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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 15, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with christian fraser and tina daheley. the prime minister calls for an end to insults and division over brexit. in a major speech this week theresa may is expected to say its time to get on and make brexit happen. to say it's time to get on and make brexit happen. good morning, it's sunday the 15th of january. also ahead. billions of pounds of restoration work is needed on the palace of westminster — today mps launch an inquiry into the repairs. representatives from 70 countries come together in france to discuss peace in the middle east. in sport...chelsea are seven points clear at the top of the premier league. their top goal scorer, diego costa wasn't playing but they still beat leicester city 3—nil. we'll meet the photographer who has ditched the smartphones and filters to create a new set of images using a century old technique. and louise lear has the weather.
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good morning. all change on the weather front. it is good morning. all change on the weatherfront. it is mild but most of us, but there's a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain around. more details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. prime minister theresa may is to call for an end to the division stirred by last year's eu referendum, when she reveals her most detailed plan yet on how the government will approach its brexit negotiations. in a speech this week to ambassadors, she'll outline a commitment to building a britain more open to the rest of the world. let's talk to our political correspondent tom bateman. a replay the lagoon to get past brea ks a replay the lagoon to get past breaks it means brexit?” a replay the lagoon to get past breaks it means brexit? i think you get a little more than that. the message will be about unity. there
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isafairamount message will be about unity. there is a fair amount we can deduce that we already know about the prime minister from we already know about the prime ministerfrom her previous we already know about the prime minister from her previous speeches. afair bit minister from her previous speeches. a fair bit of speculation this morning. it is fair to say she is likely to suggest that britain should be prepared to extract itself from the formal markets and structures of the eu in order to prioritise control over immigration and trade deals elsewhere and to try and trade deals elsewhere and to try and get bespoke trade deals in certain industries with the european union. her chancellor philip hammond has had an interview with the german newspaper, in which he appears to give the something of an ultimatum to the other member states, suggesting that if britain's single market access was closed, perhaps we could relax the tax regulation system here, in order to remain competitive. will the speech silence the debate and controversy?” competitive. will the speech silence the debate and controversy? i doubt it. thank you very much. multi—billion pound plans
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to renovate the palace of westminster, including both houses of parliament, are to be subject to an inquiry by a committee of mps. the commons treasury committee will examine whether the repair plans offer value for money, and consider whether both mps and lords will have to move out while the work is being done. here's our political correspondent tom barton. the buildings of parliament are not in a good way. stonework is crumbling, roofs are leaking and something needs to be done to bring the palace of westminster back to life. parliament is part of a world heritage site, recognised as a building of outstanding value to humanity. but fixing it won't be cheap. estimates range from 5.5 to £4 billion and the work will take at least five years. during that time, mps could have to move out of the commons chamber, where to hasn't yet been decided. the treasury committee usually conducts enquiries into big economic issues, like the work
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of the bank of england or the government's tax policy. but its next enquiry will take a look much closer to home. the committee says previous reports have failed to provide enough evidence to assess the proposals and claims ministers haven't answered their questions about the cost of the work. the palace of westminster may be crucial to public life in britain, but those who are elected to serve there say fixing it must be good value for the taxpayer. about a hundred migrants are feared to have drowned off the coast of libya. it's after the boat they were travelling in sank on its way to europe. four people have been rescued. the search operation has continued in darkness and poor weather conditions. foreign ministers and senior diplomats from 70 nations are gathering in france to try and kick—start the middle east peace process. israel is not attending, let's talk to our paris correspondent, hugh schofield.
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what can we expect today? we can expect an announcement at the end of proceedings in which all 70 nations will see once again they are committed to the two state solution and urged israel and the palestinians to negotiate directly on that basis. so it's not going to bea on that basis. so it's not going to be a ground—breaking conference, nothing particularly is going to change at the end of it all, but it isa change at the end of it all, but it is a moment for the international community to come together and say we regard this as being one of the big issues in the middle east, overshadowed by syria and iraq, but the fault lines remain. the other point is it happens just as crucial moment when the trump administration is about to take office. that's a coincidence, that was not known when this conference was called, but it does give it an added factor, because the noises from washington are because the noises from washington a re pretty because the noises from washington are pretty dramatic, and from a
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syrian and french perspective, pretty worrying. there is talk of a radical change in policy towards the palestine and israel issue. that is talk of the embassy moving from tel aviv to jerusalem, which would talk of the embassy moving from tel aviv tojerusalem, which would be a dramatic change. this is a moment which the world will put on record, that the two state solution and israel and the palestinian state is what has been agreed so far and will be the basis future talks. we will just have to wait and see if that solution will be saved. there's a warning that air passengers arriving in britain will face "severe disru ption" after brexit, unless there's an increase in border force staff. the airport 0perators association says passport checks for eu nationals are likely to become more stringent, leading to an increase in queues and processing times. here's our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. there are record numbers of travellers at britain's airports. in 2015, there were 251 million
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passenger journeys. it is thought last year's figure was even higher. but there is concern that growth in air traffic hasn't been matched by an increase in resources for border force, which is responsible for immigration and customs checks. the airport 0perators association says that has led to longer queues at passport desks and it's concerned delays will worsen. at present eu travellers use a separate channels or automatic passport gates. they tend to be quicker than for passengers outside of europe. but after brexit if people are all screened in the same way, the association says overall waiting times will increase. in evidence to the parliamentary enquiry, the association said introducing tighter controls to eu passport holders would be highly disruptive for passengers, airlines and airports. it says airports would have to spend millions of pounds on extra facilities for immigration checks, so it is asking the government
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to keep the current system in place for eu passengers travelling to uk airports. the home office says it would be wrong to set out details of how future immigration controls might work in advance of negotiations with the eu. but the department says border force has the capacity to meet passenger demand and maintain security. politicians in the us have reacted angrily after the president—elect donald trump criticised the respected civil rights campaigner, john lewis. mr trump tweeted that mr lewis was all talk and no action, after the congressman said he would not attend mr trump's inauguration. john lewis is the last surviving speaker from the 1963 ‘march on washington‘ which was addressed by martin luther king. another day, and another row on twitter for president—elect donald trump. he has caused outrage after criticising veteran civil rights campaignerjohn lewis for questioning the legitimacy of his election win.
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the georgian democrat told nbc‘s meet the press: that prompted an an angry response from mr trump, tweeting: we won't be trumped! the row comes as thousands of civil rights activists in washington kicked off a week of anti—trump protests. we come to say to the democrats in the senate and in the house and to the moderate republicans to get some backbone! get some guts! meanwhile, rehearsals for friday's
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inauguration are in full swing, but more than 15 democrats, including mr lewis, have now said they won't be going. a teenager who was snatched from a hospital in florida as a baby, 18 years ago, has been reunited with her biological father. the woman, who'd been named kamiyah mobley as a newborn, was abducted when she was just eight hours old. she was tracked down after a tip—off. gloria williams who brought her up as her own daughter has been charged with kidnapping. four months after one of its rockets blew up on take—off, the private us firm, spacex, has successfully launched a spacecraft from a launch pad in california. the craft, which delivered ten communication satellites into orbit, landed safely on a platform in the pacific ocean. spacex now has 70 planned missions, including one for nasa to fly cargo
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to the international space station. with a five month freeze and plenty of snow, the chelyabinsk region of russia would be idealfor skiing but for one problem. . . it's too flat. so horses are riding to the rescue, pulling snowboarders at speed across the area's forests and lakes. they've tried cars, motorbikes and snowmobiles but they've found horse power the best of all. it's survived major fires, bombs and centuries of heated political debate, but the cost of repairs to westminster‘s houses of parliament are estimated to cost
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up to four billion pounds and take at least five years. a committee of mps is to look into the renovation proposals, to see if the plans offer value for money. one of those who've helped draw up the plans is the labour mp chris bryant. good morning. thank you for being with us. you sit on this joint committee, the treasury select committee who looked at your numbers, see you have not provided enough evidence to come to a decision. i'm a bit bewildered by that, because one of the members of the treasury committee was on our committee will be produced the report, so he had every opportunity to ask that then. actually, the figures are there. the important thing is the building does need saving from its self, if you like. this isn't a question of the
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building falling down, but it is one of the most iconic buildings in the world. every tourist comes to the uk oi’ world. every tourist comes to the uk or europe wants to have a photograph of themselves in front of the palace of themselves in front of the palace of westminster. parts of it were finished in the 11th century, so it would be crazy if we were to risk losing it again and there is real danger of catastrophic failure. nearly half of the electrical and mechanical parts are the building will be completely redundant and pastors use by date by 2020. and even more by 2025, so if there were to bea even more by 2025, so if there were to be a fire, and we do regularly have small fires in the building. we have small fires in the building. we have patrols going round 2a hours a day, otherwise we wouldn't be abiding by the law, if we were to have a fire in one of the most inaccessible areas, there would be a real danger that that would spread throughout the building and we would lose the whole thing. there are vast
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quantities of asbestos in the building. what i would say to the treasury committee is, yes we have to make sure we do the most cost effective system for the taxpayer, that must be really important. we believe that's what we've come up with. it stands to reason that if we all move voters going to be cheaper and will get the work done by 2030 instead of 2062. the other thing is, i don't think any of the other proposals, with us staying in part of the building while the work is going on, really a feasible at all. i understand the nervousness of the money. is it appropriate to spend 4 billion or 5 billion at the preliminary estimate, and we all know building job school over the cost, is it appropriate to spend that money when we can find money for social care and for our nhs?|j think we should be finding money for
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social care. can we use this money? the difficulty is it is a unesco world heritage site. every tourist that comes to the uk wants to have their photograph taken in front of it. it's an old building, why don't we move into a new building and then maybe come back to later when some money in the system. that's an even more expensive option. you find a plot of land which is close to whitehall, so that ministers can do their work in their departments and then come into parliament, and that isn't going to cost more, and anyway, if we move out, let's say we gaveit anyway, if we move out, let's say we gave it to a museum or something like that, you'd still have to do the work to protect it. you don't save a single penny by moving out. we don't look at this idea of moving out. but unfortunately, it adds costs. you're quite right, i would like us to spend the money on care
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and on the nhs, as we've been able to do in wales, under the labour government. but leaving party politics aside for the moment, i believe this is a symbol of our democracy, that palace of westminster. in future generations, if we were to lose it, if we fail to ta ke if we were to lose it, if we fail to take action now, and this is urgent, this is not something we can keep putting off with more and more enquiries. the government has to ta ke enquiries. the government has to take action. if we were to feel now, future generations will point the finger at us and say, you work hours. you are planning to move across the road to go to the qe2 centre. why did you make a statement to the country and come up here to the north? because you'd have to move the whole of government and it ends up being very expensive. it have to move the prime minister, the chancellor, the treasury, the foreign office. really? in this day
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of telecommunications? yes. the minister has to attend parliament to vote. some people have suggested that the house of commons could sit in the house of lords and the house of lords could sit in one of the other buildings, as we did in the second world war when the house of commons chamber was bombed. the problem is youtube 650 mps walking at set times down a very narrow pavement, which is a major security risk. the security people said we can't do that. let alone the fact that in the second world war, hardly anybody turned up to parliament. you hardly had any votes are divisions. it's a completely different context we did today. if we were to move parliament to manchester or liverpool and leeds or whatever, i can see the attractions for those regions, but it actually ends up being far more expensive for the
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taxpayer. it is a nonstarter. you still have to do the work on the palace of westminster, because it is an iconic building. i don't think we should turn our back on our national heritage. there are some things here where we are between a rock and a ha rd where we are between a rock and a hard place, but it means we have to make tough decisions. my worry is that the government at the moment is delaying and delaying and we could end up their catastrophic failure. i don't want my staff or the thousands of members of the public to come in to the building, which is riddled with asbestos, without us having a programme to tackle it. the disabled access the palace of westminster is absolutely shocking. people queue in the rain for more than an hour, members of public who want to see her parliament works. that's something could do and we could train people all around the country in the skills we need to be able to
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deliver the project. you've made that point very forcefully. sorry. i actually ca re that point very forcefully. sorry. i actually care about it. we can see that. thanks for coming in. we are also passionate about the weather. use louise. —— there is louise. it is dull and miserable, but it is milder. a lot of cloud in the country and a lot of cloud waiting in the wings over the atlantic. the exception to this will be across east anglia, where it stays pretty calls. but elsewhere, the mildly flooding in. the rain will continue
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to clean away from east anglia. still the risk of ice, but that will ease in the next hour. further west, despite the rain starting to ease off, there will be a lot of drizzle around. but the temperatures up to eight or 9 degrees at nine a.m.. rain still in northern ireland and the west coast of scotland. lighter winds, a drier story across eastern scotland. not much change into the afternoon. the dank and dismal day will continue. double figures out towards the west. chilly in sheltered eastern areas. east anglia are only three degrees. that continues to drift steadily eastwards, there will be low cloud and hill fog and it sees incredibly mild in the west. into east anglia,
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it stays pretty chilly, we are looking at i degrees. it stays pretty chilly, we are looking at! degrees. there could be patchy frost and fog. elsewhere, we keep the cloud, we keep the weather front. another weather front bringing outbreaks of rain into western scotland. again, we will see ten and ii western scotland. again, we will see ten and 11 degrees. for children with a love of the great outdoors, this could make going to school a lot more appealing. plans for four new "nature schools" in england would still see pupils learning traditional subjects, but spending more of their day outside, as david gregory—kumar has been finding out. brandon marsh nature reserve near coventry, home to some excited woodland creatures getting to grips with nature. brandon marsh is also headquarters
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for warwickshire wildlife trust and it is the trust that his leading plans for nature schools across the uk. some of these children could be amongst the very first pupils. but what exactly is a nature school? children at our schools will still need to learn times tables and to read and write. but we are preparing an educational philosophy that will allow teachers to achieve that learning outside, using the natural setting of the school as much as in the classroom. so they will be outside more? they will. probably coming home a bit dirtier than they might otherwise. initially, four nature—based primary schools are planned with two in warwickshire wildlife trust which has been identified as possibly going into camp hill in nuneaton. they have already got their eyes on a site and a building. it is the camp hill school that may
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be the very first nature school in the uk and its location that might surprise some people. it's definitely an urban area but it is the area that was identified by local authorities as with the greatest need for a new school. we'll make the most of any outdoor space there is. we will create new outdoor spaces for learning, a garden and a lot more wildlife areas, possibly even beehives, really exciting. parents visiting the reserve today were very excited. some have already looked into applying for the new school. she loves being outdoors and we would like that for her, for education, really. the outside is an amazing place to learn and i think you can have so many experiences that are not traditional education that still give you the same knowledge that you would have in a classroom so i think it's brilliant. if all goes well, the uk's fist nature school could open in december, 2018. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. carol gould is an american journalist and is here to tell us
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what's caught her eye. a good week to be here, because a lot of it is about donald trump and the inauguration. let's start with this headline, threat to deport iraqi boy lifted. why have you chosen the story? it's a very poignant story, because in iraq, isis has been killing disabled children. the last people to do that where the nazis in world war ii. just getting rid of disabled people, eliminating them. and this boy has been saved because 11,000 british people signed a petition to the home 0ffice people signed a petition to the home office to stop him and his family being deported. so he is being allowed to stay here while the home 0ffice does a review. and i think it's a wonderful story about how the
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british people come out with this tremendous feeling of compassion for someone tremendous feeling of compassion for someone who really needs to stay here. i know people say nhs is burdened enough, but he and his family are being saved from a terrible fate. the family were due to board a plane at heathrow tomorrow. a plane to germany. yes, because they came from germany to hear. the british people have always had a big heart. ithink hear. the british people have always had a big heart. i think itjust gets confused between refugees who genuinely need to be here. yes, there is the 35 k rule, some people earning less than 35,000 are being deported. that was started by theresa may when she was home secretary and there's been a tremendous uproarfrom secretary and there's been a tremendous uproar from ordinary people, like nurses, who happen to be canadian or australian, that they should be allowed to stay. but he is
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very special case and i think it's a wonderful story. looking at the miller, jerry springer has been writing about friday's inauguration. when will his teflon disappear? yes, it's a passionate editorial, as you would expect. he's making the point that donald trump did not win the popular vote. hillary clinton won it by3 popular vote. hillary clinton won it by 3 million. jerry springer says he may ask troops to serve in another war. will he change his mind the next day? he seems to spend his life on twitter. does he ever give any time to his wife? he seems to spend his life in the middle of the night on twitter. jerry springer said, he will be inaugurated, but he will come unstuck. some players going to happen when he will either be impeached or something will come to light that will show that the people
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who voted for him didn't realise what a bloke he. where do you stand on his press conference? some think it's clever, because he comes back much harder and he has a leader on the run. 0thers much harder and he has a leader on the run. others say it's not presidential, you can't behave like this. i've never seen anything like it. i've been watching presidential press co nfe re nces it. i've been watching presidential press conferences all my adult life. i'm old enough to rememberjfk's press co nfe re nces . i'm old enough to rememberjfk's press conferences. and i've never seen press conferences. and i've never seen anything like it. some people said it was genius. that he managed to bring in all these little peripheral aspects, to have a go at buzz feed and cnn and he even had a go at the bbc. there was one thing the media mist, he said the pharmaceutical companies have to be brought to book. they are getting away with murder, £50 billion
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profit. and bernie sanders said exactly the same thing this week at his town hall on cnn. in fact, sanders and trump agree on several things, and nobody has recorded that. but drugs are horrendously expensive in the usa. from drugs to brea kfast. expensive in the usa. from drugs to breakfast. enjoy your full english brea kfast breakfast. enjoy your full english breakfast but don't have another.|j have so many friends in the 70s and 80s, and the cardiologists will hate me. but i'm sorry, my sister eats whatever she wants, she is going to be 70, she is fit as a fiddle. i have four friends who died this year, one of whom was a parachute jumper, one was a marathon runner, they were fit, they were nutritious
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fanatics and sadly they passed away, all through cancer. mae and make you laugh? we need a bit of laughter on this programme and in the world. my life is an open book. i had a serious heart attack a year and a half ago. and when the cardiologists was discharging me, he said my number was 98. and i said at least my temperature is normal. and he said, no, that's how blocked your heart is. and then i was with the crowd of bbc journalist heart is. and then i was with the crowd of bbcjournalist who crowded round me to ask about the heart attack. i said round me to ask about the heart attack. isaid i've round me to ask about the heart attack. i said i've only got 90% blockage. that means i can spend the next two years eating whatever i want. and also people will be waking up want. and also people will be waking up this morning, about to have a full english. thank you very much.
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coming up in the next half hour... forget smartphones and filters, we'll look at the new collection of images taken using a century—old technique. stay with us — headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with christian fraser and tina daheley. coming up before 9am: louise will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may is to call for an end to the insults and division provoked by last year's eu referendum. the prime minster will make the comments during a major speech on tuesday, in which she'll offer her most detailed insight yet into how the government will approach negotiations over britain's withdrawal from the eu. plans for a multi—billion pound restoration of the palace of westminster, including both houses of parliament, are to be scrutinised by mps. the inquiry by the commons treasury committee will look at whether the repairs offer value for money. it'll also consider whether mps and lords will have to move out while the work is undertaken. earlier the labour mp chris bryant,
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one of the mps who has been drawing up one of the mps who has been drawing up the plans, told us, it was the best option. what i would say to the treasury committee is, yes, we have to make sure we do the most cost effective system for the taxpayer, that must be really important and we believe that is what we have come up with. i think it stands to reason that if we all move out, it will be cheaper and we will get the work done by 2030 instead of by 2062. another issue, i do not think any of the other proposals, with us staying in part of the building while the work goes on, it is not really feasible at all. a major international conference to try to kick—start the middle east peace process is being held in paris. delegates from 70 nations, including britain, are expected to reaffirm support for a two—state solution to the decades—old conflict. palestinians have welcomed the meeting, but israel,
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which is not attending, says the conference is loaded against it. air passengers arriving in britain will face severe disruption after brexit, unless there's an increase in borderforce staff, according to the airport 0perators association. the body which represents more than 50 british airports warns passport checks for eu nationals are likely to become more stringent, leading to bigger queues. the home office says the border force has the capacity to meet demand. the short list for the 2017 brit awards have been revealed with david bowie receiving posthumous nominations. he released his final album just days before his death in january. craig david and radiohead are among other performers up for the honours. quite a list. eight giant panda cubs have been
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posing for chinese new year greetings in the szechwan province in the south—west of the country. the eight cubs, including three pairs of twins, were all born last year. they climbed trees and played with toys in the presence of their keepers. this chinese new year, which starts at the end of january, is the year of the rooster. how are you? very well. we have photos of players who did not take pa rt photos of players who did not take part in the football yesterday. diego costa and, both clubs doing very well and winning their matches. an interesting situation to keep our eyes on in the january transfer window. dmitri payet was left out of the squad for their match against crystal palace but west ham won 3—0 wihtout the frenhcman
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and the game included what andy carroll has called the best goal he's ever scored. joey barton had only been back in the premier league for five minutes before he scored for burnley, while both tottenham and arsenal were 4—0 winners in their games. pretty spectacular to me! you are a burnley fan! but chelsea are now seven points clear at the top of the league after beating leicester city 3—0, despite the absence of their top scorer, diego costa. joe lynskey reports. no costa, no problem. without their star player, chelsea showed their team's star quality. at the home of the champions, this was a test of their own title credentials and their inspiration came from an unlikely source. the first of two home goals from their full—back marcus alonzo sent them on their way. could this fortune turn costa away? plenty of attacking opportunities remained.
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pedro has surely sealed it for chelsea! on a night when some thought their season would unravel, chelsea proved their resolve. their lead at the top is now seven points over tottenham. their main man is a very different place. harry kane ended the week he became a parent with a hat—trick against west brom. a match ball that will make a nice souvenir for someone. i have had a busy week, but one i have enjoyed and obviously i enjoyed today as well. there were four goals for arsenal. their comfortable route to victory makes things very uncomfortable at swansea. the new boss, paul clement, needs some answers, fast. perhaps he should look to marco silva for inspiration. hull city's latest appointment marked his first match with victory against bournemouth. the tigers revitalised and had their first win since december. burnley has been surprising people, not least by bringing
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joey barton back. five minutes into his return, he's back to making headlines on the pitch. this is fast becoming a season known for its breathtaking goals, after this scorpion kick at west ham added a third take on stu ntman football. that is tremendous! on a weekend of speculation, there is still plenty of star quality left in this division. elsewhere, watford and middlesbrough drew 0—0, but the match started with a minute's applause for watford's former manager, graham taylor, who died this week, aged 72. taylor — who also managed england — took watford from the fourth division to a second—placed finish in the top flight in just five seasons. he also guided the club to the only fa cup final of their history. tributes were paid to
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graham taylor at several grounds across the country. today's games in the premier league sees the manchester clubs take on the two teams from merseyside. everton host manchester city in the early kick off, while liverpool face manchester united at old trafford. a win would take liverpool to second place in the table. manchester united, though, are unbeaten in 15 games we don't have just the good performances, we have also the happiness of the good results. we play at home, not away, so that changes a little bit, but in the end, it's just one more big match and let's enjoy the match. both teams are in the long—term on a good run and in good shape. maybe united has less problems with injuries, but it does not mean
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anything. we can lose against each team but we can win against each team but we can win against each team and that is the important thing. england's cricketers are facing india this morning in the first match of their one—day international series. india won the toss and chose to bowl in pune. alex hales and jason roy opening the batting. roy has found the boundary a few times already, but had a scare when he was given out by the umpire, but the review reversed that decision. alex hales is out. joe root has joined the crease. boxing now, and james degale has been taken to hospital as a precaution after he retained his ibf world super middleweight title overnight in new york. it came after a controversial draw with fellow world champion badou jack. degale began the fight strongly, knocking jack down in the first round, butjack came back, causing the londoner a lot of problems, and degale was knocked down himself in the final round. the judges took a long time to come to a decision, eventually declaring it a majority draw.
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both men go home with their respective world title belts, and although degale was disappointed, he says he wasn't overawed by his opponent. it is not unbelievable. he is good at everything. i need to watch it back. everyone said it was a mad fight to watch, i showed a lot of heart. that was hard. i do not want too many of them. i enjoyed it though, that is the sick thing. lisa ashton has become bdo world darts champion for the third time after a comfortable win in the women's final at lakeside. ashton beat the australian corrinne hammond 3—0 to add to the world titles she won in 2014 and 2015. the masters snooker gets underway today at alexandra palace in london. the favourite to win is six—time champion ronnie 0'sullivan. last year he thrashed barry hawkins in the final 10—1 and his aim is a record 7th title.
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it would be great to get another masters, but notjust because it's the seventh, but because it's the masters. i'm not thinking, i'd love to break the record, i just want to win the masters. i want to win another worlds, a welsh, another china open. ijust want i just want to win more tournaments. i think it could be very interesting because sullivan has been talking about entertaining the crowd and being the lionel massey of snooker. —— messi. great! there's just a few days until donald trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the united states of america, rehearsals for his inauguration on friday are taking place today. in a moment, we'll discuss the ceremony and what kind of leader he's likely to be, but first, let's take a look at how the president—elect has already been making the headlines. it is my honour, it was an amazing
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evening, it has been an amazing two—year period, and i love this country. thank you. thank you very much a stop i very much look forward to dealing with the president in the feature, he has explained some of the difficulties, some of the high—flying assets and some of the really great things that have been achieved. parking was only one part of it. it also entailed propaganda. —— hacking. ithink of it. it also entailed propaganda. —— hacking. i think it was russia, but i think we also get hacked by other countries and other people. i will say again, i think it is a disgrace that information would be let out. it is all fake news, foamy stuff, it didn't happen. these papers, they are alljust a piece of
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the many companies that are being put into trust to be run by my two sons and i hope i will come back and say, you did a good job. if they do a bad job, say, you did a good job. if they do a badjob, iwill say, you say, you did a good job. if they do a bad job, iwill say, you are fired. goodbye, everybody. some of donald trump's highlights there. joining us now from our london newsroom is pippa malmgren, who was economic advisor to the former republic president george w bush. good morning. symbolically, how important is this swearing—in ceremony, the inauguration on friday, and what do you think will happen? it is always an important symbol of the transition of power, so any kind of disruptions and controversy, it could mar the image. frankly, at this point, the president—elect is so vexing to so many people that even if it goes
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quietly, i think still there will be a lot of questions about this tra nsfer of a lot of questions about this transfer of power. but there is some concern about protesters showing up for this inauguration. it would not be the first time but perhaps because of the nature of his stance on things, it will be more visible and people will pay more attention. also paying attention to the names or lack of big names confirmed for the inauguration. just yesterday, the inauguration. just yesterday, the singerjennifer holliday pulled out and apologised for a lack of judgment and that seems to have been the theme. you are neither republican or democrat but you accurately predicted the result of the election. what are your predictions for the start of the presidency? what will it look like? my presidency? what will it look like? my views, my personal views, i am by partisan. i have served republican presidents, but the important thing is to get both sides talking to each other which may or may not happen
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with this president. but i do think that he is going to be the president and what is important is to try to see what positive things can come out of this, as well as the negative. usually presidents have both. this time is likely to have both. this time is likely to have both as well. there are big philosophical issues we need to ask. for example, should the relationship between the united states and russia between the united states and russia be one where the two countries talk or do not talk? that is a very big question. similarly with china, should there be a dialogue or a relationship marked by the inability to have a dialogue? should there be a hard—line position, softer line position? these are huge policy issues. i think it is easy to get caught up in the anything donald trump says is bad and wrong and lose sight of, what is the goal you are trying to accomplish with regard to international relations customer
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when donald trump was elected, a lot of people said, when he becomes president, he may start to act more statesman—like. president, he may start to act more statesman-like. -- international relations? we are hearing about a lot on twitter, will this be a twitter residency? i think this may be the new presidential behaviour. president 0bama and senator clinton we re president 0bama and senator clinton were not holding many press conferences either. this is the advent of technology permitting a direct dialogue between very senior people in politics and the people. i do not know if we can reverse that. trump is using it more aggressively than ever before. but i do not think he is going to change the way he talks because the bottom line is, he is not really republican, he is antiestablishment. his task in his mind is to effectively challenge the establishment on both sides of the aisle, the democrats and republicans. he is challenging many
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aspects of washington, from the need forfundraising, to aspects of washington, from the need for fundraising, to who gets fired, it is not the traditional people who a lwa ys it is not the traditional people who always assumed they would get a job. similarly with the media, he is effectively displacing the role of the media. we should look at him as an antiestablishment president, as opposed to left or right, i think. thank you very much forjoining us. and all next week, breakfast'sjon kay will be reporting from the states, in the run up to president—elect trump's inauguration. tomorrow, he'll be in milwaukee, wisconsin, the state that was narrowly won by trump in the election. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning... theresa may will urge britain to put an end to division and insults, when she sets out the government's plan for brexit negotiations this week. mps are launching an inquiry into the planned multi—billion pound restoration of the palace of westminster. this is where we say goodbye
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to christian, who's going to get ready to read the news for andrew marr on bbc one. isaid i said that in a really sad way. before we let you go, louise has the weather. it is looking wet. not the best sunday forecast. it is milder, if you have hated the cold snap we have seen milder, if you have hated the cold snap we have seen for most of us, a good deal of mild weather in the story. a lot of cloud coming our way. a series of weather fronts waiting in the atlantic. we will see some rain. the only exception to this will be across east anglia, the cold air never really departs and we will see what snow as the rain moves steadily east. it has not caused problems. it is drizzly rain now. temperatures in norwich, 1 degrees.
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further west, it is milder, eight, temperatures in norwich, 1 degrees. furtherwest, it is milder, eight, 9 degrees. drizzle in the south—west and wales. 0n degrees. drizzle in the south—west and wales. on and off through the morning. and also west facing coasts of scotla nd morning. and also west facing coasts of scotland and northern ireland. a better day in scotland in comparison to some of late. the winds. largely fine and dry. rather drizzly. there will be some hill fog as well. it will be some hill fog as well. it will stay damp and dreary this afternoon. cold across east anglia, mild to the west, but generally in eastern scotland and parts of eastern scotland and parts of eastern england, the temperatures will struggle a little. that will allow maybe a little bit of patchy frost and fog in east anglia overnight weather cold air sits. elsewhere the cloud and rain will drift east. elsewhere the cloud and rain will d rift east. pretty elsewhere the cloud and rain will drift east. pretty mild night. it
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sta rts drift east. pretty mild night. it starts off largely fine and dry in the south—east and perhaps will stay like that on monday. fairly messy elsewhere. that weather front producing drizzly rain in the midlands and across east yorkshire. another weather front bringing rain to eastern scotland. mild, 8—10d. if you have not already got the message, it is here to stay. the milder cloudier story sits in the north—west, but all the time, the possibility of east anglia and the extreme kent area, they will stay rather cold with ea rly—morning extreme kent area, they will stay rather cold with early—morning frost and fog. a sound of the seaside? or a blight on the beach? seagulls are synonymous with the coast, but they're also known for stealing food from passers—by. so, in scarborough, they're debating whether or not to bring in birds of prey to reduce the seagull numbers, as emma glasbey has been finding out. seagulls and scarborough just go together. but in recent years,
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the relationship has been turning slightly sour. the number of birds in this town has grown to a few thousand and especially in the summer, it is claimed they are becoming more aggressive. i have seen them take food from people's hands. for children, it can be scary. people feed them. they feed them titbits and they should not encourage them to come to the area. i don't think it is a real issue. i think a couple of people complained too much about it. the council has been discussing what to do about the birds. they could decide to hire a firm to work on reducing the number of birds over the next few years. we would use egg and nest removal. that is removing a percentage of eggs from nests. we work with a national body on this, and report the number
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of eggs removed. we could also fly birds of prey. we are not going out to kill anything, the idea is to move them to nesting in the cliffs. visitors are urged not to feed the seagulls. but some traders say the signs are not working and action is needed. all of the restaurant owners and traders in this area try to speak to members of the public if they see them feeding birds. but, generally, the reaction is, go away, it is none of your business. it is our business, actually, because we see this happening all the time. it may be winter, but there are still seagulls around. injanuary, you would expect them to be all out to sea, but they are so used to being fed here, they are staying on land. action will need to happen soon if it is to be taken. the seagull mating season is about to begin. a couple of weeks coming in. carroll
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says, it is people who are the menace and they need to be fined for litter. another says, i have never seen litter. another says, i have never seen them like they are at scarborough, they are like giants. moving on, if you wanted to take a picture right now, for many, it would be easy. just get out your smartphone and snap away. but it's not always been so simple, as photographer henry iddon has been finding out. he's been quite literally following in the footsteps of a pair of victorian brothers, by using a glass plate camera to capture the images you see behind me of england's highest mountains. hejoins us now. you'rejust saying, is amazing seeing them that size on the screen. it is fantastic to see them so large. what inspired you to get this camera and go up mountains to ta ke get this camera and go up mountains to take photographs, following in the footsteps of the famous photographers? i have access to the
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camera which was used by the abraham brothers through a collection and heritage trust. it was interesting to photograph contemporary climbers with a camera owned and used by the photographers which were the pioneers of rock climbing photography. that is george and ashley abraham. the camera you are holding right now, that is not the camera you took up the mountains? no, the camera i took up the mountains producers ten by 12 inch negative. this camera is of a similar ilk. we have the bellows, the glass screen at the back which you look through with a cloth over your head. this is a lot smaller and produces negative is this size. that is the one you use that we can see now. it is bigger. and a lot heavier! i can imagine! what is the process , heavier! i can imagine! what is the process, how does it work? the cameras themselves are quite simple. a lens at the front, something to
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ca ptu re a lens at the front, something to capture the image at the back, film, and bellows in between so you can focus. the cameras are quite simple. you compose it, looking at the glass screen at the back with cloth over your head and then... the camera are used had no shutter, i had a cap on the end. i could only take three pictures each time i was out because i only had three. slides containing the film. you cannot afford any duds. this shot is in langdale. leo is very well—known for his big wall climbs, this is a small boulder. this is a very famous american climber spotting a partner. this is the signature shot, poster boy. this is in the lake district. cliff fisher climbing a very hard route.
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where were you taking the photograph? we were on a small promontory about the size of the table, it was an hour walk along the side of the lake and two hours up the hill side to set up the camera on the small promontory. obviously worth it. what is the advantage of using a camera like that compare to a digital camera? you are a photographer. part of it is the size ofa photographer. part of it is the size of a negative, you can get a huge map of information on a big negative so map of information on a big negative so you map of information on a big negative so you can map of information on a big negative so you can blow them up as big as behind you. the camera, the lens was used in 1870 and the old lenses have beautiful quality with shades of grey and textures. modern lenses are very sharp and contrasting. you can do some of the subtleties. people watching, we will show you some of the pictures from the viewers, the pictures they are most proud of. could you give us some tips for
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taking a good picture? think about what you will take the picture of before you take the camera to your wife. that is a good way to catch if you want to put the camera to your icon you give the game away —— to your eye. please give us some feedback. this amazing picture of a mandarin duck. he said he took two hours to get the shot. fantastic. i am sure there was a lot of sitting around for nature photography. that would not work in black and white. this was sent to us, taken on a small digital camera, impressive. beautiful picture, lovely still day. that is the great thing about modern cameras on phones, you always have a cameras on phones, you always have a camera with you. this is of a swan at sunset, at a nature reserve in derbyshire. you get a sense of the tranquillity and the evening
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atmosphere with the sunlight and this one. the sense of the evening. beautiful. sorry if we could not show all of them today. we have had loads. what are you doing next? the exhibition hasjust loads. what are you doing next? the exhibition has just opened so there isa exhibition has just opened so there is a sense of relief. i will be doing schools workshops in cumbria about photography, which will be great, to show students how cameras work. and then we will have to see. that exhibition is at keswick museum and it will run until the 12th of may. that is it for today. breakfast will be back at 6am tomorrow, the first ofjon kay's reports from the us as well. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at nine. the prime minister calls for an end to division over brexit —
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and prepares to outline her aims in the negotiations. warnings of longer queues at passport control after brexit — unless there's an increase in border force staff. a growing number of democrats are planning not to attend donald trump's inauguration following his comments about a veteran civil rights campaigner. also in the next hour, the planned billion pound restoration of the palace of westminster. mps launch an inquiry into concerns it may be costing too much. and chelsea beat champions leicester city to go seven points clear at the top of the premier league.
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