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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 16, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello it's monday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. this morning, women who've been refused a life extending breast cancer drug called kadcyla tell us what it means to them. it's the fact you know the drug is there and is good. i think if you knew it never existed, i wouldn't have the hope of being able to use it. the only time i feel really upset is when i think about what i won't see, the events in my daughter's lives that i won't be around for and when they would have liked to have had me around. i've seen my youngest start school, seen them go to brownies and seen them achieve things that i didn't think i would be here to see. you can't put a price on that. the drug has been turned down for use on the nhs because it costs £90,000 a year.
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we'll hear from the people behind that decision at 9.15. really keen to hear from you this morning. also on the programme. "it isn't the care that people deserve". how two relatives have described their experience of the nhs. rose's son was treated on this makeshift bed. and graham's dad who has alzheimers was left for 36 hours waiting for a bed. the nurses were fantastic, brilliant. but i would say the main adjective i would use is worrying. you can't be treated with dignity and privacy in a corridor. that's the absolute reality. to suggest this is temporary is not true. we'll bring you their full story before 10. and, when one of the chief architects of brexit met president—elect donald trump. i thought the uk was so smart in getting out and you were there and
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you guys wrote it on the front—page. yes. trump said that brexit was going to happen. yes. right. and it happened. yes. that was when it was going to lose easily, everybody thought i was crazy, 0bama said we'd go to the back of the line. the front of the queue? i think you are doing great. hello, welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. throughout the programme we'll bring you the latest breaking news and developing stories. football coach barry bennell who's been charged with eight child sex offences appears in court later this morning. we'll be live outside the court. and as always we're really keen to hear from you. a little later we'll hear how half of working fathers apparently say they'd like a less stressfuljob so they can spend more time with their children. is that you? get in touch, use the hashtag victoria live. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today.
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donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. here's our political correspondent, vicky young. theresa may is about to tell us more about how she thinks the uk can prosper outside of the european union. her critics say the economy will suffer if britain leaves the single market and is no longer able to trade freely with the eu. but the president—elect donald trump says he will offer britain a quick and fair trade deal with america within weeks of taking office. and he contrasted his approach to president 0bama's. i thought the uk were so smart in getting out and you were there and you guys wrote it and put it in the front page, trumps said that brexit is going to happen and it happened. that was when i was going to lose easily.
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everybody thought i was crazy. 0bama said they are going to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen and he had to retract. that was a bad statement. in other words, we're at the front of the queue? i think you are doing great. i think it's going great. mr trump said his team will work very hard to get a trade deal done quickly and done properly and it will be good for both sides. he also predicted that other countries would leave to the eu, claiming it had been deeply damaged by the migration crisis. countries want their own identity and the uk wanted its own identity. but i do believe this, if they had not been forced to take in all of the refugees, so many with all the problems that entails i think you would not have a brexit. mr trumps' offer of a rapid trade deal is a boost to the prime minister who insists britain remains open for business. the president—elect said the two leaders will meet right after he gets to the white house. let's chat to our political
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guru norman smith. this is great news for theresa may isn't it? yes. if you are going into negotiations, then boy oh boy, you wa nt negotiations, then boy oh boy, you want the most powerful man in the world on your side and that seems to be where the donald is. he's signalling he's pro—brexit, brough britain and progiving us a fast trade deal. he says he thinks it's good for us, he thinks the economy will grow and he shares the sentiments around brexit. he is scathing about the eu and how bureaucratic it is. he cites an example where he tried to build property in ireland but gave up because of eu regulations. he says the refugee crisis and immigration has fuelled this desire for national identity. by and large, this will be
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music to the ears of the brexiteers, certainly was to borisjohnson when arriving in brussels this morning. have a look. i think it's very good news that the united states of america wants to do a good free trade deal with us and wants to do it very fast and it's great to hear that from president elect donald trump. clearly it will have to be a deal very much in the interests of both sides but i've no doubt that it will be. thank you. however a dose of cold water is nevertheless required, because although mr trump may promise a fast trade deal, we have to be honest, this is a new president, he has lots of other things to deal with. is he really going to focus on a trade deal with little old britain? it won't be top of his list of priorities. trade deals with ferociously complex, added to which, we don't really have any trade negotiators, or not many, because by and large, we have relied on the eu to do our negotiating. so
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getting a good deal with america may be extraordinarily difficult and yes, that may take time, even though the donald says he wants to do it quickly. lastly, a bit of reality, if you look at the pound today, still being hit hard, it hit a three—month low against the dollar and a two—month low against the euro ahead of the crucial speech from theresa may tomorrow amid talk of how she's going to push for what many categorise as a hard brexit. thank you. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british holidaymakers killed in a terror attack in tunisia are due to get under way this morning. 38 people were killed by a gunman who targeted a beach near the town of sousse injune 2015. women with terminal cancer,
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who were expecting to be able to take a life—extending drug to give them an extra 6 months life, have been telling this programme how they'll no longer get it. kadcyla costs around 90 thousand pounds a year. other life extending life drugs are usually between 20 and 30 thousand. nice, the organisation which decides which drugs and treatments are available on the nhs in england and wales, has ruled it should no longer be made available for routine use. one woman, bonnie fox, has told us she is considering trying to raise money to pay for kadcyla herself. taking kadcyla away, there's nothing left for me. if i'm told the drugs are not working, literally the next day i'm going to need the new drug. if that's not there for me, what else do i do? i have to have a drug to stay alive so i need to find a way claysically. —— basically. the former crewe alexandra coach, barry bennell, is due to appear
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in court this morning charged with eight child sex offences. the former coach appeared via videolink at south cheshire magistrates' court last month and was remanded in custody. all of the offences are alleged to have happened between 1981 and 1985 when the alleged victim was under the age of 15. a turkish cargo plane has crashed in kyrgyzstan killing at least 32 people. the boeing 747, which was en route from hong kong, crashed into houses near manas airport in the kyrgyz capital bishkek. rescue workers say the dead included all members of the crew, as well as several children. visibility was poor because of thick fog at the time, but the cause of the crash has not yet been confirmed. the funeral will be held today for two young cousins who died after being hit by a car on new year's eve in 0ldham. 12 year old helena kot—larova and zaneta kro—kova who was 11, were holding hands as they crossed the road, when they were struck by a vehicle. four men have since been charged in relation to their deaths. streets will close later today, for the funeral cortege to make its way through the town. every picture they're on they're
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together. they used to go out together, everything. they were like soul mates and they even passed away together. the world's eight richest individuals, all men, have as much wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of the world, according to 0xfam. the charity is calling for action to address what it's called a "warped" global economy as it's revealed that there is a much wider gap in the distribution of wealth than previously acknowledged. critics have called the claims misleading, saying the welfare of the poor is improving every year. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 9.30. thanks for your messages on cancer treatment. 0ne viewer says i've had the drug and it's given me extra time with my family definitely. roy says it's about time the nhs used
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its vast spending power to force drug companies to give it better deals and jerome says many treatments aren't available on the nhs, picking one out of context is unhelpful. 0urfilm nhs, picking one out of context is unhelpful. our film on nhs, picking one out of context is unhelpful. 0urfilm on kadcyla in the next few minutes. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport. andy murray has been in action at the australian open. yes, he is through to the second round. had to battle though. it wasn't easy for him. he was playing ukraine's marchenko. murray's serve wasn't as strong as it could have been and he struggled to find rhythm. almost three hours on court in the melbourne sunshine may have used up perhaps a bit more energy than he wanted. the world number one
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will now face rublev of russia. better news for dan evans, he beat his opponent of argentina. that is his opponent of argentina. that is his first win in the aussie open. a good day on the whole. the women get in action tomorrow. it was merseyside v manchester in the title race yesterday, but surely chelsea were the real winners? chelsea ten points ahead. they haven't really blinked in this title race so haven't really blinked in this title race so far have they? everton thrashed manchester city. that was 4-0. thrashed manchester city. that was 4—0. liverpool and manchester played out a 1—1 draw. united boss mourinho criticising liverpool's defensive style. i should tell you though, brilliant match for everton, 4—0 winners they run out. some great goals and what a moment for the
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debutant lookman over from charlton and scored in injury time to make it 4-0. and scored in injury time to make it 4—0. brilliant win for them and guardiola's said of that loss to everton that they are out of the premier league title race. they are ten points i should say behind and it's not looking good for them. and premier league clubs have come in for more criticism about access for disabled fans. yes. they've been accused of prioritising the finances over improving disabled access to their stadiums and that's according to a result by the culture, media and sport committee. in 2015, the premier league promised to improve stadium facilities for the fans by august of this year but several clu bs, august of this year but several clubs, including watford, chelsea and liverpool, are expected to miss the deadline. a statement by the premier league says they are working ha rd to premier league says they are working hard to enhance disabled fan access and will report on each club's progress at the end of the month.
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more to come on that in the coming weeks. thank you very much, jess. without this drug i won't see my child go to school or get married — the words of some women with terminal cancer, who have been told they will no longer have access to a life—extending drug because of its high cost. kadcyla is the most expensive cancer drug ever — it costs £90,000 a year. because of that cost, nice, the body in charge of the nhs‘s purse strings, has decided that it should no longer be made available for routine use on the nhs. the maximum they usually spend on drugs which extend life is normally between £20—30,000 per year. women already on the drug will continue to receive it, but those who were told by medical staff that they should receive it now won't. for those women, it's devastating. 0ur reporterjohn 0wen has been to meet some of them. it's so frustrating,
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it's so upsetting, it's just... i think it's the fact that you know that drug is there, and you know that drug is good. i think if it had never existed then i wouldn't be, i wouldn't have this hope of being able to use it. the only time that i feel really upset is when i think about what i won't see, the events in my daughters' lives that i won't be around for, and when they would have liked to have had me around. it's been called revolutionary and a wonder drug, but nhs patients who are expecting to receive the breast cancer treatment kadcyla now face being told that it will be unavailable to them. the amount of good quality time that i thought that i would have and my family expected to have with me has effectively been cut in half now.
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recently, nice, the body in charge of the nhs‘ purse strings, have decided that the treatment should not be made available for routine use on the nhs. at an estimated £90,000 a year, it was considered to be just too expensive, far beyond nice‘s usual maximum threshold of 20 to £30,000 per year of good quality life. at some point, there comes a limit to what the nhs can pay. the industry spends over $100 billion a year in research and development. and yet it's a drug that's been clinically proven to significantly extend the lives of patients suffering from advanced breast cancer by an average of six months, with fewer side effects than other treatments. it's like nothing we've had before. in advanced breast cancer, there are very few drugs that show a survival benefit. if i hadn't had access to kadcyla, i probably wouldn't be here. but on the question of whether the nhs can afford it,
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opinion is sharply divided. we can't simply say, we will pay whatever price there is for a particular drug. there are so many countries that are making this drug available, we think that there must be a way to make sure that it is available in this country. it seems to be playing chicken, in some ways, as to what nice will or won't do. nice say the decision isn't yet final. it's hoping the drug company will bring down the price. but if that doesn't happen, patients face not having access to a treatment they were relying on. in my head, i've thought about how long i can last on each drug, i've got kind of a rough, i guess, timescale laid out. "if i have this drug and then i can have this drug for a couple of years, then maybe this drug..." you bank on those years, they are so precious to you, it's so important that you can squeeze as much time as possible out of the drugs, and to have that suddenly taken away, it just feels so cruel, really. everything feels really cruel. so it was explained
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to you presumably by your oncologist that these drugs only work for a certain amount of time, and then what did she say to you about what would happen after those drugs stop working? she said to me that i could expect about two years, give or take, of life, basically, and that was factoring in the drug that would work once the herceptin and the pertuzumab stopped working, which was going to be kadcyla. and at the time she said, "well, if kadcyla were ever going to be withdrawn, people would be chaining themselves to railings, it's such a wonder drug, and it's so effective," and it was unthinkable that it would no longer be available. and here we are. in 2010, the coalition government announced the cancer drugs fund to give patients access to the most advanced cancer treatments, those not available on the nhs. kadcyla was one of them, and since then it's become indispensable for doctors in treating a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer
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known as her2 that affects up to 25% of those diagnosed with the disease. kadcyla is really a revolutionary drug, and it's like nothing that we've had before in breast cancer treatment. and it works a little bit like a heat—seeking missile in the sense that the antibody focuses in on the her2 cancer cells and it takes the drug to them and releases the chemotherapy locally. the cancer drugs fund overspent, and now nice is looking again at all of the treatments it made available. in the case of kadcyla, nice has made an initial decision that the treatment should not be made available for routine use by the nhs, ahead of a final decision to be taken in march. janine was one of the first women in the uk to use kadcyla, whilst the drug was still in its trial phase. i was diagnosed in 2010 with primary breast cancer. the following year, in 2011, i was told that my cancer had come
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back and was spreading around my body, and i was diagnosed with incurable secondary breast cancer. i wasjust 32, i'd just had a baby, she was eight months old, and i also had a three—year—old, so my family was just beginning, and the future was looking bright. i was fortunate that i had quite a few options back in 2011 and went on to receive kadcyla. tell me about what it meant for your treatment. what it meant for me was quality of life, and there's a lot of chemotherapies, a lot of drugs that don't give you that quality of life, so your hair would fall out, you would feel physically sick, you might have diarrhoea or constipation, and all of the other unpleasant side—effects that chemotherapy can bring. how do you feel about other women who are in precisely that position that you were in a few years ago who also have young children and will not have access to kadcyla, how does that make you feel?
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it breaks my heart to know that, with this drug, it could mean that they will see their children go to school, that they will make those precious memories. i've seen my youngest start school whilst i was on kadcyla. i've seen them go to brownies, i've seen them achieve things that i really didn't think that i'd be here to see, and you can't put a price on that. my name's gill smith and i have stage four breast cancer. it had already metastasised at the time it was discovered to my liver, my bones, my lungs and my lymph nodes, which means that it's stage four and inoperable and incurable. the two drugs that i'm on, still on, are herceptin and pertuzumab. and they are effective for about 18 months, but they had to be kicked off with chemotherapy.
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and what was that like, being on chemotherapy? brutal, it was absolutely brutal. and losing my hair after two weeks wasjust the least part of it, that's really not a problem at all. so you'd been advised that kadcyla would be available for you when you needed it, and it now looks as if it may well not be? absolutely right, so that's devastating because it means that the amount of good quality time that i thought that i would have and my family expected to have with me has effectively been cut in half now. it's... it's pretty grim being told that you only probably have about two years, give or take, to live, and then the first eight months of that have been severely compromised by the chemotherapy, and now, if i don't have kadcyla and the herceptin and pertuzumab stop working, chances are that means
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that this was my last christmas, and that's absolutely devastating. it's not what we were expecting. my daughter keeps saying how unfair she thinks it is, and it does, it does feel rather like that, because it was such a fantastic drug, and having cancer is hard enough but the drugs that are available have improved so hugely that it's quite possible to live with cancer rather than feel that you are dying from cancer, so you can have a very good quality of life for quite a long time. and to have half of that taken away would be awful. my oncologist now says that she is seeing about nine months of effectiveness of kadcyla, really good quality of life without the side—effects, and although that might not sound
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like very long, if you've only got two years, nine months it's a significant part of that, and it's hugely important. my older daughter, she's 25, and i probably won't see her get married. i probably won't see grandchildren. my younger daughter still lives at home with us, and she'sjust beginning to get established in life, and that's what i worry about most, really, how she'll manage without me. gill is not the only patient affected by nice's decision. my name's bonnie fox, i was diagnosed with both primary and secondary breast cancer when i was 37, when my little boy was just four months old. it makes me feel worried, it makes me feel angry and frustrated,
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angry with the drugs company and with the nhs that they haven't been able to find a way through to agree a way forward, basically. it's just adding a huge amount of stress. my life is, it's already pretty stressful, i've got this enormous black cloud, i think, hanging over me, that i try to push away as best i can but it's always there, and this is just additional worry, really, additional anxiety. it keeps me awake at night worrying. after speaking with these patients, i ask carole longson from nice how i ask carole longson from nice how they can justify their decision to deprive these women of the medicines they need. can you explain that decision? well, we know how important it is for people with breast cancer that they have access to life—extending treatments, but the reality is the cost of this
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drug, the price of this drug is too high relative to those benefits for it to be recommended for routine use. the drug company has offered a discount, but even with that discount it's still far beyond the range that we would normally consider for routine use. this drug was available through a mechanism called the cancer drugs fund. and it seems that a lot of patients thought that, because it was available then, it would be available in the future when they needed it. doesn't it seem desperately unfair that it may not be available to them now? nice needed to take another look at this drug. it has been on the cancer drugs fund, as you said, for a number of years, but now we're talking about routine use in the nhs, and for that to happen we need to strike a balance between the use of money, the use of resources for this particular drug, for these particular patients, compared to what else you can do with that money. we completely understand that that means that, for those people that are already taking this drug and for those patients who are in a position where they might wish to have this
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drug, they might need that drug, that's a very, very difficult position to be in. what do you say to those people who say this is so immensely important to the women it affects. we live in a country with a national health service, a way should be found to afford these drugs? in order to extend the, "well, let's make available everything for anybody at any cost," that leaves the nhs in a very difficult position, given that any system only has finite resources. roche, the pharmaceutical company that makes kadcyla, declined to be interviewed for this film, but richard torbett speaks on behalf of the pharmaceutical industry. what kind of responsibility do pharmaceutical companies have to ensure that new cancer medicines are priced at an affordable level so that they can be made available on the nhs? i think it's absolutely clear that pharmaceutical companies
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have a strong responsibility to price responsibly, and to work with the nhs to make sure that the medicines represent good value for money. because, ultimately, pharmaceutical companies are for profit, they're interested in making profits, and i think there's a suspicion that these drugs are being priced extravagantly and that companies are putting profits before ensuring that these drugs are available to the patients that need them. well, the worst possible outcome for a pharmaceutical company is to have spent all this time and all this money producing a medicine and for it not to reach a patient, so it's absolutely clear that all pharmaceutical companies are absolutely focused on making sure that the patients get medicines at the end of the day. the industry spends over $100 billion a year in research and development, much of that is on medicines that never reach the patient because they fail in the clinic, so obviously there's a limited period of time where prices need
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to be at a level to keep that research effort going. although nobody disputes that the nhs needs to manage finite resources as fairly as possible, for some it will nonetheless seem cruel that a drug with the power to extend life will no longer be accessible to those patients who believed it would be. for those patients who will soon need access to kadcyla, the stakes could not be higher. yeah, itjust feels incredibly unfair when you're told that you have cancer at such a young age, you just think, "why me? why am i this one person that's, you know, somehow been singled out to get this bit of bad luck?" and then, yeah, to be told that a drug is taken away from you that could extend your life is just, yeah, it's unfairness on top of unfairness, i think. you know, i'd like to suggest that people might reflect on, how would they feel if it was their wife, their mother, their daughter, their sister? what would it mean to them to have another nine months of good—quality life of that person being around?
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what would it mean, what could they do? asjohn said, we asked roche for an interview but they turned us down. they told us they have maintained an open dialogue with nice and nhs england, and gave offered improved schemes and solutions to try to keep this medicine available to patients. really keen to hear from you this morning — if you've been on kadcyla or been promised it, and now won't get it, do get in touch in the usual ways. an anonymous texter said, i had a lump equitable mist done last week, i had to wait two weeks to find out
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if it was cancer after the biopsy andi if it was cancer after the biopsy and i have to wait two more weeks for the results to see if more surgery for the results to see if more surgery is required. the stress of not knowing is unbelievable. now, i've just heard that a breast cancer drug is being taken off the nhs. do i need this extra stress at the moment? you wouldn't believe the thoughts that are going through my mind. this tweet from ian, this is a disgrace, when are we going to help these women, rather than helping out other countries. another texter, i'm incensed that the life—extending cancer drug is being withdrawn. stop sending british taxpayers' billions abroad and invest the money here in the nice and social care. thank you, keep those coming in. later on in the programme, we'll speak to some of those affected, and from a body which represents the drugs industry. we'll hear from
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we'll hearfrom some we'll hear from some of donald trump's supporters in texas. nearly half of working dads would like a less stressful job to spend half of working dads would like a less stressfuljob to spend more time with their kids. if you are a working father, how do you juggle a job and your children? let me know, oi’ job and your children? let me know, or have you given up work completely in order to achieve the right balance? joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. mr trump said he would ask his son—in—lanared kushner to negotiate a middle east peace agreement and would seek a deal with russia to reduce nuclear weapons. he said it's good news for theresa may. this is another card in the prime minister's hand, another arrow in her quiver, because the european
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union until now has been assumed to have a better hand to play. but the prime minister, we now see, has actually cards in her hand, including... how do you think she's... including... how do you think she's. .. i think including... how do you think she's... i think she's including... how do you think she's. .. i think she's getting a better deal. how do you think she's played her hand so far? she's done an company blair job. played her hand so far? she's done an company blairjob. —— she's done an company blairjob. —— she's done an exemplary job. the pound has fallen to a three month low against the dollar in early trading in asia, because of speculation about a so—called "hard brexit". some analysts predict theresa may will use a major speech tomorrow to say she's prepared to pull out of the single market to have more control over immigration. downing street has described the reports as "speculation". the inquests into the deaths of 30 british holidaymakers killed in a terror attack in tunisia are due to get under way this morning. 38 people were killed by a gunman who targeted a beach near the town of sousse injune 2015. 0rganisations including the metropolitan police, the foreign and commonwealth office and the owner of tour operator thomson holidays give evidence.
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women with terminal cancer, who were expecting to be able to take a life—extending drug to give them an extra 6 months life, have been telling this programme how they'll no longer get it. kadcyla costs around £90,000 a year. nice, the organisation which decides which drugs and treatments are available on the nhs in england and wales, has ruled it should no longer be made available for routine use. the maximum they usually spend on drugs which extend life is normally between 20—30 thousand pounds per year. barry bennell appeared via video link at south cheshire magistrates court last month and was remanded in custody. all of his offences are alleged to have happened between 1981 and 1985 when the alleged victim was under the age of 15. he'll appear in court today. the funeral will be held today
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for two young cousins who died after being hit by a car on new year's eve in 0ldham. 12 year old helena kot—larova and zaneta kro—kova who was 11, were holding hands as they crossed the road, when they were struck by a vehicle. four men have since been charged in relation to their deaths. streets will close later today, for the funeral cortege to make its way through the town. every picture they're on they're together. they used to go out together, everything. they were like soul mates and they even passed away together. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 9.30. let's get some sport. andy murray has been in action at the australian open. yes, he is through to the second round. had to battle though. it wasn't easy for him. he was playing ukraine's marchenko. murray's serve wasn't as strong as it could have been and he struggled to find rhythm. it was merseyside v manchester
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in the title race yesterday, premier league clubs are putting finance over needs of disabled fans. the premier league says it's working ha rd the premier league says it's working hard on access. more on all of that just after 15. —— just a 10. a general election could be announced in northern ireland later today. why? there was a big flaw. there was no limit to the rewards. the more heat people created from these boilers,
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the more they got paid. so some people started abusing the scheme, installing boilers if buildings that didn't need heating to cash in. it's thought this could cost the taxpayer nearly £500 million. but why the crisis? the head of northern ireland's government, arlene foster, was involved in the setting up of the heating scheme when she worked in the energy department. will you be accepting sinn fein‘s terms of reference for an inquiry? no. since the scandal broke, there have been calls for her to resign but she's refused. for my part i'm determined to do all i can to put right what went wrong, to find out through an investigation why things went wrong and seek to restore the credibility of stormont in the eyes of the public. northern ireland is unusual — it's governed by two political parties, the dup and sinn fein,
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and it has two leaders. they work together and share the decision—making. last week, the other leader, martin mcguinness from sinn fein, stepped down in protest. we in sinn fein will not tolerate the arrogance of arlene foster and the dup. because the two parties share power, if one leader goes, then so must the other. that means a general election. from this evening, it'll be down to the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, to call that election. he might try to hold off for a bit so more negotiations can take place, but he'll have to act soon. it means voters in northern ireland could be heading to the polls in weeks. now, while this was triggered by the heating scandal, sinn fein say their rift with the democratic unionist party is far greater than just this. has their attempted power—sharing come to an end? in belfast is northern ireland historian dr margaret 0'callaghan, from queen's university. what do you think is going to happen today? in all likelihood we are heading to an election but i suppose
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we have until 5 o'clock, so in theory, there are a number of points during the day at which something could happen whereby sinn fein and the dup put something together. at the dup put something together. at the moment, for example, the finance spokesperson is trying to put a deal together that will at least investigate this scandal. but there area number of investigate this scandal. but there are a number of steps during the day but the way it looks at the moment, we are probably going for an election at 5 i think. there have been a fair few crises in northern ireland politics, where does this rate? 0h, northern ireland politics, where does this rate? oh, this is pretty high, 9 out of 10. it's also very odd because it's come almost out of nowhere. as you know, the system we have here in northern ireland was set up under the good friday agreement. it's mandatory coalition. all of the parties are in theory in
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government but two of them have already withdrawn to form an opposition. so it's really the two hardline parties, sinn fein and the dup, who've been in power. there's little love lost between them. they're seen as kind of carving things up between them, if you like. but they looked like they were doing reasonably well. but suddenly, this one issue, perhaps arlene foster's lack of experience, her unwillingness to stand aside for two or three weeks, all of these things together seem to have contributed to this crisis. it's also not helped by the fact that martin mcguinness, the leading sinn fein politician, who's been deputy first minister with paisley, with peter robinson and now with arlene foster, is very seriously ill. how are voters viewing all of this? totally fed up. the only thing
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that might put pressure on sinn fein in particular today to pull back from the brink is the fact that the electorate really don't want an election. we've seen dropping voter participation and even if there is an election, it's pretty likely that we'll get the same result. so it's more public money, a huge kerfuffle, everything being, you know, pushed to the extremities. also, the economy's bad here, the whole issue of brexit affects this area given the likelihood of a border between the likelihood of a border between the eu and the uk being actually on this island. so the voters do not wa nt this island. so the voters do not wantan this island. so the voters do not want an election. no. from what you have said, margaret, this element of power—sharing is dead, but
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power—sharing is dead, but power—sharing will continue when there is a new election? well, one hopes so, but the point is, elections, i mean it's the two extreme parties on the unionist and nationalists side were primarily at issue here. they play against other parties. but the other issues have now come into play like dealing with the past, the status of the require language, respect for nationalism and once these issues come up, they polarise politics, they poison the well, they make it more and more difficult to get power—sharing up and running again. so it's a high—risk operation. it's dangerous. has it been confirmed what martin mcguinness's illness is? there are all kinds of press speculations. some stories more reliable to others so some stories more reliable to others soi some stories more reliable to others so i wouldn't really like to say because i'm not 100% sure but i think it's a serious health
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situation. thank you very much for your time. thank you for your comments on kadcyla, the life—extending drug, given to women with incurable breast cancer. claire says i've been on kadcyla cancer. claire says i've been on ka d cyla for cancer. claire says i've been on kadcyla for two yea rs, cancer. claire says i've been on kadcyla for two years, it's an amazing drug, i had to take a break from treatment to have surgery to my chest. my oncololgist and i are having to fight nhs england to go back on the drug, it's shocking. this tweet from sue. it's difficult regarding the breast cancer drug, i feel for patients who talk about what they'll miss during the next six months, but where does the line get drawn? roy says, i have terminal cancer myself and can't begin to believe how women with children are feeling when told they won't receive a drug because it's too expensive. fiona says, i'm on kadcyla and have
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been for 20 months, it's had an amazing impact, my lung tumours are sta ble amazing impact, my lung tumours are stable and there is "no evidence of active disease now". please stop saying kadcyla extends life by six months, the average is months. it's six months extra when compared with another treatment which is not available on the nhs, so a totally spurious comparison. the quality of life is fantastic. i work and i'm a wife, daughter, sister, aunt step—mum and a friend. sam says the nhs has effectively put a price on the women's heads and that is shameful. your experiences, particularly if you have been on this drug, you have been promised this drug or you are a taxpayer and would willingly continue to pay for this drug or not. do let me know. get in touch in the usual ways. later we'll hear from a representative from the drugs
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company industry. still to come: claims from 0xfam that the world's eight richest people collectively have as much wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of the world. we'll examine the claims and see how true they are. this morning, the state of the nhs. doctors are warning that some patients face "dangerous" delays in getting specialist treatment through their gp. some uk hospitals are cancelling cancer operations due to a rise in pressure on the nhs and a shortage of beds. we know that nearly half of hospitals in england declared a major alert in the first week of january as they encountered unprecedented pressures. a quarter of patients had to wait over four hours at a&e. this follows on from claims earlier in the month from the british red cross that the nhs in england was facing a humanitarian crisis. we've been speaking to two people who've experienced shocking delays at a&e hospitals. rose newman from eastbourne,
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who says her one—year—old son had to wait on a make—shift bed of two chairs, almost four hours in a&e, after he was taken there with suspected meningitis. and in birmingham graeme anderson said his dad who has parkinson's and dementia had to wait around 36 hours for a bed in a ward after he was taken ill last week. he was really, really hot, like, with a massive temperature, which is what we were worried about initially. and that's when the doctor noticed spots around his ankles which weren't going when you press to them. so he wasn't well at all but we were on the verge of thinking, is this something really, really serious or is this just a continuation of the tonsillitis that he had? but he had gone massively downhill, he was not in a good way at all. so you took into hospital, what was your experience? we got there just before eight
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o'clock and i think it was about 45 minutes for us to see the assessment nurse. and he did a really good job in trying to get us on to the children's ward, but because he was not under one, they would not take him because obviously they were really busy. so we had to wait. and then later on we got put into like a side room and a nurse came in to try to get his temperature down, which was still really high and she said that a doctor would be along in a minute, she was going shift. and then we waited hours, i think we waited a total of four hours before we saw a doctor. and obviously, there was no bed to put him in. so it wasn't great. which is when you improvised and brought two chairs together so that jack could lie across both of them? that's right. initially he was sitting on our laps but we were told, we were trying to bring his temperature down and if he was sitting
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he would get our body heat. so we could not hug him. this was 11.30 at night and we wanted to sleep so we did not know what else to do. luckily i had brought his duvet with me because we thought he would be staying overnight, that's what the doctor had told us initially. so we put the chairs together so that he could lie down. what did you think of the fact that there were no beds for him? well, initially i did not think too much of it because i did not realise how long we would be there. but a couple of nurses said to ask sorry you're having to wait a bed. and as it got on and he really needed to lie down and sleep, that's when i was really distressed because if we had not brought that duvet with us, i'm not sure what we would have done we were having to prop him up on our knee. but him not touching us so as not to take on our body heat. it was uncomfortable for him and distressing for us. i am going to bring in graeme. tell us what happened to your dad
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in the dad needed to going for a ct scan, so we went in on monday afternoon and unfortunately they could not do the ct scan until tuesday. so he had to sleep overnight in a&e. but one of the complications with dad when he is like this, he has got parkinson's and other complications, and is very distressed and disoriented. so actually staying in a&e overnight was about the worst place that he could have been in terms of him being calm and settled. because it's busy and people are in and out the whole time and in a different states of distress? yes. and when we walked in, there were 15 people at least on trolleys. they were the people who had been brought in from ambulances, and the staff did a fantasticjob. all the way through the staff have been fantastic with my dad. but clearly they were running over capacity, and again, the problem, like your other guest said, was that they were just waiting for beds, the system was blocked up because they were waiting for beds to put people into. in the end it was 36 hours before your dad got a bed and what state was he and by then? to be fair, they treated him
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medically and he got better in terms of the immediate problems that he had. the distressing thing for him was just that he was really confused and didn't know what was going on, and as his family, we were unsure about what the next steps would be, to be honest. worcester acute hospitals told us, we can't comment on your dad's individual case. they say, "we do accept that some patients spending longer than we would like in our a&e department. we apologise for this, we are experiencing pressures in all parts of the system and are working with partners to make sure that waits are kept to a minimum". and they are doing their best, i'm sure. however, the system is running overcapacity. they have got buzzers for patients lined up on the walls of the corridors now. so it's clear that they are getting used to the fact that people will be seen in corridors. and again, the staff have been fantastic with my dad. but clearly, there isn't the capacity at
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the moment in worcester to give equal the treatment that they deserve and that the staff would like to give them. rose, in your case, the hospital in hastings told us, jack was assessed for his temperature, over three hours to see a doctor. due to the volume of other patients being seen — i mean, do you accept that it was just mad yes. this was a wednesday, it was not even a weekend. i was really shocked. so it was way busier than
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what i thought it was going to be. what words would you use to describe your experience of the nhs that night? the nurses were fantastic, they were brilliant. but the main adjective i would use is worrying because it was a worry to find out from a doctor whetherjack‘s condition was serious or not. and if it had been serious and you had waited four hours, that's awful. graeme, what words would you use to describe your dad's experience of the nhs last week? i think that the staff are doing their very best. it isn't the care that people deserve. you can't be treated with dignity and privacy if you're being treated in the corridor. that's the absolute reality of it. and to suggest this is temporary is not true. we went through a&e with dad in october and he waited overnight on a trolley in october, waiting for a bed. so this is not a winter blip. undoubtedly we will probably end up in a&e again. anyone can come and see what's going on if they want to come with me, but that's the reality of what's going on at the moment. rose, your little boy's case was raised by labour
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leaderjeremy corbyn in prime minister's questions last week — i want to ask you, which party do you trust most to solve the problems in the nhs? well, i mean, based on my personal experience, likejeremy corbyn thinking it's important enough to raise in prime minister's questions, my sister, who works for the nhs, e—mailed him and he read that out. i was really impressed. and then he followed up with a phone call to me to see how jack was, and to thank me for raising my story. and in contrast, theresa may trying to say this is just a small number of incidences, which is not true at all, i'd say, you know, i trust jeremy corbyn in this situation. and obviously, for our audience, i need to ask you, are you a labour supporter or a labour member? i mean, as of this, yes, i will be a labour supporter, i would say! what did jeremy corbyn say to you on the phone? when i picked it up, i thought it was the journalist from the mirror, and he said,
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"hello, it'sjeremy corbyn". i couldn't believe it. he just said thank you for raising awareness through my sister. and he said that he really appreciated us sharing the story and then he was asking about jack and whether he had been back to nursery yet, whether he was well enough to do all the normal things he normally does. and we had a good chat. and how is jack now? he's fine. over the weekend we were able to take him to his swimming lesson and things he has not been able to do for a couple of weeks. so he's definitely back to normal which is great. thank you both very much, i really appreciate your time. an e—mailfrom an e—mail from rob. an e—mailfrom rob. he says he had to rush his two—year—old daughter to a french hospital by ambulance because she had a high fever. rob said before i was allowed into the hospital, i paid the 440 euro
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ambulance bill. 0n departure i paid the 90 euro consultation charge. because neither me or my extended family had not paid tax in france, i had to issue. i would be keen to now how many eu and non—eu members had treatment at the nhs this year? this was addressed maybe the poor women could be offered the cancer drug and a toddler wouldn't have to sleep on plastic chairs. stewart says, "whilst i know the nhs is under pressure, please remember it saves lives every day and it is important not to just report negative stories." clare says, "norfolk hospital was brilliant when i needed a bed." another viewer says, "the system is clogged up with nonemergency or alcohol and drug related problems." keep those experiences coming. we will feed them into our conversation throughout the morning. coming up to 10am, we will bring you
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latest news and sport. now the weather. is it milder or is it my imagination? well, it is becoming milder. it is already milder. we have got a lot of cloud around today. i have got a treat for you. i have got a couple of weather watcher photos which i know you like. in north—west wales, there is a lot of cloud around. under the cloud, the temperatures are higher. look at this... it's gorgeous. a weather watcher sent this in. there is cloud and breaks and that's reflected in the temperatures. so another treat for you. i'm pulling all the stops out today. these are the current temperatures in dover. the same with hull and london where we have got drizzle, but push further north and west, where we've got more cloud around, the temperature is that bit higher. so it is quite a cloudy start to the day rather like this more many of us. day rather like this more many of
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us. no snow, it is too mild and in fa ct, us. no snow, it is too mild and in fact, today, by day and by night too, the temperatures won't vary too much and that's quite nice actually. turn the heating down a bit. yeah, exactly. so what we're looking at todayis exactly. so what we're looking at today is a weather front that's draped across the central swathe of england. it moved further east taking rain with it. most of the rain is light, but we are looking at the odd moderate burst. later on, another weather front will come in across north—west scotland slow deucing more rain. there is a the lo of cloud around. here is what we've had this morning. so it is more nuisance rain. it is constant, persistent light and drizzly and it will in this way as we go through the morning, but there will be some sunshine. somewhere in east anglia, perhaps west sussex towards kent could see sunshine, but a lot of cloud out towards the west. some brea ks cloud out towards the west. some breaks across angus and fife, but through the afternoon, we will see the next weather front coming our way. so it is quite a cloudy, but as
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victoria said, mild picture that we're looking at today. there is hill fog around and where we have got the weather front we continue with the light and at times, patchy rain and drizzle. further east, some brea ks rain and drizzle. further east, some breaks in the cloud. a little bit of sunshine. in the south east, it is only six celsius. in the south—west, only six celsius. in the south—west, on the other side of the weather front which is a warm front, we are looking at highs of ten celsius. again, quitea looking at highs of ten celsius. again, quite a bit of cloud around with one or two breaks as we have across wales, but the emphasis really is on cloud. for northern ireland, you too have got a fairly cloudy day ahead and by the afternoon we will see the edge of the rain affecting scotland and clipping north western parts of northern ireland. now, through the evening and overnight, the rain will push south across northern ireland and parts of scotland and into northern england and north wales. elsewhere, the rain that we have will tend to fizzle and in the south east and east anglia under clearer skies we are looking at a touch of frost and also patchy fog, but there
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shouldn't be problems with frost elsewhere, but we will have some hill fog around. tomorrow, here is our weather front continuing its decent, weakening all the time across northern england and into north wales, you can see across the midlands, we will see drizzly bits and pieces. the south east seeing the sunshine, but only four to six celsius and parts of eastern scotla nd celsius and parts of eastern scotland favoured for sunshine. it won't feel too bad. aberdeen getting up won't feel too bad. aberdeen getting up to ten celsius. as we move from tuesday and into wednesday, high pressure dominates itself across the uk. we've got a squeeze on the isobars in the north. we've got a weather front flirting with the far north of scotland and at times it will introduce spots of rain. another cloudy day, the best chance of seeing sunshine across southern england and into the south—west, parts of the midlands, but temperatures no great shakes. if you finally take a look at what's happening on thursday, again there will be brighter skies, but there will be brighter skies, but there will be brighter skies, but there will be a fair bit of cloud around and that could produce just the odd
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shower, weather front not too far from the north and temperatures between seven and eight celsius. hello it's monday 16th january, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. this morning, women who've been refused a life extending breast cancer drug called kadcyla tell us what it means to them. it's the fact you know the drug is there and you know it's good. if it never existed, i wouldn't have this hope of being able to use it. the only time i feel really upset is when i think about what i won't see; the events in my daughters' lives that i won't be around for and when they would have liked to have had me around. i've seen my youngest start school while on kadcyla, i've seen them go to brownies, achieve things that i really didn't think i would be here to see. you can't put a price on that. thank you to those who've got in
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touch about this this morning. keep sharing your experiences. and, when one of the chief architects of brexit met president elect donald trump. i thought the uk was so smart. you quys i thought the uk was so smart. you guys were i thought the uk was so smart. you guys were there and put it in the front—page, trump said brexit was going to happen, right and it happened. that is when i was going to lose easily. everyone thought i was crazy. 0bama said they'll go to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen. he had to retract that. that was a bad statement. now it's the front of the queue? you are doing great. and 0xfam says that just eight individuals, all men, have as much wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of the world's population. good morning, here's
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joanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. he was speaking to the former justice secretary and prominent brexit campaigner michael gove for the times — in his first british interview since becoming us president—elect. mr gove says the president—elect‘s comments are good news for theresa may. this is another card in the prime minister's hand, another arrow in her quiver, because the european union until now has been assumed to have a better hand to play. but the prime minister, we now see, has actually cards in her hand, including candidate trump which will enable her i think to be able to secure a better deal. how do you think she's played her hand so far? she's done an exemplaryjob. meanwhile, the pound has fallen
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to a three month low against the dollar in early trading in asia, because of speculation about a so—called "hard brexit". some analysts predict theresa may will use a major speech tomorrow to say she's prepared to pull out of the single market to have more control over immigration. downing street has described the reports as "speculation" the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed in tunisia in june 2015 will open in the next hour. they were killed by a lone gunman at a 5 star beach resort near sousse. it remains the deadliest terror attack on britons since thejuly 7 bombings in 2005. the victims, who were aged between 19 and 80, included three generations from the same family. women with terminal cancer, who were expecting to be able to take a life—extending drug to give them an extra 6 months life, have been telling this programme how they'll no longer get it. kadcyla costs around 90 thousand pounds a year. nice, the organisation which decides which drugs and treatments are available on the nhs in england and wales, has ruled it should no longer be made available for routine use.
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one woman, bonnie fox, has told us she is considering trying to raise money to pay for kadcyla herself. taking kadcyla away, there isn't a next step for me in place. so if i'm told my drugs aren't working, the next day i'm going to need that new drug. if that's not there, what else doi drug. if that's not there, what else do i do? drug. if that's not there, what else doido? i drug. if that's not there, what else do i do? i have to have a drug to stay alive, so i need to find a way basically. and victoria will have much more on this story in the next few minutes. unconfirmed reports are saying five people have been killed after a gunman fired through an open window at the blue parrot club in playa dell carmen. the former crewe alexandra coach, barry bennell, is due to appear in court this morning charged with eight child sex offences. the former coach appeared
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via videolink at south cheshire magistrates' court last month and was remanded in custody. all of the offences are alleged to have happened between 1981 and 1985 when the alleged victim was under the age of 15. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 10.30. an e—mailfrom an e—mail from esther. an e—mailfrom esther. anyone diagnosed with cancer will know that the news currenth turns your world upside down. drugs may cost a lot but you simply cannot put a price on life. i was diagnosed in 2013 and like one of your viewers waiting for the biopsy results was agonising. anything that can help to extend life a little will give a tiny bit of hope to those on thatjourney. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now. andy murray has got his australian open campaign off to a winning start.
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he beat ukraine's illya marchenko in straight sets, although the world number one was made to battle by the world number 95. the match took two hours and 48 minutes in the melbourne heat. murray faces russia's andrey rublev in round two. dan evans is also through to the second round. marchenko played well. he was playing very fast out there. i found it hard, but managed to get through. dan evans is also through to the second round. he beat argentina's facundo bagnis in straight sets and is up against seventh seed marin cilic next. but british number four aljaz bedene is out. he lost to victor estrella burgos. pep guardiola says manchester city are out of the premier league title race. city lost 4—0 to everton yesterday and are now three points behind second place tottenham and 10 points behind league leaders chelsea.
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liverpool missed the chance to go second after a late equaliser the second one is three points. we have to see. i spoke to my players the last three weeks, forget about it, forget about the table, focus and try to do our best, try to make what you want to do to win the games and after that, we are going to weigh up how was our level of performance and then we'll have to decide. liverpool missed the chance to go second after a late equaliser from zlatan ibrahimovic held them to a 1—1 draw against manchester united. jurgen klopp's side are level on points with tottenham. 80 minutes, high intense football, it's really hard. when i saw the
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boys, i hope we had a little bit of luck. unfortunately we had maybe one situation, then the next situation we did not. premier league clubs have been accused of prioritising their finances, over improving disabled access in their stadiums, according to a report by the culture media & sport committee. in 2015 the premier league promised to improve stadium facilities for disabled fans by august of this year. but several clubs including the likes of watford, chelsea & liverpool are expected to miss that deadline. a statement by the premier league says they are working hard to enhance disabled fan access & will report on each club's progress at the end of the month. this morning we've heard how some women with terminal cancer who were expecting to be able to take a life—extending drug to give them an extra 6 months life — have now been told they'll no longer get it. the drug is called kadcyla — it costs £90,000 a year,
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far more than the £20—£30,000 normally spent on life—extending drugs. nice, the body in charge of the nhs's purse strings, has decided it can no longer fund the drug. bonnie fox says she was "completely devastated" on finding kadcyla was no longer available on the nhs, she's considering trying to raise money to pay for it herself. it's so frustrating, it's so upsetting, it's just... i think it's the fact that you know that drug is there, and you know that drug is good. i think if it had never existed then i wouldn't be, i wouldn't have this hope of being able to use it. my name's bonnie fox, i was diagnosed with both primary and secondary breast cancer when i was 37, when my little boy was just four months old.
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we'd tried for quite a while to have him, as well, so it was quite a long road to have him. so, yeah, we finally thought, we'd moved house, finally got pregnant, i spent my pregnancy quite anxious thinking something was going to go wrong, and then he was finally delivered safely. and you think, "finally, everything's going in our favour," and then, yeah, a few months down the line you get told something like this, so you just kind of think, "seriously, what else?! what have i done to deserve all this rubbish," basically. i'm hoping i get to see him go to school, but i don't really even let my mind kind of wander even further, exams, university, getting married, having children. i've just assumed that i'm not going to be here for things like that so i try not to think
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about them, i guess, i try not to dwell on them. but, yeah, it's a horrible... there's no way to describe it, really, it's just feeling heartbroken, i think, that's the only way to describe it. and you're at a point now where the drugs you're currently taking, you know at some point they're going to become ineffective, and that's when the next course of treatment would be kadcyla? yeah. we found out recently that this is probably no longer going to be available on the nhs. how did you feel when you first heard that news? it makes me feel worried, it makes me feel angry and frustrated, angry with the drugs company and with the nhs that they haven't been able to find a way through to agree a way forward, basically. in my head, i've thought about how long i can last on each drug, i've got kind of a rough,
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i guess, timescale laid out. "if i have this drug and then i can have this drug for a couple of years, then maybe this drug..." and you kind of bank on those years, they're so precious to you, it's so important that you can squeeze as much time as possible out of the drugs, and to have that suddenly taken away... itjust feels so cruel, really. i mean, everything feels really cruel as it is, but to have that taken away from me when i'm really depending on those extra years, it's just adding a huge amount of anxiety onto already an incredibly anxious situation. and i think that's the hardest thing, i can't begain to explain how it feels when you go for scan results, it's the worst kind of anxiety, and my life is, it's already pretty stressful, i've got this enormous black cloud, i think, hanging over me, that i try to push away as best i can but it's always there, and this is just additional worry, really, additional anxiety. it keeps me awake at night worrying.
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taking kadcyla away, there isn't a next step for me in place, so if i'm told that my drugs aren't working, then literally the next day i'm going to need that new drug, and if that's not there for me, then what do i do? what else do i do? i have to have a drug to stay alive, so i need to find a way, basically. do you think about having to raise the money yourself if it's not available? yeah, that's always in the back of my mind, that's a real possibility. when you're told that you have cancer at such a young age, you just think, "why me? why am i this one person that's, you know, somehow been singled out to get this bit of bad luck?" and then, yeah, to be told that a drug is taken away from you that could extend your life is just, yeah, it's unfairness on top
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of unfairness, i think. it's just making you feel even more cheated then you already do, really. breaking news. former football coach barry bennell has pleaded not guilty in the last few minutes to eight child sex offences, appearing at chester crown court. he's 63. he's a former football coach and he's pleaded not guilty to eight child sex offences at chester crown court. that's in the last few minutes. barry bennell, former football coach pleading not it will be to eight child sex offences, appearing at chester crown court. —— pleading not guilty. let's return to the cancer stories. here to talk about this this morning is mani coulter — she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2002 and didn't expect
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to live to see her daughter go to primary school — her daughter is currently taking her gcse. gill smith is in belfast, she was recommended the drug when she was first diagnosed with breast cancer. she has now been told she won't recieve it. dr anna rigg is an oncologist specialising in breast cancer. and we can get some insight into this decision from richard torbett from the association of the british pharmaceutical industry and richard sullivan from the institute of cancer policy. rirp ard has nice made the right decision? unfortunately, they have. i feel sorry for patients who are stuck in the middle of this. nice was created to make sure we have fairand was created to make sure we have fair and proportional prices for our cancer drugs and for all medicines across the nhs and many, many companies price their cancer drugs ina way
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companies price their cancer drugs in a way that ensures they get nice approval. so, in a sense, it is not rocket science if you price your drug accordingly for the impact it is going to make on the outcomes and quality of life for patients, you get authorisation from nice and patients have been stuck in the middle. the really is the price has been set is too high for ofs nhs, it is not a fair price. richard, why is this drug so expensive? well, i think the first thing to clarify is i don't think this is a final decision yet by nice on kadcyla. i don't think this is a final decision yet by nice on kadcylalj have got a couple of statements from nice and from roche which makes it sounds there is potential for nice and from roche which makes it sounds there is potentialfor some kind of solution, but why is it so expensive? that's true. medicines are often expensive for a limited period of time whilst the medicine is protected by patents after which they become very cheap, indeed. so it could go from £90,000 to what?m
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could be substantially lower. if we had been having this conversation in the 19905, we were worried that 5tatin5 were going to bankrupt the nhs. now a 5tatin5 were going to bankrupt the nhs. nowa month's 5tatin5 were going to bankrupt the nhs. now a month's supply of statins were going to bankrupt the nhs. now a month's supply of a statin costs less than a cup of coffee. what's the patent time frame then? when does that run out? often medicines are protected by this period for in practise between eight and ten years on the market. that's and ten years on the market. that's a long time when you have got terminal breast cancer. it is a long time, companies put in, companies spend over $100 billion every year researching new medicines and the, there is a need to have a certain higher price for a limited period of time in orderto higher price for a limited period of time in order to make sure that that research effort to make progress can continue. now, that doesn't mean that the price should be limitless
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and in practise there needs to be and in practise there needs to be andindeedis and in practise there needs to be and indeed is a very tough negotiation between pharmaceutical companies and the nhs through nice. the £90,000 that we hear in this case and in fact, many of the prices, most of the prices, that are discussed publicly are the starting point of the negotiation. these are list prices, not the real prices. is it true that roach gave a discount to nice. what was the discount? what did it bring down to?|j to nice. what was the discount? what did it bring down to? i don't work for roche. it won't be shared. it is a substantial discount. we are asking nice and roche to take action. we believe there are decisions that nice made when appraising the treatment which made it hard tore get through that might otherwise have been. mani, professor of cancer richard sullivan said that
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nice made the right des, what do you say? i definitely don't agree with that. i was on kadcyla five years ago. so when they banned six month increase survival rate, i'm five yea rs increase survival rate, i'm five years progression free since being on that drug. i was on it for three yea rs. on that drug. i was on it for three years. the point, when i started kadcyla, i was desperate. there were no options for me at all. the cancer was on my skin. it was travelling rapidly and there was nothing else andi rapidly and there was nothing else and i was lucky i enrolled on to a clinical trial for kadcyla, so and i was lucky i enrolled on to a clinical trialfor kadcyla, so i as on it for nearly three years, but it didn'tjust buy on it for nearly three years, but it didn't just buy me on it for nearly three years, but it didn'tjust buy me three years, it gave me opportunity to go on to another drug that wasn't available when i applied for the kadcyla. so... do you accept that it can extend women's life for longer than the six months and the communications i have had today are from women who are still here...
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this is an important drug. we need new drugs in the treatment of cancer. the issue and you've run the story today, the information is under phenomenal budgetary patients. we have patients in our waiting rooms and on trolleys, the reality is we need to get fair prices for the medicines, whether they are cancer drugs or drugs for dementia into the nhs and at the moment the price which has been put forward even price which has been put forward even with the discount was clearly not a even with the discount was clearly nota fair even with the discount was clearly not a fair price. ann rigg, you work in the nhs, is richard right? no, i disagree with him. i think encology isa disagree with him. i think encology is a speciality which is driven by evidence. i think there is very good evidence. i think there is very good evidence from the original clinical trials that were done with this drug and in fact, it was so good that it was approved in many countries including britain and was funded by the cancer drugs fund. so in fact, myself and my counterparts around the country have been using this
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drug since 2014. so as well as the original trial evidence we now have at least two years of experience of treating women with this medicine. how does it work? why is it so good? it isa how does it work? why is it so good? it is a very unusual drug. it is a combination of two drugs which have been chemically linked together. one isa been chemically linked together. one is a molecule which when you inject it into the body, travels round and will try and find cells which have got this her2 protein and it seeks them out and most of your normal cells don't have the protein. the manufacturers have linked a chemotherapy drug on to the molecule so chemotherapy drug on to the molecule so that it takes the chemotherapy to where it is needed. it does have some side—effects, but my experience and the experience of my counterparts is that it is very well tolerated and perhaps you can talk about that. let me ask gill about that. you were told, gill you would
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be able to get kadcyla. as it stands at the moment, that is not going to be the case, is it? well, let's hope that it will be the case because let's hope that some kind of agreement can be reached between roche and nice. the point that i'd like to make is that, it is a crazy system when the drugs companies invest a vast amount of money into developing a revolutionary new drug which everybody agrees is phenomenally successful and gives great quality of life for a substantial period of time and then it is not available in this country to the people who need it. it is available in other countries, it is not funded here. so, there is a real failure of imagination, i think, on behalf of the policy makers to fail to find some sort of way of funding these new drugs on which other drugs will be developed in the future. we need people like me to be on the
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drugs so that lessons can be learnt and more people in future will be able to get even better drugs. do you want to respond?” able to get even better drugs. do you want to respond? i couldn't agree more. all needs need to work together and indeed, we are working together and indeed, we are working together to try and make sure that there is a better and better, faster and faster way of making good deses for the nhs. —— and faster way of making good deses forthe nhs. —— decisions forthe nhs. the nhs budget is tight. we have to, nice's role is important in holding us to account as an industry to make sure that the medicines we bring to market are value for money. we need to make that conversation happen as quickly as possible for kadcyla so that patients can get access as quickly as possible. you are an advocate, your charity is an advocate for women with breast cancer, but you must accept, don't you, that clearly, you know, finances, that there is not a bottomless pit of money when it
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comes it the nhs? we do accept that. we feel in this instance there are things that could have been done in the process that would make the drug available and what's distressing for women in this situation, the drug has been available on the nhs. women who thought they were going to get this treatment, they thought they would have extra time with their families and good quality of life, are seeing this cruelly being withdrawn from them and that's heartbreaking for them. let me read the statements from nice and roche. we asked both for an interview and roche said, "they're maintaining an open dialogue with nice and nhs england have offered improved schemes and solutions to try to keep this medicine available to patients. this is not the end of the line for patients. we want to get back around the table with nice to turn this preliminary decision around and ensure we all do the right thing for patients and their families. families." does that suggest there will be a major discount? well, i would hope there will be a proper
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conversation between roche and nice... is that what that statement sounds like. if we have to read between the lines. there is no other way of reading that. i know you're not speaking on behalf of a roche. you as a man with a brain? there is a real question about how nice has examined the medicine. their analysis is based on a comparison with a medicine that is not the standard treatment of breast cancer patients in the uk. not available in the nhs. so i think there is a question. there is some questions for nice to answer here. and questions probably for the company as well and that discussion needs to happen in private. a brief final word, go on. yes, i mean, i represent a group called the uk breast cancer group and we are intending to lobby nice and 200 of us treat breast cancer patients. can
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ijust say? when you've got incurable cancer, things happen fast. so we can't, you know, we need decisions made very quickly. 0therwise people will die. decisions made very quickly. otherwise people will die. a final point from gill in belfast. what sort of system allows it to be available funded previously by the breast cancer fund, and available funded previously by the breast cancerfund, and maybe available funded previously by the breast cancer fund, and maybe when the patent comes out, but for those of us caught in the middle, we don't get it. what a ridiculous system. thank you very much. we will see what happens. thank you. barry bennell pleaded not guilty to eight sexual offence charges dating back to between 19.81 and 1985. our correspondent andy swiss is at chester crown court where the hearing has taken place. andy, tell our audience the details. well, barry bennell pleaded not guilty to eight charges of sexual
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assault against a boy aged under 15 yea rs of assault against a boy aged under 15 years of age. these offences are alleged to have taken place between 19.81 and 1985 at three separate locations in derbyshire, at nantwich in cheshire and also at a but lin's holiday camp. he was charged following an investigation by cheshire police which was completed in september last year. now, barry bennell didn't appear in court in person as at his previous hearing in crewe last month, he appeared viedia a video lunning. he was wearing a bluejumper a video lunning. he was wearing a blue jumper and spoke only to confirm his name and not guilty pleas. he is a youth coach. perhaps best known for his work with crewe alexander. he worked for manchester city and stoke city. he has been remanded in custody until his next
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hearing which will take place on at chester crown court on 20th march. thank you very much, andy swiss reporting. next — claims from 0xfam that the world's eight richest people have as much wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of the world. next — claims from 0xfam that the world's eight richest those richest eight billionaires are bill gates, the co—founder of microsoft who is worth $75 billion, amancio ortega, the founder of inditex, which owns clothes store zara amongst others — he's worth $67 billion. warren buffett, the largest shareholder in conglomerate berkshire hathaway, who's worth $60.8 billion. carlos slim helu, the owner of another conglomerate called grupo ca rso, who's worth $50 billion. a conglomerate by the way is a number of corporations grouped together. the fifth richest billionaire isjeff bezos, the founder and chief executive of amazon, who's worth $45.2 billion. he's followed by mark zuckerberg, the boss of facebook who is worth $44.6 billion. then larry ellison, the co—founder
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and chief executive of oracle, a computer technology corporation, who is worth $43.6 billion. and finally, the eighth—richest billionaire is michael bloomberg, who owns bloomberg lp and is worth $40 billion. bloomberg is a financial software, data, and media company. so, eight billionaires, all men, six of them american, whose combined wealth is estimated at over $427 billion. but are they really worth more than half of the world? and if so, does that matter? anthony reuben has been checking this out. dot figures add up?m anthony reuben has been checking this out. dot figures add up? it is ha rd to this out. dot figures add up? it is hard to measure the wealth of very, very rich people and very poor people. 0xfam haven't done it themselves. they have got figures from credit suisse and forbes and what they concluded this figure of eight having the same wealth as the
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poorest half, is it exactly eight? we're not sure. they have had to make assumptions along the way about whether being in debt makes you poorer than somebody who has nothing because clearly there are some people who are in debt and who have decent lifestyles, but it is fair to say that there are a lot of very, very poor people and there are a small number of people with extremely large amounts of wealth. what's difficult to say, is whether this is getting better or worse because the data sources that credit suisse use change each year and they have more information particularly about the poorest people. there is also an argument about whether wealth is what matters? we do have a fairly good idea that the income of the poorest people has been getting better, but i'm sure 0xfam will be keen to explain why wealth is important as well. cheers, anthony. with us in the studio is katy wright from 0xfam, and kate andrews from the free market think—tank the institute for economic affairs.
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katy wright, what is the point then of this? the point of this is really to show you and me how we are living ina to show you and me how we are living in a world of vast economic inequality, an inequality crisis where you have got, as has been said, eight people who have the same wealth as 3.6 billion others. the point for 0xfam actually is to say that it's not just point for 0xfam actually is to say that it's notjust that point for 0xfam actually is to say that it's not just that there's point for 0xfam actually is to say that it's notjust that there's this gross disparity of wealth but it's the same economic system and policies that are causing this extreme wealth that are also perpetuating poverty and we won't ove rco m e perpetuating poverty and we won't overcome poverty unless we tackle inequality. so the system has to change? exactly. there seems to be little referencethe fact that in 2016 alone, over 100 million people were brought out of absolute poverty, specifically in china and india. those are systems that have embraced the free market and capitalism because it's the best provider of
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wealth and income for everyone across—the—board. i'm not so bothered about the ratio between the rich and poor, i care most about the poor and how well they are faring. why do you laugh when she says that? well, because i mean it'sjust the classic bunk that we hear to justify this. let's talk about how the poorest have fared right. since 1988, the poorest 10% of the plan vet got richer by about $3 a year so for all the great economic stories of growth, getting what you and i might spend on a coffee every day a year, you know, 700 million more people could have been brought out of poverty had we had more equal growth. to celebrate some people having crumbs when everyone else is enjoying the whole cake... is that a fair point? it's the case where some people haven't seen as much growth in wealth as they could have, usually because the governments prevent it. the issue of croneyism
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is problematic. where we do see people coming out of poverty, this is where they are embracing capitalism, in china and india. we need to tackle the dictatorships, that are keeping people living on less than $3. oxfam's report, they are trying to suggest that the aggregated net wealth of a person is what is going to determine their wealth. so you are saying that a harvard graduated student is graduating with $100,000 a year so he looks poorer than an indian farmer. people show up poor even though they may be potentially going to have quite high earnings, the classic one is the harvard graduate.
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let's be clear, this is a tiny number of people. the average of the 3.6 billion people live in really poor places. but the... one second. the debt is showing up in poor countries as well. that is not people with student loans, that is people with student loans, that is people borrowing because the harvests are failed, going from money lender to money lender to money lender to money lender to money lender, people selling what they have to pay for medical costs, as we were speaking to people in vietnam the other way. we've got to leave it there, but thank you very much. still to come: donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states on friday. this morning he's been setting out some of his views. we'll hearfrom him and some of his supporters in texas. and nearly half of working fathers would like a less stressfuljob so they can spend more time caring for their children. we speak to working dads, who have given up or are thinking about quitting high powered jobs to achieve a better work—life balance. donald trump has promised that a
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trade deal will be his priority when he takes off on friday. he spoke to michael gove for the times in his first british interview since becoming us president elect. he also said he'd ask his son—in—law to negotiate a middle east peace agreement and would seek a deal with russia to reduce nuclear weapons. the former craics coach barry bennell has pleaded not guilty to eight child sex offences during a plea hearing at chester crown court this morning —— crewe alexandra. all the offences are alleged to have happened between 1981 and 1985 when the alleged victim was under 15. unconfirmed reports say five people have been killed after a gunman opened fire at a music event in mexico. eyewitnesses say the gunman fired through an open window at a
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club. it was opening a party for a festival. join me nor bbc newsroom live at 11, see you then. here's some sport now. andy murray has got his australian open campaign off to a winning start. the world number one beat illya marchenko in straight sets. he's attempting to win his first australian open title after five final defeats. dan evans is also through to the second round. he beat facundo bagnis in straight sets and will play marin cilic next. but aliaj bedene is out. pep guardiola says manchester city are out of the title race. they lost 4—0 to everton yesterday to leave them ten points behind leaders chelsea. liverpool go third after a 1—all draw at manchester united. this picture shows michael gove, formerjustice secretary and brexit campaigner, with the next us president donald trump.
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both have their thumbs up. just behind michael gove, you might be able to see a picture of a playboy magazine cover featuring donald trump on the cover. i thought the uk was so smart in getting out and you were there and you guys wrote it and put it on the front page. trump said that brexit was going to happen. yes. right and it happened. yes. that is when it was going to lose easily. everybody thought i was crazy. 0bama said they'd go go to the back of the line. that was a bad statement. it was the front of the queue? i think you're doing great. i think it's going great. countries want their own identity. and the uk wanted its own identity, but i do believe this — if they hadn't been forced to take in all of the refugees, so many, with all the problems that it entails i think you wouldn't have a brexit. shame it's not properly mic‘d.
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donald trump also revealed his and his mother's admiration for the queen. the uk, my mother was very ceremonial. i think that's why i got this aspect because my father was bricks and mortar and my mother sort of had a flair. she loved the queen, she loved anything, she was so proud of the queen. she loved the ceremonial and beauty, because nobody does that like the english and she had great respect for the queen and liked her. any time the queen and liked her. any time the queen was on television, an event, my mother would be watching. trump supporters see this as a triumph for those who're antiestablishment. critics worry about democracy. newsbeat‘s political team jonathan blake and
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declan harvey travelled 2,000 miles around texas to speak to voters putting their trust in donald trump. # i was born to lead # the land of the free... the americans who voted for donald trump weren'tjust the people you saw on the news. despite what he did or said... he had them by the... they're rapists... and no matter who got upset. she gained a massive amount of wait. supporters believed only the donald could make america great again. i needed and wanted to see jobs coming back to america. god has a big thing to do with it in my life — i think he took care of it. we will build a great wall. that war will go up so fast, your head will spin. we are on a 2,500 mile road trip round the great state of texas to hear why so many have put their trust in donald trump. we are in austin this
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morning, and off to meet a young lady called hannah, who voted for donald trump. it will be really interesting to hear her reasons for voting for him, and particularly as a woman, i guess, because we know the things he's said, his attitudes to women have been criticised. but it with just be interesting to see whether that swayed her at all, and the reasons she gives for still supporting him. # if donald trump had said all the things he said he said... small minority in austin because he is a trump voter and he does not have a lot of support here, unlike the rest of texas. so, your man won?
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yes. how are you feeling? ecstatic. it was really exciting. i was kind of laughing and crying at the same time. i was like, i don't know what's happening any more because i obviously did not expect him to win the code you were surprised? i was surprised. i want to see jobs coming back to america. it is an important issue for me, which true me to him. ourjobs are being stolen like own from a baby. ourjobs are being stolen like candy from a baby. it's not going to happen any more, folks. that is an issue, looking for more full—time employment for a long time now. and i keep getting told after the fourth interview, we liked you, we loved your interview, but we went with somebody who was willing to take a $10,000 pay cut and who has been doing this for ten years. he's been criticised for the comments he has made about women, being
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able to grab a woman and do what you want and other things — were you worried at all about what that said about him as a person? i didn't find it offensive. i listened listen to rap music, i listen to wu—tang clan! looking at your ass from behind... you walk by smelling like water melon... you might make me a felon... i can't be ideological consistent and say that that bothers me. so what three things are you trusting donald trump to do in order to make sure that you don't regret voting for him? right, do three things that i am trusting donald trump to do are to build the wall, as he said he would, to bring jobs back to the us, and to increase the growth of the economy. and then to appoint supreme courtjustices who are going to uphold the constitution in a strict way. which particular bits of the constitution are you concerned about and you would like to see upheld? so, the laws regarding free speech are important to me, and the laws that protect that free speech, our right to bear arms and carry a weapon. if you're worried about paying your bills at the end of the month, then that's a pretty good motivation?
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yes. she's struggled to find a job since college, and when it comes down to it, she's voted for the guy who he says can improve her prospects. and i think if you combine that with the social issues that are in court to people, things like abortion and immigration, you can begin to understand how he managed to achieve the level of support he did. yes. # don't sit around and cry # just roll me up and smoke me when i die... so, we headed more into the centre of texas. this is hill country. and we're going to meet a 26—year—old who's never been involved in politics before, but he said donald trump made him listen up for the first time. # don't sit around and cry. # just roll me up and
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smoke me when i die. so, the night of the election, were you watching the results come in, and what was your reaction? i was praying. god has a big thing to do with it in my life, but i think he took care of it, in my opinion. were there things that donald trump specifically said that you thought, yes, that's why he'll get my vote? immigration. they're bringing crime, they're rapists, and some i assume are good people. there are so many people in this country living for free, and i'm paying for them, and that's very aggravating for me. because taxes, i'm feeding people's families that aren't even supposed to be here. and that's just, that's not good. prisons, they're full of illegal immigrants as well. and i just don't think that's right. and that's more money going down the drain from me and from our country, because we're putting it in, too.
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your father came to this country illegally from central america — did that have any impact on how you voted for what you feel about the immigration issue? my dad, in the ‘80s, he immigrated to this country illegally. but the thing that differentiates him from the average fella on the street is, he actually did it the right way. he started working, worked hard, and he came up from nothing. he became legal as soon as he could, once he got everything established. he took the steps and he did it the right way. when there's so many people that are just living in the shadows and doing everything sketchy, in my opinion — that's a weird word, but it's just not right. are you expecting donald trump to literally build a wall now, or did you see it as more a metaphor, to say, we're going to stop people crossing over? are you expecting him to put bricks down? i honestly am not. i think they may well... barack 0bama said he was going
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to step up border enforcement, but it didn't happen. so... and personally i've been down to the border on hunting trips. and it's just crazy, the amount of tax dodgers you see running around that part of the country, down south on the border. i mean, every two miles you drive, you see a us border patrol truck, you see a helicopter coming across. if that money was filtered into a physical wall, like you're saying, laying bricks down, that could make a definite impact on the situation in some areas. but some areas are so impassible, that a wall, it's not feasible to build a wall in those areas. what are you then trusting donald trump to deliver on, now that he'sjust becoming president? we're going to get rid of the criminals and stuff like that. as far as immigration lies. and hopefully, just bring the country together, and that's going to make america great, or... again! when was the last time america was great? i would say, i wasn't alive. but...
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reagan? i don't know, but yes. that was around the time your dad came, yes. there's no getting away from the fact that his dad walked for three days across the desert to illegally come to the us during the 1980s, and one generation on, he's voting primarily to stop that immigration and others following in his father's footsteps. but you know, he didn't vote for donald trump because he literally expected a wall. i think we're so used to, in politics, people voting on what they hear. but this is different, they don't expect donald trump to deliver word for word, they just generally like what he's saying and if he comes kind of close to that, then that might be good enough for them. we've come south to san antonio to meet a more reluctant trump voter. so, donald trump won, how did you feel when you saw the result? i'm notjumping up and down elated that he's the president. but i am jumping up and down elated
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that hillary clinton isn't, i guess! religious freedom is very important to me. and hillary clinton has already pretty much declared full—scale war on that. cultural codes, religious beliefs, have to be changed. so that's just one thing, just the fact that if you feel like you can take away one of our rights, you feel like you can take away them all. the things he said about women, the things he said about black people, does any of that worry you and did it influence how you voted at all? trump has definitely said some negative things about black people, much like about women. but personally, my identity comes from so much more than being black. i have a military background, my dad was in the air force for 20 years, i'm a christian, i was home—schooled. and these are all values that are very, very important to me. what three things are you now trusting donald trump to do, now that you voted for him and he's been elected president? i'm trusting donald trump first off to take our national security
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and sovereignty very seriously. i'm trusting him to protect all of our rights in the bill of rights, the right to bear arms, the rights to freedom of religion and all the others. and i'm trusting him to protect parents' rights to make decisions regarding their children's health and education and well—being overall. everyone i think without fail who we've met that voted for trump spoke really strongly about how much they don't like hillary clinton. there is no middle ground, you either love her or you hate her. they don't like her more than they d0 like him, a lot of the time. yes. one more stop, and that's to meet a member of donald trump's republican party. were you always a supporter of him, did you always have a good feeling about what donald trump could bring? no, ididn't. donald trump was probably the bottom of my list. but he has surprised me lately. i've seen a genius in him that must also reflect well in the business world, too. many people will feel
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like they haven't seen any signs of genius — can you explain to them what genius you're seeing? the only true genius i think is not how much talent you have, but using what's around you, using your personal resources, going through and figuring out who can do the jobs that you can't. was there anything that he did during the campaign that made you feel uncomfortable? well, it's hard to say, because there were certain things he just wouldn't address. i think that's really his success. he didn't go into abortion, we hardly heard a word about it. he didn't say anything about homosexuality, hardly, and those issues are pretty important to the social core of our party. if you're a social conservative, a bible—believing christian, you believe that god is on the throne, not man. why does god keep coming up in politics here? we are a godly people. is donald trump a godly man? i don't know, it's hard. i'm sure he's not evangelical or a bible student, but i think lately, he's starting to wake up a little bit. you've seen his language change somewhat. do you think he's in the process of finding god as he becomes
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closer to the oval office? i don't know if in his position he would be able to pursue christ as a humble person — it would be very difficult as president. also with his track record, he hasn't demonstrated much poverty or humility so far? 0r repentance, yes. i think that is an issue with many conservatives, that's why he didn't do so well in texas the first time. so, what are you trusting donald trump to do, then? i'm trusting him to build a coalition. he'll need one to rule properly. he's not going to be able to lead if he doesn't have the right people, because he's brand—new to the process. so he needs them, we need trump. with the benefit of hindsight, which is a wonderful thing, not surprising that donald trump won this election, and won convincingly. not only has donald trump become president — there were other elections going on at the same time for the senate and the house
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of representatives, america's parliament. and the republican party now has complete control, which will make donald trump's life a lot easier in terms of passing the laws he needs to pass. yes. so, 2,000 miles, seven cities...? time to go home! if you want to watch that film again, you can find it on the bbc iplayer. nearly half of working fathers would like a less stressfuljob so they can spend more time caring for their children. a study for the charity working families says about a third of dads would take a pay cut to achieve a better work—life balance. martin daubney is a dad of two and former editor of the magazine loaded. he resigned from hisjob after the birth of his son seven years ago. mohsinjameel, a dad of three who run his own company but wants to spend more time to with his children. in brighton is tom briggs. he quit his job two years ago to work from home so he could look
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after his two daughters and son. right, just briefly describe the kind of work you're in and why you need to be there 24/7? kind of work you're in and why you need to be there 24”? i'm running a financial services firm which is boutique. we are dealing in the foreign exchange market and we allow the trade tors deal on different stocks and shares. this is my business to be honest. i'm heading the business for the last six years. it is my own business. ifeel that the business for the last six years. it is my own business. i feel that i have been occupied with my business inside out for the last six years andi inside out for the last six years and i have given too much time. of course, when you start a business, there is a lot of input which comes from the owner's side. so travelling, putting my head down with the business, since it is a 24 hour market i have to be vigilant on that side. it is in a fraction of a second you are on the other side of the game and you lose the business completely. how old are your
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children? i've got three. the older one is nearly 13 now and i have another son who is ten and a daughter who is eight. we are just seeing a picture of them now, you would like to spend more time with them? i would like to spend more time with them. you can see how he needs to be there and vigilant with his business. what advice would you give to him? you're realising the richness of spending time with your children which is a richness beyond salary or remuneration, when i jacked myjob in, when i was working 70 hours a week and not only seeing my child at bath time and story time, but not seeing my wife, it was making me miserable. ithought what's my life about? is it about success as a business person or success as a business person or success as a human? and ijust...|j mean, again, this is the kind of thing we used to say to women, can men have it all? are you saying you can't now? today's report pointed
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out something really interesting and that's while more men are prepared to admit they want to spend more time which by is a beautiful thing, we aren't supported through shared pa re ntal we aren't supported through shared parental leave. we get two weeks statutory minimum pay and that's it, so we statutory minimum pay and that's it, so we have to go back to work when we don't want to. so we are seeing men down skilling because they want that balance. so we are seeing this fatherhood gap emerging. tom, do you agree there is a fatherhood gap?|j agree there is a fatherhood gap?” would agree with that view, yeah. it's very difficult. workplaces don't, they still don't understand what it can be like for working parents who also happen to be male, yes. so, do you think men can have it all? a fulfilling successful job and all that time with the kids that they want? i don't know about having it all! i do often say thave' got the best of both worlds though so
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maybe i'm contradicting myself. because you work from home? maybe i'm contradicting myself. because you work from home7m maybe i'm contradicting myself. because you work from home? it is not perfect, but yeah, so i work from home so i get more time with the kids and my wife and i get to do my work as well. it's stressful like any other existence, but it is certainly better than my previous existence for sure. what are you going to do then? what changes are you going to make or are you considering making? as my son is growing, he has gone it a secondary school. there he looks at me as a mentor, as someone school. there he looks at me as a mentor, as someone who school. there he looks at me as a mentor, 3s someone who can school. there he looks at me as a mentor, as someone who can come forward and spend time with him, you know. i realised it quite late. there is two things to it, one, being a father and wanting to give the best of the best to my kids. you work hard and you start earning money, but then the other, the dark side sud can't give time to your kids. so what are you going to change, if anything? i'm going to ta ke change, if anything? i'm going to take a break off my work and slow down on myjob side and take it easy and probably employ someone else to perform the role and give me time to
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my kids. because my kid is going to a secondary school, he needs me. since i have taken a break, i have realised spending time with my kids, they need me right now. they need someone they need me right now. they need someone to guide them, you know. this is the time. if i don't give time then you know... you'll never get it back again. is he doing the right thing? you can see the genuine happiness that this brings him when he mentions it. it is progressive that men are admitting this. we don't have to be like our fathers and work nonstop. my dad was a coal minerand! and work nonstop. my dad was a coal minerand i neversaw and work nonstop. my dad was a coal miner and i never saw him apart from the weekends. he was a working dad andl the weekends. he was a working dad and i became that dad. we're unlearning to become more like our mums and more like our partners want to be. rather than being yesterday's men where you never see your to be. rather than being yesterday's men where you never see your kids and you just never get that time back. last saturday, i spent time with my son. i went out to watch a movie alone and to have dinner. just
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him and you? just me and my son. i realised that, you know, he wanted to say a lot of things to me and we shared a lot of stuff about school, about our daily stuff. i want to play football, pa pa. about our daily stuff. i want to play football, papa. i want to go here and i want to go there. thank you, gentlemen. have a good day. we're back tomorrow at 9am. have a good day. well, there is no snow in the forecast. it has turned milder across the uk. western areas right now, temperatures into double figures, but it is not a pretty picture. the weather isn't great. lots of grey skies and outbreaks of rain across england. there will abbit of brightness around today.
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the wet weather continues. it won't be wet everywhere. bits and pieces of drizzle. it is chilly in east anglia and the south east. just the chance of a bit of frost there for most of us, it is frost—free. tomorrow, we do it all over again. the hint is in the winds coming out of the south—west off the atlantic. it looks as though the grey skies will persist, and if anything, it turns milder in western scotland. east anglia and the south east, still mild. no change as we go through the course of wednesday and thursday. maybe a bit of brightness here and there. bye—bye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am.
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donald trump promises a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. barack 0bama said you're going to the back of the line. that was a bad statement. so we are the front of the queue? i think you're doing great. the former crewe alexandra coach barry bennell pleads not guilty to eight child abuse charges. the inquest opens into the deaths of 30 british tourists killed on a tunisia beach in june 2015. northern ireland's devolved government is on the verge of collapse. annita mcveigh,

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