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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 15, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with christian fraser and tina daheley. the prime minister calls for an end to insults and division over brexit. in a major speech this week theresa may will say its time to get on and make brexit happen. good morning. it's sunday the 15th of january. also ahead: billions of pounds of restoration work is needed on the palace westminster. today mps launch an inquiry into the repairs. representatives from 70 countries come together in france to discuss peace in the middle east. in sport: chelsea are seven points clear at the top of the premier league. they beat champions leicester city 3—0 and they did it without top scorer diego costa. we'll meet the photographer who has ditched the smartphones and filters to create a new set of images using a century old technique. and louise lear has the weather.
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good morning. all change on the weather front. mild for most of us, but a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain around. more details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. prime minister theresa may is to call for an end to the division stirred by last year's eu referendum, when she reveals her most detailed plan yet on how the government will approach its brexit negotiations. in a speech this week to ambassadors, she'll outline a commitment to building a britain more open to the rest of the world. let's talk to our political correspondent tom bateman. do we get any clearer idea of what she will say from the papers this morning? downing street this morning says this will be a message of unity. theresa may will save the division, the insults, of the
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referendum campaign should come to an end. beyond that i think we will find out how far the prime minister will go and there's lots of speculation this morning that she will suggest she is willing to remove britain from the formal free—trade markets of the eu in order to prioritise control of immigration and to seek global trade deals. that is something that her opponents are already seizing upon, saying that in effect this appears to prioritise immigration policy and allow that to drive economic policy. there is a fair amount of criticism that she is facing on that basis. the further details will come out on tuesday, but it is interesting to note that this will be in front of many other eu investors. it will be a message that she wants to show them that she is clear about the direction this negotiations will
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grow. thanks for the moment. multi—billion pound plans to renovate the palace of westminster, including both houses of parliament, are to be subject to an inquiry by a committee of mps. the commons treasury select committee will examine whether the repair plans offer value for money, and consider whether both mps and lords will have to move out while the work is being done. here's our political correspondent tom barton. the buildings of parliament are not ina good the buildings of parliament are not in a good way. stonework is crumbling, roofs leaking and something needs to be done to bring the palace of westminster back to life. parliament is part of a world heritage site, recognised as the building of outstanding value to humanity. but fixing it would be cheap. estimates range from 3.5 to £4 billion and the work will take at least five years. during that time mps could have to move out of the commons chamber, but where they will go hasn't yet been decided. the
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treasury committee usually conducts enquiries into big economic issues, like the work of the bank of england oi’ like the work of the bank of england or the government's tax policy. its next enquiry will take a look closer to home. the committee says previous reports have failed to provide enough evidence to assess the proposals and claims ministers haven't answered their questions about the cost of the work. the palace of westminster me be crucial to public life in britain, but those who are elected to serve it as a fixing it must be good value for the taxpayer. we'll be talking more about this on breakfast this morning, speaking to the victorian society at 6:40am, and an mp who's been involved in the restoration plans after 8am. a major international conference to try to kick—start the middle east peace process is being held in paris. delegates from 70 nations, including britain, are expected to reaffirm support for a two—state solution to the decades—old conflict. palestinians have welcomed the meeting but israel,
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which is not attending, says the conference is loaded against it. iraqi state television says government forces have taken full control of the university of mosul, one of the islamic state group's main bases in the city. clashes are reported to be continuing in some parts of the campus. military officials say they've found chemicals that could be used for making weapons, but said retaking the area was a "significant vi cto ry". about 100 migrants are feared to have drowned off the coast of libya. it's after the boat they were travelling in sank on its way to europe. four people have been rescued. the search operation has continued in darkness and poor weather conditions. there's a warning that air passengers arriving in britain will face "severe disru ption" after brexit, unless there's an increase in border force staff. the airport operators association says passport checks for eu nationals are likely to become more stringent, leading to an increase in queues and processing times. here's our home affairs correspondent danny shaw.
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there are record numbers of travellers at written‘s airports. in 2015 they were 251 million passenger journeys. it is thought last year's figure was even higher. but there is concern that growth in air traffic hasn't been matched by an increase in resources for waterfalls, which is responsible for immigration and customs checks. —— border force. it is said that has led to longer queues at passport desks and there are concerns it will worsen. at present eu travellers use separate channels automatic passport gates. we can to be quicker and four passengers outside europe. —— than four passengers outside europe. —— than foui’ passengers. passengers outside europe. —— than four passengers. but afterwards all —— but the associations says the change will mean overall waiting times will increase. they say introducing tighter controls on eu passport holders would be highly
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disruptive for passengers, airlines and airports. they say airports would have to spend millions of pounds on extra immigration checks. so it is asking for the government to keep the current system in place for eu passengers travelling to uk airports. the home office said it would be wrong to set out details of how future immigration controls might work in advance of negotiations with the eu. but the department says border force has the capacity to meet passenger demand and maintain security. politicians in the us have reacted angrily after the president—elect donald trump criticised the respected civil rights campaignerjohn lewis. mr trump tweeted that mr lewis was all talk and no action, after the congressman said he would not attend mr trump's inauguration. john lewis is the last surviving speaker from the 1963 march on washington, which was addressed by martin luther king. sarah corker reports. another day, and another row on
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twitter for president—elect donald trump. he has caused outrage after criticising veteran civil rights campaignerjohn lewis for questioning the legitimacy of his election win. the georgian democrat told nbc‘s meet the press: that prompted an angry response from mrtrump, that prompted an angry response from mr trump, tweeting: we won't be trumped! the row comes as thousands of civil rights activists in washington kicked off a week of anti—trump protests. activists in washington kicked off a week of anti-trump protests. we come
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to say to the democrats in the senate and in the house and to the moderate republicans to get some backbone! get some guts! meanwhile, rehearsals for friday's inauguration are infull swing, rehearsals for friday's inauguration are in full swing, but more than 15 democrats, including mr lewis, have 110w democrats, including mr lewis, have now set they won't be going. —— have 110w now set they won't be going. —— have now said. four months after one of its rockets blew up on take—off, the private us firm spacex has successfully launched a spacecraft from a launchpad in california. the craft, which delivered ten communication satellites into orbit, landed safely on a platform in the pacific ocean. spacex now has 70 planned missions, including one for nasa to fly cargo to the international space station. at that that was a relief. the shortlists for the 2017
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brit awards have been revealed, with david bowie receiving two posthumous nominations. the singer was named in the best album and best british male categories, after releasing his final album, blackstar, days before his death last january. grime artist skepta, who beat bowie to last year's mercury prize, is up for three awards. craig david, beyonce, little mix and radiohead are among the other performers up for honours. the winners will be announced next month. with a five month freeze and plenty of snow, the chelyabinsk region of russia would be idealfor skiing but for one problem, it's too flat. so horses are riding to the rescue, pulling snowboarders at speed across the area's forests and lakes. they've tried cars, motorbikes and snowmobiles but they've found horsepower the best of all. that looks really good fun. it is all about going back to
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basics. it doesn't matter how much technology you've got. there wasn't much snow until last week. looks like that's the place to go. a bit too fast for me! let's have a look at this morning's papers. the sunday times has the news that trump wants a putin summit in reykjavik within the first few weeks, after the inauguration on friday. there has been word from washington, that this is not going to happen, but the times insists it will. i suppose at some point in the first 100 days he will have to meet president putin. brexit. theresa may's speech, what will she say, what won't she say? her big gamble on a clean brexit. and this extraordinary story we heard about, this girl who was kidnapped from a maternity ward in
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florida 18 years ago has been reunited with her mother. incredibly she has defended the woman who abducted her and insists that she is not a criminal. brexit very much the main story on the sunday express. they say the pm will take the fight to the eu on tuesday by announcing that britain will quit the single market and also the customs union. she will speak of course to ambassadors who will be there for that speech. 0n the sun, apparently victoria beckham has scuppered plans for a £10 million spice girls reunion. she says she has drafted in more years to stop her old bandmates performing their catalogue. she has so many things on. she has so many things on. she has. i ensure many fans will be disappointed about that.
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the mail on sunday says it has done a poll, the first major poll of the anc when the crisis. they say many voters demand a cut to foreign aid sent overseas to help our stricken nhs. -- a&e in sent overseas to help our stricken nhs. —— a&e in crisis. we will speak about home care a little later. the main story this morning: theresa may will urge britain to put an end to division and insults when she sets up a government's plant for brexit negotiations later this week. mps are launching an enquiry into the planned multi—million pound restoration of the palace of westminster. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. 0nce daylight comes i suspect this is how it will look. cloudy, grey
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dull and damp. the good news is that if you do not like the cold, it is much milder in the west. the weather front arise through the night across the country and it brings in a westerly flow to the story and that allows temperatures to be better than they have of late. it brought some way rain. we may see some wet snow as it moves through west anglia is generally speaking it is cloudy dull and damp. the temperatures, 6— eight degrees. where the rain falls into the cold air there could be some ice if you were out early. not looking too bad in northern ireland with the rain easing away but it is still cloudy and damp poor visibility. not quite as cold as it has been in scotland some some of that snow will begin to melt away on the high ground as we push through the high ground as we push through the day the rain will ease but it
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stays d rizzly the day the rain will ease but it stays drizzly and grey. nine and 10 degrees up to the west but always just a little bit cooler on the exposed east. three degrees will not be pleasant. as we go through the night there will not be that much in the way of change. weather front is not going anywhere. through the spine of the country by then. and the temperatures are not falling away either. nine degrees in the west but still chilly out to the east. that cool air will not shift very fast. we will see rain drifting through the midlands and into the south. again it is new since drizzle. a few showers into the far north west look at the east—west splits. 10 degrees to five degrees. it looks like it will be chilly in the far south—east with frost and four but it does seem as though it
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will be cloudy but my other. -- milder. that is disappointing. a good day for ducks. we're talking pictures this morning, that's because later on we're joined by a photographer who's been embracing a century—old technique to take some amazing images. so we want you to send us the photograph you're most proud of taking. to kick us off, is one of my favourite pictures, this is of my nan on her 90th birthday. the birthday was made up, because we do not know when she was actually born. we know the year but not the day. how do you choose her birthday? first day of the year. this is one of mine — from last year, when i was on a rescue ship off the coast of libya, reporting on the migrant crisis.
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we will all wearing anti nausea bracelets but they do not work. i was really sick. a great picture. this picture is from alistair parker this picture is from alistair parker and it's of a treeline in the trough of bowland. alistair says he takes a photograph of these trees every time he visits. damian kershaw sent us this colourful photograph of tower bridge in london. while abi hitchcock said she's really proud of this close up. keep the third is coming in. i wonder if that is a zoom in or if she is actually that close. we are going to play with a equipment of this photographer. i am looking
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forward to that. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or you can tweet us your picture using the hashtag bbcbreakfast. and we'll be talking more about this in about half an hour from now. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30. time now to take a look at some of this week's big cinema releases in the film review with mark kermode and gavin esler. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. and we've got one or two things you might have heard of. we are in award season so it's a big week. we have of course la la land which everyone is talking about. live by night, the new film by ben affleck. and manchester by the sea, with a standout performance by casey affleck.
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la la land. yeah, you've seen this is coming out, you've seen the poster. i have seen it. i've seen the film. 0h, you've seen the film, oh great, fantastic. so, damien chazelle's swooning tribute to classic old hollywood musicals of singin‘ in the rain and also things like umbrellas of cherbourg. emma stone and ryan gosling are the star—crossed pair who meet in an la trafficjam. it's a fantastic opening. a wonderful song and dance number. he is a hardcore jazz freak, she is an aspiring actress. they hate each other at the beginning but gradually the relationship begins to thaw and they become friends and possibly something more. here's a clip. i got a call back. what? come on! for what? for a tv show. the one i was telling you about, earlier. the dangerous minds meets the 0c? yeah. congratulations, that's incredible! i feel like i said negative stuff about it before. what? it's like rebel without a cause, sort of. i got the bullets. yes.
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you've never seen it! i've never seen it. oh, my. you know, it's playing at the rialto. really? yes. you should go— i mean, i...i can take you. 0k. you know, for research. for research. yeah. 0k. um, monday night, ten o'clock. yeah, great. for research. research. you're grinning all the way through it. i know, i loved it. well, you and everybody else. i went into it thinking, the problem is everybody said this is so good, it's going to be a crushing disappointment and it isn't. it's really, really good. firstly, this is actually chazelle's second musical. he'd made a thing called guy and madeline on a park bench before he made whiplash which was drums as a war movie. full metal hi—hat we called it at the time. from the beginning, it said it was presented in cinemascope and the screen opens up into this glorious cinemascope, an explosion of colour, blues, yellows, greens, really primary colours. there is a fabulous dance sequence on a freeway which is almost kids from fame but done in la.
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then what the story does is it occupies a space between, on the one hand this nostalgic clunkiness of woody allen's everyone says i love you, and the free—form fluidity of gravity. in fact there is a scene where we are literally flying. i thought the performances were terrific. emma stone dominates it. she plays somebody who has to go to an audition and act being an actor. a really hard thing to do! and she does it brilliantly. i thought the song and dance numbers were well choreographed, i loved the lyrics, i love the way in which... people have said they are no fred and ginger. no, they are not meant to be. damien chazelle said he wanted to make something that has the magical of musicals but also had its feet on the ground. it had the texture of real life. i think it does have that. i thought it was utterly charming. plus, most importantly, it is not afraid to be melancholy or poignant, it is notjust everything is tied up neatly, it is...
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its strengths are in its sad streaks which makes the joyousness even more. i thought the opening five minutes was worth the price of admission alone. it's brilliant. it appears to be one shot. but also, we have talked about casablanca being remade, badly. this is casablanca for our times, in many ways. absolutely right. it is a movie that is good enough to nod very explicitly to casablanca and for you not to go, oh, sorry, you blew it. i really, really liked it. so did i. now live by night. so, ben affleck writes, directs, stars in an adaptation of a novel by dennis lehane. he isjoe coughlin, a small—time hood in prohibition era boston and doesn't want to be a gangster, the opposite of ray liotta in goodfellas. he finds himself travelling to florida where he becomes exactly what he didn't want to be.
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he goes up against the ku klux klan. the interesting thing about the film is it has an extraordinary pedigree. chris cooper, elle fanning, brendan gleeson, and of course affleck himself. i think one of the reasons it has sniffy reviews is when you have that kind of talent, people expect something more than a film which is ok. you said invoking casablanca, this film invokes the godfather and scarface and it is neither of those films. it is handsome but in a way which is kind of artificial. it does look good and there are... certainly, i wasn't bored, i found the story sort of interesting enough. but it does have a sense of its handsomeness is more important than any depth. it is very much to do with surface. there is stuff in there to like but at no point did i think this was a classic. when you look at the pedigree involved in it, itjust ought to be better than it is.
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argo, which ben affleck also directed was one of the best films of the last ten years. it's witty and it's tense and based on a true story which he takes liberties with but it is really good. however, this brings us nicely to manchester by the sea. this is the third film by the playwright kenneth lonergan who made you can count on me which got awards nominations and everybody loved. and then margaret, which spent five years in the editing room. he just couldn't finish it and there were law suits. is he a genius or someone who cannot finish a film? i have to say, this, as his third film, made me go, actually, he might be a genius. we're not going to be here much longer. i'm not moving to boston, lee. don't wanna talk about that right now. you said he left you money so you could move. yep, that doesn't mean... anyway, what's in boston? you're a janitor. so what? you can do that anywhere. there's plenty of toilets and clogged up drains all over town. i don't wanna talk about... all my friends are here. i'm on the hockey team, i'm on the basketball team. i gotta maintain our boat now. i work on george's
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boat two days a week. i got two girlfriends and i'm in a band. you're a janitor in quincy. what the hell do you care where you live? ok, so he is a janitor in quincy but he's called to his hometown of manchester—by—the—sea which is actually the name of the town, where he has to revisit the ghosts of the past after his brother collapses and he finds himself having to look after the nephew. the film is told in two time frames, the present in which he's going back to the past and the flashbacks in which we actually see the past. so much of the story is told through the way in which casey affleck holds himself. the scenes in boston when he is completely withdrawn and everything about the way he hunches his shoulders, the set of his face, the way he slightly purses his lips, is in a start contrast to the flashback scenes in which he's garrulous, and oozing boozy bonhomie. we know these threads will move together, we will see his old life with his beloved wife played by michelle williams, and his new life where
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he is isolated and somehow we are going to find out how the isolation happened. when it does finally come, it a fairly devastating central sequence. in one of the key sequences they use albinoni's agagio in g minor, which is a false move for me because it is used in many films. it was used in rollerball, flashdance, gallipoli. it was used by wendy craig in butterflies. simon mayo used it for confessions in radio 2. it was weird that in a film that was everything to do with the delicate nuances, it was too obvious. that aside, casey affleck is really terrific. kenneth lonergan deonstrates he is actually a very good craftsman as a film maker. and for all the criticism sometimes of hollywood, to have la la land and manchester by the sea, the grittier side of america and the... absolutely, this is an indie favourite director who has finally shown us he is worthy of the praise that has been heaped on him. your best of the week is a monster calls. a monster calls came out
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just after christmas. i think it's the best out at the moment, juan antonio bayona's adaptation of patrick ness' story about a young boy who was traumatised by his mother's ill—health, and he starts seeing visions of a tree monster, played by liam neeson, which says i will tell you stories and you will tell me your truth. it uses fantasy to address real—life down—to—earth problems and it does so in a way which is beautiful and utterly heartbreaking. it owes a huge debt to guillermo del toro who i know you're a huge fan of. i have had so many reports from people saying i knew i was going to cry but i had no idea how much. it is very moving, very touching. beautifully filmed. julieta is wonderful. i thought it was the best almodovar since volver. it is the dvd of the week. exactly what i think. i think it is the best since volver. superb story, based on the short stories of alice munro. adriana ugarte and emma suarez playing younger and older versions of the same central character who is estranged from her daughter. it does the thing that almodovar does best which is a passionate, truthful human story.
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but told in a way which is profoundly cinematic. he has never been backward in coming forward in giving you lush visuals but this has so much to do with the characters, wonderful performances, writing is terrific. it is again heartbreaking but beautifully so. honestly, looking back at the selection of movies we have looked at, that is a good sweep of films. that's a good weekend's viewing. a quick reminder before we go that you will find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/film — and you can watch our previous shows on the bbc iplayer. that's it for this week. thanks for watching. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast, with christian fraser and tina daheley. coming up before 7am, louise will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. prime minister theresa may is to call for an end to the division stirred by last year's eu referendum,
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when she reveals her most detailed plan yet on how the government will approach its brexit negotiations. in a speech this week to ambassadors, she'll outline a commitment to building a britain more open to the rest of the world. let's talk to our political correspondent tom bateman. lots of speculation in the newspapers today. what do we actually know about what she is likely to say? certainly what we know from downing street formally is that they are saying this will be a speech that has a message about unity, about putting the divisions and what she will say were the insults of the referendum campaign behind us. we can go further and deduce from what the prime minister has said already that there is likely to be a message, and certainly this is the subject of much speculation in the papers this morning, that she is prepared to remove written from those formal markets of the eu around free trade, around the customs union, in order to gain control of immigration and
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to gain control of immigration and to prioritise trade deals elsewhere in the world. i think what she is likely to then say it that they will seek bespoke free—trade deals for certain industries when it comes to the rest of the eu. that much is already i think out there in terms of what she has said and i'm sure we will hear those messages emphasised on tuesday. will its silence her critics and achieve that unity she has called for? already we are hearing noises that this is likely to view for opponents to prioritise immigration control over britain's economic prospects. will its silence the debate? i wouldn't hold your breath. plans for a multi—billion pound restoration of the palace of westminster, including both houses of parliament, are to be scrutinised by mps. the inquiry by the commons treasury committee will look at whether the repairs offer value for money. it'll also consider whether mps and lords will have to move out while the work is undertaken. a major international conference to try to kick—start the middle east
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peace process is being held in paris. delegates from 70 nations, including britain, are expected to reaffirm support for a two—state solution to the decades—old conflict. palestinians have welcomed the meeting but israel, which is not attending, says the conference is loaded against it. iraqi state television says government forces have taken full control of the university of mosul, one of the islamic state group's main bases in the city. clashes are reported to be continuing in some parts of the campus. military officials say they've found chemicals that could be used for making weapons, but said retaking the area was a "significant vi cto ry". about 100 migrants are feared to have drowned off the coast of libya. it's after the boat they were travelling in sank on its way to europe. four people have been rescued. the search operation has continued in darkness and poor weather conditions. air passengers arriving in britain will face severe disruption after brexit, unless there's an increase in borderforce staff,
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according to the airport 0perators association. the body which represents more than 50 british airports warns passport checks for eu nationals are likely to become more stringent, leading to bigger queues. the home office says the border force has the capacity to meet demand. four months after one of its rockets blew up on take—off, the private us firm spacex has successfully launched a spacecraft from a launchpad in california. the craft, which delivered ten communication satellites into orbit, landed safely on a platform in the pacific ocean. spacex now has 70 planned missions, including one for nasa to fly cargo to the international space station. the shortlists for the 2017 brit awards have been revealed, with david bowie receiving two posthumous nominations. the singer was named in the best album and best british
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male categories, after releasing his final album, blackstar, days before his death last january. grime artist skepta, who beat bowie to last year's mercury prize, is up for three awards. also on that list — craig david, beyonce, little mix and radiohead. they're all up for honours. the winners will be announced next month. a great documentary on david bowie last week. i really enjoyed that. a couple of men behind you would like to leave their clubs, as far as we know. it is the january transfer window where all sorts of shenanigans go on in the premier league. interestingly both sides on. diego costa in the blue maybe has a back injury or might be going to china for £30 million a year and dimitri who said he doesn't want to play for west ham again. we've seen some spectacular goals in the last couple of weeks.
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andy carroll added to the collection as west ham beat crystal palace 3—0. joey barton scored on his return to the premier league and to burnley, while both tottenham and arsenal put four goals past their opponents. but it is chelsea who are top of the table with a seven point lead despite the absence of their top scorer, diego costa. joe lynskey reports. no diego costa, no problem. without their star player chelsea showed their star player chelsea showed their team's star quality. at the home of the champions this was a test of their own title credentials and their inspiration came from an unlikely source. the first of two home goals from their full—back marcus alonzo said them on their way. could this fortune tend diego costa away? plenty of attacking opportunities remained. 0n costa away? plenty of attacking opportunities remained. on a night when some thought their season would unravel, chelsea proved their resolve. their lead at the top is
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now seven points over tottenham. their main man is a very different place. harry kane ended the week he became a parent with a hat—trick against west brom. something that will make a nice souvenir for someone. i have had a busy week, but one i have enjoyed and obviously i enjoyed today as well. there were four goals for arsenal. their co mforta ble four goals for arsenal. their comfortable route to victory makes things very uncomfortable at swa nsea. things very uncomfortable at swansea. the new boss paul clement means some answers fast. perhaps he should look to mark a silver for inspiration. hull city's latest appointment marked his first match with victory against bournemouth. the tigers beat a lot —— revitalised and had their first the tigers beat a lot —— revitalised and had theirfirst win the tigers beat a lot —— revitalised and had their first win since december. burnley has been surprising people, not least bringing joey barton back. five minutes into his return he is back to making headlines on the pitch.
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this is fast becoming a season known for its breathtaking goals, after one of these scorpion kicks at west ham added a third take on stockman football. —— stu ntman ham added a third take on stockman football. —— stuntman football. ham added a third take on stockman football. -- stuntman football. that is tremendous! on a weekend of speculation there is still plenty of star quality left in this division. elsewhere, watford and middlesbrough drew 0—0, but the match started with a minute's applause for watford's former manager graham taylor, who died this week aged 72. taylor, who also managed england, took watford from the fourth division to a second—placed finish in the top flight in just five seasons. he also guided the club to the only fa cup final of their history. tributes were paid to graham taylor at several grounds across the country. today's games in the premier league sees the manchester clubs take on the two teams from merseyside. everton host manchester city in the early kick off while fourth placed liverpool face
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manchester united at old trafford. a win would take liverpool to second place in the table but with manchester united unbeaten in 15 games, jose mourinho is in confident mood. we don't have just the good performances, we have also the happiness of the good results. we play at home, not a way, so that changes a little bit, but in general is just changes a little bit, but in general isjust one more big match and let's enjoy the match. of course both teams are actually, especially now in the long—term, in a good run, in good shape. maybe united has less problems with injuries or whatever, but that doesn't mean anything. we can lose against each team, but we can win against each team, but we can win against each team and that's the important thing. boxing now, and james degale has been taken to hospital as a precaution after he retained his ibf world super middleweight
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title overnight in new york, but only after a controversial draw with fellow world champion badou jack. degale began the fight strongly, knocking jack down in the first round. but jack came back, causing the londoner a lot of problems, and degale was knocked down himself in the final round. and after taking a long time, thejudges decided by a majority decision that it was a draw. both men go home with their respective world title belts. they both seemed rather disappointed. wasps have managed to keep alive their hopes of reaching the quarter—finals of rugby union's european champions cup but they left it late before beating toulouse 17—111. elliott daly scored wasps‘ first try before toulouse were awarded a penalty try. the french side were leading until the final minute of the game, when dan robson forced his way across the line. wasps are second in pool two with one group game left. leicester tigers‘ aim of reaching the knockout stages hasn't been realised after they were beaten
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34—3 away at racing 92. this was one of four tries for racing, who are last year's runners up. elsewhere, glasgow suffered a narrow defeat to munster, denting their hopes of progressing in the competition, and northampton, who already knew they couldn't reach the knock out stages, beat castre 28—21. lisa ashton has become bdo world darts champion for the third time after a comfortable win in the women's final at lakeside. ashton beat the australian corrinne hammond by 3—0 sets to add to the world titles she won in 2014 and 2015. the men's final takes place to today. the english number one seed glenn durrant, who saw off jamie hughes last night, will play danny noppert of the netherlands. neither have won the title before. the masters snooker gets underway today at alexandra palace in london. favourite to win is six—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan. last year he thrashed barry hawkins in the final ten frames to one. stephen hendry has also won the masters six times so how much does 0'sullivan want
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a record seventh? it would be great to get another masters, but not just it would be great to get another masters, but notjust because it is the seventh but because it is the masters. i'm not saying i would love to break the record, ijust want masters. i'm not saying i would love to break the record, i just want to win the masters. i want to win another world is, another china open, another welsh. and you can watch the masters live on the bbc. the action gets underway this afternoon with coverage on bbc 2. there are also regular updates live on radio 5 live. england's cricketers face india this morning to start their one—day international series. after a disappointing test series, where england lost 4—0, captain eoin morgan says he's expecting these matches to be a lot closer. this group of players have never played a one—day series here, which obviously means we are very optimistic about things. having had a bit of success at the t20 world
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cup, and having no experience in playing in india was a great confidence booster for us and playing in india was a great confidence boosterfor us and one playing in india was a great confidence booster for us and one we can draw on throughout the series. and before i go, i must show you this. racing at the skiing world cup in switzerland was cancelled yesterday because there was too much snow! the conditions on the lauberhorn course in wengen were pretty bad. more than 40cm of snow fell overnight. crews worked hard, but were unable to clear enough snow allow the race to take place. there was a dry start to the ski season in december, but resorts are now dealing with heavy flurries with a cold snap hitting europe, and many parts of the uk of course as well. last week they were skiing on grass and now have a look at it! there wasn't enough for and now there is too much! interesting, a lot of sport is going on today but i think a lot of eyes
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will be on the two manchester and two merseyside games. interesting. everton played manchester city. i would probably go for a draw. united against liverpool. the two different sides of the two cities. brave, making a prediction. the palace of westminster has been home to our politicians for five —— 500 years, and many parts of the building have been standing for even longer than that, back to the eleventh century. it's thought to need repairs costing at least £3.5 billion, and now a committee of mps is to look into the proposals to renovate it, to see if the plans offer value for money. let's talk to christopher costelloe, who's the director of the victorian society, which campaigns to preserve architecture from that period. good morning. can you give us an insight into why this repaired bill is so expensive? it's a vast bill.
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it is more like a small village or town than a conventional building. it is also very old and many other services haven't been upgraded for 50 or 60 years. large parts are full of asbestosis, no one knows what all the wires and pipes are, so it has reached the stage of its life where it needs a thorough refurbishment. the worry is how much value there is for the taxpayer. the project is estimated to cost in the region of £3.5 billion to £4 billion, it could overrun. what would that be down to, spiralling costs, in this case? overrun. what would that be down to, spiralling costs, in this case7m isa spiralling costs, in this case7m is a lot of money and it is right that parliament looks carefully at the plans and make sure they get value for money. clearly, with any billing project of this size, there is an element of uncertainty about how much it will cost. but they will have built huge amounts of contingency into the proposals, so hopefully they should be able to get it in on budget. how delicate is the
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work that needs to take pace with a building that dates back to... i know the history dates back to the 11th century, but then it burnt down in the great fire. the current version is 200 years old. what types of things will they look at? version is 200 years old. what types of things will they look aflm version is 200 years old. what types of things will they look at? it is like a open—heart surgery. they will need to be delicate and careful, carefully stripped out all of the services, put them back, modernise, more efficient and rationally planned, so the building should look very similar after they've done it. most of the work will be invisible, the idea is that the building will be better, more efficient and safe afterwards. different options have been put forward for the government to decide on. one of them is that mps and lords move out for a period of about six years. and the other is that they stay put and moved to different parts, but the projects will take longer. what would you recommend as the best option? comparisons from previous
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refurbishment in parliaments suggest that moving out altogether is the quickest and cheapest option. so the professionals who have given advice on the project so far say that is definitely the way to go. do you think there's anything that could have prevented this huge restoration project and expense? has the building being badly looked after? not at this stage. 0ne building being badly looked after? not at this stage. one of the biggest problem is there is a lot of asbestosis and a building and there isn't any way you can get rid of all that without competitively removing eve ryo ne that without competitively removing everyone from it. it hasn't exactly been badly looked after, so much as looked after in a piecemeal way. there have been individual upgrades, but no one has had the vision of how the whole building should fit together. 40 or 50 years ago when people did projects like this, the techniques were a lot less advanced
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and they didn't plan them in the same scientific way that they do now. over the centuries what is the biggest threat, i know your expertise is victorian times, but what were the biggest threats to the building? the gunpowder plot, the blitz. not to mention four hours. we have been warned that increasingly there is a risk of a catastrophic fire and it is growing. there is not good fire comp are complementation and the electrics are all. so unless something old like this —— encumbrances like this project is undertaken, the results could be disastrous. we will be speaking to chris bryant a little later. some very difficult questions. should we be spending four billion pounds on
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the palace of westminster when we can't put it into the nhs? you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may will urge britain to put an end to division and insults, when she sets out the government's plan for brexit negotiations this week. mps are launching an inquiry into the planned multibillion—pound restoration of the palace of westminster. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. a good day for a number? it looks very wet behind you. even an umbrella at some point will need to be replaced by something that will keep off the drizzle. a lot of cloud around and outbreaks of rain but a few do not enjoy the cold, it is much milder into the west. the reason is this a weather front that arrived through the night. he changed the wind direction to wear
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westerly milder source but it is bringing cloud and outbreaks of line -- light bringing cloud and outbreaks of line —— light rain. east in england it is the one place where it is going to stay cold and so we could have a speu stay cold and so we could have a spell of wet snow. we are not too concerned about it, ice could be more of an issue falling on freezing surfaces. take care out there. there isa surfaces. take care out there. there is a lot of car behind it with patchy outbreaks of rain. look at the temperature. seven, nine degrees at nine a.m.. it will be cloudy with poor visibility. the odd spot of rain as well. pools was a —— poor visibility. rain will linger and by thenit visibility. rain will linger and by then it will be drizzly and bank in then it will be drizzly and bank in the afternoon and a miserable sunday. 10 degrees in the west but in the east it will fill much colder. as we move through the
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overnight, not much change. the west east divide continues and that weather front continues to be a nuisance through the spine of the country. it stays mild and damp in the west, colder into the east. it looks as if we will continue to see cold air despite the weather front non—moving very far all very fast. behind it a lot of cloud to come with a few outbreaks of rain into the far north—west. look at the difference in the temperature. 8— 10 degrees in the west, five in east anglia. that is how it will continue over the next few days with mild weather in the extreme north—west but it could stay cloudy. potentially colder in the south—east and we could have a return of fog and we could have a return of fog and frost. if you wanted to take a picture right now, for many, it would be easy. just get out your
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smartphone and snap away. but it's not always been so simple, as photographer henry iddon has been finding out. henry's been quite literally following in the footsteps of a pair of victorian brothers, by using a glass plate camera to capture the images you see behind us of england's highest mountains. where is the camera, henry? in a museum. tell me first of all, how heavyis museum. tell me first of all, how heavy is the camera and how do you get it up a mountain? the camera that we use is ten" x 12", that is the size of the negative, the rucksack weighed about £45 and the dark slide, they hold the song, was ina box dark slide, they hold the song, was in a box weighing £25. it was a lot of equipment to carry. and it looks
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like that? now day you call this a large format camera. the bellows and the lens at the front and the screen at the back which you would cover with a cloth. that is what see in the old pictures, the victorians under a cloth, looking at the screen. a camera of this size would produce a five x four inch negative. the camera i was using was bigger. you are photographer and they assume you don't have this sort of equipment for a normal photo shoot what made you decide to do this, to ta ke what made you decide to do this, to take a camera this size and take it up take a camera this size and take it upa mountain? take a camera this size and take it up a mountain? i could only take three at a time, three photos at a time. i have been involved in mountaineering for a while and i gained access to the camera through a trust and i thought it would be interesting to shoot modern climbing
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and modern landscapes with a camera that was used by those victorian brothers at the start of the sport. this is, the brothers, the abrams brothers from keswick. before 1900 people would climb to train to go to switzerland but then a sport. these are some of the photos you have taken are some of the photos you have ta ken today? are some of the photos you have taken today? so, yes. modern climbing through an old lens. what do you get from glass plates are you do you get from glass plates are you do not get from modern film? the difference is the lens. i was using a modern film sandwiched between glass in the camera but the lens was made in 1870 and you get lovely shades of grey and subtlety. you don't get that with a modern lens. where is this picture? this is chris fisher climbing in what stale. an
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extraordinary picture. you told us that you go behind this camera and then how long does it take for the photo to form on the glass plate? the exposure takes about one second. reasonably quick because i was using a modern a mulch in between glass plates. that then it would have taken up to five seconds. and that is the camera? that is it. it is huge. it is made from mahogany and brass. it folded down but it was still a bulky item and susceptible to the wind. you had to shoot on still days. it is so far removed from today where you can take multiple photos before you can select the correct one. you only got to take three, they had to be the
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best one. what make of that now in terms of photography with everybody being able to put a photo out there? the filter tries to emulate what100 —year—old camera tried to do. but it is easy to forget what photography is, what photography involved. twiddling brass knobs, bringing you ride the glass and the viewfinder. nowadays photography is almost abstract. you use a telephone to ta ke abstract. you use a telephone to take a photograph. you need to be far more selective because you only have three plates. so there must be many photographs that you must cast away, or, since you had seen. you had to wait until everything was precisely correct. there was one shot we took were was cloudy but we had to stand around for half an hour and for the sun. before you go, cast
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your professional eye over some of these. 0ur viewers have been sending them in. there are so many of them on twitter and i am trying to get through them but they are quite good. caroline petite sent us this one that she took last week of cove—by—the beach near southwold. caroline says the sun was setting and the tide turning and it was magical. this picture of a blue—tit was sent in by ken barker, he says it was taken though window in his garden in essex. susan williams says this is her best photo ever — it's of a local farm taken from a hot air balloon injune 2003 and nikki hooper sent us this image of a red squirrel, taken at the british wildlife centre. that is the great! that is the
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beauty of modern technology. you can just snap away and get read photographs. keep them coming in. we will talk more later in the programme. henry's exhibition at keswick museum opened this weekend and will run until may 12th. a sound of the seaside? or a blight on the beach? seagulls are synonymous with the coast, but they're also known for stealing food from passers—by. so in scarborough, they're debating whether or not to bring in birds of prey to reduce the seagull numbers, as emma glasbey has been finding out. seagulls and scarborough just go together. but in recent years the relationship has been turning slightly sour love. the number of birds in this town has grown to a few thousand and especially in the summer it is claimed they are becoming more aggressive. summer it is claimed they are becoming more aggressivelj summer it is claimed they are becoming more aggressive. i have seen them take food from people ‘s hands. for children it can be scary.
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people feed them. they feed the myths grabs and they should not encourage them to come to the area. i don't think it is a real issue. i think a couple of people complained too much about it. the council has been discussing what to do about the birds. they could decide to hire a firm to work on reducing the number of birds over the next few years. we would use egg removal. that is removing a percentage of net eggs from nests. we work with a national body on this. we also fly birds of prey. we are not going out to kill anything, the idea is to move them nesting in the cliffs. visitors are urged not to feed the seagulls buttonhole some traders say the signs are not working and action is needed. all of the restaurant owners
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and traders down this area to try to speak to members of the public if they see them feeding birds. but, generally, the reaction is go away it is none of your business. it is our business, actually, because we see this happening all the time. our business, actually, because we see this happening all the timem may be winter but there are still seagulls around. in january may be winter but there are still seagulls around. injanuary you would expect them to be all out to sea but they are so used to being fed a year they are staying on lan. action will need to happen soon as it is to be taken. the seagull mating season is about to begin. i a lwa ys mating season is about to begin. i always carefully guard my chips when igoto always carefully guard my chips when i go to blackpool. headlines coming up. hello. this is breakfast,
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with christian fraser and tina daheley. the prime minister calls for an end to insults and division over brexit. in a major speech this week theresa may will say it's time to get on and make brexit happen.
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