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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 15, 2017 10:30pm-11:01pm GMT

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the us president donald trump, says leaving the eu, will be a great success for britain. says leaving the eu, he was being interviewed in new york, by the former minister and vote leave campaigner michael gove. i think brexit is going to end up being a great thing. but i predicted, the heat i took was unbelievable. tonight the times says mr trump will offer britain a quick and "fair‘" trade deal within weeks of taking office. also on the programme: of taking office. it's been revealed large numbers of cancer operations are being postponed, because of the current pressures on the nhs. because of the current you've got cancer inside you, you just really want to get rid of it. you, you just really and it's just devastating to get that type of news. a late goal earns manchester united a draw, in their big premier league clash against liverpool. a draw, in their big premier league he wanted you to say good job, son.
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that's all. and viola davis — the actress tipped for oscar success talks about race and hollywood. for oscar success talks good evening. for oscar success talks the us president—elect donald trump,says the uk is "doing great" following its vote to leave the eu. trump,says the uk is "doing great" he was speaking in his first uk interview, with the former justice secretary michael gove writing for the times. mr trump added he thought the uk was "so smart in getting out". the times also says he's promising a quick trade deal between the us and britain, when he becomes president in five days time. when he becomes president his comments came as the chancellor, phillip hammond, told a german newspaper, that the uk wouldn't "lie down," if access to the single market was "closed off." down," if access to the single mr hammond hinted at steep cuts in business taxes, to regain competitiveness. cuts in business taxes,
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here's our political correspondent vicki young. theresa may is thinking about life outside the european union and is determined to make a success brexit. i thought the uk was so smart and getting out. tonight there was a boost from ministers when the times reported donald trump was offering britain a quick and fair trade deal within weeks. an interview with michael gove, mr trump compared within weeks. an interview with michael gove, mrtrump compared his approach with president obama. president obama said, they will go to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen. it was a bad statement. i think you are doing great, i think it is going great. what might britain's economy look like after brexit. the chancellor was asked whether britain could become the tax haven of europe with
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low corporate tax rates and fewer regulations for business. he admitted the government might have to ta ke admitted the government might have to take such action to encourage companies to set in the uk. if we have no access to the european markets, if we are closed off, he said, we could be forced to change oui’ said, we could be forced to change our economic model to regain our competitiveness. the bridges people will not like down and say, too bad, we have been wounded. the prime minister has been open and that her priority in negotiations would be to control immigration and make sure the uk can do global trade deals, but leading eu figures have been equally clear. they say to do that, the uk will have to leave the single market and now the chancellor is laying out what the consequences of that might be, notjust for britain, but the eu as well. the labour leader accused mr hammond of pursuing a risky strategy. he appears to be making a threat to the european communities saying, if you don't give us exactly what we want,
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we will become this sort of strange entity on the shores of europe, where there will be very low levels of corporate taxation designed to undermine the effect of industry across europe. it seems to me a recipe for some kind of trade war with europe. but others believe eu leaders will recognise the benefits ofan leaders will recognise the benefits of an open trading relationship with the uk. we are leaving the single market, we don't intend to be in it and we want to make trade arrangements but we want to cooperate and have a free trade arrangements with the eu and have access to services. arrangements with the eu and have access to services. that is exactly where we should be. it is not damaging to the uk or the eu, it benefits both sides. on tuesday, theresa may will urge the country to unite and get behind brexit, but many mps are concerned her approach will damage the economy. and vicki's here with me. will damage the economy. on
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will damage the economy. the face of it, it looks li trump's on the face of it, it looks like mr trump's views are good news? he was prompted by michael gove, he didn't say we were the front of the queue when it comes to trade deals, but the times was reporting the team would work hard to get it done quickly and it would be good for both sides. as we are hearing more, the suggestion is likely to lead the single market, this will be a boost for theresa may ahead of a speech he will make later this week where she will make later this week where she will talk about britain being outward looking, being able to do these big global trade deals. she met with the new zealand prime minister last week and said the same kind of thing. i do think there will have to be some caveats. first of all, these trade deals, some like nigel farage said a trade deal with america could be done in three months, incredibly quickly. we know they can take years. will it be president trump's priority when he gets into the white house. the rules say, because of article 50 and the negotiations, we cannot do trade deals outside of the eu until all
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thatis deals outside of the eu until all that is done and dusted. it wasn't done and dusted for theresa may, although she will have a meeting soon with donald trump, when he was asked who was the most important leader in europe, he said it was angola merkel. —— angela merkel. sterling has slumped to a three—month low on the asian markets with investors concerned by media reports that the british government is prepared to make a "hard" exit from the european union. to make a "hard" exit the pound fell 1.6% to its lowest level since early october. dealers said the markets were worried that a decisive break from the single market would hurt british exports and discourage foreign investment in the uk. british exports and discourage doctors say cancer operations are being cancelled across the uk, because of the growing pressures on the nhs. the royal college of surgeons says such procedures were once protected because of their urgent nature, but since the start of the year that hasn't been the case in some hospitals, struggling to cope with demand. here's our health editor hugh pym. to cope with demand. he got the news by emill and at one day's notice.
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andrew's operation for prostate cancer had been cancelled, owing to a lack of beds in his local hospital. he is a victim of thep winter pressures gripping the nhs. he is a victim of the winter pressures gripping the nhs. with even cancer procedures postponed because of a big increase for demand in hospital care. postponed because of a big increase the person suffering with the cancer can cope with it better than the loved ones around them. can cope with it better my partner, she was really devastated. we don't know what to do. really devastated. it affects everybody, does cancer in the family, all the loved ones, everything. does cancer in the family, it's not just me. does cancer in the family, routine operations are cancelled every winter if there is pressure on beds but cancer treatment always continues with very few exceptions. but, since the new year, surgeons say that's changed, with a lot more cancer operations having to be put off. the current level of cancellations, if it is not unprecedented, it is certainly pretty close to being as bad as it has ever been. we are hearing from a number of trusts up and down the country,
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perhaps dozens, that it is not one or two cases that have be cancelled but several cases each day. or two cases that have be cancelled hospitals are trying to avoid postponing cancer operations for longer than a few weeks, but there have been warnings that delays, however long, can be bad news for patients. we know that speedy treatment helps people's recovery and their survival rate. helps people's recovery so we're really, really concerned this is happening. not only for the individual from a mental health and well—being perspective but more importantly the impact it could have on people's life and people's survival rate. the impact it could have on people's a department of health spokesman has said that nhs england has assured us that trusts are prioritising urgent operations and treatments whilst taking steps to alleviate additional winter demand. longer delays discharging medically fit patients back to the community, often because of the problems with social care have added to the pressures on hospitals this winter. that means fewer beds for emergency admissions, never mind patients who were expecting to come in for surgery.
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who were expecting to the latest revelations about cancer treatment postponements are further evidence of the strain across the service. the state of the nhs is dominating political debate, with winter far from over. is dominating political debate, the leader of the unite union, len mccluskey, sasteremy corbyn is "still on a learning curve". len mccluskey, sasteremy corbyn he's been one of the labour leader's biggest supporters, and told the bbc he mr corbyn was getting better, but he had to rise to the challenges the party faces. the outgoing director of the cia has warned donald trump to avoid off—the—cuff remarks once he takes office, and that spontaneity was not in the interests of national security. john brennan also warned mr trump not to underestimate russia. his comments came as washington makes its final preparations ahead of the inauguration on friday of mr trump, as our washington correspondent laura bicker reports. of mr trump, as our washington donald
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of mr trump, as our washingtonjohn trump... th! set donald john trump... the stage is set and rehearsals are underway for the moment when donald trump will ta ke the moment when donald trump will take the oath of office. but some feel the 45th president could do with being more presidential. he has accused us spies of leaking and verified dossier of claims the trump campaign team had close links with russia and he compared their actions to nazi germany. this prompted a stern warning from the head of the cia to be more careful with his words. the world is watching now what mr trump says, and listening very carefully. i think mr trump has to be very disciplined in terms of what he says publicly. he is going to be, in a few days' time, the most powerful person in the world in terms of sitting on top of the united states government. he has to recognise his words have impact. but mrtrump is not recognise his words have impact. but mr trump is not backing down and of
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course, he took to twitter saying the intelligence agencies made a mistake and urged them to apologise. the next commander in chief is proving to be just as divisive president—elect as he was a candidate. not only has he started a war of words with the people who keep america safe, he has become embroiled in a row with one of this nation's most respected civil rights heroes. it is going to be very difficult. john lewis marched alongside martin luther king. his words matter to the black community. donald trump attacked him on twitter prompting criticism from within his own party. but the vice president—elect defended his boss.|j have great respect forjohn lewis and his contributions, particularly to the civil rights movement. i was deeply disappointed to see someone of his stature questioned the
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legitimacy of donald trump's election of president and say he is not attending the inauguration. i hope he reconsiders both positions. as washington awaits crowds of trump ‘s supporters, it is also preparing for dozens of protest marches. this inauguration week and this particular piece of historical theatre will usher in a new controversial era in us politics. let's take a look at some of the day's other top stories. the pilot of a light aircraft has died after his plane crashed near the mao in oxfordshire. died after his plane crashed it had taken off from an aerodrome in north buckinghamshire. an investigation is underway. in north buckinghamshire. police in northern ireland have found an explosive device during a security operation in west belfast. they say it was "designed to kill or seriously injure police officers". to kill or seriously it's now been made safe. to kill or seriously at least 30 people have died, during a 14—hour riot at a jail in brazil. during a 14—hour riot it happened the north—eastern city of natal, involving rival gangs. it's the third major prison riot in brazil this month.
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officials say some of the victims, were decapitated. representatives of more than seventy countries and international organisations, have called on israel and the palestinians, to reaffirm their commitment to a two—state solution. to reaffirm their commitment at the end of a day—long conference in paris, they issued a statement warning that neither side should take unilateral steps, that could jeopardise future negotiations. the palestinian president mahmood abbas, and the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, didn't attend. our correspondent yolande knell is in jerusalem. yolande, the paris conference came and went, but given donald trump's suggestion the us embassy will be moved from tel aviv to jerusalem, a two state solution seems as remote as ever. well, seems as remote as ever. this conference in paris supposed well, this conference in paris was supposed to be a strong show of international support for the two state solution. this i did the palestinians should have an independent state of their own to neighbour israel. but increasingly,
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this idea does seem to be in jeopardy. the final declaration of the paris conference called for an end to violence and an end to israeli settlement building on land the palestinians want for their state. but it what it doesn't mention that also came up for a lot of discussion. this idea donald trump could move the us embassy from tel aviv, where all foreign embassies are at the moment, here to jerusalem. the future ofjerusalem is supposed to be decided in peace talks. the palestinians want these to be their future capital, the israelis see a united jerusalem as their capital. the logic goes, any move of the us embassy here would be a recognition of that israeli position. so this does seem to have given extra motivation to those in paris. interestingly, the british government said that is why it didn't send the foreign secretary. it is one of the reasons they have
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reservations about a conference taking place just days reservations about a conference taking placejust days before reservations about a conference taking place just days before a reservations about a conference taking placejust days before a new american president comes in. thank you for that. with all the sport, here's john watson at the bbc sport centre. clive, thank you. john watson at the bbc sport centre. there were two important matches in the premier league title race today. manchester united earned a 1—1 draw at home to rivals liverpool. but manchester city's hopes were dealt a blow, when they were beaten 4—0 by everton at goodison park. andy swiss reports. at goodison park. a at goodison park. fixture which hardly required any hype. a fixture which hardly required any hype. liverpool against manchester united. and sure enough, it delivered drama. first, liverpool we re delivered drama. first, liverpool were handed the initiative courtesy of paul pogba's glove work. from the penalty spot, james milner firing the visitors ahead. united did their best to fire back, not least zlatan ibrahimovic, as both before and after the break, they kept pressing forward. but for all
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after the break, they kept pressing forward. but forall their after the break, they kept pressing forward. but for all their promise, the only end product seem to be frustration. with seven minutes to 90, frustration. with seven minutes to go, the post denied maren fellaini, but nothing could be zlatan ibrahimovic. relief for united, and theirfans ibrahimovic. relief for united, and their fans and for the managers, a case of honours even. earlier it had been anything but as manchester city's title ambitions to an almighty dumping. everton ahead through romelu lukaku and then in the second half, manchester city unravelled. kevin mirallas extended the lead before 18—year—old tom davis stole the show. a lifelong everton fan, now playing for them. what a way to score your first goal. but for pep guardiola, the worst was to come. his heaviest league defeat as our manager is this debit and made it 4—0. a dream day for him. for manchester city, the stuff of nightmares. there was defeat for england's cricketers
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in their opening one day international with india in pune, despite recording their biggest one day score against the hosts. chasing a target of 351 runs, an inspired performance from captain virat kohli helped lead his side to a three wicket victory. as patrick gearey reports. to a three wicket victory. you'd to a three wicket victory. forget one englishman fo being you'd forget one englishman for being a little jaded on parade. joe root became a father last saturday, flew long haul on wednesday and was at the crease on saturday. a game of co nsta nt at the crease on saturday. a game of constant bustle and muscle. after jason roy's start, joe root took the wheel. he ran out of steam and 78, but ben stokes hoisted england up to 350. the highest one—day score against india. oreven 350. the highest one—day score against india. or even total is that they can evaporate here. an early rattle of the kids are reassured england, but none of the four who went was virat kohli. indian captain, indian icon, a man who soars under scrutiny, a signature six to complete his 27th one—day
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century. if that created a stir, this local boy did with 100. the heavy lifting had been done. time to show. right now, there seemed few heights cannot reach. saracens are into the quarter finals of rugby union's european champions cup. finals of rugby union's winger chris ashton's late try earning a 22 points all draw with scarlets, a result which sends the holders through, but ends the welsh side's chances of qualifying. but ends the welsh side's chances and exeter knocked today's opponents ulster out of the competition as they ran in a total of five tries in a 31 points to 19 victory at sandy park, to keep alive their own slim hopes of reaching the last eight. to keep alive their own slim hopes that's all your sport for now. to keep alive their own slim hopes with the baftas and oscars just around the corner, one film tipped to do well, is the denzel washington directed movie ‘fences,’ based on a pulitzer prize winning play. it tells the story of an african american family in the 19505, dealing with racial tensions
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and a troubled past. viola davis has already won a golden globe for her performance, and is tipped for an oscar. a golden globe for her performance, she was in london today, speaking to our arts editor, will gompertz. i've been right here with you, troy. to our arts editor, will gompertz. i've got a life too. to our arts editor, will gompertz. i gave 18 years of my life to stand in the same spot as you. emotions are running high in august wilson's powerful 1950s' family drama, fences. in august wilson's powerful denzel washington is the unfaithful troy. viola davis his heartbroken wife, rose. as emotional as it is, i always want to reiterate to people that it does require technique. i always want to reiterate to people a certain level of control, even in the lack of control of it. it's notjust something that comes naturally. it's not like i was just playing myself and just remembering a time in my life when someone did the same thing to me. rose told me... the same thing to me. tell them what you told me, rose. the same thing to me. i told him if he wasn't the mankind, then move out of the way
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so the mankind can find me. then move out of the way that's what she told me — you are in my way, you are blocking the view, move out of the way so i can find me a husband. you have talked about your experience as an actress and the roles tend to be experience as an actress limited because of your colour. experience as an actress do you think that producers, directors, hollywood are opening up to giving more interesting roles, explore... yes, they are opening up because i think they are being forced to open up. because i think they are america is changing. because i think they are the ethnic make—up of america is changing and people are desperate to see their own images. is changing and people are desperate brady bunch isn't working any more. is changing and people are desperate and there's so many actors of colour who are now in the position of saying — i want to be the change. i'm refusing to go back. i want to be the change. i want to be redefined. i want to be the change. ain't nobody going to hold his hand when he gets out there in the world. times have changed, troy. when he gets out there in the world. people change. when he gets out there in the world. the world is changing and you can't even see it. there is every chance
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you are going to get an oscar for this movie. you are going to get you go up on the stage, you have the golden statue, you have1 billion people to talk to. what are you going to say? to talk to. the people i always forget to thank are my mom and dad. first of all, august wilson wrote about people like my mom and dad who were born in 1936, 1943 respectfully, injim crow south, sharecropper home, 5th and 8th grade education. people who really are visible and those very much were the people whose dreams were their children. and those very much were the people whether she wins an oscar or not, i'm guessing viola davis has already fulfilled her parent's dreams. i'm guessing viola davis has already that's it. i'm guessing viola davis has already you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. but do stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello, but do stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello, this but do stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello, this is but do stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello, this is bbc but do stay with us on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. hello, this is bbc news. donald trump has promised to offer britain a quick and "fair" trade deal soon after taking office.
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in an interview with the times, the president—elect said the uk‘s vote to leave the eu was a "great thing". i think brexit will end up being a great thing but he died took was unbelievable. —— the heat i took. people don't want people coming in and destroying their country. in this country we will have strong borders from the game —— day i get in. from day one. i thought the uk was so smart in getting out. you we re was so smart in getting out. you were there and you guys were on the front page. trump said that brexit is going to happen. and it happened. it was going to lose easily. everybody thought i was crazy. obama said you at the back of bovine meaning if it does happen, that was a bad statement. -- the line. i think you are doing great. the
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country is doing great. the uk wa nted country is doing great. the uk wanted its own identity. i do believe this. if they hadn't been forced to take an all the refugees, so many with all the problems, i think you wouldn't have a brexit. you probably could have worked it out. i won the election because of strong borders and trade. you can't allow companies to leave our country, by all of its employees, moved to mexico, make whatever the product is and then sell it back and there will be a very substantial border tax for companies that do. open borders is fine but it is buzz for security, good for trade. open borders is fine but it is buzz forsecurity, good fortrade. united states has always ta ken forsecurity, good fortrade. united states has always taken advantage of, we have hundreds of billions of dollars of trade deficits with china. $105 billion in trade deficits with the world. —— 805. who
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is making these deals when you are losing that kind of money? almost $800 billion, in trade deficits with the world. we are saying who is making these deals? i do believe in trade trade, i love free trade but it has to be smart trade so i call itafair it has to be smart trade so i call it a fair trade. the problem is i say to the people do you want a conservative or do you want someone who once great deals and they all screen great deals. who do you trust more if you talk to them, angela merkel or by vermeer putin?|j more if you talk to them, angela merkel or by vermeer putin? i start of trust in both and see how long thatis of trust in both and see how long that is lasting. —— vladimir. of trust in both and see how long that is lasting. -- vladimir. who is the most important leader in europe right now? angela merkel is by far the most important leader. if you look at uk, you look at the european
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union, it is germany. it is basically a vehicle for germany. they understand that among eastern europeans that is a lot of fear of putin and russia? sure. i said a long time ago that nato had problems. it was obsolete because it was designed many years ago, number two the countries want paying what they were supposed to pay. donald trump speaking to journalists from the times and michael gove. it is time for a look at the weather with john hammond. a lot of dry weather to come for the week ahead but for the day ahead that is not necessarily the case. damp and dismal across scotla nd the case. damp and dismal across scotland and the rain pushing through the spine of england and wales. dry on either side. a touch of frost for parts of east anglia. so the across south—eastern areas
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but generally milder further north and west. the problems with frost for the north—west of ukip. a lot of cloud to start the day. dampness for central areas. stilljust cloud to start the day. dampness for central areas. still just and jobs left behind —— the north—west of the uk. this is where the lowest temperatures will be. italy viewing day with five or six celsius. the further north and west it will be milder and hopefully with a bit of brightness for northern ireland and scotland. a lot of dry weather to come for the week ahead and for most of us it shouldn't field too cold. more detail in herflower. —— more detail and have an hour. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11:00pm: the us president—elect, donald trump, says leaving the eu will be a great success for britain. i think brexit is going to be a good
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thing, but i predicted, the heater to unbelievable, because people don't want to have other people coming in and destroying their country. surgeons warn that cancer patients are having their operations cancelled at short notice because of a shortage of beds. you've got cancer inside you, you just really want to get rid of it. and that, it is just devastating to get that type of news. also in the next hour: more than 70 countries call on israel and the palestinians to restate their commitment to a peace settlement. a major summit in paris warns against any unilateral actions that
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