Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 17, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

6:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the prime minister is to spell out her plans for brexit. theresa may will say there can be no half way house as britain leaves the european union. we'll be live in downing street ahead of her big speech later this morning. good morning. it's tuesday, the 17th of january. we'll be hearing lots about the single market and customs union today. ben's here to explain what it might mean. i'll look at what's happening to the pound and how that affects the prices we pay in the shops. also this morning, rolls royce agrees to pay almost £700 million to settle claims of bribery and corruption. good morning from chicago. this week
6:01 am
we are having breakfast in america and apparently this is what president obama has at this restau ra nt. president obama has at this restaurant. we are talking to voters about what his legacy will be in the week that he leaves the white house. in sport: the british number one johanna konta moves safely through to the second round of the australian open, beating kirsten flipkens in straight sets. and are we swapping two fat ladies for a skinny cappucino? the research looking at how our high street entertainment venues are changing. and carol has the weather. good morning. it isa it is a cold start to the day across east anglia and the south—east with some frost and patchy fog but we will see some sunshine. for the rest of the uk it is cloudy, much milder at patchy rain and drizzle around. i'll have more details in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. the prime minister will today set out her vision for the terms of britain's departure
6:02 am
from the european union. theresa may has got a list of 12 demands for brexit in what's being trailed as a clean breakfrom the eu. we'll talk to ian watson in downing street shortly but first our political correspondent carole walker has this report. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a global britain that gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she is ready to take britain out of the european single market and perhaps the customs union too in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european lawli think it is highly likely we will be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market because that is the way to grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents not just grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents notjust for controlling immigration but free
6:03 am
trade opportunities. she will tell eu leaders we want to buy your goods, sell you ours, trade with you as freely as possible but she will say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers but while the president—elect said the uk was so the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market.” think the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on oui’ wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market if she cares about britain's future, she will fight for britain and fight for our corner, then she needs to fight to be in the single market evenif fight to be in the single market even if we leave the eu. she also has to indicate that the final deal will be put to the british people. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. she faces two yea rs of ha rd priorities for a deal. she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27
6:04 am
members determined to safeguard the future of the eu without britain. let's go to downing street now and our correspondent iain watson. iain, many say today could be the biggest test of mrs may's premiership so far — what are we expecting? yes, it is, certainly the most significant speech since stepping into downing street after the referendum in the summer. it is no overstatement to suggest that for the following reasons — we have had the following reasons — we have had the slogans before, brexit means brexit, and now we have the substance. let's be clear about this, there is no question that the prime minister intends to stay in the european single market. the signals are far too strong. she will make it clear that we don't want to be half in, half out. she is not looking for a associate membership of the eu. she says she doesn't want a trade deal like any other country has. that would tend to suggest we are coming out of the customs union,
6:05 am
which she thinks is important to strike deals around the world, and by giving that clarity she has also buy the same token given her opponents ammunition with which to attack her. it isn'tjust in farren from the liberal democrats on coming up from the liberal democrats on coming up of the single market, it is her own mps. at last the political battle begins in earnest. thank you. in about an hour we'll be talking to the former attorney general, dominic grieve, who campaigned for britain to remain in the eu. and after 8am, we'll speak to his fellow conservative mp, the leave campaigner iain duncan smith. police in turkey have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey have released this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. so—called islamic state said it was behind the attack and that it was revenge for turkish military involvement in syria. rolls royce has agreed to payjust over £670 million to settle bribery
6:06 am
and corruption claims. the british company, which makes engines for trains, jets and nuclear submarines, said the agreement related to offences involving it's agents overseas. dan johnson reports. it isa it is a huge sum of money for one of britain's most iconic brands. this is the image rolls—royce likes to show. advanced technology providing power in the air, on rails and at sea. all built on a reputation of trust. but questions over the way the firm did business go back 10 yea rs. the firm did business go back 10 years. in 2012 the serious fraud 0ffice began investigating allegations of corruption. there we re allegations of corruption. there were claims middlemen paid bribes to win contracts around the world in places like india, china and indonesia. and then last night the company announced it had reached a
6:07 am
settle m e nt company announced it had reached a settlement with authorities in the uk, us and brazil. rolls—royce will avoid prosecution by admitting wrongdoing and paying £671 million split between the us department of justice and brazilian regulators. in britain this is only the third deal of its type the serious fraud office has agreed to. the money involved makes it by far the biggest. the northern ireland secretary will make a statement in parliament today about the collapse of the devolved government at stormont. the power—sharing coalition collapsed yesterday after failing to reach a deal following the resignation of deputy first minister martin mcguiness. there'll be an election in early march. this report by our ireland correspondent chris page contains some flash photography. for ten years, politicians and stormont have shared power. but now the devolved government is no more and there's a big question mark over how long it will take to rebuild relations. initially, the partnership between the democratic unionist party
6:08 am
and sinn fein appeared to be something of a political miracle. 0ld enemies compromising to run northern ireland together. but there were frequent disagreements. the final row came over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. yesterday, the unlikely alliance officially fell apart, leaving the northern ireland secretary no option but to call an election to the stormont assembly. it will take place on the second of march. while it is inevitable that debate during an election period will be intense, i would strongly encourage the political parties to conduct this election with a view to the future of northern ireland and re—establishing a partnership government at the earliest opportunity after that poll. he'll speak about the crisis in the house of commons today. theresa may has discussed the situation with the irish prime minister, enda kenny, in a phone call.
6:09 am
they said they wanted the stormont institutions to be back up and running as soon as possible. the power—sharing government here at stormont has ended in a bitter breakup. the election campaign is expected to be particularly divisive. restoring devolution in northern ireland will be no easy task. chris page, bbc news, stormont. one of the pioneers of ivf has suggested that the time limit for experimentation on human embryos should be doubled. currently, scientists can test them for up to 1a days. now, simon fishel, who was on the team involved with the birth of the world's first ivf baby, claims extending it to 28 days would improve our understanding of miscarriage and some cancers. 0pponents, though, say it is ethically and morally wrong. you can hear more on this at 11am this morning on bbc radio 4 in revisiting the 1a day rule. and we'll be discussing this in more detail here on breakfast at 7:40am. elsewhere, two people have been
6:10 am
seriously injured in a suspected gas explosion at a house in manchester. two houses in blakeley were destroyed and another was badly damaged. fire and rescue crews say they have now secured the building. a kitten was also recovered alive and well from the rubble. the last man to leave his footprints on the moon has died. gene cernan was an astronaut on the apollo 17 mission in 1972. catriona renton reports. this is gene, and i'm on the surface. it was on the 14th of december, 1972, gene cernan was the last of a dozen men to walk on the moon. we leave as we came and, god willing, as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind. and with these words, the commander of apollo 17 traced his nine—year—old daughter theresa dawn's initials in the moondust, and headed
6:11 am
back down to earth. we're on our way, houston. he was born eugene cernan in 193a, in chicago. a qualified naval aviator, in 1963, nasa selected him into its third group of astronauts. he went into space three times, one of only three people to fly to the moon twice. walking up the ladder was one of the most memorable moments. why are we here, what does it mean? i look over my shoulder and there is earth, there is reality, there is home. gene cernan‘s footprints remain on the moon today. nasa said it is saddened by his loss, and on social media, the kennedy space center put, "ad astra, gene, to the stars."
6:12 am
it is well worth reading about. you know the apollo 17 mission, they took one of the most famous pictures of earth in space, it is beautifully lit and the hemisphere is illuminated. they called it the blue marble. sally is here this morning. i have a moon fact, the mission brought back more space rocks and any other, 240 pounds worth. any more for later? no, that is my only one. you have used it early. i know, it is only one. you can use it at 8:30am and it will be fine. we are starting with the tennis. britain'sjohanna konta is safely through to the second round of the australian open in melbourne. the number nine seed had few problems beating belgium's kirsten flipkens in straight sets. konta will play japan's naomi 0saka in the second round.
6:13 am
kyle a b bott kyle abbott is through. heather watson is one set all with sam stosur right now and we will keep you up—to—date with that through the morning. valtteri bottas has been confirmed as lewis hamilton's new teammate at mercedes. he replaces nico rosberg after the world champion's shock retirement in december. four—time world champion john higgins has been knocked out in the opening round of the masters snooker. he was beaten in a final frame decider by northern ireland's mark allen, who potted this incredible pink to progress to the second round. and rory mcilroy has been forced to withdraw from this week's event in abu dhabi with a fractured rib. he almost pulled out of the south african 0pen last week but played on through the pain. quite interesting that actually, there is never a good time to be injured but now is probably the best time. to get ready for the masters.
6:14 am
gets better. let's have a look at the papers. as you can imagine, lots of brexit talk. may sets out hard vision in a bid to calm the markets, and trump broadside stuns europe, with reaction from angela merkel, who took from trump yesterday. the picture is all about the start of the salmon fishing season, that was on the banks of the river tay yesterday. talking about theresa may's free britain, the 12 point plan and she rejects a deal that leaves us half in, half out, we will cover that on breakfast this morning. she is on the fun of the daily mirror, but the story about george michael's cars and asking for the truth about how he actually died, the front of the daily mirror. yes, he is on the front of the sun,
6:15 am
and they have written it up, theresa may's speech, great brexpectations, and the front of the daily telegraph has that, and one about women in maternity units, half of women in danger and many are made to feel like cattle in understaffed maternity wards, according to a report out today. i was taking a punt you might undo the front of the financial times. i saw that you had it. it relates of course to what we will hear from theresa may later. this time from the bank of england, warning inflation might start rising, that is the prices we pay for goods and services in shops, expected to rise notjust because of brexit but the falling value of the pound, and sorry to hit you with this graph at 6am but you can see what the sterling has done against the dollar, the big fall towards the end, just falling below $1.20,
6:16 am
meaning anything we import from overseas will cost more. and alex morgan has been interviewed in today's guardian. this lady has just moved from orlando and is a hugely successful football player in the united states. she moved to lyon after the president of macro three made contact, and she has made the move because she wants to improve her game. the reason i am interested is she has 2.8 million twitter followers, she is mates with people likejennifer lawrence, taylor swift in the united states. she is hugely influential, and she talks very passionately about inequality in the women's game, how even in america at the moment in terms of women generally they are 73 cents for every dollar that a man earns, so she campaigns for equality notjust in sport at all over the place as well. she is a really interesting character. quick survey, you are how
6:17 am
tall? six foot six. really? i didn't know that. none of us can ever go to this hotel, i am about five foot eight. this man is six foot one, and he went to go and stay in this hotel in the south of france. is it one of those posh boutique hotels? boutique a.k.a. tony. the ceiling height is only five foot eight. it looks like he is in the hobbit. —— a.k.a. tiny. in this bible has survived for years and years and years, it has a bullet in the bible. leonard knight, who was serving in the first world war trenches, but the bible from a family friend in his chest, he got shot and it reached the whole way through the bible, 50 pages from the end, and they kept the bible. nobody knows where leonard knight was, but
6:18 am
it stayed in the family and the bullet is still in the bible, 50 pages from the end. 0h bullet is still in the bible, 50 pages from the end. oh my goodness. wow. what a story. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning all. well, this morning it isa good morning all. well, this morning it is a chilly start for some but mild for others and i want to show you these weather watchers pictures from yesterday. beautiful pictures of the highlands but fairly cloudy. maximum temperature 12 celsius. similar, possibly 13 today. in east sussex we have similar, possibly 13 today. in east sussex we have some similar, possibly 13 today. in east sussex we have some gradual breaks, cloud coming in at times and only three celsius across parts parts of the south—east. high pressure once again dominating our weather. yesterday's front edging closer to the west and through the afternoon it topples across us again, producing a fair bit of cloud and also some drizzle. you can see from the isobars it is breezy across the far north—west. under clearer skies in the east and east anglia are
6:19 am
clearer start, patchy frost and fault as well but elsewhere are relatively mild start under the cloud. also the hill fog and the outbreaks of patchy light rain and drizzle. that is certainly the case across scotland. the damp start, watch out for hill fog as well. some fog across the vale of york and lincolnshire. we have hill fog and also some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. some fog patches on the hills of wales and into the south—west, again some dampness in the air, across east anglia is cold est. the air, across east anglia is coldest. again where we have the touch of frost and patchy fog, that will lift and we will see some sunshine, more than yesterday, we would expect, from the wash down towards the isle of wight and points east. whereas move west of that, one 01’ east. whereas move west of that, one or two brighter breaks in the shelter of the hills but there will be quite a bit of cloud around and that drizzle. but mild, particular so across that drizzle. but mild, particular so across scotland and northern ireland, not quite as mild for much of england and wales and much cooler despite the sunshine as we pull down
6:20 am
into the south—east. heading onto the evening and overnight, where we have got the clear skies, we are looking at widespread frost. temperatures could fall as low as minus seven. you will also be some patchy fog falling as well. away from that a lot more cloud so the temperature holding up, five, six or seven. for the rest of tomorrow where we have the clearer skies and patchy fog and frost, it will brighten up and we will see some sunshine. north of that, again a bit more cloud. mostly dry, one or two spots here and there. a weather front in the far north of scotland producing some rain, largely in shetland. here it will be breezy but we are hanging on to double figures. elsewhere we go down to single figures, except in belfast. for thursday a bit more of the same, more cloud around at times but you will notice across scotland and northern ireland a brighter picture. even having said that, the temperature is coming down on what
6:21 am
we are expecting today and tomorrow. across the board we are looking at seven 01’ across the board we are looking at seven or eight. so the weather fairly benign and quiet. we will ta ke fairly benign and quiet. we will take benign and quiet. thank you, see you later. ahead of donald trump being sworn in as the 45th president of the united states on friday, breakfast'sjon kay is on a week long road trip of route 45, travelling north to south and straight through the heart of america. today he is in chicago, examining barack 0bama's legacy at the president's favourite diner, as well as hearing some surprising views from the hispanic community about the next commander—in—chief. right through the middle of the donald trump's america. to get a sense of the country he is taking over. but our next stop is not trump territory. chicago. tell you what. .. i tell you what... i could do with some breakfast. this is barack 0bama's favourite diner. he lived around the corner
6:22 am
before he was president, and he still comes back. what does he eat you? hope you are hungry. very, very. there is your omelette. he is humble, he is strong. tahitia is an obama fan. as a nurse, she likes the changes he made to healthcare, giving poorer people better access. she is worried donald trump will overturn the reforms, hitting the most vulnerable. they will not have access to care, they will not have access to doctors and they will have to come through emergency services. and many of them will be very sick, can't get medicine, some
6:23 am
of them will die. her son daniel thought having a black president would mean a more inclusive america, but he fears donald trump's form of populism is encouraging division. i do feel my safety might be in danger. really — you feel more vulnerable now? i do, i do in certain situations. post—trump? post—trump, because it is something that you can see from the energy that trump built, and the way people express themselves to support trump. a lot of them have certain beliefs and things like that that do not align with my existence. some here do question the obama legacy, and think change is overdue. aspiring businesswoman erica hopes donald trump will help people like her. next, please. i believe that it's going to open up doors for small business owners, hopefully. that's trying to create big businesses.
6:24 am
like you. maybe you will be as rich as donald trump in a few years. we head to the suburbs. elgin, where nearly half the population is hispanic. donald trump's plans to build a giant wall along the mexican border mean many here cannot support him. never, never. never the wall. but some views here may surprise you. rosa hopes a wall would stop illegal immigrants. we have our own problems here in america. so, you know, to add more of them coming over here, i think — that, i don't think it's a good thing. and in the choir, margarita hopes donald trump will safeguard her pro—life catholic values. i'm so excited and i'm
6:25 am
so happy for him. and we should not be afraid of anything, not even the wall or anything. elisa confirmed to me that the hispanic community is split right now, just as america is split. there is the unforeseen, with our future, and hispanics and a lot of people are scared about what is going to happen. we don't want division. but look where we are. time to get back on route 45. iam i am fascinated by that state on that for breakfast. is it like steak with omelette on the top? it is all mixed in together. i think asjohn was saying president obama doesn't have the yoke, just the egg white.
6:26 am
what is the point in that? getting the cholesterol down, i am sure. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we will explore why swapping a pint of beerfor a primo coffee has dramatically changed the face of the great british high street in the last five years. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a report into the violence at last year's notting hill carnival has revealed that four people almost died from serious stab wounds. the event, which attracts over ten times the number of visitors of glastonbury and adds almost £100 million to london's economy, is said by the conservatives to be attracting more violence than it was a decade ago. the mayor's office has said it has ordered a review, but has ruled out moving the festival. the world—famous ivy restaurant in the west end is 100
6:27 am
years old today. it is probably best known for being a celebrity hotspot, although it started life as a small italian cafe. this afternoon westminster council is awarding it with a green plaque, to recognise its contribution to london life. protesters are expected in north london tonight, who oppose council plans to build 8,000 new homes with a private developer. there are fears that haringey council's redevelopment of wood green town centre will push up prices, making the area too expensive for current local residents. the council says the plans will create thousands ofjobs in the area. strike—hit southern railway has, not surprisingly, has been given its worst—ever score in a customer satisfaction survey. it gotjust one star for categories including punctuality and value for money. almost of half of respondents said their lastjourney was delayed.
6:28 am
southern's parent company admits its performance was unacceptable. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. while on the roads, in chelsea, gunter grove is down to a single lane because of a burst watermain. in south—east london, in bexley, the high street was closed overnight because of a burst watermain. it is now open, but temporary traffic lights will go in place this morning for repairs to be carried out. finally, in the west end, there are major roadworks at cambridge circus. temporary traffic lights are in place at the charing cross road—shaftesbury avenue junction. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a cold start this morning. temperatures down at zero, so this morning. temperatures down at zero, so a this morning. temperatures down at zero, so a touch of frost here and there. also one or two missed and fog patches but the good news is that it fog patches but the good news is thatitis fog patches but the good news is that it is a much brighter day than yesterday and we should see plenty
6:29 am
of sunny spells. now, there's a bit of sunny spells. now, there's a bit of high cloud around at first but that should start to disappear and we should get the sunshine. now, the air is called to the tempter is going to struggle today. the maximum in some spots down at zero, in central londonjust in some spots down at zero, in central london just three celsius so cold but sunny day. now, we hang on to the clear skies overnight so once the sun sets the tempter is going to fall away very quickly. we're looking at a of —2 or maybe even lower than that and all this blue indicates a widespread frost at dawn tomorrow morning so a chilly start on wednesday. perhaps a bit more cloud tomorrow afternoon but the temperatures still cold. as we head through the rest of the week, media degree or two higher in temperature but with all that it is going to still feel chilly. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it's just approaching 6:30am, on tuesday, the 17th january. we'll have the latest news
6:30 am
and sport injust a moment. coming up on breakfast today: northern ireland will go to the polls following the collapse of the assembly over a botched energy scheme. can the parties at the centre of crisis avoid future conflict? also this morning: climate change research on ice. a huge crack in the antarctic is forcing scientists to leave their state—of—the—art station. we'll ask what impact this will have on science. # perfect lives were lived...# katie melua left georgia when she was a child. she's returned to her roots with her latest album. she'll explain why it means she's learning how to sing again. that made no sense, what i said. but now a summary of this morning's main news.
6:31 am
the prime minister will today set out her clearest vision yet for the terms of britain's departure from the european union. in a much anticipated speech, theresa may will say that britain shouldn't be "half in, half out" of the eu. that's being taken as a hint that she's prepared to take the country out of the single market in order to control its borders and law. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain which gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she's ready to take britain out of the european single market and perhaps the customs union too in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. i think it's highly likely we will be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, because that's the way to grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents, not just for controlling immigration but for free trade opportunities.
6:32 am
she will tell eu leaders... ..but she will say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers, but whilst the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market. i think the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market if she cares about britain's future, if she's going to fight for britain and fight for our corner, then she needs to fight to be in the single market even if we leave the eu. she also needs to indicate that the final deal will be put to the british people. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. but she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27 members determined to safeguard the future of the eu without britain.
6:33 am
in about an half an hour, we'll be talking to the former attorney general, dominic grieve, who campaigned for britain to remain in the eu. and after 8am this morning, we'll speak to his fellow conservative mp, the leave campaigner iain duncan smith. police in turkey have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey have released this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov shortly after he was detained. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. so—called islamic state said it was behind the attack and that it was revenge for turkish military involvement in syria. the search for a passenger plane which went missing nearly three years ago with 239 people on board has been called off. malaysia airlines flight mh370 disappeared between beijing and kuala lumpur in march 2014. the joint agency coordination centre
6:34 am
in australia says the search has officially been suspended after crews finished a fruitless sweep of a 46,000 square mile search zone west of australia. rolls royce has agreed to payjust over £670 million to settle bribery and corruption claims. the british company, which makes engines for trains, jets and nuclear submarines, said the agreement related to offences involving it's agents overseas. the serious fraud office says it relates to claims that intermediaries paid bribes in order to win contracts around the world. two people have been seriously injured in a suspected gas explosion at a house in manchester. two houses in blake—ley were destroyed and another was badly damaged. fire and rescue crews say they have now secured the building. a kitten was also recovered alive and well from the rubble. there was a picture of the kitten in
6:35 am
the newspaper today. we leave as we came and got willing we will leave as we return, with peace and hope for all mankind. amazing. the american astronaut gene cernan was commander of the apollo 17 mission in december 1972, the last manned space flight to the moon. before climbing up the ladder he traced his only child's initials in the moon's dust and spoke about how he wanted to stay a while. more on that through the program. are you saving moon fact? yes, because we have alligator facts. have a look. 0nly because we have alligator facts. have a look. only a small group of people were lucky enough or unlucky enough to see this, look at this unit, this was spotted going for a stroll in florida. honestly, that is
6:36 am
sending shivers down my spine. i don't like that at all. is nicknamed is hunchback and experts estimate he is hunchback and experts estimate he is up to 15 feet long, weighing about 800 pounds. why would you stand out" —— that" meant you see them in the water. don't believe it could turn around and chase you? i would be in a car or something, maybe a lorry. up a tree? nowhere near it. i didn't realise you were so near it. i didn't realise you were so terrified of alligators. honestly! i will save some alligator fa cts honestly! i will save some alligator facts for you. and apologies for my pronunciation of kuala lumpur, i don't know what i went for. i went for the punchy version. we never do the posh version. i didn't realise you were so the posh version. i didn't realise you were so frightened of alligators until this morning. before we went
6:37 am
on air, louise was in the next room andi on air, louise was in the next room and i heard a squeal, as pictures of the alligator came on screen. then i knew. i was so scared. we need a preshow louise minchin camera. morning. she is genuinely upset. someone make her a cup of tea. morning, everybody. we are starting with the tennis today. britain'sjohanna konta has beaten kirsten flipkens to make it through to the second round of the australian open in melbourne. the number nine seed had to battle in the first set before taking it seven games to five. she had few problems against the belgian after that though taking the second 6—2. konta will play japan's naomi 0saka in the second round. iam very i am very happy to have come through that weather. if it was going to ta ke two that weather. if it was going to take two or three sets i was prepared to stay out as long as i needed to. but again, it was a tough first set, there wasn't much in it,
6:38 am
andi first set, there wasn't much in it, and i was just first set, there wasn't much in it, and i wasjust happy first set, there wasn't much in it, and i was just happy that i was able to put my foot on the pedal and really manage the difficulties the match presented. heather watson started well against sam stosur taking the first set 6—3 but the australian has fought back. naomi broady plays another australian, the number 22 seed daria gavrilova, later. in the men's draw, kyle edmund comfortably beat colombia's santiago giraldo in straight sets in just under two hours. lewis hamilton's new teammate at mercedes has finally been confirmed. he'll be partnered by finland's valtteri bottas, who's leaving williams to fill the seat left vacant by world champion nico rosberg. felipe massa will come out of retirement to take bottas' place at williams. rory mcilroy said he was bitterly disappointed to withdraw from this week's abu dhabi championship with a fractured rib. mcilroy complained of back pain during the south african 0pen, which he lost in a play—off, but a scan has revealed the real problem. northern ireland's mark allen knocked out former world champion
6:39 am
john higgins at the masters snooker. it went down to a deciding frame and allen potted an incredible pink to beat higgins 6—5 at alexandra palace. it's the third time higgins has lost to allen in the first round of the masters. another former world champion departed early as stuart bingham was thrashed byjoe perry by six frames to one. perry will play ding junhui for a place in the semi finals. joe root recently became a father, didn't he, for the first time, and he can have the prospect of becoming england captain with being a new parent. he said it would be a lot of worry and sleepless nights. those temperament or players need calming down. here is what he said. it is one of those things you sort of have to learn on the job. i suppose... the timing of it isn't
6:40 am
quite relevant, but being a date you don't really know what to do until... you have to go with it and see alec goes. i imagine that will be very similar. i will have to wait and see if and when it happens. —— how it goes. i understand what he is saying andi and i kind of agree. james. says ending his 2—year losing street against nick matthew has given him a confidence boost, he says he hasn't beaten him since 2007 but on sunday he entered the losing street to take the quarter—finals at —— james willstop. i wanted to play well and put ina willstop. i wanted to play well and put in a good performance. it is all good. when i played him last time he beat me comprehensively, so i didn't wa nt beat me comprehensively, so i didn't want that to happen again. i knew he had a good match, whether or not i
6:41 am
won. the interesting thing is they have spoken in past about their rivalry. shall we call it rivalry?|j suppose rivalry. shall we call it rivalry?” suppose with the competitive edge, they don't get on. it gives it the added edge, doesn't it? in the commonwealth final, it was a brilliant match, and james has finally beaten him. after10 brilliant match, and james has finally beaten him. after 10 years. thank you. voters in northern ireland will go to the polls on the second of march following the collapse of the power—sharing government. last week, deputy first minister martin mcguinness resigned in protest over a mismanaged environment energy scheme which is likely to cost taxpayers almost half a billion pounds. we asked diners at a cafe for their thoughts. i feel like we are back in the 80s. and i was really hopeful that, for the future generations, they would have a different story, it is an idea about the political potential of here but i feel it is a very infantile situation. there is no
6:42 am
appetite for returning to any sort of violence in the near future. i think that possibly what will happen is we will be led to another couple of years of political insecurity.“ people are wise and use this election to vote in a different, maybe the opposition party, into place in stormont where they can have an opportunity, because they appear to be able to work together, thatis appear to be able to work together, that is one way forward. some say it is an opportunity, others are concerned. peter shirlow is the director of the institute of irish studies at the university of liverpool, and hejoins us now. morning to you and thank you for joining us. we will start at the beginning about what it was all about, because, you know, the energy scandal, how serious is it for starters ? scandal, how serious is it for starters? the energy scandal is the cherry on the cake in terms of bringing the institutions down. it has been a very poor relationship between sinn fein and the dup, much of it is to do with the past, we
6:43 am
haven't had a proper enquiry, a truth enquiry, into the killings and the mayhem of previous generations. it is also to do with a series of scandals. there has been a property scandal, the lambeth scandal, linked with the dup, this is slightly different, in terms of you know cronyism, it in terms of misappropriation of funds, so i think a combination of that, the electoral results for sinn fein, fewer people are voting in northern ireland, it is creating a sense of tension between the main political parties. and one of the ironic thing is with northern ireland is every time we have a crisis we get better governance but it doesn't last very long. sometimes it can seem like a crisis but the crisis actually leads to more talks or more substantive discussions about the issues. and we thought or slowly inch forward. so it is like irish politics is always very difficult. we don't nationally know what the issue is but you know
6:44 am
that there is an issue. i am sorry i asked the question and thank you. we know that there are issues. what would it look like after the election, is there going to be changing executive, do you think? first of all, there are fewer mlas, mps in northern ireland are mlas, there will be fewer because we have too many, in many ways, so there will be a reduction in that, and one of the things which could happen, we have this process in the assembly called petitions of concern, and if you have so many seats you can affect a veto, so the dup blocked equal marriage in northern ireland, they are the only party with enough seats to have this petition of concern, and that can change, because they might lose seats, and that might change the way in which the assembly functions. that could be one big change. there was in the last election small changes in groups like the greens, people before profit, which is a left—wing
6:45 am
party, which have a member who was elected has been standing since 1968 in various elections, they started to gain some traction. it isn't necessarily that the same parties will come back at exactly the same complexion, there has been a small growth in small parties which are starting to do slightly better, but we know one thing — the main parties will still be the main parties. just very briefly, we heard some concern about instability — are they real concerns? we have to understand northern ireland society has changed dramatically and one of the signs is that fewer people vote. we have a system in which northern ireland eve ryo ne system in which northern ireland everyone once voted. that is not the same. we had a major quality agenda. we have a generation who doesn't understand this perpetual argument. we have a more liberal society which sits in contrast to a mac political system and i think the idea of going
6:46 am
back to violence is very low, although dissident groups will try to exploit that fact. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. you promised us a quiet week, but the weather is important nonetheless. so what is going to be happening? well, it is really interesting, actually. we have a warm front heading southwards. it is not making much progress and behind that we have warmer there are so behind it it is 11 celsius, whereas in the south we have a cold front. so around gatwick at the moment it is minus one. now, that front is also producing a lot of cloud and some patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle, and will continue to do so as we go through the course of the day. you can see from the squeeze on the isobars across the north—west it is rather breezy. so the first thing this morning, temperatures around freezing or just below this morning, temperatures around freezing orjust below orjust above in the south—east, a touch of frost
6:47 am
and some patchy fog. move away from that and it is much milder, especially in the north of scotland. here in the highlands, currently we have temperatures already around ten or 11 celsius. but there is a lot of cloud, some hill fog, and there is that rain and drizzle. fairly light in nature. it is the same across northern england. a lot of cloud, some hill fog, patchy fog across yorkshire and lincolnshire, hill fog across wales, patchy fog across the south—west and under the clear skies across parts of east anglia and the south—east we have the frost and we also have some patchy fog as well. a fairly cloudy start the day in northern ireland, a mild one and it will remain cloudy through the day. through the day we see a bit more sunshine across southern areas, three east anglia, down towards kent in the isle of wight, and we did yesterday. we will have a lot of cloud across the rest of england, wales, northern and scotland, although for a time it could become
6:48 am
more mild. it will feel pleasant for the time of year, around ten to 13 but in the sunshine further south it will still feel cold. through the evening and overnight under the clear skies we are looking at widespread frost. temperatures locally, for example in parts of hampshire, could drop as low as minus seven. expect to be scraping your car first minus seven. expect to be scraping your carfirst thing minus seven. expect to be scraping yourcarfirst thing in minus seven. expect to be scraping your car first thing in the morning. there will also be patchy fog around but move away from that area, tac under the cloud cover, and temperatures are that bit higher. by the time we get to wednesday we have a weather front flirting with the far north of scotland. that front will be in rain across shetland, and also possibly the likes of stornoway could see some rain. most of the uk, again, afair could see some rain. most of the uk, again, a fair bit of cloud around. as we come further south we are back into the sunshine. we also see some of that across the midlands, with temperatures very slowly starting to come down a touch but ill for most above—average at this stage in january. makes a bit of a difference
6:49 am
from last week. we will take slightly above average. the prime minister is expected to reveal more details of britain's exit from the european union later. but it is a complicated affair, so ben is looking at what is at stake, and what impact it could have on the economy and all of us. i will try and explain some of the terms, it is we hear a lot about free movement and free trade. yes, since we voted to leave the eu, there is been a lot of speculation about what brexit might actually look like. well, for the economy, it will largely depend on what trade relationship we have with europe. and that is important, because at the moment europe is by far our biggest trading partner. we do more business with the 27 other eu member states than anyone else, but that relationship is determined by the terms we agreed to when wejoined. so that includes the single market. that did away with taxes and tariffs on trade between the member countries, and that has been a big boost for businesses. and, as part of that single market, we agreed to the free movement of goods and people.
6:50 am
it means we can buy and sell anywhere in the eu, and european citizens can live and work anywhere in the eu. but that has been controversial as the eu expanded to include more and more countries. we also signed up to what is called a customs union. it means eu countries can trade freely with each other, but put a tax on goods coming from places like america or china. there are now doubts about whether the uk can remain a member of that trade club after brexit, and that has worried business. the pound has lost over 20% of its value against the dollar since the uk voted leave. so, while we might lose access to some of the benefits of being in the eu, brexit could encourage us to find new trade deals with places like america, india and china. i think there is some scope for sterling to weaken against the us dollar, the 1.18, not materially lower than the recent lows but still
6:51 am
cheaper value of the currency and we will also see stirling lose further ground against the euro, which will be increasingly tough for hard—pressed be increasingly tough for ha rd—pressed consumers, as be increasingly tough for hard—pressed consumers, as we move into the holiday season and the earlier part of this year. so how important is overseas trade to britain? well, as a country, we import billions of pounds more than we export. that is known as a trade deficit, and if we are importing a lot from overseas, the weak pound makes those goods and services more expensive. europe is the biggest buyer of our goods, so if brexit means that we will be giving up every aspect of our ownership of the eu then people will be wondering how companies can sell to europe and take it out on the pound, and the pound will weaken further. now, the problem with this is that it means that we will have less bang for our buck and prices are going to rise. because, if we need more pounds, is pounds worth less and we need more of them to buy the same amount of foreign goods, is
6:52 am
going to cost us a lot more to fill up going to cost us a lot more to fill up our baskets when we go shopping and fillup ourcarwith up our baskets when we go shopping and fill up our car with petrol. we will get some official figures later about how much prices are rising, but in general it is likely to be things priced in dollars that will see the biggest increases. so that's things like oil, and that includes petrol prices and energy bills. holidays abroad are likely to cost more, because our pound goes less far. and retailers have warned that clothing and food prices will rise. get used to hearing about inflation this year, because it is going to be the thing everyone is watching very closely. we will of course be discussing more of those points later. we are ditching frothy pints of beer for frothy cappuccinos, according to new research. local data company figures analysed by the bbc show, between 2011 and 2016, the number of town centre bars and nightclubs fell by about 2,000. during that time, cafes, fast food outlets and restaurants rose to 6,000 across england, scotland and wales. marc ashdown's report contains flashing images. cani
6:53 am
can i have a skinny dirty chiat with honey, and extra hot, please? —— chai. if you tried to order one of those 20 years ago you might have got funny look. now it is fairly routine. cafes are one of the places that brits increasingly like to spend their free that brits increasingly like to spend theirfree time. that brits increasingly like to spend their free time. across the uk, trendy pop—ups and restaurants are gradually replacing more traditional entertainment venues like pubs, bars and nightclubs. food,it like pubs, bars and nightclubs. food, it seems, is now more central than ever to our social habits and the wackier the better. i give you the wackier the better. i give you the roast dinner logo, with all the trimmings. people, they are looking for something different, but it also gives them inspiration for what they are doing at home. they eat out and cook at home for their friends. a whole culture of friends and eating out and whole culture of friends and eating outand dining whole culture of friends and eating out and dining out has changed. there is still an appetite for
6:54 am
pastimes like bingo. venuesjust have to jazz things up a bit. bongo's bingo misses a bingo with dance music. it began life here in liverpool, but they now hold events across the north of england.“ liverpool, but they now hold events across the north of england. it is quintessentially bingo. but in between it is a rave, it is done soft and stuff like that. it is nuts. —— dance—offs. soft and stuff like that. it is nuts. -- dance-offs. why go to the pub when you can come here and seeing abba? the local data company found traditional venues like pubs, and comedy clubs have declined. while quirky places like cake bars, juices and party venues have grown by 6000. the firstjonathan morris of studies of how and why
6:55 am
consumption habits change. one is the pub that we tend to go to the end of the working day, we go to the pub during the day, it is increasingly frowned on while we are working. second and connected to thatis working. second and connected to that is the kind of respectability angle, one of the reason that coffee shops have been successful as they have wrought in all those customers who felt in some way excluded from the kinds of things that would be going on in traditional pubs and clu bs. going on in traditional pubs and clubs. traditional venues haven't quite had their day. there are still more pubs quite had their day. there are still more pubs across quite had their day. there are still more pubs across the uk than any other type of leisure venue. so we haven't lost a love of a cold drink. it is just these days we expect something a little bit different. pint of chocolate organic beer, sir. cheers. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: sarah hadland is best known for playing miranda hart's side—kick, stevie. she will be here to explain why she has got competition from kylie, as she prepares to swap the screen for the stage in a family farce. and if the mere mention of giant
6:56 am
alligators makes you go clammy handed... i like the pictures of the little ones. thanks, guys. and more big alligator news for you soon. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the notting hill carnival, one of london's most popular free annual events. but according to a report out this morning, it poses a real risk to public safety. at august's carnival, four stabbings were so serious the victims nearly died, and london's mayor says it must be made safer. jo jordan, a 22—year—old singer—songwriter from wembley, was one of those stabbed, and has been left with an immobile left wrist. but he wants carnival to continue. protesters are expected in north london tonight,
6:57 am
to oppose council plans to build 8,000 new homes with a private developer. there are fears that haringey council's redevelopment of wood green town centre will push up prices, making the area too expensive for locals. the council says the plans will create thousands ofjobs in the area. the world—famous ivy restaurant in the west end is 100 years old today. it is probably best known for being a celebrity hotspot, although it started life as a small italian cafe. this morning, westminster council will award it with a green plaque to recognise its contribution to london life. strike—hit southern railways has, not surprisingly, been given its worst—ever score in a customer satisfaction survey. it gotjust one star for categories including punctuality and value for money. almost of half of respondents said their lastjourney was delayed. southern's parent company admits its performance was unacceptable. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. while on the roads, in chelsea, gunter grove is down to a single
6:58 am
lane because of a burst watermain. in south—east london, in bexley, the high street was closed overnight because of a burst watermain. it is now open, but temporary traffic lights will go in place this morning for repairs to be carried out. finally, in the west end, there are major roadworks at cambridge circus. temporary traffic lights are in place at the charing cross road—shaftesbury avenue junction. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a cold start this morning. temperatures down at zero, so a touch of frost here and there, also one or two mist and fog patches. but the good news is that it is a much brighter day than yesterday, and we should see plenty of sunny spells. now, there is a bit of high cloud around at first, but that will start to disappear, and we should get the sunshine. now, the air is cold. the temperature is going to struggle today. the maximum in some spots down at zero, in central london just
6:59 am
three celsius, so a cold but sunny day. now, we hang on to the clear skies overnight, so once the sun sets the temperature is going to fall away very quickly. we're looking at a minimum of —2, or maybe even lower than that, and all this blue indicates a widespread frost at dawn tomorrow morning, so a chilly start on wednesday. perhaps a bit more cloud tomorrow afternoon, but the temperatures still cold. as we head through the rest of the week, maybe a degree or two higher in temperature, but with all that cloud, it is going to still feel chilly. va nessa vanessa feltz will be discussing the report into the notting hill carnival with one of the report's authors to find out what could or should be done to make it safer. i am back in half an hour. good morning. it's tuesday, the 17th of january. we'll be hearing lots about the single market and customs union today. ben's here to explain what it might mean. i'll also look at what's happening to the pound and how that affects
7:00 am
the prices we pay in the shops. also this morning: the search for the passenger plane, flight mh—370, is officially suspended. a three—year, 46,000 square mile search has proved fruitless. calls for the time limit on the age embryos can be experimented on to be doubled. scientists say it would improve our understanding. 0pponents say it's morally and ethically wrong. good morning from chicago. this week we are having breakfast in america and apparently this is what president obama has at this restaurant. we are talking to voters about what his legacy will be in the week that he leaves the white house. in sport: there are five british players in the second round of the australian open. johanna konta, kyle edmund and now heather watson all made it through in melbourne overnight. and carol has the weather. good morning. it isa
7:01 am
it is a cold and frosty start to the day across parts of east anglia and the south—east, with some patchy fog and sunshine. for the rest of the uk it is fairly cloudy, mild, with outbreaks of drizzle. i'll have more details in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. the prime minister will today set out her vision for the terms of britain's departure from the european union. theresa may has got a list of 12 demands for brexit in what's being trailed as a clean break from the eu. we'll talk to ian watson in downing street shortly but first our political correspondent carole walker has this report. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain which gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she's ready to take britain out of the european single market, and perhaps the customs union, too, in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. i think it's highly likely
7:02 am
we will be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, just because that's the way we can really grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents, not just for controlling immigration but also free trade opportunities. she will tell eu leaders... ..but she will say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers, but whilst the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market. i think the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market if she cares about britain's about britain's future. if she's going to fight for britain and fight for our corner,
7:03 am
then she needs to fight to be in the single market even if we leave the eu. she also needs to indicate that the final deal will be put to the british people. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. but she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27 members determined to safeguard the future of the eu without britain. let's go to downing street now and our correspondent iain watson. i suppose it is such an important speech, isn't it, for the prime minister today? i think it isn't overstating it to say it is the most important speech she has made since she walked through the door of downing street after the referendum in summer. today she has to be clear, we have had the slogans, brexit means of brexit, today it is substance, so let's be clear about it, when she says she doesn't want to be half in, half out of the eu, she isn't looking for partial
7:04 am
membership of the eu, she doesn't wa nt membership of the eu, she doesn't want associate membership of the eu, that says we are coming out of the single market, the market of 500 million people, and although no final decision has been taken by her cabinet in downing street i think she will also signal a direction of travel on the customs union, which he thinks holds us back on trade deals around the world, she will talk about a global britain so she will come out of the customs union too, which will upset tim farren, labour say it will spark a trade war, and also opponents inside her own party believe we should stay inside the single market even though we are coming out of the eu, so the shadowboxing is over on brexit and the political battle will begin today. ok, thank you very much indeed. in a few minutes, we'll be talking to the former attorney general, dominic grieve, who campaigned for britain to remain in the eu. and after 8am, we'll speak to his fellow conservative mp, the leave campaigner iain duncan smith. police in turkey have
7:05 am
arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey have released this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. so—called islamic state said it was behind the attack. 0ur turkey correspondent mark lowen is in istanbul. good morning to you. i mean, there must be huge relief that they have finally apprehended this man? yes, huge relief of course that they caught him, that they caught him alive, and that can now lead to questions under police custody for what sort of support from accomplices he may have had to have carried out the massacre in the reina nightclub in istanbul on new year's eve. there were fears that abdulkadir masharipov might have fled the country in the aftermath. he managed to escape after his killing spree, that just he managed to escape after his killing spree, thatjust lasted seven killing spree, thatjust lasted seven minutes. there were fears he could... (inaudible). no, he stayed here in...
7:06 am
(inaudible). finally, after a 2—week manhunt he was arrested in the western istanbul suburb along with his four —year—old boy, who was with him, and four others, along with a kyrgyz national, so questions about what support network e had and how to keep turkey is safe and prevent this wave of attacks. that update, apologies for the slight loss of sound, but i think we got the gist of what mark was saying. rolls royce has agreed to payjust over £670 million to settle bribery and corruption claims. the british company, which makes engines for trains, jets and nuclear submarines, said the agreement related to offences involving it's agents overseas. it will pay the money to britain, america and brazil. the serious fraud office as it relates to claims intermediaries paid rides in order to win contracts around the world. —— bribes. one of the pioneers of ivf has suggested that the time limit for experimentation on human
7:07 am
embryos should be doubled. currently, scientists can test them for up to 14 days. now, simon fishel, who was on the team involved with the birth of the world's first ivf baby, claims extending it to 28 days would improve our understanding of miscarriage and some cancers. 0pponents, though, say it is ethically and morally wrong. you can hear more on this at 11am this morning on bbc radio 4 in revisiting the 14 day rule. and we'll be discussing this in more detail here on breakfast at 7:40am. the underwater search for malaysia airlines flight mh370, which disappeared almost three years ago, has been called off. the plane took off from kuala lumpur for beijing with 239 people on board but it turned off course and was never seen again. jonathan head is in bangkok. morning to you, and such an extensive search. why this decision?
7:08 am
well, it always made it clear that the search area they designated is a huge area, 120,000 square kilometres, that once they've finished, they have been at it for two years, with specialised ships towing underwater scanners, that without information they couldn't justify extending the search. it has already cost $160 million, £130 million, but having said that there are people looking at the information we have who say that given we haven't found anything over this extensive search, experts have a lwa ys this extensive search, experts have always said if it was at the bottom of the ocean they would have found it, it is probably somewhere to the north of that. although they are saying if we don't get more information we can'tjustify spending more on extending the search of course relatives and families who want to know what happened, who want some kind of closure, have been pushing for the search to go on. but as it stands at the moment, the long searching the southern indian ocean is over without any immediate plans to extend it all started again. ok, jonathan. thank you. the northern ireland secretary
7:09 am
will make a statement in parliament today about the collapse of the devolved government at stormont. the power—sharing coalition collapsed yesterday after failing to reach a deal following the resignation of deputy first minister martin mcguiness. there'll be an election in early march. this report by our ireland correspondent chris page contains some flash photography. for ten years, politicians and stormont have shared power. but now the devolved government is no more and there's a big question mark over how long it will take to rebuild relations. initially, the partnership between the democratic unionist party and sinn fein appeared to be something of a political miracle. 0ld enemies compromising to run northern ireland together. but there were frequent disagreements. the final row came over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. yesterday, the unlikely alliance officially fell apart, leaving the northern ireland secretary no option but to call an election to the stormont assembly. it will take place on the second of march. while it is inevitable that debate during an election period will be
7:10 am
intense, i would strongly encourage the political parties to conduct this election with a view to the future of northern ireland and re—establishing a partnership government at the earliest opportunity after that poll. he'll speak about the crisis in the house of commons today. theresa may has discussed the situation with the irish prime minister, enda kenny, in a phone call. they said they wanted the stormont institutions to be back up and running as soon as possible. the power—sharing government here at stormont has ended in a bitter breakup. the election campaign is expected to be particularly divisive. restoring devolution in northern ireland will be no easy task. chris page, bbc news, stormont. the last man to leave his footprints on the moon has died at the age of 82. we leave as we came and god willing
7:11 am
as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind. the american astronaut gene cernan was commander of the apollo 17 mission in december 1972, the last manned space flight to the moon. before climbing up the ladder, he traced his only child's initials in the moon's dust and spoke about how he wanted to stay a while. he is one of only three people to have been to the moon twice. amazing. yeah. i don't like the next pictures. the least favourite of the year. yes, definitely. it is an alligator, a very, very large one.” think this is causing generalfear around the place this morning. it is about 4.5 metres long, it weighs about 4.5 metres long, it weighs about 60 stone... it is in florida, luckily. you can see the localsjust
7:12 am
casually filming, which has really sent louise around the bend. earlier on, when she saw it for the first time, she went all sweaty palms and everything, and thank you for your alligator comments. i will tell you later on about the world record sized alligator to put the frighteners in you. richard says 20 yea rs frighteners in you. richard says 20 years ago we went on a family holiday to orlando, just stopping to watch the alligators, on restarting the engine, something penetrated the bottom of the boat and we all ended up bottom of the boat and we all ended up in the water. it is amazing how fast you can swim when you find yourself faced with dozens of alligators. that is going to live with me for the rest of the day. carol will be here with the weather inafew carol will be here with the weather in a few minutes. let's return to our main story, the prime minister will set out her goals this morning for negotiating britain's exit from the european union, and she appears to be favouring the idea of leaving the single market. the conservative mp, dominic grieve,
7:13 am
campaigned to remain in the eu and he wants britain to stay in the single market. hejoins us now from our westminster studio. morning to you, thank you for joining us. so much of this speech is widely trailed, but i will read it for viewers who haven't seen it, she talks about not partial membership of the eu, associate membership of the eu, associate membership of the eu, associate membership of the eu or anything leaving us half in, half out. when you hear that, what are your concerns? in one sense, i fully understand what she wants to try to achieve, which is clearly a bespoke relationship with the european union. i don't disagree with that in light of the referendum result. but the question we have to ask ourselves is that we are a country that believes in free trade. the single biggest free trade agreement we have is our access to the single market of the european union. if we are to abandon that, or be excluded from it, then there are going to be
7:14 am
economic consequences for our country, so i hope that in the negotiations which are going to follow that the priority of maintaining access into the single market is at the forefront of the britain negotiating stance, but ultimately this will be a negotiated settlement, and negotiations are going to require some give and take and we may not be able to get everything we want, so we are going to have to make in this process some very tough decisions. if we stay focused on what matters for the united kingdom, then i have every hope that we will come out with a satisfactory outcome. and free trade with the eu comes with certain caveats, as it stands at the moment, especially on immigration, doesn't it? free trade agreement of any kind are going to come out with caveats. the question is, what are the impacts likely to be on this country, and how can we try to reconcile the different goals that we have in the negotiation? just to
7:15 am
make a point, immigration is driven by dob availability. when we leave the eu, we may move to a work permit system. we will have to have a greatly expanded bureaucracy to provide that work permit system. if thejobs are provide that work permit system. if the jobs are available, and if there are not people to fill them, they will have to go from —— come from somewhere and they will likely come from eu partner countries, where they have been coming, especially for low skilled work, in large numbers over the last few years. the alternative is we don't want the jobs filled and we will take the economic hit that goes with it. ok, let's talk about access to the single market and control of immigration. do you think there will be ideal, because you might have to deal with 27 different countries, is there a deal to be done and can it be done in any timescale that is a cce pta ble be done in any timescale that is acceptable i have no idea.” be done in any timescale that is acceptable i have no idea. i have to say, this is one of the really difficult issues. we have two years
7:16 am
to negotiate our expert, but while that might be sufficient to negotiate the difficult terms of the severance process, negotiate the difficult terms of the severance process, it may not be enough to negotiate the future relationship —— our exit. that, of course, raises the risk that at the end of the period we have a period where in fact we have no free trade agreement with the eu and we are back on tariffs, and i happen to think that tariffs would be immensely damaging to our trade and our national prosperity. quite apart from the bureaucratic nightmare that this is going to create in our country, which i think people may not have fully grasped, as to what will happen in those circumstances in view of the volume of trade which we do with our eu partner countries. so those are other reasons why it is really important that we should try to maintaina really important that we should try to maintain a deal that gives us access into the single market. i also fully understand what the prime minister is saying. she doesn't want a halfway house. she won something different. we are in deep leaving the eu. it is quite clear. we will
7:17 am
know longer be subject, part of the eu council, we won't participate in it in the same way, although it is worth bearing in mind the prime minister has indicated on matters of security cooperation, for example, she was to remain within some eu structures because they are very much in our national interest. 0r that has to be worked out as well. and the arbitral mechanisms for determining what the rules are for that if it is not going to be the european court of justice. that if it is not going to be the european court ofjustice. all of those are immensely complicated legal points and technical ones and they are all going to have to be sorted out. the prime minister is clearly set on trying to take this forward and insofar as we can and i can, she will have our support in doing it. in an hour we'll be talking to the former conservative leader, iain duncan smith, who campaigned for britain to leave the eu. we are going to be wading through
7:18 am
brexit for quite sometime. it is important for all of brexit for quite sometime. it is important for all of us, brexit for quite sometime. it is important for all of us, as brexit for quite sometime. it is important for all of us, as is brexit for quite sometime. it is important for all of us, as is the weather. carol is with us once again this morning. what can we look forward to this week, carol? much the same as we had yesterday. what we have today is yesterday's weather front has drifted from the east towards the west, producing a lot of cloud than some drizzle. kind of blue areas we have some cold fronts, behind the semicircles, the red ones, we have milder air and that shows the difference in the temperature. let me show you what we are looking at. in stornoway we have at the moment 11 celsius. belfast, eight. the temperatures coming down where we have the weather front in cardiff and birmingham but not as cold as it is in east anglia and the south—east. some of us seeing temperatures of freezing orjust below. across scotland and northern ireland there is a lot of cloud this morning, remaining cloudy through the day across northern ireland. we also have hill fog and some patchy outbreaks of rain and drizzle across
7:19 am
scotland. for northern england it is cloudy, there is hill fog, some rain and drizzle and patchy fog across lincolnshire and yorkshire. hill fog across wales and the moors, a lot of cloud across the midlands and four east anglia and the south—east, under clearer skies there is a touch of frost and also some patchy fog. that will lift through the morning, allowing some sunshine to develop. expect more than we saw yesterday, extending over towards the isle of wight. for the rest of the uk it remains fairly cloudy, with drizzle on and off at times. nor the scotla nd on and off at times. nor the scotland there is a good chance it will brighten up with some sunny skies, and here we could see up to 1213dc, whereas in the south—east despite the fact that we have sunshine we are looking at four or five. this is below average for the stage in january, five. this is below average for the stage injanuary, a degree above average for this this stage in january. under the clearer skies we are looking at a widespread frosts. locally some places could go as high high as —5 —7 —— as low. there will
7:20 am
also be patchy fog but under all this cloud it will remain fairly mild, so problems with frost, whereas you can see the temperatures are mentioned, freezing or below but locally much lower than that. then tomorrow when we lose the patchy fog that forms, there will be a fair bit of sunshine across southern and south—eastern counties. still a lot of cloud as we push further north, and we have got a weather front scooting across the top of scotland. introducing some rain across parts of the outer hebrides, and also shetland in particular. here as well the wind will pick up a touch. temperatures still a high side across scotland and northern ireland, the england and wales are looking at not bad values but low average across parts of the south. a quick look at thursday shows there is not a humongous amount of change. still some rain coming in across the far north of scotland, showers into the north—west and you will notice in scotland and northern ireland the temperature just in scotland and northern ireland the temperaturejust coming in scotland and northern ireland the temperature just coming down a touch. having said that, still above average by this stage injanuary.
7:21 am
touch. having said that, still above average by this stage in january. as always, thank you. if you ever wondered what president obama likes for breakfast, you are about to find out as we look ahead to donald trump's inauguration on friday. we are taking a road trip through the heart of america on route 45, to find out how americans are feeling about 0bama's legacy and donald trump being sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. today, breakfast'sjon kay reports from chicago. right through the middle of the donald trump's america, to get a sense of the country he is taking over. but our next stop is not trump territory. chicago. tell you what, i could do with some breakfast. this is barack 0bama's favourite diner. he lived around the corner before he was president, and he still comes back. what does he eat here? what's his favourite?
7:22 am
normally he is a breakfast guide. home—made oatmeal. hope you're hungry. very, very. there is your omelette. he is humble, he is strong... tahitia is an obama fan. as a nurse, she likes the changes he made to healthcare, giving poorer people better access. she worries donald trump will overturn the reforms, hitting the most vulnerable. they will not have adequate care, that they will not have access to doctors, that they will have to come through emergency services. and that many of them will be very sick, can't get medicine, some of them will die. her son daniel thought having a black president would mean a more inclusive america, but he fears donald trump's form of populism is now encouraging division. i do feel my safety might be in danger. really — you feel
7:23 am
more vulnerable now? i do, i do. in certain situations i do. post—trump? post—trump, yes, because it is something that you can see from the energy that trump built, and the way that people express themselves, who support trump. a lot of them have certain beliefs and things like that that do not align with my existence. some here do question the obama legacy, and think change is overdue. aspiring businesswoman erica hopes donald trump will help people like her. next, please. i believe that it's going to open up doors for small business owners, hopefully, that's trying to create big businesses. and that's you. yeah. maybe you will be as rich as donald trump in a few years. we head to the suburbs, elgin, where nearly half the population is hispanic.
7:24 am
donald trump's plans to build a giant wall along the mexican border mean many here cannot support him. never, never. never the wall. lam i am concerned, what he will think about us, especially mexicans. but some views here may surprise you. rosa hopes a wall would stop illegal immigrants. we have our own problems here in america. so, you know, to add more of them coming over here, i think — that, i don't think it's a good thing. and in the choir, margarita hopes donald trump will safeguard her pro—life catholic values. i'm so excited, and i'm so happy for him. and we should not be afraid of anything, not even the wall or anything. this is called the holy hill,
7:25 am
because there's so many churches... elisa confirmed to me that the hispanic community is split right now, just as america is split. there is the unforeseen, with ourfuture, and hispanics and a lot of people are scared about what is going to happen. we don't want division. but look where we are. time to get back on route 45. iam i am loving his road trip. lots of fa cts , i am loving his road trip. lots of facts, what we are all thinking about american breakfasts, ensuite? i want maple syrup pancakes, and the sta ke. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. the notting hill carnival, one of london's most popular free annual events. but according to a report out this
7:26 am
morning, it poses a real risk to public safety. at the carnival in august, four stabbings were so serious the victims nearly died. the report points to risks of a hillsborough—scale tragedy, which has led the mayor to undertake a review, although he has ruled moving carnival from its current route. carnival is a time of year that people really look forward to. some people really look forward to. some people want to cause trouble, but i feel like the majority who are there to have a good time outweigh those who are there for trouble. the world—famous ivy restaurant in the west end is 100 years old today. it is probably best known for being a celebrity hotspot, although it started life as a small italian cafe. this morning, westminster council will award it with a green plaque to recognise its contribution to london life. strike—hit southern railways has, not surprisingly, been given its worst—ever score in a customer satisfaction survey. it gotjust one star for categories including punctuality and value for money.
7:27 am
almost half of respondents said their lastjourney was delayed. southern's parent company admits its performance was unacceptable. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. while on the roads, in chelsea, gunter grove is down to a single lane because of a burst watermain. in south—east london, in bexley, the high street was closed overnight because of a burst watermain. it is now open, but temporary traffic lights will go in place this morning for repairs to be carried out. finally, in the west end, there are major roadworks at cambridge circus. temporary traffic lights are in place at the charing cross road—shaftesbury avenue junction. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning.
7:28 am
it is a cold start this morning. temperatures down at zero, so a touch of frost here and there, also one or two mist and fog patches. but the good news is it is a much brighter day than yesterday, and we should see plenty of sunny spells. now, there is a bit of high cloud around at first, but that will start to disappear, and we should get the sunshine. now, the air is cold, so the temperature is going to struggle today. the maximum in some spots down at zero, in central london just three celsius, so a cold but sunny day. now, we hang on to the clear skies overnight, so once the sun sets the temperature is going to fall away very quickly. we're looking at a minimum of —2, maybe even lower than that, and all this blue indicates a widespread frost by dawn tomorrow morning, so a chilly start on wednesday. perhaps a bit more cloud tomorrow afternoon, but the temperatures still cold. as we head through the rest of the week, maybe a degree or two higher in temperature, but with all that cloud, it is going to still feel chilly. there is more on the falling numbers of pubs and clubs in london, while cafes and restaurants increase, on the breakfast show
7:29 am
with vanessa feltz in the next few minutes on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is aimed on 7:30am on this tuesday morning. thank you for being with us. let's bring you up—to—date on some of the main stories today. the prime minister will today set out her clearest vision yet for the terms of britain's departure from the european union. in a much anticipated speech, theresa may will say that britain shouldn't be "half in, half out" of the eu. that's being taken as a hint that she's prepared to take the country out of the single market in order to control its borders and law. in about an half an hour we'll be talking to the conservative mp and leave campaigner iain duncan smith. that's at 8:10am. elsewhere today: police in turkey have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey have released
7:30 am
this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov taken shortly after he was detained. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. so—called islamic state said it was behind the attack and that it was revenge for turkish military involvement in syria. the search for a passenger plane which went missing nearly three years ago with 239 people on board has been called off. malaysia airlines flight mh370 disappeared between beijing and kuala lumpur in march 2014. the joint agency coordination centre in australia says the search has officially been suspended after crews finished a fruitless sweep of a 46,000 square mile search zone west of australia. rolls royce has agreed to pay more than 670 million to settle bribery and corruption claims. the british company is one of the uk's biggest manufacturing exporters. it will pay the money to authorities in britain, america and brazil. the serious fraud office says it relates to claims that intermediaries paid bribes in order to win contracts around the world. two people have been seriously injured in a suspected gas explosion
7:31 am
at a house in manchester. two houses in blakeley were destroyed and another was badly damaged. fire and rescue crews say they have now secured the building. a kitten was also recovered alive and well from the rubble. the last man to walk on the moon has died at the age of 82. we leave as we came, and god willing as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind. the american astronaut, gene cernan, was commander of the apollo 17 mission in december 1972, the last manned space flight to the moon. before climbing up the ladder he traced his only child's initials in the moon's dust and spoke about how he wanted to stay a while. amazing man, and if you've got a bit
7:32 am
of time today, have read about of his achievements, accomplishments, and some of the things he said about his time in space as well. he was a very wise fellow. absolutely. another wise person, carol, she knows most things, she will have the weather for you. and sally... not very wise. i take advice from carol on everything. welcome back from your holiday. thank you, i had a wonderful time. it is nice to be back. no, it really is. iwas worried i would sleep through might alarm, but i have managed it, i worried i would sleep through might alarm, but i have managed it, lam here. i have brought a bit of sunshine, and left share it with everyone this morning. go on, then. britain'sjohanna konta has beaten kirsten flipkens to make it through to the second round of the australian open in melbourne. the number nine seed had to battle in the first set before taking it seven games to five. she had few problems against the belgian after that though taking the second 6—2. konta will play japan's naomi 0saka in the second round. i am very happy to have come
7:33 am
through that weather. if it was going to take two or three sets i was prepared to stay out as long as i needed to. but again, it was a tough first set, there wasn't much in it, and i was just happy that i was able to put my foot on the pedal and really manage the difficulties the match presented. heather watson willjoin konta in the second round after beating sam stosur in three sets. naomi broady plays another australian, the number 22 seed daria gavrilova, later. in the men's draw, kyle edmund comfortably beat colombia's santiago giraldo in straight sets in just under two hours. lewis hamilton's new teammate at mercedes has finally been confirmed. he'll be partnered by finland's valtteri bottas, who's leaving williams to fill the seat left vacant by world champion nico rosberg. felipe massa will come out of retirement to take bottas' place at williams. rory mcilroy said he was bitterly disappointed to withdraw from this week's abu dhabi championship with a fractured rib. mcilroy complained of back pain during the south african 0pen, which he lost in a play—off,
7:34 am
but a scan has revealed the real problem. you could see he was struggling. he hopes to recover in plenty of time. if you are going to get injured as a golf, perhaps this time of year isn't the worst time. northern ireland's mark allen knocked out former world champion john higgins at the masters snooker. it went down to a deciding frame and allen potted an incredible pink — look at this, here it comes — to beat higgins 6—5 at alexandra palace. it's the third time higgins has lost to allen in the first round of the masters. wonderful shot. another former world champion departed early as stuart bingham was thrashed byjoe perry by six frames to one. perry will play ding junhui for a place in the semi finals. joe root says captaining england would be rather like becoming a father for the first time. root is favourite to replace alastair cook if he decides to step down as test skipper.
7:35 am
root‘s fiancee gave birth to their first child ten days ago. it is one of those things you sort of have to learn on the job. i suppose... the timing of this is quite relevant, but being a dad you don't really know what to do until... you have to go with it and see how it goes. i imagine that will be very similar. i will have to wait and see if and when it happens. in squash, the british number two, james willstrop, says ending his ten year losing streak against rival, nick matthew, has given him a real confidence boost. willstrop hasn't beaten him since 2007! but, on sunday, james ended that losing streak at new york's grand central station. that's where that's taking place. taking him into the quarter—finals of thejp morgan tournament of champions. james says he had to put a top performance in. i wanted to play well and put in a good performance.
7:36 am
i like it when we have a good match together. when i played him last time he beat me comprehensively, so i didn't want that to happen again. i knew he had a good match, whether or not i won. former manchester united boss louis van gaal has announced his retirement from football. he hasn't worked since leaving united at the end of last season, but he's turned down a lucrative offer to coach in the far east. he is actually... there are has been a terrible family tragedy, his daughter's husband died very suddenly and he decided he simply wa nts to suddenly and he decided he simply wants to spend time with his family and his grandkids. very wise decision. yeah. thank you. one of the pioneers of ivf has called for the time limit for experimentation on embryos to be doubled from 14 to 28 days. simon fischel believes it would improve our understanding of disease but some groups have raised concerns about the suggestion. matthew hill reports. the birth of louise browne, the
7:37 am
world's first ivf baby in 0ldham in 1978, changed reproduction for ever. at the time scientists were accused of playing god for experimenting on human embryos but eventually a law was brought in to allow controlled ivf and research on human embryos and research for up to 14 days. scientists at cambridge university have cultured embryos for 13 days and believe they could make discoveries about genetic disease and why miscarriages happen if the law changes. there were people that condemned mum and dad for having the treatment and for having me, so anything, as i said, that can help create a family, i think, is brilliant, it's just fantastic, create a family, i think, is brilliant, it'sjust fantastic, that there are people out there trying to help people have a family. the bbc has commissioned the first survey of
7:38 am
its kind into this question. 48% supported increasing the limit up to 28 days. 19% wanted to keep the present limit. 10% wanted a total ban. 0ne present limit. 10% wanted a total ban. one in four didn't know. the scientist who worked in the same tea m scientist who worked in the same team that created the world's first ivf baby has caught on the government to hold an enquiry into extending the rule. i think the benefits of doing this research are that specifically during that period of time, which we can't get access to at the moment, many things happen and go wrong, and we can learn an awful lot from what goes wrong. for example, miscarriage. it will happen, it will start because to rowe period of time. there are so many things in relation to some cancers that almost begin their problems at that very stage. however, religious, moral and ethical objections have also been raised. an embryo is a person with the rights or person, it is going to
7:39 am
grow into a person and it would become a human if it were not a human already, so even the great benefits from come, we consider that that embryo has rights which cannot be turned over. dee has had several miscarriages. if there were research that could give insights into why that could give insights into why that happened, that could stop that. if one in four people experience miscarriage, if it reduced the number it is really important. giving women like her the need to shed light on why this need to be happen is the most important thing. joining us now alison campbell, group director of embryology at a private fertility clinic in the north—west and anthony mccarthy a bio ethicist from the society for the protection of unborn children. good morning to you both. thank you for your time to come and discuss this. is it quite clear of the benefits, extending this rule? yes, absolutely. what would they be? it is to gain insight into the developmental patterns of the human
7:40 am
embryo and into human development per se. i think there are benefits for miscarriage patients in the first instance, and going beyond that just into first instance, and going beyond thatjust into investigating and being able to study tumour development, different abnormalities of development, so generally huge benefits. so, if there are benefits for women suffering from miscarriages, would you, can you see a benefit to extending it to 28 days? ikard, really. first of all, the 14 day limit was the trick, set in 1990 -- i the 14 day limit was the trick, set in 1990 —— i can't, really. at the time we were told they would be strict controls, and what would happen, would never happen, for example, human cloning, hybrids, three parent embryo is another one, so three parent embryo is another one, sol three parent embryo is another one, so i think there is a continual push to, in effect, dehumanise the embryo
7:41 am
in orderto make to, in effect, dehumanise the embryo in order to make creation and destruction of embryos more and more available. we have to ask morally, you know, should we be doing that, is that a way of seriously treating human beings? we need to remember these embryos are not created specifically for research. where i work at care fertility, they have extra embryos which would otherwise be discarded. they don't need them. they are using informed consent to donate the embryos for specific licensed research. specifically on the moral concerns, do you think they are not relevant? of course moral concerns are relevant. it is an importantand moral concerns are relevant. it is an important and sensitive debate. i think we can see that the public are engaged with this, it is something everybody needs to be involved in. ifi everybody needs to be involved in. if i can just everybody needs to be involved in. if i canjust take everybody needs to be involved in. if i can just take you back to what, this is what mary warnock, who was involved in the decision of the 14
7:42 am
days, and what she said, before 14 days, and what she said, before 14 days it is certain beyond any doubt whatsoever there are no beginnings to the spinal—cord, so whatever happens, it cannot feel anything. you talk about a sort of arbitrary, she talks about something specific going on. s well, she herself said this was not arbitrary —— this was an arbitrary limit, so what is said is not precise or scientific. what we are talking about is a human being from conception. that is the only sensible way in which to understand the nature of the embryo. we are told again and again to respect the embryo but we see mass production, quality control, spare embryos, embryos we don't need, these are young human beings. we wouldn't talk that way about human beings that were somewhat older, and yet when we talk about the new human being, the person, what we see is an
7:43 am
undermining of that. they are created through a production process and treated as products. the whole language surrounding that. this extension of the limit is another way to open further this. what we have seen is a push for no limits. what we have also seen is no cures from the embryo experimentation. we will come back on that.” from the embryo experimentation. we will come back on that. i would say that there are strict limits. they are not treated as a commodity. i am are not treated as a commodity. i am a fertility specialist, we treat them with respect. they have the potential of course to become an human being. most of them don't make it. most of them are not viable. they are a product of the fertility treatment which, in many cases, will not be used for anything else. you say that they are treated with respect. they are destroyed in their hundreds of thousands and they are referred to as spare or supernumera ry. referred to as spare or supernumerary. ivf parents feel a relationship with embryos. they are not treated as though they other children or parents. if we look at it from your point of view, you have
7:44 am
a problem with the doubling of it, do you have a problem with it per se? indeed, i am not going to pretend that the 14 day limit is a good thing. i think that there should be a protection for all human life from conception. however, i think if you have a bad policy in place, it can be made worse, and i think this is an attempt to do so. baroness morgan, who created the rule, said scientist to try to carry out more research in that time rather than trying to extend it —— barnoess warnock. is that a sensible suggestion? we need to do both things, we need to research it, in pre— implantation phasers, which we are doing, and looking beyond that, because these researchers in cambridge, who we have worked with closely, can see that we can culture embryos for longer. so, with very careful control of thing we do absolutely need to look beyond, but at the moment, of course, yes, we are looking at pre— implantation,
7:45 am
so, before 14 days. thank you both very much. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. she has told us it is a quiet week. iam sure she has told us it is a quiet week. i am sure there is something happening. yes, there is something happening. yes, there is something happening but it is quite weak nonetheless. i'll start off by telling you about the temperatures that we currently have. in stornoway it is 11 celsius. belfast are looking at eight, cardiff six, birmingham four, but in the south—east temperatures are much lower, and that is because we have clearer skies. there is also some patchy frost and fog around. in the south we are pulling in cold continental air behind this cold front, represented with the triangles, whereas in the north, behind the warm front with the semicircular read on it we have the milder air, hence elevens, ten, semicircular read on it we have the milderair, hence elevens, ten, nine across parts of northern ireland and scotland. so a lot of clout around this morning, some hill fog, some patchy fog now lifting across lincolnshire. still a bit left
7:46 am
across the vale of york but under clear skies across the south—east we will see some sunshine. there is some patchy fog just to watch out for first some patchy fog just to watch out forfirst thing. in some patchy fog just to watch out for first thing. in the afternoon across scotland and northern ireland there will be a lot of clout although brightening up a touch across the north—east. temperatures at 11, 12, possibly locally 13. across northern england you are still under the influence of the weather front so a lot of cloud and drizzle on and off at times. across the midlands, into wales and the south—west, still a lot of cloud around. you might catch some drizzle but there will also be quite a bit of dry weather. meanwhile in the south—east, heading towards the isle of wight, brighter conditions in the sunshine but feeling colder. under clear skies by night the temperature will drop away quite quickly. widespread frost and also some patchy fog. away from that, under the cloud it is going to be milder but although you could see values of freezing or below, locally you will see much lower than this, —5 —7 possible in somewhere like south farnborough, for example. so under
7:47 am
patchy fog and frost we are looking at blue skies across southern counties of england. brightening up in the midlands but essentially there is still a fair bit of cloud around. a weather front crossing the far north of scotland will introduce some rain across the likes of lewis and also shetland, and hear the wind will pick up a touch as well by temperature—wise, especially in western scotland and northern ireland, still in double figures. despite the sunshine, it still will feel cool in southern areas. by thursday there will be more cloud around really across the board so more in the south and we are going to see today or tomorrow and it will break across parts of scotland and northern ireland where we should see some sunshine. hanging onto it for northern england and wales and once again there will be some showers coming in across western parts. temperatures, well, seven to about eight for most of the uk. it is sort of all right, isn't it? it is not bad. i shouldn't really summarise
7:48 am
her hold two and a half minute. we love you, carol. as we have been hearing, the prime minister is expected to reveal more details of britain's exit from the european union. but it is a complicated affair, so ben is looking at what is at stake, and what impact it could have on the economy and all of us. yes, iam yes, i am going to try and make sense of some of the words, because a lot of it sounds pretty familiar, free trade, free movement, single markets, that sort of thing. since we voted the european union there has been a lot of speculation about what brexit might actually look like. well, for the economy, it will largely depend on what trade relationship we have with europe. and that is important, because at the moment europe is by far our biggest trading partner. we do more business with the 27
7:49 am
other eu member states than anyone else, but that relationship is determined by the terms we agreed to when wejoined. so that includes the single market. that did away with taxes and tariffs on trade between the member countries, and that has been a big boost for businesses. and, as part of that single market, we agreed to the free movement of goods and people. it means we can buy and sell anywhere in the eu, and european citizens can live and work anywhere in the eu. but that has been controversial as the eu expanded to include more and more countries. we also signed up to what is called a customs union. it means eu countries can trade freely with each other, but put a tax on goods coming from places like america or china. there are now doubts about whether the uk can remain a member of that trade club after brexit, and that has worried business. the pound has lost over 20% of its value against the dollar since the uk voted leave. i think there is some scope for sterling to weaken off against the us dollar,
7:50 am
probably in the region of 1.18, not materially lower than the recent lows but still cheaper value of the currency and we will also see sterling lose further ground against the euro, which will be increasingly tough for ha rd—pressed consumers, as we move into the holiday season and the earlier part of this year. so, while we might lose access to some of the benefits of being in the eu, brexit could encourage us to find new trade deals with places like america, india and china. so how important is overseas trade to britain? well, as a country, we import billions of pounds more than we export. that is known as a trade deficit, and if we are importing a lot from overseas, the weak pound makes those goods and services more expensive. europe is the biggest buyer of our goods, so if brexit means that we will be giving up every aspect of our membership of the eu, then people will be wondering how
7:51 am
companies can sell to europe and take it out on the pound, and the pound will weaken further. now, the problem with this is that it means that we will have less bang for our buck and prices are going to rise. because, if we need more pounds, if pounds are worth less and we need more of them to buy the same amount of foreign goods, it's going to cost us a lot more to fill up our baskets when we go shopping, and fill up our car with petrol. we will get some official figures later about how much prices are rising, but in general it is likely to be things priced in dollars that will see the biggest increases. so that's things like oil, and that includes petrol prices and energy bills. holidays abroad are likely to cost more, because our pound goes less far. and retailers have warned that clothing and food prices will rise. get used to hearing about inflation this year, because it is going to be the thing everyone is watching very closely. we will of course be discussing more of those points later. we get the official figures at
7:52 am
9:30am this morning. we are ditching frothy pints of beer for frothy cappuccinos, according to new research on town centres in england, scotland and wales. the figures show that, over the last five years or so, the number of bars and nightclubs fell by about 2,000, but there were 6000 more cafes, fast food outlets and restaurants. marc ashdown's report contains flashing images. can i have a skinny dirty chai with honey, and cinnamon and extra hot, please? if you tried to order one of those 20 years ago, you might have got funny look. now, it is fairly routine. cafes are one of the places that brits increasingly like to spend their free time. across the uk, trendy pop—ups and restaurants are gradually replacing more traditional entertainment venues, like pubs, bars and nightclubs. food, it seems, is now more central than ever to our social habits, and the wackier the better. i give you the roast dinner burger, with all the trimmings. people, they are looking for something different, but it also gives them inspiration for what they are doing at home.
7:53 am
they eat out, and cook at home for their friends. the whole culture of friends and eating out, and dining out, has changed. there is still an appetite for pastimes like bingo. venues just have to jazz things up a bit. bongo's bingo mixes bingo with dance music. it began life here in liverpool, but they now hold events across the north of england. it is quintessentially bingo, but in between it is a rave. it is dance—offs, and stuff like that. it's nuts. why go to the pub when you can come here and sing abba? based on visits to thousands of towns and cities,
7:54 am
the local data company found traditional venues, like pubs, bingo halls and comedy clubs, have declined by 2,000, while quirky places like cake bars, juicers and party venues have grown by 6,000. professorjonathan morris studies how and why consumption habits change. one is the pub, that we tend to go to at the end of the working day. if we go to the pub during the day, it is increasingly frowned on while we're working. second, and connected to that, is the kind of respectability angle. one of the reasons that coffee shops have been successful is they have brought in all those customers who felt in some way excluded from the kinds of things that would be going on in traditional pubs and clubs. but traditional venues haven't quite had their day. there are still more pubs across the uk than any other type of leisure venue, so we haven't lost our love of a cold drink. it is just these days we expect something a little bit different. pint of chocolate organic beer, sir. marc ashdown, cheers. you are well up for a bit of bongo
7:55 am
bingo. she is planning a work night out as we speak. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. the notting hill carnival may be london's most popular free annual event, but according to a report out this morning, it poses a real risk to public safety. the london assembly police and crime committee says the event is now at a tipping point, and is calling on the mayor of london, sadiq khan, to get a grip on how it is managed. but a 22—year—old singer—songwriter from wembley, who was one of those stabbed and left immobile in his left wrist, wants carnival to continue. carnival is a time of year that people really look forward to. some people want to cause trouble, but i feel like the majority, who are there to have a good time, outweigh those who are there for trouble. strike—hit southern railways has,
7:56 am
not surprisingly, been the world—famous ivy restaurant in the west end is 100 years old today. it is probably best—known for being a celebrity hotspot, although it started life as a small italian cafe. this morning, westminster council will award it with a green plaque to recognise its contribution to london life. strike—hit southern railways has, not surprisingly, been given its worst—ever score in a customer satisfaction survey. it gotjust one star for categories including punctuality and value for money. almost half of respondents said their lastjourney was delayed. southern's parent company admits its performance was unacceptable. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0n the roads, it is clearly that time of year for burst watermains. first there is one in chelsea, on gunter grove, which is down to a single lane. there is also one on victoria street, which has closed parliament square
7:57 am
at westminster abbey. and finally on our burst watermain news, the one in bexley, which closed the high street last night, will have temporary traffic lights in place for repairs to be carried out. let's have a check on the weather now, with kate. good morning. it is a cold start this morning. temperatures down at zero, so a touch of frost here and there, also one or two mist and fog patches. but the good news is it is a much brighter day than yesterday, and we should see plenty of sunny spells. now, there is a bit of high cloud around at first, but that will start to disappear, and we should get that sunshine. now, the air is cold, so the temperature is going to struggle today. the maximum in some spots down at zero, but in central london just three celsius, so a cold but sunny day. now, we hang on to the clear skies overnight, so once the sun sets the temperature is going to fall away very quickly. we're looking at a minimum of —2, maybe even lower than that, and all this blue indicates
7:58 am
a widespread frost by dawn tomorrow morning, so a chilly start to wednesday. perhaps a bit more cloud tomorrow afternoon, but the temperatures still cold. as we head through the rest of the week, maybe a degree or two higher in temperature, but with all that cloud, it is going to still feel chilly. 0n bbc radio london in 20 minutes, vanessa feltz will be speaking to the former conservative leader iain duncan smith about the prime minister's speech, which is being delivered today, on theresa may's strategy for britain to leave the eu. i'll be back in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the prime minister is to spell out her plans for brexit. theresa may will say there can be no halfway house in britain's departure from the european union. we'll be live in downing street ahead of her big speech later this morning. good morning, it's tuesday the 17th of january.
7:59 am
also this morning... the search for the passenger plane flight mh 370 is officially suspended. a three year search of a huge area has proved fruitless. good morning from chicago. this week we are having breakfast in america and this, apparently, is what president obama has when he comes to this restaurant. we are talking to voters about president 0bama's legacy in the week he leaves the white house. this huge crack in the antarctic ice is forcing scientists to leave the base they have there. we'll ask the team leader what it might mean for the site's future. in sports, there are five british players in the second round of the australian open, johanna konta, kyle edmund, dan evans and now heather watson have all made it through in melbourne overnight. and carol has the weather. a cold and frosty start for some in
8:00 am
the south—east and east anglia, some patchy fog but quite a bit of sunshine today. away from those areas, lots of cloud, some drizzle but a much milder. more details in about 15 minutes. first, our main story. the prime minister will today set out her clearest vision yet for the terms of britain's departure from the european union. theresa may has a list of 12 demands for brexit — it's being trailed as a clean break from the eu. in a moment we'll be live in downing street with our political correspondent iain watson and in brussels with our europe reporter, gavin lee. first, carole walker has this report. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain, which gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she's ready to take britain out
8:01 am
of the european single market, and perhaps the customs union, too, in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. i think it's highly likely we'll be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, just because that's the way we can really grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents, not just for controlling immigration but also free trade opportunities. she'll tell eu leaders... ..but she'll say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers, but whilst the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market. i think the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single
8:02 am
market if she cares about britain's future. if she's going to fight for britain and fight our corner, then she needs to fight to be in the single market even if we leave the european union. she also needs to indicate that the final deal will be put to the british people. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. but she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27 members determined to safeguard the future of the eu without britain. let's hear how theresa may's speech is likely to be received at home and in europe. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in downing street. when theresa may comes out of the door behind you she will know this isa door behind you she will know this is a really significant day for her? probably the most significant since she moved here in the summer, because in the past we have had hints about what she wanted to do on
8:03 am
the european union, some slogans, brexit minister brexit, red, white and blue brexit, today we get the substance. nobody should be in any doubt, she will say in her speech that we do not want to be half—in, half out of the eu, she is not trying to seek associate membership of the european union, she will signal that she wants to come out of the single market of 500 million people, party to control our own borders. though she does not have the agreement of the full cabinet in downing street she will be signalling a direction of travel on the customs union and willingness to pull out of this in order to do global trade deals. this clarity and watching means brexit, she is also providing more ammunition to her political opponents, notjust the liberal democrats who argue we should stay in the trade union, not just the labour party but some conservatives, too, who do not think the so—called hard brexit, coming out of the single market, is in the
8:04 am
interest of britain. the political battle lines are being drawn. thank you. other battle lives will be drawn in response to this speech. —— battle lines. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee is in brussels. gavin, how are other eu states reacting to these hints from theresa may that she favours leaving the single market? if we listen to theresa may's past mantra, brexit minister brexit, in europe they have had their own mantra. angela merkel said no negotiation without notification. until article 50 is triggered, the eu leaders will not tour, they have not. there are quite a lot of loose lips on twitter and social media normally, on the issue of brexit negotiations there has been silence. this test is unanimity. different countries and different leaders have different priorities, competing interests. the dutch and french are trying to capture any loss of financial markets in britain. there isa financial markets in britain. there is a misnomer among some of the press reporting that the european
8:05 am
institutions, the european commission are ready, but senior figures tell me they are ready for the unknown, they will come from behind. they believe the civil service in britain, once it gets behind the clarion call of the government and knows what it is looking for, the eu may be behind them might have to start working out what britain wants, and start from there. and in a few minutes we'll speak to the conservative mp and leave campaigner iain duncan smith. we should hopefully find out more detail about what theresa may might say. the huge search for malaysia airlines flight mh370 which disappeared almost three years ago has been called off. the plane took off from kuala lumpur for beijing with 239 people on board but it turned off course and was never seen again. families of the victims called it an "irresponsible" move that must be reconsidered. from sydney, phil mercer reports. and exhaustive deep sea search of a
8:06 am
vast swathes of the southern indian 0cean has failed to find a single trace of flight mh370. in a statement, australia, malaysia and china said the decision was taken with sadness. the boeing 777 vanished almost three yea rs the boeing 777 vanished almost three years ago after taking off from kuala lumpur on what should have been a routine flight to beijing. relatives of some of those on board believe the mission should be extended further north in the indian 0cean. boys 370, a family support group, said was dismayed that the hunt had been called off. —— voice 370. it appealed to international partners to reconsider the decision. australian authorities have previously rejected calls to look elsewhere, claiming there was a lack of credible evidence. the suspension of credible evidence. the suspension of the australian led mission raises the prospect that modern aviation's
8:07 am
greatest mr reid may never be solved. —— greatest mystery. police in turkey have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey have released this photo of abdulkadir masharipov, taken shortly after he was detained. he's since confessed to carrying out the attack at the reina bar. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded. 50 people in total have been detained in relation to the attack. rolls royce has agreed to pay more than £670 million to settle bribery and corruption claims. the british company is one of the uk's biggest manufacturing exporters. it will pay the money to authorities in britain, america and brazil. the serious fraud office says it relates to claims that intermediaries paid bribes in order to win contracts around the world. the northern ireland secretary will make a statement in parliament today about the collapse of the devolved government at stormont. the power—sharing coalition collapsed yesterday afterfailing to reach a deal
8:08 am
following the resignation of deputy first minister martin mcguiness. there'll be an election in early march. —— in early may. this report by our ireland correspondent chris page contains some flash photography. for ten years, politicians and stormont have shared power. but now the devolved government is no more and there's a big question mark over how long it will take to rebuild relations. initially, the partnership between the democratic unionist party and sinn fein appeared to be something of a political miracle. 0ld enemies compromising to run northern ireland together. but there were frequent disagreements. the final row came over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. yesterday, the unlikely alliance officially fell apart, leaving the northern ireland secretary no option but to call an election to the stormont assembly. it will take place on the second of march. while it is inevitable that debate during an election period will be intense, i would strongly encourage the political parties to conduct this election with a view
8:09 am
to the future of northern ireland and re—establishing a partnership government at the earliest opportunity after that poll. he'll speak about the crisis in the house of commons today. theresa may has discussed the situation with the irish prime minister, enda kenny, in a phone call. they said they wanted the stormont institutions to be back up and running as soon as possible. the power—sharing government here at stormont has ended in a bitter breakup. the election campaign is expected to be particularly divisive. restoring devolution in northern ireland will be no easy task. the election is due to be held on the 2nd of march. the last man to walk on the moon has died at the age of 82. we leave as we came and, god
8:10 am
willing, as we shall return. with faith and hope for all mankind. the american astronaut gene cernan was commander of the apollo 17 mission in 1972, the last manned space flight to the moon. that was his voice that we just heard. before climbing up the ladder he traced his only child's initials in the moon's dust and said he wanted to stay a while. he was one of only three people to have been to the moon twice. you are watching breakfast, carol will have the weather in a few minutes. "brexit means brexit" is a phrase we've heard a number of times from the prime minister. today we should find out more about what that means when theresa may gives her big speech. ever since the referendum we've been tracking the views of our bbc breakfast brexit panel. here's what they have to say. what i want is to understand that we
8:11 am
actually do have they were boasts negotiation proposition to take to europe. 0n the covers —— one that cove rs europe. 0n the covers —— one that covers the single market issue, open borders across europe and immigration policy. i want to know if, axed —— after brexit comment me and my family, we are all polish, will have the right to remain in britain, work, go to school and carry on our lives. yes, definitely. we could then negotiate bilateral trade deals with like—minded countries throughout the world. i feel this would like—minded countries throughout the world. ifeel this would be beneficial to the uk. the single market is so vital to reach one of us, it means that farmers, businesses, normal people, we can trade with the ee wondered partners easily. to pull out of it after 40 years of legislation would cause to chaos —— we after 40 years of legislation would
8:12 am
cause to chaos “ we can after 40 years of legislation would cause to chaos —— we can trade with the eu and its partners easily. given the recent resignation of the uk ambassador to europe, i am not at all convinced that mrs may has any kind of plan, consensus plan across the board for government. iain duncan smith, one of the leading figures in the leave camp, joins us now from westminster. thank you for your time this morning. 0n thank you for your time this morning. on that issue particularly of what theresa may has a plan, we have had a lot of slogan, we need some substance. what shall we say today and will she give us clarity on where the uk are with brexit negotiations? with respect to the media, she has been pretty clear. back in october she made it very clear that we would not be subject to european law, we would control our own borders and wa nt to would control our own borders and want to make trade deals outside. adding back together, and what she is saying today is that essentially we will not be in the single market, in essence we still want to do trade
8:13 am
deals outside, so boiling back down, you will get that she had a very clear idea that basically britain is leaving and wants to take back control of how it runs itself uncensored laws, it makes it very difficult to begin, as she said, bits and pieces. leading the single market... just to answer one of the questions raised the single market, it means that everybody in the uk, every business, has too abide by all the regulations and rules across the european union, even if they do not export to the european union, and 90% plus businesses in britain do not. they have felt very highly bound by those regulations and it has made them less competitive, so being outside the single market means they do not have to abide by those regulations, only those exporting, but more importantly the reality is we will want to have a free trading, zero tariff
8:14 am
arrangement and access to services in the european union, i think that is doable as in america and canada. wouldn't it leave is uncertain, unable to negotiate deals until 2019? you will find with the single market that's all about our relationship about free trade. we want no tariffs and access for services and we should focus on that and not being in the single market. you can't be in the single market. you can't be in the single market if you want to control our borders and set your own laws. i'm happy for union businesses to do the same to the uk. london is the only global financial centre in europe. it won't be replicated anywhere else. all the people who know about this in paris and frankfurt. when mr barnier was talking to meps in the european union, he said, "we want to have full access to london afterwards." so there is a deal that benefits
8:15 am
both of us. you just seem to be saying what we want, what we want. is it up to theresa may... it is what the european union wants too. that's the point i wanted to make to you. is she really in control of what happens next? surely the other member states will have, as much of a say into what kind of a deal we have? of course, they will. that's the point i was making. we should spend our time making it very clear what we're not going to come and ask for. if we said we want to be a member of the single market then, of course, that will create mayhem in the european union. there won't be agreement on that. the commission is going to say no. some of the nation states may say yes and you won't get a deal. if we say we're not asking to bea a deal. if we say we're not asking to be a member of the single market, but what we say is what benefits you and benefits us is a access to services. london makes capital requirements in europe much cheaper than they would be else where. it is
8:16 am
good for them and it is good for us and we focus on the thing that benefits both of us, not us going in with special pleading of the that's what she saying today and that's the right direction of travel in the two yea rs of right direction of travel in the two years of the negotiations post—march. years of the negotiations post-march. it is a very important day for theresa may and a crucial speech. do you think she has the support of all her colleagues?” think so. there will always be differences of opinion in any political party as there are in all of them, but the reality, i believe and i've talked to downing street a lot about this, is there is a real commonality of purpose now. we want the relationship between us and the european union and those individual nation states to be a good one. we're leaving the eu. we're not leaving europe. so we will be involved in defence and security, and all these other things that we will continue to be involved in. but what, i think, will continue to be involved in. but what, ithink, the will continue to be involved in. but what, i think, the key thing is that the jewel in the crown in all of this when we leave is to be able to set our trade deals around the world and america said as you see, they
8:17 am
wa nt to and america said as you see, they want to do a trade deal immediately, we have had australia and new zealand and india is lining up, the commonwealth where some of the biggest emerging markets are now, wa nts to biggest emerging markets are now, wants to do deals with the uk again. all of this is a prize ahead of us as we leave to get this right, i believe, could be incredibly strong for the uk going forward and in fact the governor of the bank of england himself now, having said it might be difficult, is now saying, well, he thinks that the uk will thrive and prosper after we leave the eu and that's the key point. ok, we shall find out. iain duncan smith's thank you for talking to us. the speech from prime minister, theresa may, is at10.45am from prime minister, theresa may, is at 10.45am this morning. shall we have a look at the weather? carol is saying it is not too bad. this beautiful picture was sent in by ros. it is cold in london. what's
8:18 am
happening is we have got these weather fronts. the cold front is the one with the blue try angles. it is pulling in the cool continental air. temperatures are low and we have got frost and patchy fog. the other end of the weather front is a warm front. behind it, milder conditions. but equally, there is a lot of cloud across many parts of the uk, some hill fog and also some drizzle. the exception is where we've got the coldest conditions in the south east. here, we'll have sunshine, for some of us, from the word go, there is a wee bit of high cloud across parts of the south—east at the moment, but into the afternoon, some of the sunshine extending over towards parts of dorset and into kent and east anglia. so we're expecting more sunshine than yesterday, but despite that, it will feel nippy. as we move across the midlands and into northern england, a lot of cloud and hill fog and drizzle at times on and off. across scotland, still a lot of cloud and hill fog, but brightening
8:19 am
up cloud and hill fog, but brightening up across cloud and hill fog, but brightening up across the north—east with sunshine. feeling pleasant with higher temperatures. higher temperatures too above average across northern ireland, despite the fa ct across northern ireland, despite the fact that it will remain cloudy. fairly cloudy across wales and south—west england. again, there will be a little bit of hill fog here and there. you might see the odd spit or spot coming out of that, but nothing substantial. through the evening and overnight, under the clear skies across the south east, it will be cold. we are looking at a swid spread frost and again some patchy fog forming. locally, temperatures could dip as low as minus five to minus seven celsius. move away from the clear skies, back under the cloud, and temperatures will not fall as low. we're not expecting any problems with frost. tomorrow then, where we've got the frost, when we lose the patchy fog we will see sunshine across southern counties. some of the cloud across the midlands breaking up so brightening up here too. 0nce the midlands breaking up so brightening up here too. once again, for much of the uk, it will be another cloudy day. temperatures in
8:20 am
double figures across the outer hebrides and northern ireland. we've got a weather front scooting across the north of scotland introducing rain at times. again, nothing too heavy and the wind will strengthen as well. then on thursday, spot the difference! if anything, there will be more cloud in the south, less cloud in the north, but still showers and the temperatures just slowly starting to fall a little bit, but for most of the uk, lou and dan, we still are talking at temperatures above average for this stage in mid—january. thank you, carol, i do love spot the zirches! located on a giant slab of floating ice thatjuts out into the ocean, halley v! is britain's most remote research station. but staff there are being pulled out for safety reasons following the discovery of a big crack in the ice. there is no immediate danger but they want to start the move before winter sets in. captain tim stockings of the british antarctic survey joins us from our london newsroom. this is a fascinating place and a
8:21 am
fascinating story. just tell us what, tell us about the place in first of all? well, good morning. you're right halley is the most incredible place. it is isolated and ona incredible place. it is isolated and on a floating ice shelf which moves. the station itself almost looks like a moon base from another century. it is designed for moved. there is a series of pods bright blue and a big red one, the red one weighs over 200 tonnes and we've just about completed a very successful move of thatice completed a very successful move of that ice station over 23 kilometres of this floating ice shelf. so, incredible place in which we do incredible place in which we do incredible science. just tell us about what the worries are now. you have seen this crack? there is a crack in an ice shelf. there are a lwa ys crack in an ice shelf. there are always cracks in ice shelves, that's the nature of the environment down there, but this particular one is
8:22 am
about 17 kilometres away from the station. it is growing. we're not worried about it right now, but shortly we will be entering the antarctic winter and during winter, it is pitch—black. there is no sunshine. the temperatures go as low as minus 55 celsius and the winds can blow up to gale force and in that period of time, so more about six to eight months of the year, we can't actually reach the station. so we've taken the prudent decision that in light of this new crack, it would be best and the safest thing to do to close the station in a controlled way and to bring our team home because their safety is paramount to us and the aim therefore is to go back in next summer, which will be about november, and re—open the station and continue with that amazing science. and during the normal course of a winter they would stay there when it's dark and you can't get to them. it sounds extremely daning us? it is an amazing place and normally we would have between 13 and 16 of our staff there over
8:23 am
winter. they get to see the southern lights, the aurora which is truly incredible and halley is where the space meets the earth. it is an incredible place to be and in the winter, it's remote and isolated. so the aim is always to make sure that our people are well looked after and that's why we've made the decision that's why we've made the decision that actually the best thing for them, for their safety, is to bring them, for their safety, is to bring them home. we'll do it in a very controlled manner and hopefully get them back in as soon as we can. we're looking at pictures of the aurora and they are just staggeringingly beautiful. i understand they have to be rebuilt and moved because the snowjust can crush the buildings. what happens? well, it can. you're right. there is anywhere between three or five meters of snow falls every year and the current station is the sixth in line. the previous five have had to be either moved or they have been
8:24 am
buried. they went underground because over a period of let's say ten years, you know, if you get 30 or 50 meters of snow then that piles on top of a normal station and actually the weight and the pressure of the ice and the snow causes them to collapse. so we designed this station to be moveable. it is on jackable legs so we can raise it to ta ke jackable legs so we can raise it to take account of the snow and also we can separate the modules and move them and that's what we're doing this year. and not for the faint—hearted to go there. you have been there three times, have you? yes, i have. it is a truly incredible place and i hope that people can see that. they can visit our website and see pictures that our website and see pictures that our team have taken. when you look out of your office window when you're so the there, there is nothing but ice more about 1,000 miles. no signs of human kinds. it isa miles. no signs of human kinds. it is a very special place where we do amazing science. captain tim stockings, thank you very much. thank you.
8:25 am
is that your idea of a holiday, is it? i don't like short days anyway, but imaginejust no it? i don't like short days anyway, but imagine just no light at all. i'd find that tough. it's time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. foremost, another client, grey day on the cards. lots of rain around this morning, some mist and fog across parts of yorkshire, lincolnshire and the south—east has had a touch of frost overnight. the air is still coming out of the continent so we are still getting the leftovers of that cold weather from last week. getting the leftovers of that cold weatherfrom last week. a getting the leftovers of that cold weather from last week. a very different story across many western and northern parts of the uk. a lot, lot are milder in the western isles of scotland. right now a tropical 11 celsius, it hover around ten or 11 through the course of the day so no change for you. temperatures in the north—east of scotland could peak at around 12 or 13 degrees. for most of us, around nine, cloudy, light rain
8:26 am
or drizzle from yorkshire through parts of england into wales. this portion of the uk from the isle of wight through london, east anglia and the south—east will get sunshine, not a and the south—east will get sunshine, nota bad and the south—east will get sunshine, not a bad day. because the skies will be clear both during the day and at night it will turn frosty. you can see the south—eastern quadrant of the uk is pretty nippy tonight, —1, unusually in london, more like 9 degrees still a reversal of what the norm is. through wednesday we have that frosty start, we should get some sunshine around which will develop across the south—west as well but north of that it will be mostly cloudy. thursday, very little change although i think the clouds will increase in the south so it will be not quite so sunny. beyond that, friday into saturday, a lot more cloud. nothing but grey cloud. goodbye. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and rachel horne. hard brexit ahead for hms britannia
8:27 am
— the uk's pm will today say she's prepared to take britain out of the single market as part of an eu exit deal. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 17th of january. no "half in, half out." that's the message from theresa may to brussels. the prime minister's speech will set out 12 priorities for the eu exit deal that she hopes to strike, but is she wishful thinking? also in the programme, rolls—royce on the rack, the aerospace giant agrees to pay $800 million fine to settle bribery and corruption cases in overseas markets. and all eyes on the pound sterling.
8:28 am
8:29 am
8:30 am

171 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on