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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 16, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump praises brexit and promises a quick trade deal with the uk, when he becomes president. speaking to the conservative mp and leave campaigner, michael gove, he said he thought the uk was doing great and had been "so smart in getting out." the heat took was unbelievable. people do not want other people coming in and destroying their country. and with just days to go until donald trump's inauguration, jon has the first in series of special reports from the us. good morning from a freezing cold milwaukee. we are taking the temperature of public opinion in the week donald trump becomes president. good morning it's monday the 16th of january.
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also this morning: northern ireland's power—sharing government is expected to collapse today triggering a snap election to the stormont assembly. the inquests will open today into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed in a terror attack on a tunisian beach a year and half ago. the pound falls to a 31—year low, after reports suggest the prime minister will push for a hard brexit. i'll look at what it means for us and our money. in sport, pep guardiola believes manchester city are out of the premier league title race after their defeat to everton. while manchester united rescue a point against liverpool, thanks to zlatan ibrahimovic. the draw moves liverpool up to third place. and carol has the weather. good morning. the weather this week is quiet and benign compared to last week ‘s top today cloudy with patchy
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rain and a drizzle but some of us will see sunshine. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner, michael gove, for the times, in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. here's our political correspondent, vicky young. theresa may is about to tell us more about how she thinks the uk can prosper outside the eu. the critics say the economy will suffer if britain leads the single market and is no longer able to trade freely with the eu. donald trump says he will offer britain are quick and fair trade deal with america. will offer britain are quick and fair trade deal with americali thought the uk was so smart and you
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we re thought the uk was so smart and you were there and you were in the front page, donald trumps saying that brexit was going to happen and it happen. everybody thought i was crazy. obama said they are going to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen any had to retract. i think you are doing great. mr drummond said he will work very hard to get a deal done weekly and properly and predicted other countries will lead to the eu, claiming it had been deeply damaged by the migration crisis. countries wa nt by the migration crisis. countries want their own identity and the uk wa nted want their own identity and the uk wanted its identity. they had been forced to take all the refugees, so many and all the problems that entails. if not you would not have a
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brexit. the offer is a boost to the prime minister who insists britain remains open for business. the president—elect said the two leaders will meet right after he gets to the white house. how did you think the government will respond? number ten will be encouraged by the wall words towards it. the bombastic way donald trump embraces everything about the uk, including the queen. they will like what he says and the contrast with what he says and the contrast with what president obama was saying before the referendum about written being at the back of the queue —— great britain. the change in tone could not be more stark. it is interesting view, a big scoop or the times. michael gove, a prominent
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leave campaign, donald trump saying that britain should leave the eu. he talks interestingly about donald trump believing the refugee crisis was a big reason britain voted for brexit. he thinks that was a factor and we also learnt theresa may wrote to donald trump after christmas saying she hopes the uk and the us have a close friend turned all relationship, citing that between churchill stand the us during world war two. plenty more on all of these throughout the morning. we will speak to james rubin at ten past seven. michael gove is well, we will talk to him. a group of mps and organisations from both sides of the brexit debate have launched a manifesto for how britain's departure from the eu
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should take place. the brexit together manifesto says it's time for all sides to "leave the referendum trenches" and join forces to create a strategy that reflects the country as a whole. the movement is backed by mps who campaigned for both the leave and remain campaigns. the pound has fallen sharply against the dollar ahead of theresa may's speech on how britain will leave the european union. the currency is being affected by fears that the prime minister will opt for a so—called "hard brexit". ben is with us now. astonishing figures for the pound? it has been taking a bit of a hammering over the weekend in asia. this is the first opportunity the markets have had to react and it suggests theresa may will opt for ha rd suggests theresa may will opt for hard brexit leaving the customs union and the single market at the same time and business are worried about what it will mean for their
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fortunes. the pound, 31 ye low. —— 31 year low. the right to reason that they are worried. the customs duty with europe our biggest trading partner but also what it means for the clean break, will it mean we have trade deals, will we start tilting towards america. that is the real worry. if you are a business good news but not great news for all of us if we are travelling abroad because our money will not go as far. lots of questions. so many. northern ireland's devolved government looks set to collapse today, after sinn fein again insisted it would not replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister at stormont. under the rules of the power—sharing system, his resignation last week also forced the removal of the democratic unionist leader,
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arlene foster, as first minister. sinn fein has until 5 o'clock this evening to name mr mcguiness' replacement, otherwise a snap election could be called. chris page reports. for a week, a part of the uk has been without a functioning government. when martin mcguinness of sinn fein resigned as northern ireland's deputy first minister, he automatically put the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster out of her job as first minister. that is the way the power—sharing system works. the party's relationship finally failed over a financial scandal involving a green energy scheme. but the partnership between unionists and irish republicans has always been uneasy. there are many disagreements between them. the stormont stalemate means an election is likely in the next few weeks. however, the british and irish governments have held talks with the parties to try and avoid that. but, with no sign of a breakthrough, a breakdown is looking imminent. today at the northern ireland assembly, the dup and sinn fein have
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been asked to nominate new members for first minister and deputy first minister. but sinn fein say they will not do so, so the devolved government will officially collapse. the law says the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, must call an election within a reasonable period of time. negotiations to try and restore power—sharing would follow, but no—one believes it would be an easy process. devolution has lasted for almost a decade in northern ireland, but stormont may not survive its most serious crisis. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british holidaymakers killed in a terror attack in tunisia are due to open at the royal courts ofjustice later today. in total, 38 tourists were killed by a gunman, who targeted a beach near the town of sousse injune 2015. the first week of hearings will see organisations including the metropolitan police, the foreign and commonwealth office
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and the owner of tour operator, thomson holidays, give evidence. sarah campbell reports. lives lost — 30 at people were killed in total, 30 british, including three generations of the same family, married couples and a teenager. all had been staying at hotel riu imperial marhaba in the popular resort of port el kantaoui in sousse. they stood little chance. seifeddine rezgui will later be shot by security forces. 0ver seifeddine rezgui will later be shot by security forces. over the next seven weeks, inquest hearing will be heard here. 30 victims coming from across the uk, proceedings will be fed to courts elsewhere, including newcastle and cardiff. a senior
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figure from the foreign office, and from the parent company from thompson, the travel agency used by the victims will give evidence. within the scope, the family want to know about the security arrangement of the 5—star hotel where they were staying on whether the travel advice ofa high staying on whether the travel advice of a high risk of terrorism including in tourist areas was given to them before they left. it shattered the lives of those who lost fa m ily shattered the lives of those who lost family members. they have waited a long time to hear in detail what happened to their loved ones and whether any lessons could be learnt. premier league football clubs should face legal action if they don't do enough to ensure access for disabled fans, according to a report by a committee of mps. the culture media and sport select committee says it's disappointed some clubs aren't doing more after a bbc investigation in 2015 found that 17 out of 20 failed to provide enough wheelchair spaces. the clubs say making alterations
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to older grounds is difficult to do quickly. the rspca is urging the public to double check before raising the alarm, after the charity received a string of calls from people mistaking inanimate objects for live creatures. in november, the charity was called out to investigate reports of an owl, which had been sitting on a roo for four days — only to discover it was made of plastic. that might be my favourite story of the day. the alp is fine! an endangered baby rhino has been filmed meeting herfather for the first time, at knowsley safari park. the calf has been named nomvula, which means mother of rain. she is only a year old and was born as a part of a special breeding programme. the mother is 21—year—old maroo.
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nomvula is her sixth calf. we are doing well, plastic owls and rino news. you can see more of this story on inside out north west, tonight at 7:30pm and after that on the bbc iplayer. it's 6:13. andy murray dropped his opening service game in his first round match of the australian open. we should have said sir andy murray. well they have not done so at the australian open. the world number one eventually took the first set 7—5 he is 5—5 down in the second set to ukrain‘es ilya marchenko. the britihs number 4, aljaz bedene
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has already been knokced out of the tourament this morning. manchester united's winning run is over but they come from behind to earn a point against liverpool. zlatan ibrahimovic‘s late goal cancelled out james milner‘s first half penalty. liverpool move up to third place. in the day's other premier league game, manchester city were thrashed 4—0 at everton. teenager ademola lookman, with a goal on his debut. despite scoring their highest ever total against india, england's cricketers lost the first one day international by three wickets. they must win the final two matches to win the series. that is the sport at the moment! let's take a look at this morning's papers. loads of the front pages have gone with, i'll start with the times, they have a big interview with donald trump, we will be speaking to michael gove about this later, this is what he says. he has one of the
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messiest desk side ever seen. in front of him he's not only got papers and books but also hats, this is one of the fake desks you don't ever do any work at. it looks like a desk where you would do lots of work. it's in neat piles as well. if people saw underneath your desk they would say something. there's the messy side and the untidy side. louise has home—made porridge so there's a dividing line. the times did the interview but it makes all of the papers, they have done their own analysis, this is the daily telegraph. trump declaring britons we re telegraph. trump declaring britons were right to vote for brexit and once a quick trade deal to make it a six test. it's in the guardian as
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well. i'm interested to see how quick is in practical terms, we will talk about it later. that picture is going through the inauguration. they are practising, this isn't obviously the president—elect. are practising, this isn't obviously the president-elect. they have been practising the swearing in. the president-elect. they have been practising the swearing inlj the president-elect. they have been practising the swearing in. i wonder if he has a messy desk! the daily mail, this is another one. meghan markle, the family have been defending the gun charge of their her brother in the us. the front page of the daily mirror. the nhs faces a winter funding crisis. page of the daily mirror. the nhs faces a winterfunding crisis. some people say it's a long story, man makes money from business he owns. and this story about the girl abducted when she was hours old and being reunited with her real month. extraordinary story. ben. shall we
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start in davos? it is that time of year where davos begins, the big gathering in the swiss alps of all the world leaders. and jamie oliver? yeah, but this year it's interesting, the telling thing is who isn't there rather than who is, some leaders have gone, angela merkel, francois hollande, justin trudeau isn't going, the canadian prime minister. shakira, will.i.am, jamie oliver is there and it always gets criticism because it's a big knees up, high security, skiing, they all do wonderful things. this year the theme is responsible leadership. interesting with trump and brexit but it comes at the same time were an 0xfam report says eight billionaires own as much as half the rest of the world's poorest. half of the rest of the world's poorest own as much as eight people. it shows
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the mismatch and that is why davos gets criticism. these guys are there to try and change it. i was on the radio a few years ago and the producer said will.i.am radio a few years ago and the producer said will. i.am is radio a few years ago and the producer said will.i.am is in davos and he wants to speak to you, he just came on and chatted about davos for ten minutes. i've been there a couple of times for this job and all the real work gets done at the dinners and parties, not these big formal sessions during the day. did he ask for you personally? he had no idea who i am and still doesn't, but he wanted to speak to someone. what did he talk about? ipods. he is very into technology, isn't he? the newspapers are going on about manchester against merseyside. pep giving up on city's title. the worst defeat in pep guardiola's managerial career given its only january. guardiola throws in the towel after
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18—year—old davies and 19—year—old lookman with the goals for everton. david gale lost his front tooth after his fight with jack in new york. they're talking about a possible rematch. shall we talk about fat cats? here's a fat cat in about fat cats? here's a fat cat in a pool. he lost for lbs apparently having swimming lessons. is it plastic or a real cat? it is a real cat but why cat would want to swim, i don't know. he can do 12 lengths in 45 minutes! wow. that is impressive swimming from charlie the cat. excellent. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the weather this week is much quieter than it was last week. today for most of us it will be fairly
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cloudy and damp with sunlight and pa ntry cloudy and damp with sunlight and pantry raider and drizzle but some later will see some sunshine. you can see we've got a weather front which is moving east through the day —— son and damp rain and drizzle. some hill fog. northern ireland, largely dry but cloudy and damp all england, through the midlands to the south, and again parts of wales, parts of east anglia, we got thicker cloud and also light rain and drizzle. the odd burst of rain coming out of that weather front, though. a cold start from the yorkshire moors to the south—east. here in the far south—east today you could see sunshine, as you could in parts of north—east wales, north—east scotland, possibly the very far north of the north—east of england but that's also where we've got the weather front not far away so quite a bit of cloud. not a cold
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day in the west, cooler in the east despite the fact we're looking at sunshine. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we still have a weather front fizzling in nature, the one coming in across scotland will continue south, a lot of hill fog around tonight. under clear skies in the south—east you may well find a touch of mist and fog and possibly frost. elsewhere it should be frost free. then into tomorrow on a weather front, coming south it is still doing that here, still murky conditions, still a lot of cloud around, south—east favoured best for sunshine and the wind is picking up in the north—west as well. temperature wise, we're looking at 11 in glasgow and belfast, ten in aberdeen but cooler down towards london despite the fact we have some sunshine at only six. from tuesday into wednesday, you can see from the squeeze on the isobars, the wind picking up in the northern and western isles, far north—west of scotland, high pressure building
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into southern areas. the weather this week is really quite settled. variable amounts of cloud again, sunny breaks to the south, windy in the north and north—west and here too we have some rain. as we head into thursday, a bit more of the same, quitea into thursday, a bit more of the same, quite a cloudy day with some spots coming out of that cloud but the brighter skies will be in the south—east. temperatures around eight celsius so you won't be writing postcards to anyone over that temperature. doctors‘ leaders say a system designed to check decisions made by gps is leading to unacceptable delays in diagnosis and treatment. the warning comes as a bbc investigation has discovered that hundreds of thousands of patients are having referrals from their family doctors reviewed by third parties. so—called referral management centres are being used in more and more areas of england to examine and sometimes reject decisions from gps. nhs managers say it helps them keep costs down, but the british medical association claims it puts a barrier between patients and specialists. jenny walrond reports. for tracy
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for tracheffries, house work is no longer a painful chore. but only because she paid nearly £3000 for an operation on her leg.|j because she paid nearly £3000 for an operation on her leg. i was in so much pain with my leg, 2a hours a day. i wasn't sleeping properly, much pain with my leg, 2a hours a day. iwasn't sleeping properly, i was struggling to get through my work. the pain was caused by varicose veins. her gp wanted them treated on the nhs but his referral was rejected. tracey had to go private. if a gp feels a specialist needs to look at you then the nhs should be supporting that and they're not. tracey's treatment was blocked by something called a referral management centre. some are in by doctors, others by admin staff. last year they screened 2 million referrals on behalf of the nhs, a rise of almost 30% compared
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to two years before. 4%, nearly 84,000, to two years before. 4%, nearly 811,000, were rejected, mostly for admin reasons, like missing information. doctors‘ leaders are strongly opposed to what they say is a blunt form of rationing. these centres, which are taking a crude approach to scrutinising all gp referrals, can be inefficient, cost more to run than any potential saving, but crucially in the process delaying patient care. there are 60 referral management centres in england and one in wales. gatekeeping what are often expensive hospital—based services. we‘ve not found similar setups in scotland or northern ireland. those who commission nhs care said the system delivers value for money. we don't wa nt to delivers value for money. we don't want to squander any money, we have limited resources so it‘s really important the resources we have we spend most effectively and get the best value for our population. referral management is, for now, a
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relatively small part of efforts to manage rising demand. but its use is increasing and that means more gps, like tracey‘s, are likely to see their decisions scrutinised and even overturned. jenny walrond, bbc news. still to come this morning: we‘ll hear from american voters on their new president. i‘m hoping that from an economic standpoint trump reflects giving that stability back to the country. this is one of the most important jobs in the world and i'm not certain that he's for it. in the week that donald trump becomes the 45th commander—in—chief, we‘re taking a breakfast road trip across the states to find out how people are feeling about their future. jon kay in a big scarf in very cold milwaukee! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. there‘s a call from the equality
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and human rights commission for premier league clubs like chelsea face legal action if they fail to meet the needs of disabled fans. an influential committee of mp‘s is supporting the call which comes as some clubs, which include watford, appear likely to miss the deadline on meeting basic standards. watford says that all known demand from disabled supporters has been met. the lights at piccadilly circus are to be switched off later this morning for the longest period of time since the second world war. the billboard which has displayed electrical advertisements for more than a century but now work is to be carried out to make it a more interactive screen. it‘ll be off until the autumn with a temporary banner being put up in its place. a piece of abstract art made from a student‘s rejection letter from oxford university has gone viral on twitter. claudia vulliamy from london applied to study classics at wadham college. upon receiving the rejection,
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she decided to turn the letter into a piece of art and a picture of it was posted on twitter. just so you know, claudia was offered a place at durham university where she‘s doing well. some of the london acts up for this years brit awards say it‘s a great thing that they‘re recognising the diversity in music much more than in previous years. grim artist, skepta from tottenham, who won a mercury music prize last year, joined michael kiwanuka from muswell hill and kano from east ham in welcoming the broader range of nominations. they‘re up against david bowie in the best male artist category. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. we can see it‘s a good service on all lines apart from tfl rail which is partly suspended due to ongoing engineering work. the a! has reopened at upper holloway after being closed since october while the railway bridge was replaced. but bus lanes will remain closed for a few more months. just by the elephant & castle roundabout,
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st georges road is closed up to the imperial war museum. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. there are one or two fog patches around this morning. not widespread but they do sneak up on you, so worth bearing in mind. a lot of cloud around and somehow break sovereign. the further eased you are this morning be chilly it‘s likely to be but the drier the day. not much rain through there elsewhere, outbreaks of this light rain and drizzle, drying out a little as we head through the afternoon. the maximum temperature today at six else is so still feeling reasonably chilly. 0vernight tonight we hang on to the cloud, mostly dry picture. maybe one or two breaks in the cloud and if we do then we could see some fog developing and the temperature dropped that little bit lower. minimum temperature about one or two celsius. a chilly start tomorrow again, we could get one or two mist
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and fog patches but as we head through the day there‘s a bit of cloud but a brighter day with drier air moving in. another dry day tuesday into wednesday but for much of the week it‘s staying rather cloudy. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. as the inquests into their deaths begin, we‘ll hearfrom one holidaymaker who was forced to hide as the rampage took place. as new research suggests a third of fathers would take a pay cut to spend more time with their children, we‘ll ask how dads can balance their work lives with the roles they play at home. she shocked sherlock fans
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with her turn as the detective‘s psychotic sister. we‘ll be joined by the actress sian brooke, as the bbc one drama draws to a close for what could be the very last time. i have not watched it so i alert for spoilers. he is not telling anything. we will not give the game away but she will be an interesting character. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times — in his first british interview since becoming u—s president—elect. mr trump said he would ask his son—in—lanared kushner to negotiate a middle east peace agreement and would seek a deal with russia to reduce nuclear weapons.
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he also blamed the outcome on june‘s brexit referendum on the refugee crisis. countries want their own identity and the uk wanted its own identity but i do believe that if they had not been forced to take in all the refugees, with all the problems that entails, i think you would not have a brexit. later on in the programme we will spring to michael gove and james rubin. a group of mps and organisations from both sides of the brexit debate have launched a manifesto for how britain‘s departure from the eu should take place. the brexit together campaign says it‘s time for all sides to "leave the referendum trenches" and join forces to create a strategy that reflects the country as a whole. the movement is backed by mps who campaigned for both sides of the debate.
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northern ireland‘s devolved government looks set to collapse today, after sinn fein again insisted it would not replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister at stormont. his resignation last week also forced the removal of the democratic unionist leader, arlene foster, as first minister. sinn fein has until 5 o‘clock this evening to name mr maguiness‘ replacement, otherwise a snap election could be called. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british holidaymakers killed in a terror attack in tunisia are due to open at the royal courts ofjustice later today. a total of 38 tourists were killed by a gunman who targeted a beach near the town of sousse injune 2015. the first week of hearings will see organisations including the metropolitan police, the foreign and commonwealth office and the owner of tour operator thomson holidays give evidence. premier league football clubs should face legal action if they don‘t do enough to ensure access for disabled
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fans, according to a report by a cross—party group of mps. the culture media and sport select committee says it‘s disappointed some top clubs aren‘t doing more, after a bbc investigation in 2015 found that 17 out of 20 failed to provide enough wheelchair spaces. the clubs say making alterations to older grounds is difficult to do quickly. the rspca is urging the public to double check before raising the alarm after the charity received a string of calls from people mistaking inanimate objects for live creatures. in november, the charity was called out to investigate reports of an owl, which had been sitting on a roof for four days — only to discover it was made of plastic. all was well. i hope they left it
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there. i sure they did. i going to find out more about that story. check yourselves. we are trying to follow andy murray. we might get a result in our time? this might be over before we came on air but knowing andy murray it has not happened. his brother got in a taxi and said he looked like andy murray, but a lot better looking. he tweeted that this morning. the opening grand slam tournament of the year is underway with andy murray in action in melbourne. the world number one is the top seed at the australian open, but he‘s not having an easy time against ukraine‘s illya marchenko. it took murray almost an hour to win the first set 7—5.
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and the second set went to a tie break. he has won that in the last few minutes. fellow briton aljaz bedene lost his first round match while british number three dan evans plays later. one of the biggest rivalries in english football ended in a stalemate yesterday as manchester united and liverpool played out an intriguing 1—1 draw in the premier league. united‘s world record signing paul pogba was at fault for liverpool‘s goal when he gave away a first half penalty that james milner dispatched. united — who had won their last nine games — trailed for nearly an hour until zlatan ibrahimovic headed in the equaliser as the side‘s shared the points for the second time this season. liverpool was much more defensive. they defended with tempo is in the second half. when you have good players, you always smell the possibility of a counter—attack but today was the reverse. it let‘s see if the critics are fair. 80 minutes
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of high intent will all is really ha rd of high intent will all is really hard to say when i saw the boys, a new and hoped for a little bit of luck but unfortunately we didn't have much in the second. we had enough. all good. manchester city‘s title hopes were dealt a big blow as they were thrashed 4—0 at everton. romalu lukaku and kevin mirallas opened the scoring, before teenagers tom davies and ademola lookman, on his debut, added two more. it‘s pep guardiola‘s heaviest league defeat as a manager. you cannot plan a game like this. everybody knows it is always difficult against city. they play some great football but i think the second half for us was perfect. in every aspect of football. ok, we all conceded too many chances and we created enough to put it in balance.
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but you have to put it in the net in order to win. england‘s cricketers scored 350 — their highest one day total against india but still lost the opening one day international by three wickets. centuries from virat kohli and kedarjadhav helped india to their target with 11 balls to spare. they go 1—0 up in the three match series. the next game is on thursday. a last—minute try from chris ashton denied scarlets a famous win over saracens in rugby union‘s european champions cup. scarlets needed a win to keep up their hopes of qualifying for the quarterfinals, but ashton scored in the final play of the match. so it finished as a draw, 22 points all. that means saracens are through to the quarter—finals, but ended scarlets‘ chances of getting to the quarters it‘s five years since ronnie 0‘sullivan last went out in the first round of snooker‘s masters but he came as close as you can get yesterday. china‘s liang wenbo came from 11—2 down to lead 5—4 and had this black to win the match. but 0‘sullivan, despite suffering
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with a heavy cold, won that frame and the next to win 6—5. glen durrant is the new bdo world darts champion, after beating danny noppert of the netherlands by seven sets to three. the man from middlesbrough took control of the match from the halfway stage, winning four sets in a row and taking out double sixteen to ensure he‘ll be taking the trophy back home to teesside. it‘s been a weekend to remember for english golfer graeme storm. the 38—year—old won just the second european tour event of his career at the south african 0pen. he and rory mcilroy went to a play—off after both finishing the tournament on 18 under par, but mcilroy made the first error on the third extra hole, and storm, who nearly lost his tour card last year, sealed a first win since 2007. that is a great story. he stormed
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it! he only did his tour card because patrick reed pulled out. it meant he played in the south african open and one is first tournament in ten years. mcilroy was treating how great it was. what a great story. on friday, donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. his election to the white house followed one of the most bitter and divisive campaigns in history, and many have questioned how the new leader will unite the country. to find out, we‘ve sentjon kay on a road trip along the iconic route 45 — travelling from north to south — straight through the heart of america. today, in the first of a week—long series of reports, he‘s in winsconsin — a state that elected mr trump by the narrowest of margins. milwaukee, known for its harsh
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winters, for making cheese and beers and now for its role in america‘s fragile new politics. this is no place forfragile. the fragile new politics. this is no place for fragile. the junior ice hockey. this is the green bay junior galette. he likes donald cart because he is different, a nonpolitician, an outsider. —— donald trump. an alternative that is outside of the box. he is a billionaire, not exactly every man. no, he‘s not the bury saint to be said for him being able to relate to a plumber, a welder, a teacher. the
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state‘s largely working—class electorate normally vote democrat but this time they chose donald trump. they love giving new things and try, like soccer on ice. but might donald trump president c end up might donald trump president c end up feeling like this? your gloves and nearly as big as my hands. engineerjason is confident. after nine redundancy threats in six yea rs, nine redundancy threats in six years, he says it is time for a businessman in office. it'll be nice to have more stability on the job front. i hoping he reflects giving that stability. are you more optimistic for your personal economics? absolutely. confidence on theiceis
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economics? absolutely. confidence on the ice is another matter, for me at least. turnbull and dean! some of america‘s top ice at least actors on this rink. you are not doing that as much. nancy was an olympian and is now a coach. it is time to be a little risky. she told me donald trump can bring a winner‘s mindset to the white house. he makes a decision and gets it done. did you have any reservations about his personality? i think everybody behind it has some reservations because they do not know the truth behind that and they are hoping in this point in his life he has put that behind him. wisconsin voted for trump that only by 1% and some are still struggling with the result. this is one of the most important jobs in the world and i not certain he is prepared for it. this hockey
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mum is willing to give the new president a chance even though as a muslim she is worried by some of his comments. i tried to look at the bright side. we have to wait and see what happens. are you saying you are a little nervous stop yes, i might be. you prepared to support him? not quite prepared but prepared to initiate change to support him. what does that mean? change my way of thinking, trying to find the good. it is time for us to get our skates on. donald trump will be the 45th president of america so we are heading down route a5, travelling 1000 miles, hearing from voters. tomorrow we will be in chicago, to reflect on president 0bama‘s legacy. a p pa re ntly
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reflect on president 0bama‘s legacy. apparently tomorrow he‘s going to barack 0bama‘s apparently tomorrow he‘s going to ba rack 0bama‘s favourite apparently tomorrow he‘s going to barack 0bama‘s favourite diner. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump has used his first uk interview as president—elect to promise a rapid trade deal with britain — predicting brexit will be "a great thing". members of the northern ireland assembly are to gather at stormont facing the prospect that the power—sharing administration will collapse. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. what‘s happening today? good morning. it is fairly cloudy and dampfor good morning. it is fairly cloudy and damp for some today. in fact at the moment in the isles of scilly, the moment in the isles of scilly, the temperature is 10 celsius, dover, one celsius so a wide range of temperatures on either side of this weather front, of temperatures on either side of this weatherfront, producing of temperatures on either side of this weather front, producing the cloud and damp conditions. later in
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the early afternoon we see another weather front in the north of scotland. at 8am we will see the effects of the weather front in the east of scotland with some rain, the rest of scotland fairly cloudy and murky. northern ireland, cloudy and dry. as we come across england, you can see all the cloud, the light patchy rain and drizzle, the odd burst drifting to the west. still mild in the west, ten in plymouth. shared by quite a few places in the west. through the day where we have our weather front, the west. through the day where we have our weatherfront, the north yorkshire amours to the isle of wight, will hang on to the cloud and the damp conditions. from the wash to the west sussex area, more sunshine and more cloud to the west. some breaks, north—east scotland will see some sunshine and parts of north—east wales and possibly northern england, but more unlikely here. at the same time we have a weather front coming in a cross northern scotland. through the evening and overnight, this first
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front fizzles almost in situ and the second sinks further south taking the rain with it and the wind will pick up in the north—west. in between, clear skies. in pick up in the north—west. in between, clearskies. in the south—east there could be rain patchy fog and a touch of frost and we could start to see clear skies developing further west as well. on tuesday itself, a south—east sunny region, here we will have lower temperatures. this weather front is producing all the cloud and some spits and spots here and there. the other break from the cloud will be in parts of the central lowlands but generally a lot of cloud around and higher temperatures in the north—west. as we go from tuesday into wednesday, a squeeze on the isobars and it will turn windier in the northern and western isles, north—west scotland but high pressure is building in further south. the weather once again during wednesday, very quiet. 0n south. the weather once again during wednesday, very quiet. on wednesday
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the best sunshine will be in southern counties and into the south—west and up through central areas. meanwhile, more rain coming in to the north—west of scotland and temperatures here still hanging on at ten. lower than that as we go further south. 0n at ten. lower than that as we go further south. on thursday itself, quite a bit of cloud around, one or two brighter breaks and the cloud thicken off for the odd spot but most will get dry weather and then later some rain showing its hand in the far north—west —— dig enough for. temperatures 8—10. 0n the far north—west —— dig enough for. temperatures 8—10. on friday, a fairly quiet week weather—wise. —— thick enough for. temperatures were they should be for this time in january. it was a bit hectic last week so we will take a quiet week this week! the labour mp caroline flint, who was a remainer, helped to put it together. she joins us now from westminster. i know it covers many issues, shall we talk about trade? you‘re all talking together, what kind of trade deal would you like to see? this is
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the first time we have had a joint initiative and that‘s because we wa nt initiative and that‘s because we want the best deal for britain and we recognise there will have to be a consensus and compromise from both the leave and remain point of view. now, part of that is how can we make sure we have as much access as possible to the single market, trade with the other 27 member states, and also them trading with the uk as well, but also recognising that control of our sovereignty and controls on immigration, particularly on of movement, has to be part of the deal as well and we believe if we work together we can achieve that in a real and positive way that is good for britain and our relationship with the eu. you think there is no need to sacrifice one for the other? i don't. the reality is we will be leaving the european union so we will not have the same
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relationship in the single market as we currently do. at the present time we currently do. at the present time we have a say about the rules of that single market. leaving the european union we won‘t have that so it will be different. there‘s an opportunity here to come together and focus on what we can do constructively rather than all the things that are negative. tomorrow theresa may has an opportunity to actually on behalf of the country try bring people together and that requires her to be more open and willing to engage with different parties but also different organisations to achieve the best dealfor britain. let's organisations to achieve the best deal for britain. let's talk about immigration and you‘re talking about a new system offering britain control of unskilled immigration, we talk all the time about numbers on it but how do you decide if somebody would be allowed in? overwhelmingly and certainly as a doncaster mp, the biggest concern of my constituents and has been open access in low pay, low skilled jobs. there should be a
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two tier approach, we should recognise the rights of eu nationals here just like we want brits abroad to be recognised. but importantly people aren‘t so worried about stu d e nts people aren‘t so worried about students coming here or filling shortages in high—paid jobs, they are worried about the low pay, low skilled sector. we think there should be to tears and the low skills sector should be looked at on a sector by sector basis and if that means restricting the numbers coming into certain sectors, so be it, and that‘s what the british people want. looking at the ftse today, the index blooming, donald trump said this morning that the uk would get a trade deal with the us within weeks, do you think the remain campaign over played the negative impact on the economy that any vote to leave would have had ? the economy that any vote to leave would have had? there was a lot said in both campaigns that have left the public feeling i think quite baffled at some of the rhetoric. that‘s why our initiative today, to say leave
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the trenches behind, let‘s get together in the interests of britain. we have to recognise control of sovereignty and immigration was uppermost in the minds of those who voted to leave but we need an importantly good relationship with the eu and of course getting a deal with the us would be a fantastic opportunity as well. but we need to make sure we can be more constructive about what we need to do, talk about the details of what a deal would look like rather than emphasising and concentrating on everything that might go wrong. carolyn flint, thank you forjoining us on breakfast this morning. record highs for the stock market, but record lows for the pound. why? ben can explain. and it‘s mainly down to two things. trump and brexit. the pound is down sharply against the dollar over fears that the prime minister could push for a so—called hard brexit. sterling is now down about 20% since the vote injune. but at the same time, the index of our leading 100 shares, the ftse100, has soared.
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it‘s now closed up 11; days in a row, 12 of those setting new record highs. that‘s good news for anyone with a pension or investment in the stock market. but it‘s not necessarily representative of the health of the uk economy because most of the firms listed on it are big internationalfirms. tom stevenson is with me to explain what‘s going on, he‘s from fidelity international. good morning. how significant? we saw that rise, 11; days of rises, 12 of those set records, put it into a bit of context for us. both of those are extremely unusual. we‘ve had 11 days of rises before in a row, we‘ve had a consecutive record rises in a row but you have to go back to 1997 when tony blair won the election. that‘s 20 years ago when we had that run of eight consecutive records. a
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very unusual event. why? it tends to be they go hand—in—hand, the ftse rising as the pound falls, but why are they both doing what they‘re doing? there's a couple of reasons why the ftse100 is so strong, one isa why the ftse100 is so strong, one is a general improvement in investor sentiment as investors focus on the potential for sentiment as investors focus on the potentialfor higher sentiment as investors focus on the potential for higher economic growth with taxcutting antiregulatory and a higher spending president, donald trump. that‘s one reason. —— taxcutting and regulating. something like 70% of earnings among the biggest companies are made outside the uk. a weak pound is good, it makes our exports more competitive and it makes the value of those profits earned overseas when they‘re converted back into sterling moore valuable. not so good if we import things from overseas because it means they go up, like oil, energy, that could lead to higher inflation?
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—— more valuable. that‘s the flip side, it can lead to inflation and companies that import goods, retailers or example, they buy goods priced in dollars and they sell them in pounds. it‘s bad news for them but also individuals because your holidays abroad will be more expensive, and the price of petrol, and clothes, will be more expensive. this is where we are now, no one saw these rises, especially people that didn‘t predict brexit or trump, what about the next six months? it could be telling because we see more on brexit and also trump. the last two months have been a period of optimism and expectation about what 2017 would bring. 2017 is going to be the year of delivery or not. really donald trump needs to deliver on economic growth and the uk government needs to deliver on its plan for brexit. if we don‘t see... if we don‘t see either of those then
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the stock market might become nervous and we could get a wobble later in the year. we will talk again. tom, for now, thank you, tom from fidelity international. more from fidelity international. more from me after 7am. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. there‘s a call from the equality and human rights commission for premier league clubs like chelsea face legal action if they fail to meet the needs of disabled fans. an influential committee of mp‘s is supporting the call which comes as some clubs, which include watford, appear likely to miss the deadline on meeting basic standards. watford says that all known demand from disabled supporters has been met. some of the london acts up for this years brit awards say it‘s a great thing that they‘re recognising the diversity in music much more than in previous years. grim artist, skepta from tottenham,
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who won a mercury music prize last year, joined michael kiwanuka from muswell hill and kano from east ham in welcoming the broader range of nominations. they‘re up against david bowie in the best male artist category. the lights at piccadilly circus are to be switched off later this morning for the longest period of time since the second world war. the billboard which has displayed electrical advertisements for more than a century but now work is to be carried out to make it a more interactive screen. it‘ll be off until the autumn with a temporary banner being put up in its place. a piece of abstract art made from a student‘s rejection letter from oxford university has gone viral on twitter. claudia vulliamy from london applied to study classics at wadham college. upon receiving the rejection, she decided to turn the letter into a piece of art and a picture of it was posted on twitter. just so you know, claudia was offered a place at durham university where she‘s doing well. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now.
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we can see it‘s a good service on all lines apart from tfl rail which is partly suspended due to ongoing engineering work. the a! has reopened at upper holloway after being closed since october while the railway bridge was replaced. but bus lanes will remain closed for a few more months. just by the elephant & castle roundabout, st georges road is closed up to the imperial war museum. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. there are one or two fog patches around this morning. they‘re not widespread but they do sneak up on you, so worth bearing in mind. there‘s a lot of cloud around and some outbreaks of rain. the further east you are this morning be chilly it‘s likely to be but the drier the day. not so much rain through there. elsewhere, outbreaks of this light rain and drizzle, drying out a little as we head through the afternoon. the maximum temperature today at six so still feeling reasonably chilly. 0vernight tonight we hang on to the cloud, mostly dry picture.
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maybe one or two breaks in the cloud and if we do then we could see some fog developing and the temperature drop that little bit lower. minimum temperature around one or two celsius. a chilly start tomorrow again, we could get one or two mist and fog patches but as we head through the day there‘s a bit of cloud but a brighter day with drier air moving in. another dry day tuesday into wednesday but for much of the week it‘s staying rather cloudy. vanessa is about to go on air on bbc radio london and she‘s looking at pharmacists in london, who say funding cuts could put them out of business. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump praises brexit and promises a quick trade deal with the uk, when he becomes president. speaking to the conservative mp and leave campaigner, michael gove, he said he thought
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the uk was doing great and had been "so smart in getting out." the heat i took was unbelievable. people do not want other people coming in and destroying their country. and with just days to go until donald trump‘s inauguration, jon has the first in series of special reports from the us. good morning from a freezing cold milwaukee. we are taking the temperature of public opinion in the week donald trump becomes president. good morning it‘s monday the 16th of january. also this morning: northern ireland‘s power—sharing government is expected to collapse today triggering a snap election to the stormont assembly.
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the inquests will open today into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed in a terror attack on a tunisian beach a year and half ago. the pound falls to a 31—year low, after reports suggest the prime minister will push for a hard brexit. i'll look at what it means for us and our money. but the scot market is heating new re cord but the scot market is heating new record highs. in sport, andy murray is serving for the match at the australian open first round. temperatures in the next 24 hours not too dissimilar. a weather front producing a lot of cloud, brighter
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skies in the south—east. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner, michael gove, for the times, in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. here‘s our political correspondent, vicky young. theresa may is about to tell us more about how she thinks the uk can prosper outside of the european union. her critics say the economy will suffer if britain leaves the single market and is no longer able to trade freely with the eu. but the president—elect donald trump says he will offer britain a quick and fair trade deal with america within weeks of taking office. and he contrasted his approach to president 0bama‘s. i thought the uk were so smart in getting out and you were there and you guys wrote it and put it in the front page, trumps said that brexit is going to happen and it happened.
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that was when i was going to lose easily. everybody thought i was crazy. obama said they are going to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen and he had to retract. that was a bad statement. in other words, we're at the front of the queue? i think you are doing great. i think it‘s going great. mr trump said his team will work very hard to get a trade deal done quickly and done properly and it will be good for both sides. he alse predicted that other countries will leave to the eu, he alse predicted that other countries would leave to the eu, claiming it had been deeply damaged by the migration crisis. countries want their own identity and the uk wanted its own identity. but i do believe this, if they had not been forced to take in all of the refugees, so many with all the problems that entails i think you would not have a brexit. mr trumps‘ offer of a rapid trade deal is a boost to the prime minister who insists britain remains open for business.
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the president—elect said the two leaders will meet right after he gets to the white house. vicky young, bbc news 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. and absolutely fascinating to see that interview. with regards to the trade deal, how we click or anything like that be done? it would take a while and i thought it was interesting that michael gove asks the president—elect to say they are in the front of the queue and that is an invitation that donald trump does not take. he does not say we are at the front of any queue because, frankly, the to—do list all president elect trump is long. the question is, after britain has left
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the european union, will it get as good or a better deal with the us as it has now. it is complicated stuff that we can expect to take quite a while to signoff but on the whole, number ten should be encouraged by what they heard. he sounds like a fan of britain, an enthusiast for brexit. theresa may wrote to him just after christmas, reinforcing the view that she wants the us and uk to have a close relationship just like churchill and the us during world war two. number ten will be encouraged by the warm words they getting from the man who will be us president. we will speak to michael gove and to the former us state department spokesman rueben. —— john
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rueben. a group of mps and organisations from both sides of the brexit debate have launched a manifesto for how britain‘s departure from the eu should take place. the brexit together manifesto says it‘s time for all sides to "leave the referendum trenches" and join forces to create a strategy that reflects the country as a whole. the movement is backed by mps who campaigned for both the leave and remain campaigns. they include caroline flint. there was a lot said that have left the public feeling quite baffled with some of the rhetoric and that is why our initiative today, to say leave the trenches behind and get together in the interest of britain and recognise that sovereignty and immigration was in the minds of voters. the pound has fallen sharply against the dollar ahead of theresa may‘s speech on how britain will leave the european union. is it all about hard brexit? your
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top two stories having a great impact on the value of the pound and the stock market. to start with the pound, it has fallen to record lows ina pound, it has fallen to record lows in a speech theresa may is expected to talk about a hard rack set. prioritising that control over immigration over the single market. ——a hard brexit. europe is our biggest trading partner and that could affect economic growth. the poundis could affect economic growth. the pound is down about 20% since our vote injune. pound is down about 20% since our vote in june. the pound is down about 20% since our vote injune. the huge impact. it is good news because it makes our exports more competitive, we might sell more but it has an effect on what we buy from overseas and makes imports more expensive, especially things like oil which means petrol
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prices that could push up inflation and it have an effect on our pockets. new record highs, rising consecutively for 12 sessions. that is really a view that america, a stronger economy, expected to pick up stronger economy, expected to pick upa lot stronger economy, expected to pick up a lot of frederick boosting the global economy. the ftse100 and the stock market doing pretty well. the pound falling. there is a concern about the mismatch and what it could mean to our pocket. northern ireland‘s devolved government looks set to collapse today, after sinn fein again insisted it would not replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister at stormont. under the rules of the power—sharing system, his resignation last week also forced the removal of the democratic unionist leader, arlene foster, as first minister. sinn fein has until 5 o‘clock this evening to name mr mcguiness‘ replacement, otherwise a snap election could be called. chris page reports.
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for a week, a part of the uk has been without a functioning government. when martin mcguinness of sinn fein resigned as northern ireland‘s deputy first minister, he automatically put the democratic unionist party leader arlene foster out of her job as first minister. that is the way the power—sharing system works. the party‘s relationship finally failed over a financial scandal involving a green energy scheme. but the partnership between unionists and irish republicans has always been uneasy. there are many disagreements between them. the stormont stalemate means an election is likely in the next few weeks. however, the british and irish governments have held talks with the parties to try and avoid that. but, with no sign of a breakthrough, a breakdown is looking imminent. today at the northern ireland assembly, the dup and sinn fein have been asked to nominate new members for first minister and deputy first minister. but sinn fein say they will not do so, so the devolved government will officially collapse. the law says the northern ireland
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secretary, james brokenshire, must call an election within a reasonable period of time. negotiations to try and restore power—sharing would follow, but no—one believes it would be an easy process. devolution has lasted for almost a decade in northern ireland, but stormont may not survive its most serious crisis. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british holidaymakers killed in a terror attack in tunisia are due to open at the royal courts ofjustice later today. in total, 38 tourists were killed by a gunman, who targeted a beach near the town of sousse injune 2015. it remained the deadliest attack in britain since the thousands five. sarah campbell reports. lives lost — 38 people were killed in total, 30 of them british — they included three generations of the same family, married couples and a teenager.
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all had been staying at the 5—star imperial marha ba hotel in the popular resort of port el kantaoui, near sousse. their attacker appraoched from the beach. the holyday—makers stood little chance against the heavily—armed 23—year—old man. seifeddine rezgui would later be shot by security forces. over the next seven weeks, the inquest hearings will be heard here in london at the royal courts ofjustice. but reflecting the fact that the 30 victims came from across the uk, proceedings here will be fed to courts elsewhere, including in sterling, newcastle and cardiff. witnesses will include a senior figure from the foreign office, and from the parent company from thompson, the travel agent used by those who died. the families want to know the answer to the question, how did their loved ones come by their deaths? within the scope that the coroner has set out, they also want to know about the security arrangements of the 5—star hotel where they were staying and whether the travel advice given by the fco that there was a high risk of terrorism including in tourist areas was given to them before or after booking. the attack decimated the tourist
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industry in tunisia and shattered the lives of those who lost family members. they have waited a long time to hear in detail what happened to their loved ones and whether any lessons can be learnt. sarah campbell, bbc news we will be speaking to an eyewitness later on, at 18. premier league football clubs should face legal action if they don‘t do enough to ensure access for disabled fans, according to a report by a committee of mps. the culture media and sport select committee says it‘s disappointed some clubs aren‘t doing more after a bbc investigation in 2015 found that 17 out of 20 failed to provide enough wheelchair spaces. the clubs say making alterations to older grounds is difficult to do quickly. they‘re out just four
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they‘re outjust four days to go before donald trump is inaugurated and there are always plenty of headlines. michael gove has secured the first uk interview with the president—elect. the focus was abroad with the matter of brexit firmly on the agenda. james rubin was a spokesman during bill clinton‘s term and most recently a senior media adviserfor clinton‘s term and most recently a senior media adviser for hillary clinton. good to have you on bbc brea kfast. clinton. good to have you on bbc breakfast. some of our viewers said it would be a big stake to leave the eu. donald trump says brexit will and are being a great thing. what have you made of donald trump‘s first uk interview? it is not a big surprise, i guess, first uk interview? it is not a big surprise, iguess, if first uk interview? it is not a big surprise, i guess, if you believe
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donald trump‘s position he took during the campaign were going to change and he was going to suddenly become much more presidential figure, much more diplomatic and unwilling to criticise people from far away and you are going to be surprised. it took some shots today at the german chancellor, who is pretty widely respected around the world. he was pretty much the same about mrs merkel as he was about the russian leader, vladimir putin. he is still being donald trump and rana singha lot is still being donald trump and rana singh a lot and being very blunt. —— still promising a lot. do you think foreign policy will be weaker as a result of leaving the eu is make we will see what happens as things evolve. if you believe mr trump, the eu is starting to collapse and that
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britain leaving was the first step. this is a president who does not seem to have a strong tie to international bodies. he does not particularly like nato either. the us foreign policy is going to change a lot under donald trump. if you like, the last 60 years of working with european, asian allies, having freedom and democracy, free markets growing through american leadership, you are not going to like what is coming next because it is going to be very protectionist, not supportive of the nato allowance, unusually only with russia and it will have trade was with countries like china. do you think it will be better for the uk? 0bama do you think it will be better for the uk? obama said if brexit happened we would be at the back of the line and donald trump didn‘t
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give the clearest answer when michael gove asked him, but when askedif michael gove asked him, but when asked if he would put them at the front of the queue he said he thinks it would be great. what do you make of that? i think they will get priority. donald trump will reward his friends and punish his enemies, that‘s what he does. unfortunately he regards enemies as anyone that disagrees with him. look, on the european union issue, donald trump believes the british people made the right decision and he wants to help the levers. he‘s going to try to make a trade deal early on. —— leavers. but people around the world and your viewers have to remember it is difficult to make a trade deal. for instance his son—in—law has said he would make peace in the middle east, he said he would solve the israeli—palestinian problem, and that would be great! but i think it‘s a lot easier to put out a tweet
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and say something, we‘ll have to see if he‘s as good at doing these deals as he is at criticising them. from your knowledge and experience, what would a trade deal with the uk look like? if it‘s a quick deal how quickly can it be done? trade deals are hard because they involve extraordinary levels of detail, there aren‘t too many people in the system around the world that can do them. they really can be counted in them. they really can be counted in the dozens of trade negotiators that are qualified. with all—time full out government effort on both sides you could do it in between six months 28—year—olds if that‘s all you wanted to do and they would emphasise the kinds of things britain and the us are good at —— between six months to a year. it would require big changes in the focus of all the people in europe and the uk who have got used to the british being part of the european
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union. ijust british being part of the european union. i just worry... british being part of the european union. ijust worry... what i‘d be worried about is those changes would come too fast and the economy would suffer as a result. james, good to talk to you this morning. thank you for your time. thank you. it will be the year of talking trump and brexit non—stop! it will be the year of talking trump and brexit non-stop! we will guide you through on bbc breakfast! later we will be speaking to michael gove, who did the interview, at 8:30am.“ you have time can you ask him about the messy desk? i was concerned about the number of papers on the desk. no room for any actual work. i can work in a messy environment as you can see! you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump has used his first uk interview as president—elect to promise a rapid trade deal with britain, predicting brexit will be a great thing. northern ireland‘s devolved government is expected to collapse today if sinn fein doesn‘t name a new deputy first minister, a snap election is likely. here‘s carol with a look
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at this morning‘s weather. it looks miserable, doesn‘t it? nice umbrella, though. good morning. the forecast for most todayis good morning. the forecast for most today is cloudy and also damp. a weather front is coming right across central parts of england in particular, that‘s producing the dampness. later we have another one coming into north—west scotland, which will produce rain. but for most it is a cloudy start. not particularly cold first thing across scotland, there‘s a lot of cloud and hill fog. some rain in the east. same for northern ireland, lots of cloud but not particularly cold and then across england we have a weather front producing a lot of cloud and also patchy rain, the odd heavy burst, and some drizzle and as we drift to the west, wales and the south—west, a murky start, a fair bit of cloud around, hill fog and
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dampness. through the day is weather front edges slightly further east thenit front edges slightly further east then it will weaken as it retreats a bit back towards the west. some sunshine from the wash to west sussex and all points east it will be cooler but look at the temperatures to the west, 9—11. here‘s the weather front in the afternoon in north—west scotland. that weather front will continue southwards through the rest of scotla nd southwards through the rest of scotland into northern england, fairly patchy so some will miss the rain altogether. quite a cloudy night generally across—the—board, except for the south—east where we will see clearer skies and possibly patchy fog and patchy frost lows of around two celsius. as we head into tomorrow, we still have a weather front producing rain in parts of scotla nd front producing rain in parts of scotland and northern england. a little of that getting into north wales and a lot of cloud associated with it. but again, into the south—east, east anglia, that‘s where we see the sunshine with temperatures at their lowest. behind it we see brighter skies coming
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through in parts of scotland, maybe the east of northern ireland. temperatures here, ten or 11. then from tuesday into wednesday, the weather remains fairly benign, high pressure takes charge of most of the weather and the winds strengthen in the western isles and the bar west of scotla nd the western isles and the bar west of scotland with a weather front flirting with a bit of rain at times. for most on wednesday it will be dry with quite a lot of cloud. the best of the sunshine in the south—west, southern counties and also central areas. temperatures widely between 7—9, maybe ten or 11 in the far north of scotland. then on thursday, a bit more of the same, much quieter than last week. again a lot of cloud at times, some brighter brea ks lot of cloud at times, some brighter breaks and sunshine, temperatures between seven and ten and finally on friday, you‘ve guessed it, more of the same. quite a lot of cloud around, thick enough here and there for some rain and temperatures between six, seven and eight. no severe weather on the cards monday
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to friday for sure this week. that could be my michael fish moment, but i hope it‘s not! i‘m sure it went the! i'm sure it went the! carol, don't worry! —— i'm sure it won't be. we need to explain the lemons now... to most people, lemons might conjure up images of delicious tarts or refreshing drinks, but one woman decided these bright yellow fruit were the perfect way to raise awareness of breast cancer symptoms. you might have seen this image circulating on social media, it‘s the know your lemons campaign, which aims to highlight the range of changes that can point to the disease. it was created by corrine ellsworth beaumont, who joins us in the studio. good morning to you. the necklace, very lennon like. tell us more about the campaign, why lemons? -- lemon.
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it's the campaign, why lemons? -- lemon. it‘s been difficult to talk about breast cancer until now because we can‘t display breasts in public and cancer isn‘t a thing people want to talk about very much. when we use something like a friendly lemon, it allows us to convey a lot of information because it looks like a breast without being a breast, we can bypass censorship issues and we can bypass censorship issues and we can reach people in a way they haven‘t been reached before, especially on a global scale. you have been looking carefully at the image, and! have been looking carefully at the image, and i think we can see it, there are lots of things women and their partners should be looking for when it comes to their breasts? exactly. being aware of breast cancer symptoms can make a difference when it comes to breast cancer mortality. talk us through some of the things, this is the image, tell us some of the things that you might see when you?m image, tell us some of the things that you might see when you? it is a lwa ys that you might see when you? it is always not to talk to a doctor about
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these symptoms. the most common symptom will be a hidden lump you can‘t see but you can feel. it often feels hard and immovable like a lemon seed, but it can be any shape. as small as a lemons seed or a thick mass that you feel. it‘s important to still get your mammogram because that can detect a cancerous lump long before you feel it. in some cases breast cancer doesn‘t present itself like a lump, so these images can give people the visual to understand what it is no matter where they live in the role world or their literacy. who has a gold to reduce deaths by cancer by 25% by the year 2025. —— live in the world. we think the know your lemons campaign will be pivotal to make that happen with breast cancer, with people getting involved, educating themselves and others and then donating to the campaign to reach more around the world. we have 2.2
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billion women that need to know this information and if they can find the symptom, and can report it earlier, particularly in developing countries where 90% of women that present with breast cancer are at a fatal stage, that‘s because they don‘t know the symptoms and the workers don‘t know what to do about the symptoms either. this campaign in one image for one minute educate a woman and save a life, save a mother, save a grandmother, that‘s why i‘m so passionate because both of my grandmothers died of breast cancer and a very close friend so i wanted to make a difference. why has it struck such a chord and it has cut through were so many other campaigns don‘t? through were so many other campaigns don't? it is friendly, its unique. when people see the lemons they think, i‘ve never thought of lemons as breasts before so people will change the way they think about lemons and it will remind people to check themselves and take care of themselves. it‘s easy to share a
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lemon, it‘s not easy to share the standard know yourself type messages because they are usually text and the visuals that go with them aren‘t very viral. but this one definitely is. i'm already looking at the lemons differently! thank you very much indeed, a great campaign! to find out more about what symptoms to look out for and the support available, you can contact breast cancer care, breast cancer now and cancer research uk. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. there‘s a call from the equality and human rights commission for premier league clubs to face legal action if they fail to meet the needs of disabled fans. an influential committee of mps is supporting the call which comes as some clubs, which include watford, appear likely to miss the deadline
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on meeting basic standards. watford says that all known demand from disabled supporters has been met. some of the london acts up for this years brit awards say it‘s a great thing that they‘re recognising the diversity in music much more than in previous years. grim artist, skepta from tottenham, who won a mercury music prize last year, joined michael kiwanuka from muswell hill and kano from east ham in welcoming the broader range of nominations. they‘re up against david bowie in the best male artist category. the lights at piccadilly circus are to be switched off later this morning for the longest period of time since the second world war. the billboard which has displayed electrical advertisements for more than a century but now work is to be carried out to make it a more interactive screen. it‘ll be off until the autumn with a temporary banner being put up in its place. a piece of abstract art made from a student‘s rejection letter from oxford university has gone viral on twitter. claudia vulliamy from london applied to study classics at wadham college.
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upon receiving the rejection, she decided to turn the letter into a piece of art and a picture of it was posted on twitter. just so you know, claudia was offered a place at durham university where she‘s doing well. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. minor delays on the circle and district lines as well as the hammersmith & city lines. tfl rail which is partly suspended due to ongoing engineering work. the a1 has reopened at upper holloway after being closed since october while the railway bridge was replaced. but bus lanes will remain closed for a few more months. and in south east london, the woolwich ferry is down to one boat service due to mechanical problems. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. there are one or two fog patches around this morning. they‘re not widespread but they do sneak up on you, so worth bearing in mind. there‘s a lot of cloud around
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and some outbreaks of rain. the further east you are this morning be chilly it‘s likely to be but the drier the day. not so much rain through there. elsewhere, outbreaks of this light rain and drizzle, drying out a little as we head through the afternoon. the maximum temperature today at six so still feeling reasonably chilly. 0vernight tonight we hang on to the cloud, mostly dry picture. maybe one or two breaks in the cloud and if we do then we could see some fog developing and the temperature drop that little bit lower. minimum temperature around one or two celsius. maybe one or two breaks in the cloud and if we do then we could see some fog developing and the temperature drop that little bit lower. minimum temperature around one or two celsius. a chilly start tomorrow again, we could get one or two mist and fog patches but as we head through the day there‘s a bit of cloud but a brighter day with drier air startubf to move in. another chilly night tuesday into wednesday but for much of the week it‘s staying rather cloudy. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london and she‘ll have more on the lights at piccadilly about to go out. they happen at 8:30am.
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in his first british interview since becoming u—s president—elect. in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times — in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. mr trump said he would ask his son—in—lanared kushner to negotiate a middle east peace agreement — and would seek a deal with russia to reduce nuclear weapons. a group of mps and organisations from both sides of the brexit debate have launched a manifesto for how
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britain‘s departure from the eu should take place. the brexit together campaign says it‘s time for all sides to "leave the referendum trenches" and join forces to create a strategy that reflects the country as a whole. the movement is backed by mps who campaigned for both sides of the debate. they include the labour mp caroline flint, who voted for remain in the referendum. i think there was a lot said in both camps — leave and remain — that have left the public feeling i think sort of quite baffled at some of the rhetoric and that is why our initiative today, which is to say leave the trenches behind, let‘s get together in the interest of britain. we have to recognise that control of sovereignty and immigration was uppermost in the minds of those who voted leave, but it is absolutely right that we should have a good trading relationship with the eu. northern ireland‘s devolved government looks set to collapse today, after sinn fein again insisted it would not replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister at stormont. his resignation last week also forced the removal of the democratic unionist leader, arlene foster, as first minister. sinn fein has until 5 o‘clock this evening to name mr maguiness‘ replacement, otherwise a snap election could be called.
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the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed in tunisia injune 2015 opens today. they were killed by a lone gunman at a 5 star beach resort near sousse. it remains the deadliest terror attack on britons since thejuly 7 bombings in 2005. the rspca is urging the public to double check before raising the alarm after the charity received a string of calls from people mistaking inanimate objects for live creatures. in november, the charity was called out to investigate reports of an owl, which had been sitting on a roof for four days — only to discover it was made of plastic. iam in i am in cheek by that story. would you call the rspca if you saw and now on the tree for five days?”
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would go and check it out.|j now on the tree for five days?” would go and check it out. i know, it was posted. coming up on the programme — carol will have your full weather forecast. that‘s in around ten minutes. it was not the most straightforward match. andy murray has won his first round match at the austrlalian 0pen this morning, beating ukraine‘s illya marchenko in straight sets. this is murray‘s first grand slam campaign as a world number one and top seed but he didn‘t have it all his own way against his opponent ranked 94 places lower. the first set took almost one hour. murray took it 7—5. the second set went to a tie break but once murray had won that he raced through the final set 6—2 to book his place in the second round.
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dan da n eva ns dan evans is in action. he has never made it in the second round in melbourne. he is now involved in a tie—break. fellow briton aljaz bedene lost his first round match while british number three dan evans is in action now against facundo bagnis of argentina. the game between manchester untied and liverpool may have ended in a 1—1 draw but it was a fascinating premir legaue encounter. united‘s world record signing paul pogba was at fault for liverpool‘s goal when he gave away a first half penalty that james milner dispatched. united — who had won their last nine games — trailed for nearly an hour until zlatan ibrahimovic headed in the equaliser as the two side‘s shared the points for the second time this season. liverpool was much more defensive. they defended with tempo in the second half. they defended with ten players in the second half. when you have good players, you always smell the possibility of a counter—attack but today was the reverse.
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let‘s see if the critics are fair. 80 minutes of high intent football is really hard to say when i saw the boys, hoped for a little bit of luck but unfortunately we didn't have much in the second. we had enough. all good. manchester city‘s title hopes were dealt a big blow as they were thrashed 4—0 at everton. romalu lukaku and kevin mirallas opened the scoring, before teenagers tom davies and ademola lookman, on his debut, added two more. pep guardiola admitted that being 10 points behind league leaders chelsea means they are probably out of the title race you cannot plan a game like this. everybody knows it is always difficult against city. they play some great football but i think the second half for us was perfect. in every aspect of football. 0k, we all conceded too many chances and we created enough to put
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it in balance. but you have to put it in the net in order to win. england‘s cricketers scored 350 — their highest one day total against india — but still lost the opening one day international by three wickets. centuries from virat kohli and kedarjadhav helped india to their target with 11 balls to spare. they go 1—0 up in the three match series. the next game is on thursday. a last—minute try from chris ashton denied scarlets a famous win over saracens in rugby union‘s european champions cup. scarlets needed a win to keep up their hopes of qualifying for the quarterfinals, but ashton scored in the final play of the match. so it finished as a draw, 22 points all. that means saracens are through to the quarter—finals, but ended scarlets‘ chances of getting to the quarters. sale were defeated by toulon. it has been five years since ronnie 0‘sullivan last went out in the first round of snooker‘s masters but he came as close as you can get yesterday.
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china‘s liang wenbo came from 4—2 down to lead 5—4 and had this black to win the match. but 0‘sullivan, despite suffering with a heavy cold, won that frame and the next to win 6—5. 2016 was rather difficult for the english golfer graeme storm but 2017 couldn‘t have had a better start. the 38—year—old won just the second european tour event of his career at the south african 0pen. he and rory mcilroy went to a play—off after both finished the tournament on 18 under par. mcilroy made the first error on the third extra hole, and storm, who nearly lost his tour card last year, sealed a first win since 2007. brilliant. what a lovely story. he nearly... 100 euros from losing the
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two ca rd nearly... 100 euros from losing the two card and because someone pulled out, so he was suddenly back in the tournament. it is a brutal, if you are not in the top echelon. we have the sister of sherlock coming up. but do not fear, we will not give the game away but we will find out exactly what she felt about. the game away but we will find out exactly what she felt aboutm makes the nervous because i know you seen it and i have not. it is seven 38. it‘s the start of another working week. and for many families that means dad working long hours while mum does the bulk of the childcare. but according to research published today, more than a third of fathers say they‘d be willing to take a pay cut to gain more time with their children.
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before we speak to one dad who did just that, let‘s see if the fans at yesterday‘s manchester united versus liverpool match feel that they‘re scoring enough extra time with the family. we have flex the worktime so i start early and finish early and i can work from home if my son is not feeling well. the main thing for me is to bring him on to the match.|j am lucky i have a very understanding employer. a family man himself so he understands the pressure. he has been there, done that and understands the family has stood come first. i find it quite easy, really. i have three children and make sure i find the time and do things on the weekend. it is important to take the time and make the effort and spend time when you
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can with them. we run a business and we are both able to get on this score. if we have meetings, we can kind of slot in and manage our diaries because of being self—employed. diaries because of being self-employed. i just tend to diaries because of being self-employed. ijust tend to bring him to their knees. —— to these matches. we‘re joined now by sarahjackson, the chief executive of working families, which commissioned this research into fathers‘ work—life balance — and also byjohn adams, who gave up his job to spend more time with his two young daughters. what was it like for you? what brought you to that decision and what were your employers like? informally, they were generally very supportive and, if i could give one example, i tried a couple of different employers and one of them was quite happy to rearrange my
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working hours so i could arrive early and combine that with a nurse. u nfortu nately, over early and combine that with a nurse. unfortunately, over time, i early and combine that with a nurse. unfortunately, overtime, iwas taken to one side and told that i was not attending certain meetings. 0ver was not attending certain meetings. over time i felt it was untenable and did exactly what working families have said and took a part—time role in the sharif. families have said and took a part-time role in the sharif. lots of different ways to spend time with your daughter? my wife and i had to discuss it because she works full—time and we thought our daughters would benefit from having more time with their parents and in this case it was me. economic league, i had done some calculations, i thought we should be 0k. calculations, i thought we should be ok. my calculations were the off
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beam but i think that is the same with many families. you have taken the time to spend more time with your daughters, we can see them on screen. why should employers be concerned about this? this is the fourth year we have run the modern families index and we have seen tendencies are among younger fathers to say what we want is equality at home as well as at work. fathers, like those interviewed at old trafford, is they want to be fathers involved with their family. the other thing they are telling us is that they are resentful with the lack of balance. did you see things from employers point of view. when they are under increasing pressure,
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can you see it from their side as well is make it lacks a really hard to employ somebody and do theirjob. what we have seen over the years is long hours increasing. we are picking up very strongly that people, men and women, are both saying a lack of balance at work is causing enormous stress. they do not eat well, drink too much, do not do enough exercise, do not spend time with their children. you have a cost to society which we need to take seriously if the way we are organising work is making people feel and is keeping them from their children, we need to do something about it. from your point of view, is it that you have had your experience and it has changed things for you. parents, should they be given special treatment or should it
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be everyone, being given a little bit more freedom to be happy? you raise a number of questions. we are talking about the father. we then have faced the same issues as well. i would never say that either is more important. it is a serious issue but the rout some are bigger issues in the whole workplace culture. people still expect but it is more acceptable for a mother to bash out of the office and look after an six child. whenever a father leaves the office, said thursday to go and spend the day with his daughter, his boss may give
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comments. we will try to read some comments. we will try to read some comments. if we had a pay cut, we would be in a huge debt, says one. the cost of living is too high. do get in touch with us as well. twitter, e—mail... get in touch with us as well. twitter, e-mail. .. shout! get in touch with us as well. twitter, e-mail... shout! let's have a look at the weather. for the rest of the uk under the cloud, it is a mild start, temperatures widely 7—10. we could see some brighter brakes around fife. then in the north of england, we have a weather front fizzling but still producing mostly light and patchy rain. further east, a lot of cloud but the best chance of sunshine is from the wash to west
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sussex, there‘s the rain and on the other side of it, quite a bit of cloud around. some brighter spells but the cloud thicken off for the odd spot here and there. a cloudy afternoon in wales but with some exceptions, a bit of brightness but that will be the exception rather than the rule and for most of northern ireland, cloudy and dry but you can see the rain affecting scotla nd you can see the rain affecting scotland and nudging on the door of the north—west. through the evening and overnight, our first front fizzles and our second front goes south across northern england and to north wales, taking a passing swipe at northern ireland. under the cloud and hill fog it won‘t be cold but in the south—east under clearer skies temperatures will be low enough for a touch of frost and potentially some mist and fog. tomorrow we start on this cloudy note once again with our patchy rain in northern england and north wales. ahead of it the south—east is favoured for sunshine and we could see some getting into the south—west and also parts of
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eastern and southern scotland, easton northern ireland. ten or 11 in scotland and northern ireland and for to nine as we go across england and wales. from tuesday into wednesday, high pressure takes charge. we still have a squeeze on the isobars in the far north of scotland, indicating it will turn windier in the northern and western isles and the far north of mainland scotla nd isles and the far north of mainland scotland where we also have a weather front not too far away. that‘s likely to bring some spots of rainfora time that‘s likely to bring some spots of rain for a time but for most of tuesdayit rain for a time but for most of tuesday it will be dry. wednesday will be fairly cloudy and the best chance of sunshine will be in southern counties of england and also central parts of england, but that‘s not reflected in the temperatures because once again the highest temperatures are in the north. 0n highest temperatures are in the north. on thursday, spot the difference, the weather is so much quieter this week. quite a bit of cloud around, some sunshine and a few showers with highs of between six and ten. then as we head on into
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friday, not a huge amount of change. again some bright spells, some thicker cloud and the odd spot of rain here and there. certainly a lot different to last week! thanks, see you later. the transport minister will meet volkswagen bosses this week to find out if the car giant will pay compensation to motorists caught up in the emissions rigging scandal. ben‘s here. it seems unfair because if you‘re in america there is compensation, but if you‘re in the uk nothing but that could change. the company set aside over £10 billion to deal with the fall out from this scandal, but some say they‘re going to need a lot more. last year they agreed a £12 billion payout to car owners in the united states affected. that means some motorists there could get compensation of up to £8000. but what about here? the devices are starting to be removed and the government has been given
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over £1 million to cover the costs of tests they carried out. but no compensation yet. last week lawyers representing 10,000 motorists started their own case for £3000 but we don‘t know if they‘ll get it. with me now isjim holder from what car magazine. why the difference, why do they get £8,000 each for the same problem but here no muggy yet and even if we do it will be £3000. it's a very different problem between the us and europe. —— money. in the us the emissions regulations are tougher and in order to fix the cars vw had to make sure there was less space in the cars so they didn‘t perform in the cars so they didn‘t perform in the same way, in europe they have fixed the cars and it‘s been ratified there will be no performance changes as a result so no loss for the owner. if you're an owner you feel duped, you thought it was cleaner than you thought and
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based on that you would think you‘re due for some compensation. the transport minister is meeting with them, how much power does he have? that is open to debate. it‘s a moral debate against a legal one, volkswagen will stand very clear to say they haven‘t broken regulations in europe. the regulations are saying they haven‘t broken them by fitting these cheating devices. they will come under pressure because of the moral argument but legally they will stand firm. does this labour there the difference in regulation between emissions standards in the us and europe, it seems a lot more relaxed in europe —— does this labour there. that's become clear as a result of this scandal but we are going to have the toughest regulations in europe in the world later this year and they will roll out over the next 18 months. what does it mean in terms of reputation for vw? they are keen to draw a line under this and you think if they can
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afford it can‘t they pay something to make the problem go away?|j afford it can‘t they pay something to make the problem go away? i don't see that happening because of the scale of the problem, it could be ruinous if they had to pay compensation across europe. it has been incredibly damaging but the irony is volkswagen sold more cars last year than anyone else in the world, they became the world‘s largest carmaker in the face of this scandal so they‘re holding up well and they will resist calls for compensation in europe. where are we now, if you have one of the cars what happens? you should have heard from volkswagen in the post, 1 million people have been informed of the1.2 million people have been informed of the 1.2 million owners that their six is ready and by autumn it should be completed. thanks very much, we will be waiting and seeing on that one. i will be back after 8am with more on the fall of the value of the pound. and more on the markets as well. on friday, donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. his election to the white house
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followed one of the most bitter and divisive campaigns in history, and many have questioned how the new leader will unite the country. to find out, we‘ve sentjon kay on a road trip along the iconic route 45, travelling from north to south, straight through the heart of america. today, in the first of a week—long series of reports, he‘s in winsconsin, a state that elected mr trump by the narrowest of margins. milwaukee, known for its harsh winters, for making cheese and beer and now for its role in america‘s fragile new politics. go! go, right now. this is no place forfragile — junior ice hockey. this is the green bayjunior gamblers. jonathan is coaching the under—9s. he likes donald trump because he is different, a nonpolitician, an outsider. itjust goes back to an alternative that is outside of the box, a different viewpoint. he is a billionaire,
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not exactly every man. no, he‘s certainly is not the i think there‘s something to be said for him being able to relate to a plumber, a welder, a teacher. the state of wisconsin switched sides in this election. its largely white working—class electorate normally vote democrat but this time they chose trump. a little brassy but i‘ll give him a try. they like giving new things and try here, like soccer on ice. engineerjason is confident. after nine redundancy threats in six years, he says it is time for a businessman in the oval office. it‘ll be nice to have more stability in the job front. i‘m hoping from an economic stand—point, that trump reflects giving that stability back to the country. are you more optimistic for your family‘s, your personal economics? absolutely. some of america‘s top ice athletes practice on this rink. you are not doing that as much.
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nancy was an 0lympian and is now a coach. it is time to be a little risky. she told me donald trump can bring a winner‘s mindset to the white house. trump makes a decision, he gets it done. did you have any reservations about his personality, i mean, the things he‘s said about women, for example? yeah, i think everybody who is behind him has some reservations because they really do not know the truth behind that and they are just hoping at this point in his life he has put that behind him. wisconsin may have voted trump but only by 1% and some are still struggling with the result. this is one of the most important jobs in the world and i‘m not certain he is prepared for it. this hockey mum is willing to give the new president a chance even though as a muslim she is worried by some of his comments. i try to look at the bright side. we have to just wait and see what happens.
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are you saying you are a little nervous? yes, i might be. are you prepared to support him? not quite prepared to support him but i‘m prepared to initiate change to support him. we heard that a lot here. a desire to unite but that it will not be easy. and tomorrowjon kay will be in chicago, getting reaction from people visiting president 0bama‘s favourite diner. we don‘t know quite yet what the president used to order but no doubt we will find out. as long as there's rins there i‘ll be happy! —— rips. does anyone have rips for breakfast? —— ribs. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. some of the london acts up for this years brit awards
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say it‘s a great thing that they‘re recognising the diversity in music much more than in previous years. grim artist, skepta from tottenham, who won a mercury music prize last year, joined michael kiwanuka from muswell hill and kano from east ham in welcoming the broader range of nominations. they‘re up against david bowie in the best male artist category. there‘s a call from the equality and human rights commission for premier league clubs to face legal action if they fail to meet the needs of disabled fans. an influential committee of mps is supporting the call which comes as some clubs, which include chelsea and watford, appear likely to miss the deadline on meeting basic standards. watford says that all known demand from disabled supporters has been met. the lights at piccadilly circus are to be switched off in just over half an hour so they can become more interactive. jason rosum is there. they‘re going to be turned off for
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quite a long time. we won‘t see any lights on piccadilly circus until the autumn and that‘s because these six giant screens are going to be turned off, they‘re going to be taken away turned off, they‘re going to be ta ken away and turned off, they‘re going to be taken away and a brand—new giant screen to fit the whole building behind me will be replaced and we‘ll see it by the end of the year. a piece of abstract art made from a student‘s rejection letter from oxford university has gone viral on twitter. claudia vulliamy from london applied to study classics at wadham college. upon receiving the rejection, she decided to turn the letter into a piece of art and a picture of it was posted on twitter. just so you know, claudia was offered a place at durham university where she‘s doing well. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. minor delays on the circle and district lines as well as the hammersmith & city lines. tfl rail is partly suspended due to ongoing engineering work. the a1 has reopened at upper holloway after being closed
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since october while the railway bridge was replaced. but bus lanes will remain closed for a few more months. let‘s have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. there are one or two fog patches around this morning. they‘re not widespread but they do sneak up on you, so worth bearing in mind. there‘s a lot of cloud around and some outbreaks of rain. the further east you are this morning be chilly it‘s likely to be but the drier the day. not so much rain through there. elsewhere, outbreaks of this light rain and drizzle, drying out a little as we head through the afternoon. the maximum temperature today at six so still feeling reasonably chilly. 0vernight tonight we hang on to the cloud, mostly dry picture. maybe one or two breaks in the cloud and if we do then we could see some fog developing and the temperature drop that little bit lower. minimum temperature around one or two celsius. a chilly start tomorrow again, we could get one or two mist and fog patches but as we head through the day there‘s a bit
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of cloud but a brighter day with drier air startubf to move in. another chilly night tuesday into wednesday but for much of the week it‘s staying rather cloudy. vanessa is about to go on air on bbc radio london and she‘s looking at pharmacists in london, who say funding cuts could put them out of business. hello this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump praises brexit and promises a quick trade deal with the uk when he becomes president. speaking to the conservative mp and leave campaigner michael gove, he said he thought the uk was "doing great" and had been ‘so smart in getting out‘. isaid i said people don‘t want to have other people coming in and destroying their country. and with just days to go until donald trump‘s inauguration, jon kay has the first in series of special reports from the us. good morning. we are crossing
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america, taking the temperature of public opinion in the week donald trump becomes president. good morning it‘s monday the 16th january. also this morning, as the markets open all eyes on the pound after it hits a 31 year low. it‘s down sharply on reports suggesting the prime minister will push for a hard brexit and quit the single market. but the stock market is still on the up, after hitting another new record on friday. northern ireland‘s power—sharing government is expected to collapse today triggering a snap election to the stormont assembly. in sport andy murray has won his first round match at the australian open.
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the world number one and top seed beat ilya marchenko in straight sets. she shocked sherlock fans with her turn as the detective‘s psychotic sister. we‘ll be joined by the actress sian brooke, as the bbc one drama draws to a close — for what could be the very last time. carol has the weather, good morning. quieter than last week. no snow, it‘s too mild. the temperatures by day and night next few days won‘t be too dissimilar. cloudy and damp and some sunshine around for some. more in15 some sunshine around for some. more in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former
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justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. here‘s our political correspondent, vicky young. theresa may is about to tell us more about how she thinks the uk can prosper outside of the european union. her critics say the economy will suffer if britain leaves the single market and is no longer able to trade freely with the eu. but the president—elect donald trump says he will offer britain a quick and fair trade deal with america within weeks of taking office. and he contrasted his approach to president 0bama‘s. i thought the uk were so smart in getting out and you were there and you guys wrote it and put it in the front page, trumps said that brexit is going to happen and it happened. that was when i was going to lose easily. everybody thought i was crazy. obama said they are going to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen and he had to retract. that was a bad statement.
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in other words, we‘re at the front of the queue? i think you are doing great. i think it‘s going great. mr trump said his team will work very hard to get a trade deal done quickly and done properly and it will be good for both sides. he alse predicted that other countries would leave to the eu, claiming it had been deeply damaged by the migration crisis. countries want their own identity and the uk wanted its own identity. but i do believe this, if they had not been forced to take in all of the refugees, so many with all the problems that entails i think you would not have a brexit. mr trumps‘ offer of a rapid trade deal is a boost to the prime minister who insists britain remains open for business. the president—elect said the two leaders will meet right after he gets to the white house. vicky young, bbc news 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in westminster. this is making headlines all over
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the place. i wonder what the prime minister will think reading this this morning? morning, dan. i‘m sure numberten will be pleased with the general gushing sentiment coming from donald trump. he sounds an enthusiast for britain, excited for brexit. he said in the clips, he was an advocate for brexit before the referendum, before he became president and this is an interview conducted by michael gove, also a champion for brexit. the headlines aren‘t surprising, but nevertheless, i think the way that donald trump is talking about his optimistic view of trade deals being done quickly will cheer number ten. when michael gove invites trump to say britain will be at the front of the queue for the trade deal, trump swe rves the queue for the trade deal, trump swerves a nd the queue for the trade deal, trump swerves and says something can be done quickly. we need to remain sceptical about this until it happens. britain can only do trade
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deals once it‘s left the customs union, we don‘t know whether that‘s something number ten yet want to do. it remains to be seen whether a trade deal can be done quickly and whether it‘s as good as britain can now, as a member of the european union do. the government believes it can and we‘ll get more clarity from theresa may when she makes a much heralded speech about brexit tomorrow, setting out the government‘s aims ahead of the triggering of article 50 which will happen by the end of march. michael gove will be speaking to us about 8. 30. the pound has fallen sharply against the dollar ahead of theresa may‘s speech on how britain will leave the european union. what is happening, ben? it's expected to fall as the london market opens because of fears over the so—called hard brexit, the idea
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that theresa may may prioritise control of migration over access to the single market. the single market is the thing that many businesses in this country need to be able to trade with the european union. they say that is key. the european union our biggest trading partner and they say without access that could affect business in the uk. we have seen the pound fall sharply. at one point it hit a 31—year low, below $1. 20, it‘s bounced back a bit but the concern is what happens next, clarity for business as far as the pound is concerned. it‘s down about 20% since the vote to leave the european union back injune. so for all of us, it means that imports are more expensive so anything priced in dollars like oil, it means petrol will be more expensive. there is a concern about the effect that could have on inflation. prices rising for us have on inflation. prices rising for us because of things we buy in the shop get more expensive because they are bought in from overseas. it‘s good news if you are a business and export your stuff around the world
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because it makes the products look cheaper and it‘s more attractive for people to buy british—made goods. the ftse100, the index of leading shares on the stock market have risen every day since christmas, 12 of those days it hit new records. the two tend to go hand in hand but nonetheless some worry over the value of the pound and the effect that could have. northern ireland‘s devolved government looks set to collapse today, after sinn fein again insisted it would not replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister at stormont. his resignation last week also forced the removal of the democratic unionist leader, arlene foster, as first minister. sinn fein has until 5pm today to name mr maguiness‘ replacement, otherwise a snap election could be called. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed in tunisia injune 2015 opens today. they were killed by a lone gunman at a 5 star beach resort near sousse.
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it remains the deadliest terror attack on britons since thejuly 7 bombings in 2005. in just a few minutes morning we‘ll be speaking to an eyewitness of the june 2015 attack. that‘s at 8.10. premier league football clubs should face legal action if they don‘t do enough to ensure access for disabled fans, according to a report by a cross—party group of mps. the culture media and sport select committee says it‘s disappointed some top clubs aren‘t doing more, after a bbc investigation in 2015 found 17 out of 20 failed to provide enough wheelchair spaces. the clubs say making alterations to older grounds is difficult to do quickly. an endangered baby rhino has been filmed meeting her father for the first time at knowsley safari park. the calf is called nomvula, which means "mother of rain". she is only a year old, and was born as a part of a special breeding programme.
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keepers say she‘s a bundle of energy who runs circles around her patient mum, meru. viewers in the north west can see more of nomvula‘s story on inside out this evening at 7.30. it‘ll also be available on the bbc iplayer. it‘s 8.15am and you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories: donald trump has used his first uk interview 18 months ago, 30 uk holiday—makers died when a gunman attacked a popular beach resort near sousse in tunisia. it was the worst british loss of life to terrorism since thejuly 2005 london bombings. the inquests into their deaths will open later today. in a moment, we‘ll speak to 0livia leathley, who was staying at the resort at the time of the attack. first, we‘rejoined by richard galpin, who is at the royal courts ofjustice ahead of today‘s hearing. richard, what do we expect
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from the inquests? this is going to be a very significant moment for the survivors of the horrific attack in sousse in 2015 and also for the families of those who were killed. 30 british tourists killed, many others injured and, of course, others killed from other european countries. it was the worst attack on british citizens since the 7/7 attacks back in 2005. now, of course, the inquest is going to go into a lot of painful detail for the families, the detail of how their loved ones were killed, but we understand the coroner is going to go further than that. he has a broader scope. he is able to make recommendations for how attacks like this and the huge number of fatalities they caused can be prevented in the future. that looks into how this attack was possible and able to be carried out by the lone gunman for more than 30 minutes
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using an automatic rifle and grenades without being challenged by the police. it took them over 30 minutes before they eventually confronted and killed him. there are some really important questions which he is going to be looking into. the security at the hotel — was it sufficient? did the holiday company provide sufficient advice on the risk of going to tunisia, the potential threat of terrorist attacks? and also a question i think for the foreign office about the level of risk which they believed existed in the country on their travel advisory service which they put out on the internet. we‘re joined now by 0livia leathley, who witnessed the attack injune 2015. thank you so much for coming in to talk to us. remind viewers what happened to you. it was very much a case of when you heard the gun shots, if you turned the other way when you came out of the hotel, you wouldn‘t have been there? when you came out of the hotel, you wouldn't have been there?m when you came out of the hotel, you wouldn't have been there? it was that close. my boyfriend and i left
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our hotel room and heard some bangs on the beach. we originally thought it was fireworks, it turned out to have been the first grenade and other people that were there sadly lost their lives on the beach. we went to the lobby where i rang my dad because he was all—knowing with things like this knowing what to do in situations like this. he said stay calm, listen to the staff, listen to what they are going to say andi listen to what they are going to say and i was like, all right, i was fine. i sat down, we were waiting and nothing was happening, we didn‘t know what was going on. then somebody from behind us shouted "they‘re inside" and suddenly the airwas "they‘re inside" and suddenly the air was just "they‘re inside" and suddenly the air wasjust thick with "they‘re inside" and suddenly the air was just thick with bullets and they were all bouncing off the inside of the lobby. it was complete panic. everyone is running in all directions. my boyfriend and i ran out the front of the hotel. we started running towards the street
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and one of the hotel reps told us it wasn‘t safe. we ran to the left and lost each other for a couple of seconds. we ran towards the gap in the hotel doors. we spotted each other on the way past, took each other‘s hand and ran. we got signalled into a security lodge on the ground by one of the hotel workers and stayed in there for about two hours. there was us, four brits, a couple of french and a couple of germans. we found out about an hour later that he‘d been shot, that he‘d ran to the right. i know we‘ve talked to you about it before. just now, is it still affecting you? it does. u nfortu nately, affecting you? it does. unfortunately, i don‘t want it to and neither does mike, but it is difficult. like one thing that i was
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not expecting was bonfire night. i love bonfire night. i love fireworks, but i just... love bonfire night. i love fireworks, but ijust... it makes my heart stop now hearing the bangs and espotionly car backfires that makes me full—onjust espotionly car backfires that makes me full—on just freeze and the same for him. it is little things. for the first six months it was any loud noise. i ended up having a particularly graceful moment in home sense when someone dropped something andi sense when someone dropped something and ijust sense when someone dropped something and i just burst sense when someone dropped something and ijust burst into tears. we‘re here. it has got to be 1,000 times worse for people who lost others. when you hear about the inquest, how does it make you feel when you think about sort of assigning blame when you have been through what you have been through and you saw what you saw and you saw people save so many by their quick thinking and their actions. how does this make you feel? i just
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actions. how does this make you feel? ijust want it actions. how does this make you feel? i just want it to be actions. how does this make you feel? ijust want it to be really, clearly apparent that the blame is on is. it is on that gunman. it shouldn‘t be on anybody else. you can‘t predict a terror attack. it‘s an attack and i‘m hoping maybe, i mean, we were very an attack and i‘m hoping maybe, i mean, we were very aware of an attack and i‘m hoping maybe, i mean, we were very aware of the risks when we went over, it was all happening in the bigger cities, like tunis, we were right on the edge of the coast. so we were aware of things happening, you know, further away, but we thought, we‘ll be ok. i think that‘s what they thought. thompson got us on a flight home that night and they were great and so were the hotel staff, but i mean if the inquests can bring, you know, better strategies and better protocol, you know, then hopefully if anything, god for bid does happen like this and they will have maybe better procedures, but i don‘t think
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it‘s fair to expect, you know, the police and the security forces out there to be equipped to deal with something they‘ve never seen before and we never expect. ok, olivia, good to see you again. thank you for coming. thanks. good to talk tourks thank you very much. it's thank you very much. it‘s 8.17am. let‘s get weather from carol. it isa carol. it is a cloudy start and it is a damp one. the exception is across the south east where it is cold. from patchy fog around. the rain is being caused by this weather front. we‘ve got another one coming in later in the day across north—west scotland. that‘s going to introduce rain and the wind will pick up. the rain and the wind will pick up. the rain is starting to become more patchy through the afternoon. the best of sunshine will be across parts of east anglia and from west
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sussex eastwards and across scotland. for the rest of us, it does remain cloudy. temperatures getting up to nine celsius. then as we head on through the evening and overnight, this front fizzles in nature, but again, a lot of cloud around. some murky conditions. across the rest of scotland and no northern england, north wales and clipping northern ireland. in the south east, where we‘ve got clear skies, there is the risk again, of some frost and also some patchy fog. but here we‘ll start off with some sunshine when we lose that fog. so here is the rain across northern england and north wales tomorrow. quite a lot of cloud around it. on either side of it, there will be some sunshine. temperatures highest across scotland and northern ireland. we‘re looking at tens and 11s. lowest in the sunshine in the far south—east. and then as we move from tuesday and into wednesday, with the high pressure in charge of the weather, the weather front flirting with the north—west of scotla nd flirting with the north—west of scotland and here the isobars are tighter, that means it will be windier across the far north of
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scotla nd windier across the far north of scotland with rain at times. a lot of cloud, but on wednesday, we could see brighter breaks across central and southern parts of the uk. dan and southern parts of the uk. dan and lou. thank you very much. we will see you in halfan thank you very much. we will see you in half an hour. doctors‘ leaders say a system designed to check decisions made by gps is leading to unacceptable delays in diagnosis and treatment. a bbc investigation has discovered that hundreds of thousands of patients in england are having referrals from their family doctors reviewed by third parties. nhs managers say it helps them keep costs down, but the british medical association claims it puts a barrier between patients and specialists. jenny walrond reports. for traceyjeffries, housework is no longer a painful chore. but only because she paid nearly £3,000 for an operation on her leg. i was in so much pain with my leg, 24 hours a day. i wasn‘t sleeping properly, i was struggling to get through my work. the pain was caused by varicose veins. her gp wanted them treated on the
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nhs but his referral was rejected. tracey had to go private. if a gp feels that a specialist needs to look at you then the nhs should be supporting that and they‘re not. tracey‘s treatment was blocked by something called a referral management centre. some are run by doctors, others by admin staff. last year they screened two million referrals on behalf of the nhs, a rise of almost 30% compared to two years before. 4%, nearly 84,000, were rejected, mostly for admin reasons, like missing information. doctors‘ leaders are strongly opposed to what they say is a blunt form of rationing. these centres, which are taking a crude approach to scrutinising all gp referrals, can be inefficient, cost more to run than any potential saving, but crucially in the process delaying patient care. there are 60 referral management
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centres in england and one in wales. gatekeeping what are often expensive hospital—based services. we‘ve not found similar set—ups in scotland or northern ireland. those who commission nhs care said the system delivers value for money. we don‘t want to squander any money. we have limited resources so it‘s really important the resources we have we spend most effectively and get the best value for our population. referral management is, for now, a relatively small part of efforts to manage rising demand. but its use is increasing and that means more gps, like tracey‘s, are likely to see their decisions scrutinised and even overturned. doctor helen stokes—lampard is chair of the royal college of gps, and joins us from our birmingham newsroom. good morning to you. good morning.
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thank you for talking to us about this subject. to some of our patients who are patients —— viewers who are patients. how do the referrals work? they are nothing new. the he is sention and there are various types. after the gp made a referral to hospital, somebody looks at that referral letter and decides if it is appropriate. so, the person looking at the letter might be another doctor. it might be a gp who is an expert in that area, or an administrator to see if a few box have been ticked in the letter. then in general, they decide if the referral is correct and if it does, it passes in the usual way. sometimes they look and say suppose somebody has been referred for a heart problem, it might be more appropriate to get investigations done first. rather than the patient see the consultant when the tests are not already done, they might have the tests first. clearly, that‘s an efficient thing to do. it
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saves time at the hospital. sometimes they say the gp hasn‘t given enough information or this isn‘t appropriate and they send it back and they say to the gp, no, the patient can‘t be referred and that‘s where the difficulties come in. because sometimes the gp will have a great insight into the patient‘s issues that perhaps they haven‘t conveyed clearly in the letter. but that a consultant would have picked up that a consultant would have picked up and that‘s when a lot of hurt and upset can happen. some of the systems upset can happen. some of the syste ms ca n upset can happen. some of the systems can be good. many are causing discomfort and upset. how much does it cost? well, it is difficult to say how much it costs. they are so variable across the country. it depends who is looking at the referral. some are computerised and online and are being handled by private companies and we really don‘t know what those cost. some of being done by administrators and some by doctors. there is a range of costs involved. what we do know is that some schemes are being incentivised for bouncing referrals back. there are some parts of the country where private companies are getting an extra £10 a
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letter for not accepting them and that‘s caused a lot of andy bodies amongst doctors who feel that financial motivation is getting in the way of good patient care. can i ask you about the job of being a gp. a i ask you about the job of being a gp. aiwas ask you about the job of being a gp. a i was speaking to my friend who is agp a i was speaking to my friend who is a gp and he is tearing his hair out at the prime minister‘s suggestion that surgeries should be open for longer. what‘s the morale? that surgeries should be open for longer. what's the morale? the crisis has built recently. the headlines on saturday, were devastating to most gps. nobody becomes a doctor or a nurse or any healthcare professional because they don‘t care. we‘re here because we ca re don‘t care. we‘re here because we care and we want to dot best for our pa rents. care and we want to dot best for our parents. 0n care and we want to dot best for our parents. on friday i did a 13 hour day and to wake up on saturday morning with headlines suggesting i was lazy. it is just crazy. it is not like that. if we are not seeing
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patients in routine appointments, we are making visits and the notion of lunch is something i left behind when i was a student. i grab a sandwich in between making phone calls to patients if i‘m lucky. it was demoralising and demoting, but we have had a lot of positive feedback from doctors and doctors have pulled together to be clear with our condemnation of this nonsense. gps and healthcare professionals need to be working together to make sure the true story of what‘s going on in the nhs is heard. do you think theresa may is out—of—touch then? heard. do you think theresa may is out-of-touch then? i don't know what the truth of those comments is. so it is not for me to comment. what i do know is the health service is in a very difficult place and we need to work together to fix it. how many gps are needed to fix that? theresa may is promising 5,000, is that enough? 5,000, no, it is not enough to cu re enough? 5,000, no, it is not enough to cure things for the future. it will make a huge difference. we have been promised 5,000 more whole time gps by 2020. it will be hard enough to find those because it takes a
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long time to train a good gp. probably in the reality in the medium—term is we need 10,000 gps to make the service sustainable, but 5,000 would be a great start. ok, thank you very much. coming up in a moment on the bbc news channel is business live. here on breakfast. we‘ll hearfrom the man behind today‘s biggest scoop, the first uk interview with president—elect donald trump. we‘ll speak to michael gove in just a few minutes. it‘s time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. quiet weather and nothing dramatic this week. this is what it looks like in the short—term. a lot of cloud around. patchy rain also stretching from newcastle through yorkshire, the midlands, down into central southern england as well. by the side of that, the weather is drier and the side of that, the weather is drierand a the side of that, the weather is drier and a big temperature contrast across the uk right now. western areas will have a lot of milder weather. the further east you are, particularly east anglia and south—east kent and sussex, it will
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feel chilly today, temperatures four or five degrees at best whereas in the west you can see double figures there. central parts of the country will remain cloudy with some rain on and off. there‘ll be mist and low cloud through the course of the night. no major change. you can see where the cold air is across the continent, that is where it‘s frosty. that cold air leaking into east anglia and the south—east. most of us have the mild winds continuing off the atlantic. that is what tuesdayis off the atlantic. that is what tuesday is looking like. many western areas seeing a fair bit of cloud and also the mild air coming in from the south. high pressure dominates and there‘ll
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bea high pressure dominates and there‘ll be a touch of frost maybe in the morning on wednesday. in the west, still heading up to double figures and not much change as we head into thursday. have a good day. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and jamie robertson. us president—elect donald trump says britain will be at the front of the queue when it comes to striking a trade deal with america. but how quickly will that happen? live from london, that‘s our top story on monday 16th january. us president—elect donald trump says uk ‘doing great‘ after brexit vote but he threatens a huge tariff on bmw cars imported from mexico. plus, prosecutors in south korea are seeking the arrest of the head of samsung,
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who‘s accused of bribery.
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