to carry, but you can wear it! big news from the labour party with tristram hunt saying he was leaving his seat in stoke to go and be the boss of the victoria and albert museum. ukip see it as their big chance? yes, they fancy their chances. they are 5,000 votes behind in the 2015 general election. some people view ukip as a busted flush. they say the purpose of ukip was to get a referendum on leaving europe and therefore, what are they about anymore? i found up and therefore, what are they about anymore? ifound up in cope land where there will be a by—election after the labour mp jamie reid resigned, ukip has a lot of support and labour need to take this seriously, indeed. whati and labour need to take this seriously, indeed. what i thought was interesting about the telegraph's story. they can disclose
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that moderate labour mps are plotting to undermine mr corbyn by staging resignations over the coming monthsment they're suggesting that tristram hunt and jamie reid won't be the only labour mps who give up their seats. that will be a tough test forjeremy corbyn. we understand today he is making a speech. some people say addressing some of those issues, some of the claims about him. so we will see. yes. very good to see you here. good luck with your travels and your bicycle helmet. and with your flex tarian lifestyle. we are on bbc one until 10am. we're on bbc one until 10am when michel roux junior takes over in the saturday kitchen. michel, what's on the menu for us? our guest is davina mccall. tell me youridea our guest is davina mccall. tell me your idea of food heaven? food heaven is rabbit which is unusual. yes. it is. we use a lot of rabbit.
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and food hell? mussels, chewy. mussels and coriander. coriander, the smell of coriander. two brilliant chefs with me today. they both hold two michelin stars. emma benson is here. what are you cooking? i'm going to make a version of swedish dumplings. cooking? i'm going to make a version of swedish dumplingslj cooking? i'm going to make a version of swedish dumplings. i love that. they are good. making a welcome return to the show. i will be cooking perfect spice roast chicken. he knows his place! i will see you at 10am. thank you very much. it sounds lovely, as always. we just it sounds lovely, as always. wejust sit here it sounds lovely, as always. we just sit here staring at the screen saying i would love that. also coming up in the programme, it's described as rock'n'roll sport, so we sent mike to get to grips with the thrills and spills of motorcross to see why the bumps
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and jumps are attracting competitors as young as ten. headlines are coming up. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before ten: we'll be hearing from the environment agency's director of operations about the planning for this week's storms. not so many problems as feared overnight. we'll bring you up—to—date with that. first, a summary of the morning's main news: the prime minister has said gps in england should keep their surgeries open for longer to ease pressure on accident and emergency departments. downing street says too many family doctors are closing early and failing to open at weekends, forcing patients to seek treatment in hospitals. those practices could face losing the extra funding they currently receive for offering a seven—day service but the british medical association says gps are already over—stretched. let's not forget,
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as we are speaking, there are thousands of gps out there visiting patients at home. we provide a 2a/7, 365—day service. it is those gps who are propping up the nhs on a daily basis. the main alert that needs to be recognised is the alert for general practice. the east of england has escaped major flooding, despite fears that storm surges could hit towns along the coast. thousands of people were urged to leave their homes as the environment agency issued 17 severe flood warnings for yesterday evening. by the early hours of the morning the threat had subsided, but the flood warnings remain in place and authorities continue to urge caution in affected areas. a clear plan for brexit should be published by february at the latest — that's the call from a group of mps. the exiting the eu committee is also calling for the prime minister to allow a vote in parliament on the plans before they're presented to brussels.
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the government says it will set out its plans by the end of march. it's a matter of principle that parliament should have a right to decide what it thinks of the deal. parliament will have to weigh up if there is any chance of getting anything betterfrom the 27 member states, or is this the best we're going to get? the labour leaderjeremy corbyn will say his party would take care homes into public ownership, rather than see them close because of financial difficulties. at a speech in london, he'll say the social care system is at "serious risk of breakdown" unless the government invests more money. he's due to speak at an event for the fabian society. the left of centre think tank that recently said the labour party was too weak to win elections under mr corbyn. president—elect donald trump has said he's willing to work with russia and china, providing they co—operate. mr trump said the recently—imposed sanctions on russia would remain in place for the coming months, but could be lifted if moscow helped washington in the war against islamic extremism.
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he said the one china policy, under which the us no longer acknowledges taiwan, was up for negotiation. the us house of representatives has voted to begin the process to abolish president obama's health insurance laws, known as obamacare. the senate approved the measure on thursday. the law provides medical coverage for more than 20 million americans, but president—elect donald trump has tweeted that obamaca re "will soon be history". banks still need to do more to improve their day—to—day services, particularly when it comes to being clear about fees and charges, according to a customer satisfaction survey. which? found several of the biggest banks — such as rbs, natwest and hsbc — came out bottom. the consumers' association say banks are doing better with mobile banking, but could improve in other areas. police in the united states say a girl who was stolen as a newborn from a hospital in florida 18 years ago has been found alive
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in south carolina. this is kamiyah mobley as a baby. until friday she was living under another name. authorities say she's in good health but overwhelmed. her kidnapper, who posed as a nurse at the hospital where she was born, has been charged. scientists have found a deep sea treasure with the first sighting of a ruby sea—dragon in the wild. researchers filmed the brightly coloured creatures in western australia. it's the first time the 10—inch—long fish has been seen alive. it was declared a new species in 2015, making it only the third known sea dragon species. everyone, when they watch this, just sta rts everyone, when they watch this, just starts to drift. it's mesmerising. just ten inches —— ten inches? that
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is quite big for a fish. people have been sending in pictures of pig squid. there are plenty of pictures out there. we are not allowed to show them. chelsea, just when it seemed they were heading for the title, there top scorer, diego costa, has been left at home because of a dispute over, officially, his fitness, but then there is all the talk about the great call of china, and the chinese money. those are the main stories this morning. he may be top scorer, but diego costa hasn't trained for three days and hasn't travelled with the chelsea squad for today's match at leicester, after a dispute with the club's coaching staff. it follows a disagreement with a coach over his fitness. but the news comes amid reports that he's been the subject of an offer from a chinese club, who could be willing to pay him £30 million a year. that's £577,000 a week.
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there will be tributes around grounds this weekend to remember graham taylor. the first match in the premier league, sees third place tottenham, play west bromwich albion. spurs are hoping to build on their victory against chelsea last week and not repeat the dip in form which followed their earlier win, against manchester city. a few months ago, we dropped our performance after a fantastic victory. now, after chelsea, it is a great opportunity to show we can keep momentum. that will be key. tottenham's north london rivals arsenal are currently outside the top four. they're playing bottom club swansea city later. it's swansea manager paul clement's first match in charge,
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iam i am really looking forward to it. it has been an ambition to manage at this level. going up against arson wenger and arsenal will be a special moment for me. leeds united have moved up to third in the championship, after a 1—0 win over derby at elland road. they're now four points off the automatic promotion places. chris woods' headerjust before the break was enough to seal a fifth home win in a row for garry monks‘ side. it was an unhappy to return to his former club for derby's bradleyjohnson, who was sent off late on. britain's dan evans is on court playing in his first atp tour final. he's up against gilles muller. it has been a very close first set, with evans saving two set points. it has gone to a tie—break, but i am just hearing that miller has one that tie—break. —— has won that
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tie—break. it's a potentially decisive weekend in european club rugby union. irish side leinster are through to the quarter finals of the champions cup after a big win over montpellier last night. the french side had a man sent off in the first half, and leinster took full advantage — jack conan scored three of their eight tries in a 57—3 victory. bath also scored eight tries in their victory over local rivals bristol, in the second—tier challenge cup competition. england's semesa roko—duguni one of the scorers in a 57—22 win. there will be a new rugby league club in bradford for the start of the season after the rugby football league agreed a deal with a consortium. the old bradford bulls club was liquidated earlier this month after its latest spell in administration. it followed years of financial problems. the winning consortium was one of four bids to revive the club. traditionally, motorcross is an outdoor sport, given that it involves racing
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motorbikes overs hills and through mud. but now it's come inside, and this weekend riders as young as ten are competing in the arena cross event in glasgow, for the second leg of the uk championship. i've been finding out more. take a load of soil, dump it in an arena, and shape it into bumps and jumps and you have the championship that's opening up the great indoors to the world's motocross riders. it is attracting sell—out crowds up and down the country. we have 3000 tonnes of dirt on the floor, so it is rock ‘n' roll sport. that is how i try and explain it. there will be seven legs in places like this throughout the winter. from young riders up to the age of, what, 35,
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30 six. having seen those pile—ups, and imagine being a dad watching your son is competing against each other. that is the case for richard jones this season, and his two lads, who have been riding since they were poor. since they were four. everything is dangerous, to an extent. it is a nightmare, they are competitive, so let's hope they both finish in one piece. not many kids will be able to do this in front of so many people. it'sjust incredible. on the same track as some of the world's top motocross riders, chasing the £100,000 prize, racing almost on top of each other, it's more intense than the outdoor version of the sport. outdoors, it is a bigger track, so the racing is not as close. it is 18 laps, such high—intensity, short laps. everyone is on top of it. it is accessible and exciting. on an outdoor track,
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you could be on one cool corner and miss all the action on another. how would a novice handle the action? the bike is a bit bigger than me. let's see if i can get on, first. i know it is only a 250 cc, but it is one of the most powerful and valuable bikes. they are holding on for dear life, they do not want it to end up in the last row! it is so powerful, this machine, that he is leading me like a horse on a lead rein. it'll take a lot more coaching before i get the call—up for the team, and i would have to do a few more hours in the gym to deal with the bone crunching thrills and spills of this sport. by sunday night, it's all gone again.
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last weekend, when we filmed, it was in manchester. this weekend, glasgow, next weekend, birmingham. it is like a cartoon. you forget they are real people, taking those real hit. next, horse racing. british horse racing is set to get a funding boost with overseas betting firms that take bets from british customers having to pay back 10 per cent of their profits to help support the sport. uk based book makers will also pay a levy, that the government hopes to introduce in april. this could add around £30 million to the sport's funds. nick rust is the chief executive of the british horse racing authority and joins us now. give us a guide to what these changes will mean. about 55 years
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ago, when betting was allowed away from racecourses, a levy was set up a british horse racing to compensate for the fact that people would make their bets away from the racecourse and there would be a loss of income. and that would be bookmakers. yes. so for around 50 years, betting shops are paid around 10% of their profits on british racing to help fund the sport. ten years ago, and this is a success story for betting and british racing, the internet really took off on the betting site, and now more than 50% of bets on british races are taken via the internet, 99% of those happening offshore, with companies who are
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targeting british customers. so those companies, because they are offshore, have been avoiding paying the levy. yes. they were setting up centres of excellence and looking to compete around the world with their betting product, but the effect was they were no longer required to pay they were no longer required to pay the levy, and where british racing was attracting over £100 million ten yea rs was attracting over £100 million ten years ago, that has been cut in half. so there has been action, which is good for the grass roots of the sport. what will this cash be spent on? there are quite a lot of trainers, jockeys, stable staff struggling. there are people getting up struggling. there are people getting up this morning well before it was like, looking after our 20,000 equine stars. we want to make sure they can continue economic way to do that and to provide our sport. we
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will spend on equine welfare, and to help work towards reducing injuries. presumably that cost, the extra 10%, who pays that? will it cost more to place a bet? betting shops are already paying this 10% and offering great value for customers. bookmakers will compete for that business. people who spend on british sport are valuable to bookmakers. it would be crazy if they started to raise their prices. william hill says the levy of 10% is too high and that horse racing is a financially healthy sports at the moment. at the top end, it is. the stuff that would happen anyway, whether there was a betting industry or not, that is in pretty good shape
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in terms of prize money, but the day m, in terms of prize money, but the day in, day out stuff, some of the smaller meetings today, they are struggling to put on enough prize—money to justify keeping horses in training. thank you for joining us. for a budding young rock photographer, the late 19705 was an exciting time to try to launch a career. mike searle was just 17 when he took a cheap camera to a 1979 gig by thejam. the snaps he took didn't make it into the press, and he forgot all about them.
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but decades later, his dream came true and they've ended up on an album cover. john danks has the story. the jam on top of the pops in november, 1979. when mike searle went to see them play live in aylesbury later that month, he took along his russian—made zenit camera. it was an amazing gig, they were an amazing band to see live. paul weller used to leap around his with guitar so what i wanted to do was catch him jumping with his guitar, because that was his signature move. i managed to get that. lacking confidence, mike didn't do anything with them. the pictures didn't see the light of day again until a few years ago. wanting to set up as a freelance photographer, mike dug them out, put them online and then he got a call. someone from universal music called me up and said, we'd like your photos and we'd like to use them on a live album we're releasing from the same year, are you interested? and i was, like, yes i am. a deal was done and six months later the finished album was posted to him. i got the package and open it up and it was shiny, heavy, a beautiful piece of art. i would have done it
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for love to be honest. so teenage dreams that finally came true 38 years later. i really wanted to thank 17—year—old mike for earning me a little bit of money. the message to other people that age, if you got a talent follow your passion and really follow it through and good things can happen. john danks, bbc news, newquay. what result for him, all those years later. you're watching bbc brea kfast. later. you're watching bbc breakfast. the headlines: gp surgeries are being told they must stay open longer and give patients appointments when they want or risk losing funding. towns and villages on england's east coast have escaped flooding after a change in wind direction prevented a storm surge. let's have a look at the weather
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with louise. high—pressure is in control. this is what is in store for tomorrow. the winds have been a nuisance today, driving in showers from the north sea. some of those have been sharp. those. to ease. in eastern england, a contrast. blue skies and sunshine, but it is cold, temperatures just1 degrees or so above freezing. for the rest of the day, we keep some sunshine. the breeze will drive in a few showers. these showers in east
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anglia could fall as snow. further west, they will fall as rain because the milder air has already started to show its hand. in northern ireland, it will stay pretty cloudy. it will be mild with a scattering of showers. the same in the north west of scotland. the risk of a few wintry showers in north—east scotland. it will be cold in the east overnight, with an early frost. we could see some snow over time. it will turn back into rain is mild air wins the battle. it will be above freezing out to the west, but still cold in the east. there could be problems first thing in the morning. eventually, the milder air will win,
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but yorkshire, lincolnshire and into east anglia could see some wintry showers. it will be a pretty grey, damp, dismalaffair showers. it will be a pretty grey, damp, dismal affair tomorrow. that's it for today. back to you. it's nearly a month since the professional dancer, joanne clifton, lifted the famous glitterball when she waltzed her way to becoming joint winner in strictly come dancing, and now she's swapping the ballroom for the stage. next week she takes the lead as a new york flapper in the musical ‘thoroughly modern millie'. phillip norton caught up with her in rehearsals. a few weeks ago, it was strictly crowning glory forjoanne clifton. but while ore's gruelling training may be over
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for now, his mentor is hard at work. she has swapped blackpool and dance floors for the stage, finding herfeet as millie. normally, i don't sing or speak. dancing wise, you are there and you perform it. this time, you have to perform it 360 degrees, with the acting, singing and dancing. it is quite different, quite manic, but it has been a childhood dream of mine. more than 13 million people watched as the celebrity pair were awarded the glitter ball before christmas. joanne beating her big brother kevin in his fourth final. everyone saw your reaction when your name was
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announced with ore as the winner. how did you feel? well, we didn't expect it in the slightest. she seemed to read our names are pretty quick, and i wasjust like, what? i can't remember anything after that, apart from i think my brother picked me up, spun me around, then i went towards the glitter ball, and i remember nearly fainting. as i didn't hear what ore said. i was thinking, i am going to faint on live tv — keep calm, breed! keep calm, breathe! joanne was cast in the musical last summer. it is the story of a girl who travels to new york to follow her dreams, similar to howjoanne left grimsby at 16 and moved to italy for a career in dance. i can relate to it because the musical starts with me turning
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round, arriving off the train in new york, looking around and being excited and nervous at the same time. i remember that moment, getting off the plane in bologna in italy, on my own, going, ok, this is great, but what now? following your dream, the dancing dream. yeah. with that dream now a firm reality, she has been playing catch up with the rest of the cast of thoroughly modern millie, who had to dance without her. i was rooting for her, but at the same time, i was thinking, i need to have her in the rehearsal room. she rises to every challenge. she has been fantastic to work with. it is exciting. i get a real buzz, performing live and getting an audience reaction.
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if you say a line and they laugh, or they gasp, you get a buzz from that. i think it's going to be amazing. joanne hopes to defend her strictly crown later in the year, but for now, it is millie on her mind. curtain up is in wimbledon on tuesday. that looks like fun, doesn't it? last night, though were concerns that stormy weather could cause problems on the east coast. homes we re problems on the east coast. homes were evacuated and centres were set up were evacuated and centres were set up to accommodate people, but a change in conditions meant that the worst was avoided. alex is in great yarmouth for us. i see you have some snow there. tell us what has
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happened over the last 2a hours. mercifully, the snow has stopped, and the river looks pretty benign. we expect the next high water at around 10:30am, but it will be nothing like what we saw last night will stop the water came up to within two feet of this flood defence, but mercifully, it receded. the emergency services said they marshalled all those efforts because they had to be prepared. last night, i noticed that a lot of lights were burning in these houses last night, which meant that people had decided to hunker down rather than go to the evacuation centres. this man helped coordinate last night's effort. let six —— just explained why we did not get the surge we were expecting.
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there are three things that need to come together at the same time — a high spring tide, surge on top of that, and the wind action, which causes the big waves. we predicted all of those, they just causes the big waves. we predicted all of those, theyjust did not come together at exactly the same time. if they had, we might have seen significant impact. what we saw was mercifully minor. a lot of planning went into this. some might say you overrea cted, went into this. some might say you overreacted, perhaps. if you look at what happened in 1953, what happened in 2007, all the work we have done since those events is to improve the flood defences you see here, those have protected about 500,000 properties down the east coast of england. in addition, we brought in more resources, temporary barriers, to protect isolated communities that flooded in 2007. the danger is that
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people will look back to 2013, when we got away with a flood, and we got away with it last night, is there a danger that they will look at those events and say, we will not bother to evacuate next time? what we have donein to evacuate next time? what we have done in the intervening years is to improve the flood defences, so the protection is improving. but we can't protect everyone all the time from flooding. when partners together make the decision that the right thing to do is to evacuate, i would encourage people to heed that advice. we saw many people going to relatives, using sandbags and going to rest centres. there is no room for complacency. that's right. these defences do a fantasticjob, but we can't protect against every eventuality. we appreciate your coming to talk to us. with that, back to the studio. you look freezing, the pair of you.
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you look freezing, the pair of you. you need to have a hug and get a mug of tea. what a lovely idea. when you are doing an outside broadcast, harding is crucial! we're back tomorrow. —— hugging. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at 10am: gps are warned by downing street to keep their surgeries open longer to meet patient demand or risk losing funding. the one thing that general practice needsis the one thing that general practice needs is more resources, forfunding and more doctors and more nurses. what we cannot cope with is having any further pressure and the idea of cutting funding would just be a disaster. the east coast of england escapes significant flooding after a tidal storm surge passed overnight. more than 5,000 homes were evacuated. labour leaderjeremy corbyn gets set to defend his leadership, after claims by think—tank
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with links to the party it was too weak to win an election. also in the next hour, the next steps for brexit. a group of mps says theresa may must spell out whether she wants the uk to remain in the single market by mid february, before talks can begin. a girl stolen as a newborn from a florida hospital is found
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