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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  January 16, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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station today at 5pm — decision time at stormont as northern ireland's political crisis comes to a head. today, sinn fein will not renominate for the position of deputy first minister. following that decision, the power—sharing government has collapsed. we'll have the latest from stormont on the likelihood of a new set of elections to the assembly. iamat i am at stormont and we are expecting to hear from the secretary of state james brokenshire in the next hour, when it is thought he will announce elections. we'll be following events in stormont after weeks of political stalemate in the province. the other main stories on bbc news at five. donald trump tells the times that he wants to help make brexit a beautiful thing. obama said they will go to the back of the line, meaning if it does happen and he had to retract, that was a bad statement. i think you are doing great. an inquest into the deaths of 30
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britons on a beach in tunisia in 2015 hears that the shooting could have been stopped sooner. and a young woman abducted as a baby 18 years ago has now been reunited with both her biological parents. it's five o'clock. our main story is the political crisis in northern ireland, where the power—sharing executive has collapsed following sinn fein‘s refusal today to nominate a new deputy first minister to replace martin mcguinness. the first minister and dup leader, arlene foster, has accused sinn fein of risking northern ireland's stability for political self—interest by forcing an election. the northern ireland secretary is expected to make a statement within the hour. the crisis was provoked
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by the mishandling of an energy scheme which could cost the taxpayer half a billion pounds. sinn fein have accused arlene foster of failing to take responsibility for it. my colleague annita mcveigh is in stormont for us. thank you very much. good evening from stormont, where in the last few moments, that deadline has passed that means that is the effective colla pse that means that is the effective collapse of the power—sharing executive here. in the last few minutes, we heard from sinn fein, who said that there would be no return to the power—sharing executive without, what they called, a fundamental change to the approach of the dup. sinn fein, of course, being the main republican party here, the dup being the main unionist party. but the other side of that coin is that earlier, the dup accused sinn fein of not working
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with them and acting in political self—interest and creating the conditions in which the secretary of state has probably no choice now but to call elections to this assembly. a lot of vitriol, it sets the scene for a very difficult election period if, as we expect, that happens within the next hour or so, we are expecting to hear from james brokenshire, but first of all, let's look at the picture up to this point with chris page. after a week with no functioning government, this is the moment when northern ireland's power—sharing executive finally collapsed. today, sinn fein will not renominate for the position of deputy first minister. sinn fein has honoured all agreements. we have striven to make these institutions work. sinn fein‘s refusal to replace martin mcguinness as deputy first minister means stormont can't operate any longer. that's because under the power—sharing system, the first and deputy first ministers can't work in isolation from each other. a new election may be called as early as this evening. northern ireland does not need, nor
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does its people want, an election. with the triggering of article 50 to leave the european union, a new president in the united states of america, a volatile global economy, now, more than ever, northern ireland needs stable government. long—running tensions between the democratic unionists and sinn fein came to a head over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. the renewable heat incentive began in 2012 and had overly—generous subsidies and initially no upper payment limits. the scheme closed in february last year, having run almost half a billion over budget. political controversy grew. the dup leader, arlene foster, had previously been the minister in charge of the project. in december, sinn fein said she should temporarily stand down as first minister. she repeatedly refused. seven days ago, martin mcguinness resigned in protest. the power—sharing partnership between irish republicans and unionists has always been uneasy
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and it's often been unstable. restoring it may take some time and people here are worried about the prospect of losing their devolved government. a key moment for the stormont executive had been due to come this week. an inquiry has been examining the scale of historical child abuse in residential institutions. its report will be published on friday but now it looks like there will be no ministers to act on the recommendations. we just didn't want to believe that as soon as sir anthony hart's report was ready and delivered on friday, there's the collapse of the government and the collapse of our dreams and hopes and desires that this was going to be our day. there are many concerns, frustrations and questions as northern ireland faces an uncertain political future. after ten years, the latest stormont stalemate has brought about the downfall of devolution. chris page, bbc news, stormont. well, in that brief statement to the
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media area well, in that brief statement to the media are a few moments ago, sinn fein said that it was working towards an election date of the 2nd of march and, indeed, at the weekend, there were plenty of signs that sinn fein and the dup were already putting themselves on an election footing. now, —— and other big question in this is what does it mean about northern ireland's voice being heard in any brexit negotiations and does it have an impact on theresa may's timetable for brexit and triggering article 50? some for brexit and triggering article 50 7 some believe for brexit and triggering article 50? some believe without an act of executive here, it will have an impact on that timetable. there is the possibility of a return to direct rule by westminster. that would get around that issue for theresa may. however, at the moment, james brokenshire says he is not contemplating that scenario. the only scenario he is thinking about
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isa only scenario he is thinking about is a return to a power—sharing executive after an election, the assembly members would have three weeks to try and bring that arrangement back together again, but with all the issues, legacy issues and many others that have to be resolved, particularly between the dup and sinn fein, three weeks seems like a very short period of time indeed for that to happen. for the moment, back to you. thank you very much. a quick reminder, just tell you again, at just gone half past five, we think we will have that live statement from the northern ireland secretary james brokenshire. he is expected to announce at that point that there will be new elections to the northern ireland assembly, so around 5:30pm, but when it happens, we will be there to follow every word of that statement. donald trump, the us president—elect, has promised he'll approve an early trade deal with britain after he takes office on friday.
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he told michael gove of the times newspaper and a journalist from germany's bild that he was enthusiastic about britain leaving the eu and that the offer of a trade deal would strengthen theresa may's hand in the brexit talks with brussels. but his statement that nato was "obsolete" has caused consternation in european capitals, according to germany's foreign minister — who said it contradicted comments made days ago by mr trump's incoming defence chief. our political correspondent ben wright reports. by friday, he'll be president, the most powerful politician in the world. and getting a visit in first, formerjustice secretary and brexit campaigner, michael gove, presenting the president—elect with a chance to boast about his brexit foresight. i thought the uk was so smart in getting out. you were there and you guys put it on the front page, "trump said that brexit will happen".
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yes. right? and it happened. that is when it was going to lose easily. everyone thought i was crazy. obama said they'll go to the back of the line, meaning, if it does happen... and then he had to retract it. that was a bad statement. and now we are at the front of the the queue? and now we are at the front of the queue? i think you're doing great. so perhaps not the front of the trade deal queue and the uk can only start to negotiate once we've left the eu, but michael gove was clearly pleased with his visit to trump tower and the president's to trump tower and the president's enthusiasm for britain and brexit. it is clearly the case that he has an agenda, a business agenda, which has some potential for britain to benefit from. this all matters to a british government of the brink of leaving the eu. for now, though, it was business as usual for the foreign secretary in brussels this morning. i think it's very good news the united states of america wants to do a good free trade deal with us and wants to do it very fast. as the uk plans to go it alone, theresa may will make a major speech tomorrow setting out the deal
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she wants from brexit. but we already have some big clues. the prime minister has strongly hinted that britain will leave the single market, with its free movement of goods, finance and people. that's because she wants uk control over eu migration and freedom from eu law. we know theresa may wants to trigger exit negotiations by the end of march, and she thinks negotiations can be done within two years. so britain would be out of the eu by early 2019. but there is so much we don't know as well. what sort of access to the european union single market will britain get and what conditions will the eu demand? will britain be completely free to strike trade deals with other countries? and how long will they take? i think it is a good thing. who will reject the idea of a new trade deal between the uk and us? although i don't think it will remotely match the scale of our trade relationships with the rest of the european union. where i think we need to be careful, both in the united kingdom and the rest of europe, is that you now have
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two major world figures who basically wish europe ill, they want to see the union will fall apart. one is vladimir putin and the other is donald trump. but britain needs cheerleaders for brexit, friends to cut deals and rhetorically, at least, the government has one in trump. 0ur correspondentjenny hill is in berlin for us. jenny, quite a few things that we can focus in on today, but let's talk about mr trump's remarks about the european union and how it can last, or not last in his view, and, of course, trade with germany. last, or not last in his view, and, of course, trade with germanylj think of course, trade with germany.” think his comments have caused a great deal of dismay here in berlin, though not necessarily surprise. mrs merkel had a very, very strong, warm political alliance with barack 0bama, no one here was expecting an
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immediate continuation with that, but that alliance meant that mrs merkel, germany and the eu had clout. barack merkel, germany and the eu had clout. ba rack 0bama merkel, germany and the eu had clout. barack obama was a vocal fan of the eu, he was also a big supporter of mrs merkel and her refugee policy. how that transatlantic tone has changed in just a few weeks and that is something that is really concerning people here, particularly of concern are mrtrump‘s people here, particularly of concern are mr trump's comments about nato, which he has described as obsolete and the eu, which he has predicted will simply fall apart. it does now seem to be clear to many here in berlin that on one side of the world, you've got russia, who would very much welcome a fragmentation of the eu and on the other side of the world, perhaps you now have a us administration who are starting to think the same way and in the middle, you've got, actually, and increasingly lonely mrs merkel trying to preserve the integrity of the european union and i think that is why we saw her today responding
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to donald trump's comments, first of all to the comment about her refugee policy being a catastrophic mistake, responding characteristically by saying simply that he has laid out his position again and she has her opinions and they are well—known, but secondly by saying that what needs to happen now is the eu has to work together to try and combat those common challenges of terrorism and protecting external borders, of things like producing jobs and dealing with the digital single market. her parting words on the subject were this, "europe's fate is in its hands". i think that his keynote for mrs merkel, she and her ministers are trying very hard to try and foster ties between germany and the new us administration and they are struggling but they are very keen to take a pragmatic approach and try and work with mr trump, try and deal with this potential issue over whether he really wa nts potential issue over whether he really wants to impose a 35% tax on
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german cars sold to the uk, but at the same time, try and shore up the european union which, as we know, is a very tricky position. these comments don't help and i know here in berlin they are well aware that. jenny hill for us with the latest in berlin. let's stay with that interview with the times newspaper. there were several strands with it, he talked about trade and trade with the uk, where mr trump said he wa nted the uk, where mr trump said he wanted to have some kind of early trade deal and he had some very positive things to say about brexit. how has it gone down in downing street? vicki young, what are people taking away from it? well, downing street have welcomed this idea that donald trump is willing to do a quick and airfare trade deal, but there are many here, mps who are sceptical about it. many point out that under eu rules, until article
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50 is done and dusted, we cannot sign off formally on any trade deals. the response from downing street was we cannot formally do that but we can scope deals and the suggestion is you can have informal talks and maybe get things ready, evenif talks and maybe get things ready, even if you don't sign off on it and downing street is very clear we will stick to our obligations while we remain in the european union but there is no doubt this will be a boost for theresa may before she goes into those negotiations, you wa nt to goes into those negotiations, you want to go in feeling strong and having donald trump say he is willing to do a free trade deal, that will help you a lot, i think. what we have seen in the debate about brexit over the weekend is the government trying to make this not about what the uk, how the uk might suffer outside of the eu, what we have got to lose, they want to try and say to the eu, this is about the partnership, doing the right deal for both sides, that we have all got a lot to lose if we don't get the right deal and we have to concentrate on that partnership and
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that cooperation. vicki young, thank you. the former youth football coach, barry bennell, who worked at crewe alexandra has pleaded not guilty to eight charges of child abuse. the allegations against bennell all involve a boy under the age of 15 between 1981 and 1986. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: northern ireland's power—sharing government has collapsed today sparking fresh elections possibly announced within the hour. donald trump has promised a trade deal between britain and the united states will be a priority when he takes office on friday. an inquest has heard that a gunman who shot and killed 38 tourists on a beach in tunisia in 2015, could have been stopped sooner. and in sport, andy murray is through to the second round of the australian open after beating
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marchenko in straight sets. british number three dan evans is also through. valtteri bottas will partner lewis hamilton at mercedes this season, replacing nico rosberg, who retired after winning the world title. felipe massa returns to the va ca nt title. felipe massa returns to the vacant seat at williams. and northern ireland's mark allen has knocked out former world champion john higgins at the masters snooker. it is the third time he has lost to him in the first round. i will be back with more on those stories at around half past. the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists who were killed in tunisia 18 months ago have started in london. they were shot dead by a gunman at a beach resort near sousse. it was the deadliest terror attack on britons since thejuly the 7th bombings in london in 2005. 0ur correspondent richard galpin is at the royal courts ofjustice. let'sjoin him now.
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it was a very sombre and poignant start to this inquest, with the coroner calling for the names of all 38 people who were killed in the attack back in 2015 to be read out one by one. after that, everybody in the courtroom stood up for a minute of silence. of course, in the courtroom here and also via video link around the country, there are many families who lost loved ones who have been following proceedings very closely and earlier today, some of them broke down in tears when they were shown cctv footage of the attack as it unfolded. 0ne they were shown cctv footage of the attack as it unfolded. one person actually walked out, one family member walked out, before the footage was shown, simply not wanting to see that kind of material again, too stressful for them. wanting to see that kind of material again, too stressfulfor them. so it has been a difficult start in many ways to this inquest and that has been compounded, i think, by the fa ct been compounded, i think, by the fact that another senior legal
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counsel at the inquest stated that there was a witness who had said the police unit who were very close by to the site of the attack, very close to the hotels, had deliberately delayed their arrival at the scene. we don't know why but certainly, they would have had the potential to have stopped the attack and therefore for many lives to have been saved if they had active. —— acted. the families of those killed in the attack have waited a year and a half for this moment. now, with the full inquest finally getting under way this morning, they are hoping for answers to some critical questions. the gunman, seifeddine rezgui, a 23—year—old student armed with an automatic rifle and grenades, began his attack on the beach, systematically shooting dead british and other european holiday—makers as they sunbathed and swam. from the beach, rezgui, who trained at an islamic state camp in libya, killed and injured more tourists in the hotel complex.
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amid the panic, local shopkeepers managed to save some people by sheltering them inside. gunfire the attack continued for more than half an hour until eventually, a large group of policemen arrived and shot him dead. it's alleged other police officers who had been nearby had been too frightened to tackle him, leading to one hotel worker snatching a policeman's gun and trying to shoot rezgui himself. but the gunjammed and rezgui threw a grenade at him. and all this just three months afterjihadis carried out this attack inside one of the country's most famous museums, in the capital, tunis. once again, tourists were the target. 22 people were killed. and it is alleged the same is cell was behind both attacks. now, almost two years later,
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tunisia remains on high alert. the country has long been a hotbed of jihadist activity, the security forces struggling to deal with the growth of islamic state. it's estimated 5,000 tunisians have fought for islamic state in iraq, syria and libya. and many have returned home in recent years. well, in the last hour or so, in the final stages of the hearing today, we have been hearing from a very senior official, a counterterrorism official, from the foreign office and of course there are some questions facing the foreign office in terms of the kind of travel advice they gave at this time and certainly there have been allegations or accusations from some otherfamilies allegations or accusations from some other families that they should have changed their advice from initially it was all but essential travel, and
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they say it should have been changed to absolutely no travel to tunisia. the foreign office official was insisting the security of british tourist was always their priority, but then went on to say between 2013 and 2014, there had been eight terrorist attacks in tunisia, including one in sousse, and attempted suicide attack in the same resort, which failed, the only person who was killed was the bomber, but that was in the same resort and they are also saying the consensus after the attack in the museum three months before the sousse attack in 2015, the consensus was that security had been increased by the tunisian authorities but they we re by the tunisian authorities but they were worried that that would not be maintained. richard, again, thank you very much for the latest there from the royal courts ofjustice for the latest there from the royal courts of justice on for the latest there from the royal courts ofjustice on those inquest. but have a look at some of the other
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stories at 5pm. a coroner has said the death of a mother after an emergency caesarean section was the result of "failu res, inadequate diagnosis and treatment" at a kent hospital. frances cappuccini, who was 30, had a heart attack after an operation to stop heavy blood loss at tunbridge wells hospital at pembury. the trial of the former entertainer rolf harris has been told he groped a blind woman despite her protestations. the woman said it was appalling and degrading. rolf harris, who's not attending court in person, denies indecent assault and sexual assault. the funeral has taken place for two young cousins who died after being hit by a car on new year's eve in 0ldham. 12—year—old helena kotlarova and zaneta krokova, who was 11, were holding hands when they were struck as they crossed a road. four men have been charged in connection to their deaths. doctors are warning that some nhs patients in england face "dangerous" delays getting specialist treatment through their gps. the british medical association says
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referral management centres create barriers and take decisions away from gps. supporters of the system say it's a good way to manage resources. 0ur correspondent, jenny walrond reports. for tracheffries, housework is no longer a painful chore, but only because she paid nearly £3,000 for an operation on her leg. i was in so much pain with my leg, 24 hours a day. i wasn't sleeping properly, i was struggling to get through my work. the pain was caused by varicose veins. her gp wanted them treated on the nhs, but his referral was rejected. tracy had to go private. if a gp feels a specialist needs to look at you, then the nhs should be supporting that, and they are not. tracy's treatment was blocked by something called a referral management centre. some are run by doctors, others by admin staff. there were over 13.5 million
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gp referrals in england last year. more than two million of them were screened by referral management centres on behalf of the nhs. a rise of almost 30% compared to two years before. 4% — more than 84,000 — were rejected. mostly for admin reasons, like missing information. doctors‘ leaders are strongly opposed to what they say is a blunt form of rationing. these centres, which are taking a crude approach to scrutinising all gp referrals, can be inefficient, cost more to run than any potential saving, but crucially, in the process, delaying patient care. referral management centres are used by one third of england's clinical commissioning groups. there are 61 of them in england and wales. gatekeeping what are often expensive, hospital—based service. expensive, hospital—based services. we have not found similar
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set ups in scotland, or northern ireland. those who commission nhs care say the system delivers value for money. we don't want to squander any money, we have limited resources, so it is really important the resource we have we spend most effectively, and get the best value for our population. referral management is, for now, a relatively small part of efforts to manage rising demand, but its use is increasing, and that means more gps, like tracy's, are likely to see their decisions scrutinised and even overturned. jenny walrond, bbc news. and there will be special programmes on the nhs tonight in inside out at half past seven on bbc one in england — and later on the bbc iplayer. one of the must—see places for millions of tourists when they visit london is piccadilly circus and its famous lights.
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but from today, they're going to be disappointed because the lights on the advertising hoardings were switched off at 8:30 this morning for refurbishment. and they're going to stay off until the autumn — that's the longest they'll have been off since the second world war. the six screens currently used for advertising are being replaced by one single giant new screen. it will take several months to install. a quick look at what is going on in stormont, because we are expecting the northern ireland secretary james brokenshire are to appear within the next few minutes for the statement following the political stalemate in northern ireland and everyone there, anyway, is expecting him to announce that there has been a failure to agree between the parties, notably sinn fein and the dup and he is therefore bound to call a new set of elections, probably in early march.
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a new set of elections to the northern ireland assembly. so the stalemate there will be addressed of state in a few minutes' time and we will be there when it happens. in the meantime, let's catch up with the meantime, let's catch up with the weather. it has been a couple dream for many parts of the uk but in north—east scotland and south—east england, a bit of sunshine. 0vernight south—east england, a bit of sunshine. overnight in northern ireland, outbreaks of rain and dampen drizzly across a large part of england where you have low cloud, so of england where you have low cloud, so you may encounter of england where you have low cloud, so you may encounter some of england where you have low cloud, so you may encounter some hill fog travelling with elevation and down towards the south—east, an exception, a touch of frost possible way you get some clearer skies into east anglia but it does mean here tomorrow, you are more likely going tomorrow, you are more likely going to see some sunshine compared to today but elsewhere in the uk, the emphasis is on cloud, it majors brighten up across parts of eastern scotla nd brighten up across parts of eastern scotland in the afternoon but outbreaks of rain still affecting northern england and north wales. it will be mild for many of us under cloud but despite the sunshine in
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east anglia and south—east england, it will be a chilly one but it will bea it will be a chilly one but it will be a bright one, without sunshine. it will be a cold night on tuesday night into wednesday morning but on wednesday, south—east england again sees the best of the sunshine with plenty of cloud elsewhere. this is bbc news at 5pm — the headlines: northern ireland's power sharing executive has collapsed following sinn fein's refusal to nominate a new deputy first minister. the secretary of state is expected to announce new elections. the us president—elect, donald trump, has promised a "quick and fair" trade deal between the united states and britain. he said the uk was "doing great", following its vote for brexit. an inquest into the deaths of 30 britons on a beach in tunisia in 2015 has heard local security units were deliberately slowed down, to delay their arrival at the scene. and, a young woman abducted
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as a baby 18 years ago has been reunited with both of her biological pa rents. the time is 5:30pm. we are expecting the northern ireland secretary to appear at the northern ireland secretary to appearatany the northern ireland secretary to appear at any moment now at stormont. he's been overseeing the behind the scenes activity today and in the past few weeks, to try to break the stalemate there in northern ireland. all of this started because of a very controversial green energy scheme, which could cost the taxpayer in northern ireland half £1 billion. there we have the preparations being made forjames brokenshire's statement. that signals that he is probably on his way. that energy
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scheme has caused a huge political row, with sinn fein accusing arlene foster of failing to take responsibility for her role in putting that scheme into place. that has been the main cause of this crisis. they've not been able to ee, crisis. they've not been able to agree, and therefore following martin mcguinness‘s resignation last week, a week ago, as deputy first minister, the terms of this deal in northern ireland mean the first minister is now also out of a job and there is a political crisis. with that in mind, given the failure to sort things out, it is mr broken shard'sjob as to sort things out, it is mr broken shard's job as secretary of state to try and bang heads together and try to get people to agree. —— itjames brokenshire is's to get people to agree. —— itjames brokenshire is‘sjob. he has not been able to do that. today he is going to step up with a relatively brief statement and say that failing any kind of late developments, there will have to be elections in early
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march, probably. he will probably confirm the date when he makes the statement himself. then we will have reaction from the other parties in the assembly, all of whom will blame the assembly, all of whom will blame the other. today we've had the dup blaming sinn fein and sinn fein blaming sinn fein and sinn fein blaming the other parties. we can expect more of that when the statement has been made. i'm hoping there will be a chance for questions to the secretary of state, to underline a couple of the points that need to be clarified. it's been very difficult so far to get a clear picture of exactly what lies ahead. but, as arlene foster were saying earlier, it's a very turbulent time in the world. a new president coming into office in the united states, the whole brexit process, which has very big implications for northern ireland, as it does for the rest of the uk. so the absence of an executive administration belfast is clearly a cause for concern. but
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notwithstanding all of those concerns, it's been very difficult to get agreement there. the photographers are preparing for mr brokenshire's entrance and i am sure he will be with us in a few seconds. his statement is safely fair on the podium and there is a gathering of journalists. i am podium and there is a gathering of journalists. iam being podium and there is a gathering of journalists. i am being told he will ta ke journalists. i am being told he will take a few questions from press and media. this room is one of those rooms off the assembly context itself. it is where the northern ireland secretary has a residence in belfast. and the secretary of state clearly on his way. here he is. let's listen to him. good evening. the resignation of martin mcguinness last monday began a seven—day period in which the post
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of deputy first minister could be filled. this period expired at 5pm this afternoon, without anyone having been nominated to the position. i am having been nominated to the position. iam now having been nominated to the position. i am now obliged, having been nominated to the position. iam now obliged, under releva nt position. iam now obliged, under relevant legislation, to propose a date for the next northern ireland assembly election. in forming a view ona assembly election. in forming a view on a potential polling day, i've consulted the chief electoral 0fficerfor northern consulted the chief electoral officer for northern ireland consulted the chief electoral 0fficerfor northern ireland on operational matters, and been informed by my ongoing dialogue with northern ireland's political leaders. in light of this, i propose that a d raft in light of this, i propose that a draft order in council be brought forward shortly, to set an election date of thursday the 2nd of march, and to dissolve the assembly from
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the 26th of january. meaning its last sitting day would be the 25th. no one should underestimate the challenge faced to the political institutions here in northern ireland and what is at stake. while it is inevitable that debate during an election period will be intense, i would strongly encourage the political parties to conduct this election with a view to the future of northern ireland, and re—establishing a partnership government at the earliest opportunity after that poll. this is essential to the operation of devolved government and this means that all must remain to dialogue. the government continues to stand firmly behind its commitment to the belfast agreement and its
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successors, and our responsibilities to safeguard political stability here in northern ireland. we will continue to do all that we can to find a way forward, to secure the continuation of devolved government, andi continuation of devolved government, and i will make a further statement in parliament tomorrow. i will take a few questions. mark davenport, bbc. what assurance can you give to voters that they should take part in this election, given the concerns there are that on the other side of it might prove impossible to restore devolution? well, i've obviously set a date for the election, and i would encourage eve ryo ne the election, and i would encourage everyone to participate, to take part, but i am clear that we need to see that this election is conducted in sucha see that this election is conducted in such a way that does not divide, that seeks to have a view to the
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future of northern ireland, seeks to have a view as to how we can bring people back together again, and also ensures that those lines of communication are maintained and open. i am conscious of the need to use the time available and there is a relatively short window of time after a poll has been concluded, and therefore how we can use this time to see that devolved government does continue here. that is absolutely my intent and how we as the government will be doing all we can to support that in the days ahead. peter smith from itn. many are so in this election campaign will be the most bitter northern ireland has seen for quite some time, that it will be brutal. how can you expect people involved to come together again... inaudible and maintain theirfocus to come together again... inaudible and maintain their focus and make sure northern ireland gets a fair deal in the brexit negotiations?
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northern ireland has shown over so many years what can be achieved, how difference can be overcome, how people can come together when that seemed almost impossible. i think we need to reflect on those days gone past, as we look to the future, to see that we can maintain that continuation of devolved government, because that is absolutely what's in the best interests of northern ireland and why i will be using all of my efforts to support the political parties to that end. and yes, this does not affect the timing for the triggering of article 50. as the government, we will seek to continue our brick approach in respect that and continue to invite the executive to the relative meetings during this time period. i think is that focus that everyone has to have in mind, as to quite what is at stake here, in terms of the future of that shared government, that shared future with
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all that's been achieved, and how that should not be easily lost. darren whittle from sky. how serious... is a prospect... inaudible ijust inaudible i just announced the start of an election campaign, the date of our election campaign, the date of our election now being set. i don't want to prejudge the outcome of that election in any way or any discussions that may take place. my focus is on how we bring people together, how we use the time at hand to maintain dialogue and discussion, to overcome differences where differences may remain and to encourage, and i reiterate that message, of consciousness as to how this campaign ahead is conducted, to enable that bringing together of people, to see that we have a functioning executive, how we see institutions that can command respect and authority in and see
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that northern ireland is able to move on. jane from utv. powell damaging do you believe this election could be —— how damaging? i was obviously concerned about the impact ofa i was obviously concerned about the impact of a divisive election campaign. that's why i think it is important for everyone to think about the future of northern ireland. that this election was crystallised by an issue over the renewable heating scheme, and yet that has now highlighted differences, strong differences, within the executive and a breakdown in that relationship. it is really essential that we use the time ahead as calmly as we possibly can do, to think of the future of northern ireland, to think about how we can get back into that space, and i think it can be done with that sense of will, with that sense of shared purpose and how we as the government will do what you
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can to support the parties through this period and see that we get back to that re—establishment of people working together and the strong position for devolved government here in northern ireland. brexit is a very sensitive issue for the people of northern ireland. the only part of the united kingdom where people are entitled to a british passport and an irish stroke european passport. does this further complicate what will be very difficult brexit negotiations? we have those negotiations to come and the prime minister will be setting out in detail her priorities during her speech tomorrow. but we are very clear in seeking to get the best possible arrangements for northern ireland through those negotiations. being very focused on so many issues that have been presented to me by the executive, by so many people
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across the community here in northern ireland. and yes, some really significant issues in respect of the border, that we are very conscious of, not seeing a return to borders of the past. this does not affect our timing borders of the past. this does not affect ourtiming in borders of the past. this does not affect our timing in relation to the triggering of article 50. we remain intent on triggering the start of that process by no later than the end of march. that is what we will continue to do. but i will continue to engage across northern ireland, asi to engage across northern ireland, as i have done, i will continue to do that. i do want to see an executive back in place here, fully functioning at the earliest opportunity, so we can continue to work with the executive. we will as i have indicated, continue to invite was that britain —— representatives here to northern ireland to the joint ministerial meetings that will ta ke joint ministerial meetings that will take place. it is having that functioning executive that is one of thoseissues functioning executive that is one of those issues that underlines the need for us to be focused on the future. focused on the future of northern ireland, what it can be and will be, the success we can make of
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it and how getting back devolved government into a strong, workable spaceis government into a strong, workable space is absolutely our focus and our intent and the work i will be taking forward to really support the parties, to help achieve that. but it is being very conscious of what is at stake here and ensuring people recognise that as they look to that campaign ahead. finally, david young from the press association. inaudible i don't think it is helpful for me to speculate on what may happen in an election or what the outcome or discussions, debates between parties may be between now and then. but there is a period between now and polling day and a relatively short period of time after polling day, that three—week period you
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referred to. i think we have to use all of the time ahead, so notjust waiting for that three—week period, but to see that there is open communication, to see and encourage dialogue and discussion, to see where there is difference and how that can be overcome. therefore to encourage all of the parties to be conscious of the way in which this campaign is conducted, but equally, as the uk government, we stand behind our commitments, our key responsibilities to provide political stability here in northern ireland and we will fulfil those duties and responsibilities. but as i've indicated, i am not contemplating anything other than the back anything other than devolved government. that's what i wa nt to devolved government. that's what i want to see here, that is my absolute intent in terms of the work i see ahead and why i do encourage eve ryo ne i see ahead and why i do encourage everyone to be focused on the future of northern ireland, to be focused on what we need to do, and frankly
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get back to devolved government, which is in the best interest of northern ireland. thank you very much, thank you. that was the long—awaited statement byjames that was the long—awaited statement by james brokenshire, the that was the long—awaited statement byjames brokenshire, the northern ireland secretary, confirming there will be a new set of elections to store mont, to the northern ireland assembly, on the 2nd of march. the assembly, on the 2nd of march. the assembly will be dissolved and put out of action on the 26th of january. the last day it will sit will be on the 25th of january. the dissolution will take place on the 26th of january, ready for those elections on the 2nd of march. those are the logistics. but really the very interesting part of that statement, of course, was the direct message from mr brokenshire, which really was a pretty strongly worded warning to these people, and others. in other words, the main political players in northern ireland. arlene
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foster, the outgoing first minister there and to others in sinn fein, who have been part of this power—sharing agreement. it's all been, says mr brokenshire, an exercise in trying to remind people of how fragile the devolution processes and unless people try to come together, he was raising the very clear prospect that we could be looking at a position in which these institutions are unsettled in future. it was a pretty stark warning. mark is with us. what did you make of that? as expected, we are going to go to an election early in march. james brokenshire wouldn't get into contemplating any possibility of devolution not being restored after that election, even though it does seem that election, even though it does seem to be quite a likelihood. i think hejust seem to be quite a likelihood. i think he just simply didn't want to start talking about the possibility
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of direct rule, ministers being appointed from london and taking over the day—to—day running of northern ireland, not yet, even though many commentators think that isa though many commentators think that is a distinct possibility. he still trying to keep it upbeat at this stage, saying it's worth voters turning out because he believes with the right attitude the parties can put this back together again in the three weeks they would have after the march the 2nd election. here is the march the 2nd election. here is the direct question. how do you read things between the main players, given that mr brokenshire's appealed today was for people to take seriously the prospect of some of these institutions, the whole devolved process is being undermined. given what we've seen in the last few months, what are the prospects of collaboration between the main political operators?” think most commentators and i would be in this camp, that it will be a very difficult spring indeed. there has been a breakdown of trust between the two main players that store mont, did dup and sinn fein. notjust over
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store mont, did dup and sinn fein. not just over the heating store mont, did dup and sinn fein. notjust over the heating scandal but over another issues such as the treatment of the irish language, which is of particular concern to sinn fein, or how they deal with the legacy of northern ireland's troubles. they have quite a few problems they have to iron out and that would seem to me to be the basis for relatively lengthy negotiations in the spring and summer negotiations in the spring and summer of next year. brexit could well feature as one of the items in those negotiations, given the different parties have different views about what northern ireland's state should be in relation to the eu in the future. thank you for giving us that analysis. i'm sure there will be more reaction from the dup, sinn fein and others and we will bring you that when we can on the bbc news channel. it is 12 minutes to six and a little later than usual, apologies tojohn and his team, time for the day's sport. thank you. competing at his first grand slam as world number one, andy murray made a winning start in melbourne in the early
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hours of this morning. he beat ukraine's illya marchenko in straight sets to safely reach the second round of the australia 0pen. nick parrot reports. will this be the year andy murray finally steps out of the shadows at the australian open? he has reached five finals, but has yet to win it. top seed for the first time at a grand slam, on the other side of the net was world number 95, illya marchenko. if anyone thought this would be a gentle introduction to the first big tournament of the year, they were wrong. murray was given a good work—out in the 31 degree heat, made to sweat for almost an hour before he could take the first set. the ukrainian was determined not to give the world number one an easy ride, breaking at the first opportunity in the second. the briton needed a tie—break to overcome his opponent's stubborn resistance. but after that, it was how many would have expected it to be from the start — co mforta ble. murray rattled through the third. it was a far from world—class performance, but to be a champion, you have to win when you're not at your best. the british number three dan evans
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is also through to the second round. he beat argentina's facundo bagnis in straight sets. valtteri bottas will partner lewis hamilton at the formula one team mercedes next season. he's been announced as nico rosberg's replacement. bottas moves from williams, taking over from the german world champion who quitjust days after winning the f1 championship. his place at williams will be taken by felipe massa, who only just retired, but will return to the team. northern ireland's mark allen has knocked out former world champion john higgins at the masters snooker. allen beat the world number three in a thrilling match, winning by 6 frames to 5 at alexandra palace in london. it's the third time higgins has lost to allen in the first round of the masters. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in sportsday at 6.30pm. thank you very much. we will catch
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up thank you very much. we will catch up with you later on. on friday, donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. his election to the white house followed one of the most bitter and divisive campaigns in american history, and many have questioned if the new leader is capable of really uniting the country, as he's promised. to find out, jon kay has set off on a road trip through the heart of america — along the iconic route 45 — travelling from north to south. today, in the first of a week—long series of reports, he's in wisconsin — a state that elected mr trump by the narrowest of margins. milwaukee. known for its harsh winters, for making cheese and beer, and now for its role in america's fragile new politics. go, go, go, go — right now. this is no place forfragile. junior ice hockey. this is the green bayjunior gamblers. jonathan is coaching
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the under—nines. he likes donald trump because he's different — a non—politician, an outsider. itjust goes back to an alternative that's outside of the box. a different viewpoint. he's a billionaire, though, isn't he? he's a tv star, he's not exactly everyman. no, he certainly is not, but i think there's something to be said for him being able to relate to, you know, a plumber, a welder, a teacher. the state of wisconsin switched sides in this election. the large white working class electorate normally votes democrat, but this time they chose trump. they like giving new things a try here. even if it's risky. your gloves are nearly as big as my hands. engineerjason is confident. after nine redundancy threats in six years, he says it's time for a businessman in the oval office. it will be nice to have a little bit
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more stability in a job front, so i'm hoping from an economic standpoint that trump reflects giving that stability back to the country. some of america's top ice athletes practise on this rink. i understand you like to do this thing, but you're stopping to do that. you are not doing that much as much, correct? nancy was an 0lympian and is now a coach. it's time to be a little risky. she told me donald trump can bring a winner's mind set to the white house. trump makes a decision, he gets it done. do you have any reservations about his personality? i mean, the things he said about women, for example. yeah, i think everybody who is behind him has some reservation, because they really don't know the truth behind that, and they're just hoping at this point in his life he has put that behind him. wisconsin may have voted trump, but only by 1%. and some here are still struggling with the result. this is one of the most importantjobs in the world, and i'm not certain he's
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prepared for it. but hockey mom liela is willing to give the new president a chance, even though as a muslim she is worried by some of his comments. i try to look at the bright side, so, ijust, i think they have to wait and see what happens. you sound to me like you're maybe a little nervous? yes, i might be. we heard that a lot here, the desire it will but the reluctance it might not be. and you can watch full coverage of donald trump's inauguration as the 45th president of the united states here on bbc news. 0ur coverage begins on friday afternoon at 3pm live from washington with katy kay — with the new president sworn in at 5pm. a teenager who was snatched from a hospital in florida
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as a baby 18 years ago has been reunited with her biological father. —— with both of her biological pa rents. she was abducted when she was just eight hours old. the woman she believed was her real mother has been charged with kidnapping, as our correspondent sian grzeszczyk reports. for the last 18 years kamiyah mobley had no reason to think that gloria wasn't her real mother and she had no reason to that that her own name wasn't really alexis, but now she is trying to deal with the news that the person she thought was her mother for all that time is under arrest charged with kidnapping her, just after she was born, and giving her a false identity. 51—year—old gloria williams is being held in south carolina after dna tests proved that alexis was baby kamiyah, snatched from hospital back in 1998. police say she poseded as a nurse and snuck the newborn out of the hospital,
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starting a frantic search. at the time her real mother was distraught and desperate to find her. i just want to know where my baby is. ijust want my baby back. but now, 18 years later, she was delighted to be reunited with her the daughter she never thought she would see again. and kamiyah‘s biological father was overwhelmed after meeting herfor the first time. it's a feeling you can't exlpain. it's hard to put it in words right now. it's hard to deal with this right now, you know what i'm saying? we just, like we say, we are trying to process it. 18 years, you kmow. it will be hard to make that up. but the man who thought he was her father all this time is full of heartache. named her. that's the name i have for years, alexis kelly. she is the love of my life. all the things she said, since this was going on, friday, "dad, i love you." she is sill my child.
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i love herjust that much. that is not going to change, that she is the love of my life. she's my child. now it is kamiyah who has to come to terms with what has happened, with her new identity, her new family. sian grzeszcyk, bbc news. stay with our speakers we have bbc news at six and in a moment the latest on the northern ireland political crisis and the latest on donald trump's latest pronouncements on brexit and more besides. i will be back at ten. first, the weather. the weather shouldn't be making any headlines this week. a lot of cloud as we can see from our weather watcher. parts of eastern scotland and england had some sunshine. the rain in nottinghamshire came from this weather front, which rain in nottinghamshire came from this weatherfront, which nudges west overnight into west wales on the north—west of the uk. that means
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for scotland and northern ireland, they will get some outbreaks of rain pushing southwards overnight. for much of the uk overnight it is cloudy, damp, at least drizzly and some hill fog but there is a clearer zone. wait you saw the sun shining kent, but a cold zone as well. temperatures close to freezing in the countryside, as part of east anglia and south—east england. eight o'clock, nine or 10 degrees in parts of scotla nd o'clock, nine or 10 degrees in parts of scotland and northern ireland tomorrow, but with that cloud some hill fog and some outbreaks of rain. a damp and drizzly picture for many areas. it looks like the rain in northern england and north wales through the day. back into that clearer zone where you have the lower two bridges to begin with, with that touch of frost, but here you get some sunshine. and more across east anglia and south—east england are likely to see the sunshine tomorrow compared with today. elsewhere, plenty of cloud. cou nters today. elsewhere, plenty of cloud. counters of lucky if you see any sunshine. parts of eastern scotland
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could see that in the afternoon. where you have bigger cloud, outbreaks of rain possible, but a big range of temperatures, 10—11 in scotla nd big range of temperatures, 10—11 in scotland and northern ireland, in the sunshine in the south—east for— five. under those clear skies tomorrow and overnight, a sharp frost across east anglia and south—east england. elsewhere with plenty of cloud, frost free as wednesday begins. quite a contrast in the weather on wednesday. sunshine the further south you are, elsewhere sunshine at a premium, plenty of cloud and perhaps a little drizzle. little changed on thursday and friday although those sunny areas in southern england may cloud over. temperatures 7—9. a few places might geta over. temperatures 7—9. a few places might get a little higher than that. high pressure with us at the start of the weekend. areas of low pressure in the atlantic. when are they coming our way? it looks like that will happen at the start of
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next week. the inquest into the tunisian terror attack opens. 30 britons were killed. the jury hears claims local police were deliberately slow to confront the attacker. he systematically gunned down holiday—makers for over half an hour before he was stopped. also wanted my‘s programme, crisis in stormont. today's sinn fein will not read nominate for the position of deputy first minister... elections in northern ireland is power—sharing colla pses. northern ireland is power—sharing collapses. donald trump annoys some in europe as he praises brexit and says he wants a quick trade deal with the uk when we leave. it's very good news the united states of america wants to do a good free trade deal with us

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