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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 17, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's tuesday, it's 9 o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire, welcome to the programme. brexit means brexit. brexit means brexit. brexit means brexit. brexit brexit means brexit. brexit means brexit means brexit. brexit means brexit means brexit. and this morning we may get a little bit more information about whether brexit does indeed mean brexit. and find out exactly what that famous phrase means. a blueprint for brexit or a plan with no policies? we will get some detail. we are leaving the single market, but there is an awful lot theresa may ain't going to tell us. plus george michael's childhood friend tells this programme he believes a cocktail of drugs and anti—depressants were responsible for the singer's death on christmas day. hard drugs had been back in his life, it was not heroin. are you talking about cocaine? cocaine, crack was one of his favourite drugs. we'll bring you the full exclusive interview with andros georgiou —
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who was so close to george michael they described themselves as cousins — at 9:15am. and we'll meet one of britain's most prolific organ donors who's already donated a kidney, 16 eggs and 80 pints of blood to people she's never met — and plans to do much, much more. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11am. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. we will bring you the latest news and stories throughout the day. what do you want to hear theresa may say in her big brexit speech which is due at around 1145, you will see that on bbc news. if you have donated an organ, tell us if you have donated an organ, tell us what motivated you. if you have received a stranger's organ, tell us about that as well. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate.
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our top story. the prime minister will this morning set out her vision for the terms of the uk's departure from the european union. theresa may has a list of 12 demands for brexit, and it's being trailed as a clean break from the eu. she'll say she doesn't want a half—in half—out membership — but a global britain, trading with everyone. we'll talk to norman smith in downing street shortly but first our political correspondent carole walker has this report. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain, which gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she's ready to take britain out of the european single market, and perhaps the customs union, too, in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. i think it's highly likely we'll be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, just because that's the way we can really grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents, not just for controlling immigration
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but also free trade opportunities. she'll tell eu leaders... ..but she'll say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers, but whilst the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market. i think the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market if she cares about britain's future. if she's going to fight for britain and fight our corner, then she needs to fight to be in the single market even if we leave the european union. she also needs to indicate that the final deal will be put to the british people. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. but she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27 members determined to safeguard the future
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of the eu without britain. norman, how much detail will we guest promises made today? you know those colouring in books which are so popular now a day, today we get what i think is the brexit colouring book, the big picture, the outlines, but do not expect theresa may to pick up a felt tip and start colouring in any detail. we will get her vision, her ambition, but in terms of policy, i think lots of people will be pretty disappointed today. let me take you through it. on trade she will tell as we are leaving the single market but she will not say whether we are also leaving the bigger customs union, the broader european economic area which ensures that goods do not have to phase customs checks and terrorists. they
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are still deciding whether we are in all out of the customs union. —— have to phase customs checks and tariffs. how will theresa may draw down the numbers? do not expect a nswe i’s down the numbers? do not expect answers today. summon government think we should have freedom of movement light, to say to work as you can come here if you have a job. others want a much more restrictive system with quotas for particular sectors, setting limits. there is theissue sectors, setting limits. there is the issue of the so—called transitional deal, to give breathing space before we eventually leave the eu. mrs may has said she is in favour of an implementation period but we do not know how long that will be, how much we might have to pay for it. i think by the end of the day a lot of people will be thinking about she has an awful lot more colouring in to do. cheers for the moment, norman. joanna is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news.
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police in turkey have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey released this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov shortly after he was detained. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. our correspondent in istanbul, mark lowen, gave us this update. this was the culmination of the huge nationwide police manhunt that appears to finally have apprehended 34—year—old and respect national. he is believed to be the main suspect behind the stumble nightclub attack. —— a 34—year—old national of uzbekistan. he managed to flee the scene, there were fears he could have left turkey, managing to get areas controlled by so—called islamic state which said was behind the attack, that is not the case. he was arrested in a western istanbul suburb, along with his four—year—old sun and others. they were reportedly hiding in an apartment belonging to
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occui’ hiding in an apartment belonging to occur gives man here in istanbul, there will be questions about his support network and whether he had support network and whether he had support and accomplices going into the attack itself, in which he is thought to have killed 39 people, mostly thought to have killed 39 people, m ostly ara b thought to have killed 39 people, mostly arab tourists, some of them turkish nationals, people jumping into the freezing waters of the bosporus to escape. photograph show him very heavily bruised, being held by his neck wearing a grey t—shirt and bloodied. he has been transferred to police custody. the turkish authorities will be hugely relieved by this capture but the greater challenge for turkey going forward is how to secure this country and prevent the wave of terror attacks and golfing turkey from continuing, how to step up intelligence as to supporting a country that feels very shaken at the moment. childhood best friend of george michael says he believes strokes were the cause of
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the singer's death. andros georgiou claims the friend he referred to as his cousin had taken a cocktail of drugs, including antidepressants. a postmortem examination following the death of george michael on christmas day proved inconclusive. he had stopped all the hard drugs, you know, and he was trying to lead a normal life again and ijust believe he was dragged back in to the dark side and the people who dragged him back in have, they need to answer for that, as far as i'm concerned. and you can hear victoria's full interview with andros georgiou on the programme in the next few minutes. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl who was found dead on a pathway in rotherham. the girl, who has been named locally as 16—year—old leonne weeks, was found by a member of the public in the dinnington area of the town yesterday morning. the search for the malaysia airlines flight which disappeared almost three years ago has been called off. flight mh370 took off from kuala lumpur, bound for beijing with 239 people on board.
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the search was being led by australia. despite debris being found off africa are the cause of the crash remains a mystery. a report into the violence at last year's notting hill carnival has revealed that four people almost died from serious stab wounds. the london assembly police and crime committee says the event is now at a tipping point and is calling on the mayor of london, sadiq khan, to get a grip on how it's managed. it says there are concerns about overcrowding at the event, which is attended by more than a million people. the northern ireland secretary will make a statement in parliament today about the collapse of the devolved government at stormont. the power—sharing coalition collapsed after failing to reach a dealfollowing the resignation of deputy first minister martin mcguiness. this report from chris page contains some flash photography. for ten years, politicians and stormont have shared power. but now the devolved government is no more and there's a big question mark over how long it will take to rebuild relations. initially, the partnership between
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the democratic unionist party and sinn fein appeared to be something of a political miracle. old enemies compromising to run northern ireland together. but there were frequent disagreements. the final row came over a financial scandal about a green energy scheme. yesterday, the unlikely alliance officially fell apart, leaving the northern ireland secretary no option but to call an election to the stormont assembly. it will take place on the second of march. while it is inevitable that debate during an election period will be intense, i would strongly encourage the political parties to conduct this election with a view to the future of northern ireland and re—establishing a partnership government at the earliest opportunity after that poll. he'll speak about the crisis in the house of commons today. theresa may has discussed the situation with the irish prime minister, enda kenny,
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in a phone call. they said they wanted the stormont institutions to be back up and running as soon as possible. the power—sharing government here at stormont has ended in a bitter breakup. the election campaign is expected to be particularly divisive. restoring devolution in northern ireland will be no easy task. two people have been seriously injured in a suspected gas explosion at a house in manchester. two houses in blackley were destroyed and another was badly damaged. fire and rescue crews say they have now secured the building. a kitten was recovered alive from the rubble. more than a0 learner drivers are caught each year using impersonators to take their tests. 209 people have been convicted in the past five years, according to data published by the transport minister andrewjones. more than 100 others were convicted of taking the practical or theory tests on behalf of others. motoring experts warn that offenders are putting people's lives at risk. that's a summary of the latest bbc
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news — more at 9:30am. thank you. we are asking what you are hoping forfrom thank you. we are asking what you are hoping for from theresa may's speech on brexit. james says, hoping for? we demand what we voted for, a total exit from the eu. we have voters in the studio from burnley, manchester, orpington, beaconsfield, what are you hoping for? what is brexit mean to you?‘ decade of uncertainty. prosperity. a challenge with huge opportunities. decade of uncertainty. prosperity. a challenge with huge opportunities! new future. difficulty for students. a brighter future. that is what some photos here think or believe brexit should mean. do get into urged to tell is what you are hoping for from theresa may, what brexit means to
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you —— do get into it. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport withjessica. it's been quite a day for the brits at the australian open. heather watson, johanna konta and kyle edmund have gone through to the second round, adding that two andy murray and dan evans yesterday and thatis murray and dan evans yesterday and that is five british people through to the second round of the australian open, that is for the first time since 1987. heather watson, the last three appearances in the australian open she has gone out in the first round. this time she has beaten the 18th seed and the home favourite son stosur, and sam stosur is no easy opponent. she is a former us open champion. it really is a remarkable achievement for watson. they were on call for over two i was in the melbourne heat —— they were on court. watson was broken early on but took the first set 6—3, she dropped the second set 3—6 and then stormed back 6—0 in the final set,
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son stosur did not get a look in. a really good day for british tennis and more to come, naomi broady is on court ina and more to come, naomi broady is on court in a couple of hours. what else do you have? and olympic funding review going on, seven sports want to challenge uk sport and their funding decision to basically a rate their funding going into the next olympic cycle for tokyo 2020. five of the seven were funded at the rio olympics and paralympics. badminton was one of those, i was at rio and watch the badminton, followed it really closely and i saw the men's doubles pairwin theirfirst closely and i saw the men's doubles pair win their first badminton closely and i saw the men's doubles pair win theirfirst badminton medal for british badminton and 12 years, a bronze medal, they really thought that would be the catalyst to inspire future generations to take up inspire future generations to take up the sport and basically pave the way for improved funding, it was a real shock for them to have funding
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com pletely real shock for them to have funding completely removed. for uk sport, they want each of these boards to prove they can win medals in tokyo 2020 -- prove they can win medals in tokyo 2020 —— each of those sports. there is badminton, archery, fencing, weightlifting and wheelchair rugby, table tennis is in the mix and today is the final day for those sports to get their reviews in. one former premier league manager calls time? louis van gaal used a management resting a night, he is 65 years old, had a 26 year career —— used to manage manchester united. he has not worked since winning the fa cup at the end of last season with man utd, he was later sacked. dutch media have reported that part of his decision was motivated because of the sudden death of his daughter's husband, he wants to go away from football and spend more time at home. he has had a remarkable career, not only managing manchester united but the likes of bayern munich and barcelona. fittingly he made his announcement about his retirement after receiving
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the lifetime achievement award by the lifetime achievement award by the dutch fa for his contribution to football. this morning, in an exclusive interview, george michael's childhood best friend has told this programme he believes a cocktail of hard drugs and anti—depressants may have been responsible for the singer songwriter‘s death on christmas day. andros georgiou, who was so close to george michael growing up they called each other cousins, says he believes the singer was "dragged back to the dark side of hard drugs use" and claims he was using crack cocaine. in a wide—ranging interview mr georgiou, who was in the process of reconciling his relationship with the star after a falling out also says george michael was "one of the nicest people you could ever meet". a post—mortem examination on the 53—year—old has proved inconclusive and the police aren't treating his death as suspicious. in his only broadcast interview mr georgiou shares new insight into george michael's extraordinary generosity and says that his getting caught cottaging in a public toilet in la was, in the end, a "relief" for the singer.
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# wake me up before you go go, take me dancing tonight. from two years old when he grew up together. our fathers came over from cyprus. there's nine months between us in age, so pretty much we spent our childhood together and, you know, we kind of really bonded when it came to music. it was one of those things that hit both of us in such a big way, especially the likes of queen and eltonjohn. when we were around nine—years—old we went to see queen at earls court while our mums waited
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in the wimpey bar next to earl's court station. we were probably the youngest there. the george i know was a very private person, and incredibly generous person, and one of the nicest people you could ever meet. he would never say, very rarely say no to a photograph or an autograph for someone. # let the sun going down on me.# eltonjohn was always, even in, he was a big fan of wham straightaway. of wham straightaway. ladies and gentlemen, mr eltonjohn. once we went to dinner at elton's house, he told as princess diana was going to be there.
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after dinner he said i really want to play you my new album, so we are like, yeah, great. so he got one of the servants and said can you back the bentley up and we were like, where are we going? he said, nowhere. he said ijust don't have a good sound system. itjust made us laugh. he has this magnificent multi—million dollar house, but he didn't have a good stereo! so the driver parked outside, elton gets in the driver's seat, george is in the front seat and me and princess diana are sitting in the back and i couldn't help but pinch myself, because, wow. we listened to the album and we were in the car for nearly an hour. you have got some music, some songs, that george had written, you have got that. yeah. what are you going to do with those songs?
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i have no plans at the moment. no artist would do that. would you consider releasing those tracks?l ha rd consider releasing those tracks?l hard question. not on my mind at the moment. it's not, you know, i don't know if, i mean, it is one of those things probably in the future, you know, i'd have to get a producer in to finish the record off. but i have a little bit more respect than that, you know, we talked about finishing the album. i mean i've got all the master tapes. i've got everything, you know, like sitting in a vault in the west end somewhere. my a ccou nta nt the west end somewhere. my accountant put them in there. so right now, no, but i don't know what the future will bring. i mean right
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i'iow the future will bring. i mean right now we are all raw and. and just the whole family is incredibly upset and everyday there are more and more stories that are completely untrue. i read one that he had done heroin for the last four or five months of his life, that is absolute rubbish. how do you know? i know that was the one drug he would never touch. # time can never mean... # to careless whispers of the good friend.# i'm going to come back to that later. i want to ask positive stuff about what george michael did for lgbt rights by eventually talking about his sexuality frankly, the fact he enjoyed sex, the fact he wasn't ashamed of cottaging and criticising other gay celebrities for saying things
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like the preferred to have a cup of tea rather than have sex. boy george, you mean? how important was that to him? it was really important. he felt like a spokesman in the end because he was a sex symbol, let's be honest. every girl had a picture of george michael upon their wall. it was the faith tour that really put him in a position where i cannot do this any more. he was an honest person. he just felt like he was pulling the wool over people's eyes. once he had been caught he just figured i might as well talk about it. # yes, i've been bad.# did he ever say it was a good thing that i got caught? yeah, he absolutely
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said it's a relief. you hadn't seen george yourself for 12 years. yeah. i think you fell out around the time of the public toilet incident in la. specifically, why did you fall out? well, because i got a phone call at four o'clock from his pr and she told me that he had been arrested and ijust didn't believe it. i basically got up, went to heathrow, got on a plane and got to la. when i got to the house the road was full of cameras, vans from every country going crazy. so i presumed we would have a nice quiet night in, but he was ready to go out and party. it was almost like a relief for him. it was like it's out. # let's go outside.#
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we went out that night and it was probably one of the best nights we had out. the trouble was the next day the la times put in a story, because we used to take my son down to the park before he was arrested and a children's playground is right next to the rest rooms, where he was arrested. so they kind of insinuated that there was something going on with children. he just lost it at that point. so he asked me to book a page in every times and once he had written a letter i read it and it was just so wrong, i was like you just cannot do this. you cannot put this out. he went kind of crazy at me
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because i wouldn't do what i was told to do and he said well you might as well go. # baby, i know you're asking me to stay.# can i ask you about the incredible acts of generosity we have heard about it since his death? the woman who was on deal or no deal and he got in touch with the programme and paid for her ivf, secretly ringing radio stations and donating money, going round to homeless charities, helping homeless people. that was the george that you knew, presumably. we didn't know that. we would often go out on christmas eve with two range rovers full of food and travel around the west end and feed all the homeless and he would give them all £50 or £100 each for christmas. was he in disguise or did they know it was george michael? not in disguise, he just had
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a baseball hat like i've got on. you know, most people didn't recognise him. they wouldn't have known who he was. tell us about the time you were at an eltonjohn aids foundation fundraiser on behalf of george and he effectively given carte blanche to bid would ever you wanted, use his money for that charity. again, he was so charitable. we were supposed to go together and at the last minute he decided he would pull out for whatever reason. he said, you go and i will give you £25,000 and buy a couple of things. we went, we had dinner, but then did a private show and the auction started. it was like for people on the orient express,
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all these crazy things and so every time elton said something i did. no one else bid, so i went through the 25 pretty quickly, so i said give me one minute, i went into the corridor, i rang up george and i said no one is bidding here. i said it is full of real famous people. i said no one is bidding and he said just buy everything. can i ask you about the moment that you heard he had died? yeah, that was, you know... well, first of all, i did not believe it. i still needed confirmation, so i was trying to call people and everything. i couldn't get hold of anyone until late that night, 11 o'clock before i got hold of anybody. then, it was all confirmed to me and everything. and ijust broke down. i believe he obviously had suicidal thoughts over the last few years because his mental health wasn't in the best place, but i don't
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believe this was suicide in a million years. why would you arrange such a huge dinner with the whole family if you we re dinner with the whole family if you were going to kill yourself the night before? it just were going to kill yourself the night before? itjust doesn't make any sense. there is a lot about this that doesn't make sense. a pathology report has proved inconclusive. what do you think happened? i think it was an accident. what do you mean? in a way that, i mean, i can't really say what i know, because. you can if you want to. well, you know, what i do know is that hard drugs had been back in his life, but it wasn't heroin. are you talking about cocaine?
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yes, cocaine and crack was one of his favourite drugs. so, when you say this was an accident, what do you mean? ijust mean that he took too much of something, mixed with the anti—depressants and other drugs he was on with alcohol. i think his heart just stopped beating. if you take, if you are on xanax, for instance, or something, your heart slows down anyway. they are anti—anxiety drugs and sleeping tablets, aren't they? yes. he was actually getting better. he was planning the freedom documentary. he had written some new songs. i know he had been out as well. he was a recluse for nearly four years.
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he was in rehab for three years. the papers reported it as a year, he was actually in the swiss clinic for three years before he came out and he had stopped all the hard drugs. he was trying to lead a normal life again and ijust believe he was dragged back in to the dark side. you're adamant those reports of george michael taking heroin in recent months absolutely not true. absolutely not true. # last christmas i give you my heart, the very next day you give it away. what other questions you want answered? who put him on hard drugs.
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he was not on them. he was getting better. that is why i got in contact, because i heard he was getting better. he was planning the freedom documentary, you had written some new songs. and i know he had been out as well. he was a recluse who nearly four years. he was in rehab for three years. the papers reported it as a year, he was actually in the swiss clinic for three years before he came out and he had stopped all the hard drugs. he was trying to lead a normal life again and ijust believe he was dragged back in to the dark side. ijust want to get
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to the truth of what happened exactly, what was in his blood at the time, why did he have that again. the quicker this is all put to bed then the quicker we can put him to rest and move on, because until that happens no one can move on. i still cannot believe what i'm talking about here. i can't even imagine that he is lying on a slab in a fridge. it is shocking. shocking experience. christmas will never be the same. his records, last christmas, it will be played for ever. and the fans and the family, de margaret rowley.
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talking to you, i still can't believe it. i can't comprehend it. it is like, no. it will pop up somewhere, you know? —— he will pop up somewhere, you know? —— he will pop up somewhere, you know? i still cannot believe what i'm talking about here. such a shame and may he rest in peace. thank you very much for talking to us. you are welcome, thank you. and, of course, he did not receive nor ask for a fee for that interview. you can read more about our exclusive interview with him on the bbc news site and watch the full interview again on our programme page bbc.co.uk/victoria. we'll bring you more reaction after 10am. still to come: we'll meet one of britain's most prolific organ donors who has already donated a kidney, 16 eggs and 80 pints of blood to people she's never met. that's in 15 minutes. 10,000 people killed and millions more starving in yemen war rages between houthi rebels and the saudi—led coalition supporting the government. we'll talk to mp andrew mitchell
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who has just returned from yemen about what can be done. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. the prime minister will this morning set out her clearest vision yet for the terms of the uk's departure from the european union. theresa may will say britain shouldn't be half—in, half—out of the eu. that's being taken as an indication that she's prepared to leave the single market in order to control britain's borders and laws. police have arrested the main suspect in the new year's eve attack on a nightclub in istanbul. authorities in turkey released this photo of uzbek national abdulkadir masharipov shortly after he was detained. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar. so—called islamic state said it was behind the attack and that it was revenge for turkish military involvement in syria. george michael's childhood best friend has told this programme that he believes drugs were responsible for
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the singer's death. andros georgiou claims the friend he referred to as his cousin had taken a cocktail of drugs, including anti—depressants. a post—mortem following george michael's death on christmas day proved inconclusive. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl who was found dead on a pathway in rotherham. the girl, who has been named locally as 16—year—old leonne weeks, was found by a member of the public in the dinnington area of the town yesterday morning. concentrix — the us firm accused of incorrectly withdrawing tax credits from hundreds of claimants — has been criticised in a report out today. the national audit office says the company had insufficient staff to handle the volume of calls from people trying to find out why their tax credits had been stopped. in one week alone, 19,000 calls went u na nswered. well, this programme has learned that there are still families struggling with debt after having their tax credits withdrawn —
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and we'll be hearing from some of them at just after 10am. the latest inflation figures arrived. let's get the details from rachel horne, our business expert this morning. what is inflation? the way we measure the prices of goods, if it is going up, if the price you pay at the petrol pump or your cinema ticket or hotel room is going up, thatis ticket or hotel room is going up, that is inflation, the prices rising. what to the latest figures show? figures are right for december, we expected to see inflation up about 1.4%, it is up around 1.6%. it is not much of eight prize, we have heard about sterling falling because of brexit concerns, when the pound is weak, the price of stuff we buy into the uk, we import, rises. there is the price of oil,
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around 12 months ago it was down $27 around 12 months ago it was down $27 a barrel, it is a rentable lab. inflation measures the price of things now compared to last year, it is going up. thank you, rachel. now the sport with jessica. three british players have reached the second round of the australian open overnight, bringing the total to five. johanna konta beat kirsten flipkens in straight sets. the british number one will face the thai wild card or teenager naomi osaka next. heather watson beta 18th seed and local favourite stand so is there in three sets. she will next face americanjennifer three sets. she will next face american jennifer brady league or one belgian in her next match. kyle edmund beat santiago giraldo of colombia in straight sets. he will face cab low —— pablo carreno busta next. the rfu is investigating a complaint from cell that one of their own team, understood to be this play in
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blue, passed information to the bristol camp ahead of a narrow defeat this month. seven sports are attempting to challenge the uk sport decision not to fund their programmes for the uk olympics and paralympics in 2020. badminton is among five sports which we re badminton is among five sports which were funded the rio 2016 and will challenge the decision. more on that atjust after 10am. so we've heard an awful lot of... brexit means brexit. now it's time to find out exactly what that means. prime minister theresa may is making her "big" brexit speech today and our political guru norman smith will be there. her speeches at 11115 and you will hear it on bbc news. norman? today is the day when we are meant to find out what it is theresa may is trying to achieve, what her game plan is, what her blueprint is for brexit.
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we know she will say we will not do some sort of hokey cokie, halfway inn, hardware and, we will not be associate members of the eu, we will not have partial membership, we are wrote. understandably, prominent brexiteers are delighted. listen to young duncan is this morning. there isa young duncan is this morning. there is a real commonality of pope —— purpose. we want the relationship between us, the eu and individual nation states to be good. we are leaving the eu, not europe, we will be involved in defence and security and all these other things that we will continue to be involved in. the key thing is that the jewel in the crown in all of this when we leave is to be able to set our trade deals around the world. what sort of detail are we going to get? it is a bit like a high—stakes
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game of political poker, as theresa may enters the negotiating chamber. she has some cards in her hands but let's look at the cards she wants to play. card number one is the trade card. she wants to say, we are leaving the single market. that is the economic area where businesses have to play by the same set of rules, there are no tariffs between different eu countries. she says we will leave because we want to strike run trade deals. the second card is the immigration card, she wants to say no more freedom of movement where eu citizens can come to the uk regardless of whether they have a job. she wants to end that. the last card we know she wants to play is justice, to stop the european court ofjustice being able to lay down the law to british judges. but theresa may will also keep some cards pretty close to her chest,
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because she does not want to reveal her hand before the negotiations. she will not tell as much about playing the tax break card. we heard philip hammond say at the weekend that if the eu gets tough with those we could start to cut business taxes to make britain more attractive for investments. she will not sure whether she will pay the tariff card, if the eu gets tough with us might we put tariffs on goods they wa nt to might we put tariffs on goods they want to export to us? she will not say whether she will play the card marked eu citizens, because she will not guarantee eu citizens the right to stay here until brussels has guaranteed the right of british people elsewhere in the eu to continue living there. but mrs may also has a number of aces up her sleeve. ace number one, the security card. we are the biggest military power in europe, we have an
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extensive intelligence network crucial in the fight against terrorism and is, so that is quite an ace card. money, another ace, we area an ace card. money, another ace, we are a wealthy country with the city, can other eu countries and companies really manage if brussels seeks to damage the city of london? lastly we have the donald, donald trump yesterday clearly said he is backing brexit and backing britain, in other words he is in our corner when it comes to negotiations. but a word of caution, remember the last prime minister who tried to strike a deal with brussels? have a look at this. within the last hour i have negotiated a deal to give the united kingdom special status inside the european union. i believe this is enough for me to recommend that the united kingdom remain in the european union, having the best of both worlds. the british people have voted to leave the european union,
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and their will must be respected. i will do everything i can as prime minister to steady the ship over the coming weeks and months. but i do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. it did not turn out too well for him, did it?! the stakes are enormously high for theresa may. although we may not get all the detail today, we are getting a sense of what theresa may is trying to achieve. she wants britain to be free of the constraints associated with the single market and the european justice, but we don't really know what sort of curves she will put on immigration and we don't
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really know whether there might be some sort of transitional deal to ease our way out of europe, so there is still an awful lot we have to find out. ina find out. in a moment we will talk to voters from manchester, burnley, orpington, beaconsfield. thank you for your patience, we will be with you very soon. in the meantime... let's talk now to peter lilley, the conservative mp for hitchin and harpenden — he voted to leave — and to jenny chapman, labour's brexit spokesperson and mp for darlington. she voted to remain. what do you want to hear from theresa may, peter lilley? logical conclusions of what she has already said, because we are taking back control of our borders we cannot be members of the european economic area. once we are free of that we can negotiate trade deals and services, we will no longer had to pay £250 million a week net into the european budget, and we will not be subject to european law. we will
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also be outside the common external tariff, so we will be able to cut ta riffs tariff, so we will be able to cut tariffs on the sort of products we don't make like food and clothing which have very high tariffs at the moment, which by heavily on ordinary people's budgets. we can cut those turrets and enter free trade agreements with the rest of the world, which is the majority of our trade. how long would you expect those dreich —— agreements to take? well, the average time it takes to negotiate free trade agreement across the world are 28 months. if there are a lot of countries, it ta kes there are a lot of countries, it takes more, if there are only two countries, less. a trade deal between us and the united states could be done in less than that, 18 months. say similarly with new zealand and australia, it would take longer with the really big prizes. the only trade deals that matter are those with huge markets like india
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and china. but switzerland has negotiated such deals and i think we could too. yes, i think that took three years, but anyway, fair enough, i take the point. jenny, what do you want to hear from theresa may? almost anything is an improvement on what we've heard so far. because let's not forget she doesn't want to make this speech today. she didn't want to do this. she has been forced to make this speech because parliament obliged her to publish a plan. she needs to publish more detail. i understand there will abstatement in the house of commons later today which hopefully will include some of the detail that we have been asking for. but she is going to say by all accounts, yes, we are leaving the single market, which you don't want? if we're not going to have that, what are we going to have? she can't stand up and give us the platitudes which has done previously, if we are not going to be in the single market
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and the customs, what are we going to have? and the customs, what are we going to have ? she and the customs, what are we going to have? she made promises to nissan, without tariffs and won't be damaged, she made that promise. so if we're not going to be in the customs union... it was published that she made a commitment to them. yes. yes. we don't know what it entails. if we are not going to be in the customs union, which is a logical and reasonable think for her to say... the broader economic area. that's what we need out of today's speech. i'm not sure we're going to get that today. what are we going to have? it is narrowed down to two options, either the european union will agree to continue trading with us on zero will agree to continue trading with us on zero tariffs and no new barriers. highly unlikely if we are not accepting freedom of movement? we are got deals with 50 countries. i agree it may not happen. or we
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will trade on the same terms as the eu trades with america and japan and russia and china. so we will be no worse off than its best trading partners if there is no agreement, if there is an agreement we will be better off. are you expecting any detail, either of you today, when it comes toum gration? ie if we are pulling out of the single market then we don't have to accept freedom of workers from the eu, are you expecting details about how eu workers will be able to come to britain, either guarantee of a job or will it be a visa system?” britain, either guarantee of a job or will it be a visa system? i hope we will apply the same criteria to european countries as we apply to the rest of the world. so we have a colour—free immigration policy whereas at present we have a different regime for people from europe as we do from people from the rest of the world and obviously people who are coming on business back and forth it should be as easy and as free as possible, but we want to put an end to mass immigration which created, added to the housing
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crisis in our country and undermined the incentive we have to train our own people up to the skills they need. i think peter's fantasy speech is all very interesting and it is exactly what we were told during the referendum campaign and a lot of this is fantasy politics sol referendum campaign and a lot of this is fantasy politics so i think what we need to do is let's wait and see what she actually says because i would be very, very surprised and i think you might be disappointed later today if what she says is anything close to that which you've just outlined. i think what we're going to get, it will be broad brush, very high—level and we will have as many questions at the end of today as we have now. this has been an over hyped speech and we could be disappointed. well, we will see, won't we? thank you both very much. jenny chapman and peter lilley, conservative mp who voted to leave the european union. our audience of leave and remain voters are with us. you were looking for a brighter
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future, prosperity. when politicians talk about it, does it make you any clearer about what you want for the future of this country? no. it muddles things up more. i don't thinkjenny helps the situation when you degrade people's opinions by calling them fantasy. there is nothing fantasy about what he said. i disagree with the way you approached the situation and it is quite irresponsible. the idea of it being a fantasy resonates with me because at the moment we don't know anything. a lot of the things that theresa may has said has been brexit means brexit but what does that actually mean? today hopefully we will get clarity on that because again, there will be some immigrants for example who live here who are going to say, "hey, what about me? what's going to happen to me and my family?" thank you. more from you all at 10.15am.
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this programme has learnt that there are still families struggling with debt after having their tax credits wrongly stopped by concentrix, a company employed by the government to reduce benefit fraud. a teenager admitted throwing a stone ata a teenager admitted throwing a stone at a toxy in birmingham leaving a woman with a fractured skull. the taxi's cctv captured the incident. this video does contain graphic images. so, if there is anyone in the room that might be distressed by it, just to let you know. well, that 17—year—old boy admitted... it, just to let you know. well, that 17-year-old boy admitted... are you 0k 17-year-old boy admitted... are you ok folks? are you ok folks? hang on. hang on. hang on, folks. hang on. hang on. hang on, folks. hang on.
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hang on, folks. hang on, folks. hang on. we'll phone 999, folks. the 17—year—old who threw the stone admitted he was drunk and targeting taxis. he appeared in court with two other youths, two were found guilty of wounding and all four were convicted of conspiring to damage taxis. next this morning, meet one of britain's most prolific organ donors. she's called tracey jolliffe, she's 50 and she's already donated a kidney, 16 eggs and 80 pints of blood to people she's never met. she intends to leave her brain to science and is now hoping to give away part of her liver to a person she may never meet. tracey jolliffee joins us now alongside george compton who became
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a trustee for the organ donation charity live life, give life after she received a double lung transplant which saved her life at 25. tracey it has been a gradual thing, i know, it started when you signed up i know, it started when you signed up to donate blood and to the bone marrow register when you were 18. what evolved after that? well, i donated blood on a regular basis. bone marrow i have only been called once and wasn't a match at final hurdle. the organ donation, it has been something i have always been interested in. ithink been something i have always been interested in. i think if you can do something, you should. in terms of donating your kidney, that's quite a big deal. tell us the process. well, i first read about it in the news in 2010. just a few years after it became legal to donate to a stranger andi became legal to donate to a stranger and i thought about it for a while before i approached the local transplant co—ordinator and chatted
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to her at length before i started under going the tests. right. ok. and the test involved what? quite a lot of blood tests. you have to have an mri, a ct scan, a lot of kidney function tests and you have to go and see a psychiatrist to make sure you're donating for the right reasons. and your reasons were what? ijust reasons. and your reasons were what? i just thought it was a nice thing to do. as simple as that? yes. i don't know anyone who has kidney failure so i can't say it is a personal story. i know there are people waiting for transplants. 300 people waiting for transplants. 300 people a year die waiting for a kidney transplant and i could do something to save one of them. in terms of your surgery and recovery time, how long in total? ways in hospitalfor time, how long in total? ways in hospital for five days and probably about six weeks before i was back to full health. but that's individual. how did your family react? they were fine. they are used to me doing what i want to do! fair enough. the eggs as well, donating the eggs, that's a
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pretty invasive procedure? as well, donating the eggs, that's a pretty invasive procedure ?m as well, donating the eggs, that's a pretty invasive procedure? it is. it does involve having a lot of injections to stimulate the egg production and it is‘ general anaesthetic to recover the eggs and you recover quickly from that. in terms of the people that, that you are donate to go, you don't know any of them? no, it is all done anonymously, no idea. complete strangers? yeah. do you have, do you wa nt strangers? yeah. do you have, do you want to, are you curious, would you like to find out? it is not your call, as it happens, a recipient could make an effort to get in touch with you, but as a donor you can't? idid think with you, but as a donor you can't? i did think about it. it would be nice to put a face to what i've done. but and then i thought well, what if i meet them and i don't like them? oh. i think it is what if i meet them and i don't like them? oh. ithink it is probably safest not to. they would be so grateful to you, you're bound to fall in love with you. possibly. george, you were diagnosed with cystic fibrosis as a baby and went
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on the organ transplant list for a second time in 2014. what does it feel like from your point of view to have your life saved by a complete stranger? ah, it is incredible. i never experienced my life this well. growing up, i have always been in and out of hospital with chest infections and never been able to breathe properly. it is incredible. it really is the gift of life. i have been given a second chance and i'm making the most of it and doing all that i can. how in need of the lung transplant were you? all that i can. how in need of the lung transplant were you ?|j all that i can. how in need of the lung transplant were you? i was days away from dying. i had my, it was my fourth call that everything went ahead. i was in hospital and unable to leave. i was on oxygen and i had an invase yave mask to help me breathe. i was bed—bound and i could barely eat for myself. things had got as worse for myself at that
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time. roger says, "i donated a kidney two years ago. i looked to see if i could help some other way and that's when i found about organ donations, different people at the hospitals kept asking me why? i didn't have an answer at first, it may have been for a variety of reasons. i think the simplest answer is that i enjoy helping others." you are now a trustee of live life give life, you want to encourage others to donate organs. yes. not necessarily while they are alive, but that's possible, as we know. necessarily while they are alive, but that's possible, as we knowlj think what tracey has done is incredible. we encourage people to sign up for organ donation. talk to their families, which is the most important thing. even when people sign up for organ donation, 48% of families refuse, that's why it is important this to get people to talk to every memberof important this to get people to talk to every member of their family so they are aware of that des organ donation is so special. from my experience, it is life changing and
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to give someone that opportunity when you are not longer here or still alive like tracey. we like to promote it and get the word out there and just see where we go. thank you very much for coming on the programme. thank you, george, thank you, tracey. later in the programme we'll be talking to a recovering alcoholic who donated her kidney to a stranger. they've now met and become friends. now the weather. some of us seeing a cloudy start to the day and it will remain cloudy with drizzle, but here it will be milder. where some of us have clearer skies this morning, so there is frost around. also some patchy fog too and currently for example, in reading the temperature is minus one, but in lossiemouth, it is minus one, but in lossiemouth, it is 11 celsius! so a huge range in temperatures. now, ican is 11 celsius! so a huge range in temperatures. now, i can show you some of the weather watchers photos. this cat isn't stupid, he has got
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his umbrella out. in gloucestershire there is rain and drizzle. in wales, some drizzle. pushing further towards the east, this is sunningdale in berkshire, a beautiful start to the day. across many south—eastern areas, that's what you can expect. but there is still some patchy fog which could ta ke still some patchy fog which could take much of the morning to clear. we've got this weather front draped across central areas. behind the cold front, we're pulling in colder continental air, hence the lower temperatures, behind the warm front, we've got milder air coming our way, hence the higher temperatures. but there is a lot of cloud around. some hill fog. the weather front producing patchy rain and drizzle. to the south of that, under the clearer skies, some of us in the sunshine and where we've got the patchy fog, it will lift and more of us patchy fog, it will lift and more of us will see sunshine as we go through the day. we're expecting more sunshine than we had yesterday. and we could see it as far west as parts of dorset, but across southern
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counties, all the way to kent, essex and east anglia and the midlands, only four celsius in london. across the midlands, we are back under the blanket of cloud producing drizzle and hill fog. clearing up across much of scotland, but it will be fairly cloudy. parts of the north—east could well see sunshine. temperatures up to 11 celsius or 12 or 13 celsius. a cloudy day across northern ireland. again, high temperatures for this stage in mid—january. as we push into wales, under the weather front once again, we've got more cloud. still hill fog. the odd spot coming out of that cloud as it will do across the south—west. now, through the evening and overnight, under the clear skies, the temperature will drop away quickly. we're looking at a frost. and some patchy fog. to give you an idea of the temperature values we're looking at in towns and cities, freezing or just values we're looking at in towns and cities, freezing orjust below, ru rally, cities, freezing orjust below, rurally, somewhere in hampshire we could see minus seven celsius. under
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the clear skies, no problems with frost, but there will be a lot of cloud around. tomorrow morning, we will lose the patchy fog through the morning allowing sunshine across southern areas. although elsewhere, across the uk, there will be quite a bit of cloud. it should break across the midlands and here it should brighten up as well. but we have a weather front flirting with the far north of scotland. that's introducing rain and showers across the west highlands. here too, the wind will strengthen, but the not temperatures, northern ireland and western scotland still in double figures. further south, western scotland still in double figures. furthersouth, despite the sunshine, well, we're looking at about four or five celsius. hello, it's 10am, it's tuesday january 17th. i'm victoria derbyshire. prime minister theresa may this morning said that her brexit plans. what do you want to hear from the prime minister when she delivers her big speech on brexit? —— sets out her brexit plan. -- sets out her brexit plan. for myself, what happens now? they
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mentioned the idea about the single market, if we will not have that and allow people to trade or travel freely, what will happen? sovereignty, including migration, law, including how we make new laws without reference to the eu, thirdly trade. i think the government needs to be bowled on trade. i want to make sure theresa may does the swift, clean brexit, leaving the single market, the european court of justice, the customs union. that is what i want to hear from theresa may. we'll be getting reaction from a group of you — voters — a mix of people who voted leave and remain. plus george michael's childhood friend tells this programme he believes a mixture of drugs and anti—depressants could have been responsible for the singer's death on christmas day i think that he took too much of something, mixed with the antidepressants and other drugs he was on, with alcohol. this programme has learned there are
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still families struggling with debt after having their tax credits wrongly stopped by concept tricks, the american firm employed by the government to stop benefit ford. —— by concentrates. i have had to go to a food bank, it isjust hard. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may is expected to use a speech on her brexit strategy this morning to give a clear signal that she's prepared to take britain out of the single market, so the uk can control its own borders and laws. mrs may will tell an audience in central london that she has no desire to be half—in, half—out of the european union. the main suspect in the istanbul nightclub attack has been arrested following a huge manhunt. the 34—year—old uzbek national was detained during a police raid at a house in the city. the governor of istanbul says he has
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confessed. 39 people were killed and 70 wounded at the reina bar on new year's eve. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl in rotherham. her body was found yesterday morning on a path in the dinnington area of the town. she has been named locally as 16—year—old leonne weeks. her body was found by a member of the public. george michael's childhood best friend has told the programme that he believes drugs were the cause of the singapore ‘s mike death. andros georgiou claims the friend he referred to as his cousin had taken a cocktail of drugs including antidepressants. a postmortem examination following the death of george michael on christmas day proved inconclusive. police have arrested a man following an explosion at a house in manchester. two people were seriously injured following the blast in leonne. residents were told to leave their homes while fire
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crews secured the area. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. diana tweeted about organ donation, i donated a kidney in december, i would love a little letter saying all is well, that would be so special. linda, ijust special. linda, i just thought was a nice thing to do, what an understatement from you wonderful guest. sarah says that tracy and others like her are awesome. as somebody who has regular blood transfusions, 18 units since may, and kidney problems. keep those coming in. around 100 people a year who are alive donate their organs. it is called altruistic organ donation. if you are one of those, let me know. and if you have received a stranger's organ, let me know as well. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. here's some sport now withjessica. three british players have reached the second round of the australian open overnight. that's a total of five players now, which is the first time since 1987. first up on court wasjohanna konta.
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she beat the former wimbledon semi—finalist kirsten flipkens 7—5, 6—2. the world number nine will now face thai wildcard luksika kumkhum orjapanese teenager naomi osaka. iam very i am very happy to have come through that, whether it was going to take two or three sets i was prepared to stay out as long as i needed to. again, it was a tough first set and there was not much in it, i wasjust happy that i was able to put my foot on the pedal and little bit but also just manage really well the difficulties of the match. a brilliant win for heather watson against an opponent 60 places above her in the world rankings. she beat home favourite and 18th seed sam stosur in three sets. up next is americanjennifer brady or belgian maryna zanevska in her next match. a bit later today, naomi broady plays number 22 seed daria gavrilova.
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i knew it would not be any easy match. i have played sam a couple of times before and she has beat me both times. she has a very different style of play to most girls, she hits the ball very heavy and has a great serve. so, yeah, i knew! would have to return well and try to be the first want to dictate, otherwise she would have been all over me. “— otherwise she would have been all over me. —— the first one to dictate. in the men's draw, kyle edmund beat colombia's santiago hiraldo in straight sets, taking just under two hours to do it. he'll face 30th seed pablo carreno busta next. the rfu are investigating a complaint from sale that one of their own team passed information to the bristol camp ahead of a narrow defeat earlier this month. it's understood to be sale's former bristol wing tom arscott — seen here in the blue. bristol fought back from 15—0 down to win the game 24—23 on new year's day.
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seven sports are challenging the removal of their funding for the tokyo olympics and paralympics in 2020, with another asking for more cash. badminton is among five sports which lost funding after rio 2016 looking to reverse uk sport's decision. they are joined by goalball, not funded in 2016, and table tennis which only gets paralympic funding. former manchester united boss louis van gaal has announced his retirement from football. he hasn't worked since winning the fa cup with united and leaving the club at the end of last season. he made the announcement after receiving a lifetime achievement award from the dutch government for his contribution to football. that is all the sport for now, i will have the headlines for you at about10:30am. use justin, the former about10:30am. usejustin, the former foreign secretary jack straw faces being sued over allegations over 2004 kidnapped after the supreme court ruled that a tortured libyan
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dissident‘s case must be heard in british courts. this dissident alleges that mi6, which mr straw was responsible for, help the us abduct him ina responsible for, help the us abduct him in a shirt to return him and his wife to libya. the landmark ruling isa wife to libya. the landmark ruling is a blow for this government, which fought to stop the case being heard. the lawyers for the libyan said he is determined to sue unless he receives an apology and a token £1 in damages. the supreme court said that the allegations will associate risk they had to be heard before a british court, because if not they would never be heard anywhere else in the world. the damages action is based on documents unearthed in tripoli following the fall of colonel gaddafi. in 2004, m16 communicated with the regime over the fate of the dissident. according to documents uncovered in tripoli, mi6 tipped off the libyan regime and the couple were seized in bangkok by
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us secret service is. i think we can talk to our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani outside of the supreme court. can you hear me? hello, victoria. can you hear me? we are still getting microphones on. hello, victoria. can you hear me? we are still getting microphones onlj have read a little bit to the audience that former foreign secretary jack straw faces being sued, phil is in? -- phil is in. have been long—running allegations of rendition, the uk's alleged role co m pete ntly of rendition, the uk's alleged role competently in rendition. the cases about this man and his wife, the man was a libyan dissident who fled libya after failing to overthrow colonel gaddafi many years ago. he was hiding in china. in 2004 he tried to leave to get to the uk to claim asylum. en route, according to
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his allegations, mi6 tipped off the libyan authorities and the americans then arranged for this couple to be kidnapped in bangkok, supposedly en route to claiming asylum. they were flown to libya, imprisoned, she was pregnant and only released days before she gave birth. abdel hakim belhaj was tortured over six years, told he would be executed and was released shortly before the business of colonel gaddafi being overthrown. documents weren't covered in tripoli after the overthrow of colonel gaddafi which show, according to mr belhaj and his legal team, that mi6 had tipped off the libyan authorities. it is a critical message from a former counterterrorism official called sir mark allen which states that british
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intelligence was behind the tip—off which led to the capture of mr belhaj and his subsequent rendition and detention in libya. for years the government has tried to stop this case from coming before the courts, it is argued that the case cannot be heard because of it amounts to an allegation of torture by one state elsewhere, nothing to do with britain, but this is court said it is not having that, that these allegations were so serious against the british government and the then foreign secretary jack straw that they must be heard before british courts. lord manns hasjust finished speaking and said that the magna carta finished speaking and said that the magna ca rta itself, finished speaking and said that the magna carta itself, the ancient documents, is the critical piece of law in this case because provides a right for mr belhaj not to be held arbitrarily, to be tortured and so on, he said that this case needs to go back to court. mr belhaj says he is determined to sue, he does not wa nt is determined to sue, he does not want quiet compensation out of court, he says hejust
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want quiet compensation out of court, he says he just wants an admission from the uk that it was mixed up in complicity in his detention. does he want that apology from this current conservative government, from jack straw of labour, then the foreign secretary responsible for mi6, who did the tipping off? in essence he wants the apology from everyone. the way these things work is that jack straw was the minister at the time. when this goes to the high court, and i apologise for some of the noise around here at the moment, when it goes to the high court they will have to look at whatever the allegations are and whatever the allegations are and whatever evidence there may or may not be about the director role of mr straw and the alleged direct role of a former mi6 official called sir mark allen. as two individuals are there in essence, but then there is mi6 itself, the foreign office and the attorney general effectively being sued as the government. effectively what has happened so far is that the government is not
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lawyers have been acting on behalf of the likes of mr straw and sir mark allen. —— the government's lawyers. they have neither confirmed nor denied the scope of the allegations, this is a standard procedure they have always used in secret cases, but mr belhaj says he wa nts secret cases, but mr belhaj says he wants his day in court and to finally hear the truth of what has happened and he will fight on. 0k. happened and he will fight on. ok. you are doing well battling above the heckler, but we are hearing everything you are saying. we have a statement from preview, the lawyer for the libyan dissidents, the lawyerfor the lawyer for the libyan dissidents, the lawyer for rendition victims, actually, saying that in 72 hours would be torture will take the reins of the earth's most powerful security state. this security state is not just about security state. this security state is notjust about history, the sta kes is notjust about history, the stakes could not be higher. we enter the trump euro was not a soul held to account for britain's past role
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in rendition. no official has condemned trump's torture boasts. intelligence agencies might be pressured to help america torture again. a final couple of lines, the government brought years of delay by wasting hundreds of thousands of pounds on this appeal when a simple apology would have closed the case. theresa may should apologise to this family, draw a line in the sand against torture and restore british honour. a really interesting statement from that person at reprieve. these allegations of british complicity, allege british complicity go all the way back to the opening of guantanamo bay in early 2002 when there were allegations brought that british security officials on the ground in afghanistan had facilitated the transfer of british suspects to guantanamo bay. that trench of cases were effectively
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wrapped up when the government settled with the individuals who had been held in guantanamo bay and then released without charge to get on with their lives in the uk. those many, with their lives in the uk. those any with their lives in the uk. those many, many cases went on for years. they settled out of court the millions of pounds. that meant the evidence was never effectively add. the government than promised effectively a public inquiry and a retired judge to get to the bottom of the rendition and ill—treatment claims. that was suspended when these claims from mr belhaj and his wife surfaced, these claims were so serious that there had to be a full police investigation. that investigation was passed to the cps, the cps said it could not charge because of insufficient evidence. to date we have not had any full clarity or airing of all these allegations, testing this evidence and seeing what the official papers hidden deep in the bowels of mi6 under the government agencies say about those event. critically the testimony of individual officials or ministers cheering all those years.
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the case of mr belhaj, assuming it goes ahead and he does not get the apology and the £1 compensation he demands, if it goes ahead that will be the first time any of this will be the first time any of this will be properly ad in the british courts. i think it will be absolute fireworks if it gets to that stage. the government is in a very tricky position and i think we will have to wait to see how they respond. it is really, really quite devastating a ruling from the supreme court. what do you want to hear from the prime minister when she delivers her speech on brexit. let's talk to a mix of people who voted leave and remain the you heard from them briefly already. it is time to get into the nitty—gritty. so welcome again all of you. introduce yourself. tell us what you voted and tell us what you want to
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herfrom voted and tell us what you want to her from theresa may? i'm linda and i'm interest orpington and i voted to leave. you were able to vote because you have lived here since 1979? that's right. what do you want from theresa may? to hear her say that she is going to invoke article 50 and get on with the process of moving us away from the european union. happen happy with a clean break? and look at opportunities in other countries to do direct deals with them. ok, what about yourself, sir, what do you want to hear?|j wa nt sir, what do you want to hear?|j want to hear her talk about sovereignty because people clearly voted, i voted sovereignty because people clearly voted, ivoted remain, with relu cta nce voted, ivoted remain, with reluctance in a sense, but people wa nt reluctance in a sense, but people want to know that britain can celebrate its culture without being xenophobic and mean—spirited to refugees. i want to hear her talk about law because we need to be able to make laws in this country that... we are coming out of the single market and coming out of the
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jurisdiction of the european courts of justice. jurisdiction of the european courts ofjustice. it would take time i wa nt ofjustice. it would take time i want to hear more about that and trade. the government needs to have a bold attitude towards trade because we have a lot of talent in this country and we can build a better future if we give them the right leadership as opposed to political management. your accent, it is not british? it is a mongrel actually, i'm australian, but i lived in denmark for ten years and in the uk for 12. sol lived in denmark for ten years and in the uk for 12. so i understand both sides of the eu situation. jake, you voted leave.|j both sides of the eu situation. jake, you voted leave. i did, yes. you're from burnley, what do you wa nt to you're from burnley, what do you want to hear from you're from burnley, what do you want to hearfrom mrs you're from burnley, what do you want to hear from mrs may. you're from burnley, what do you want to hearfrom mrs may. the mood ewesic, are you happy with it? i'm happy, the fact she wants a clean break and we must leave the single market. why? the single market has got the freedom of movement and the freedom of money. we reject freedom of movement and we cannot remain a memberof the
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of movement and we cannot remain a member of the single market. this vote m ea nt member of the single market. this vote meant we reject freedom of movement? no, that was, ithink, my main issue because we don't want to look back too much but the way that immigration was portrayed and how it was a rhetoric of hate, discrimination and using people's fears to kind of push this ammunition behind the leave campaign. for me, personally speaking, i think freedom of movement who is thinking, you know, i want to be able to easily, because that's the issue here, easily move around and! that's the issue here, easily move around and i know i will be able to go into another country and work or even one day i was to run my own business and i wanted to import orks port easily. all of that will be made difficult. you're studying in cambridge at the moment. yes. you're going to be able to go wherever you wa nt going to be able to go wherever you want once you get your english lit degree. why do you say that? it is a top university. no one is going to
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close the doors on t i don't have an education. i have never been to university and yet i'm against the freedom of movement even though it will make my life harder because it is not about what i want. it's about the safety of other people. ok. it's about control. if we control our borders and we can choose who we wa nt borders and we can choose who we want based on their skills, not on anything else, not on their backgrounds or their religion, their skills. so if we need nurses, or engineers, then why don't we let those people in to boost the country? that's why i reject the whole notion of us rejecting like the free movement of people because i think for me, this whole issue is centred around an antiestablishment vote rather than necessarily a vote for in and out. that was my rhetoric around it. there were a lot of people angry about a lot of things and this was a stage for them to
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say... but we are where we are, what do you want from theresa may?|j say... but we are where we are, what do you want from theresa may? i i wa nt do you want from theresa may? i i want clarity, the uncertainty for me asa remain want clarity, the uncertainty for me as a remain voter, the thing i'm shocked about, she hasn't said much and we've talked about the fact she has to keep her cards close. there is an incredible amount of people who are uncertain. even within the markets. you voted leave, do you feel really uncertain now? is that something that worries you? theresa may made it clear that a clean, swift exit means leaving the customs union. she hasn't been clear about leaving the customs union yet? she said you can't have bits — half in and half out. therefore, leave means leave and that needs to happen because now, ifeel like leave and that needs to happen because now, i feel like she's delaying. why is she delaying? just get on with it. the whole world is listening. we have got to remember
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that we're going to be in a pretty tricky situation. we're going to have to negotiate with a lot of different people. now, if we show our cards straightaway. if theresa may was shouting out every single idea that she had before they had a chance to explore the ideas properly we mightfind chance to explore the ideas properly we might find ourselves at a loss, you know. this is a complex thing we're doing. this is a really big thing for our country. so why would we play all our cards? well, the argument, there is that argument argument, there is that argument argument and the counter argument is because voters need to know what's going on. the fact that it is a complex process, i don't think we can be going, "0h great, we're going to do this in two years and that's what is going to happen." you think it can't be done in two years? no. does anyone else think it can't be donein does anyone else think it can't be done in two years? no. that would meana done in two years? no. that would mean a transitional deal. would you happy with that as a leaver? yes, i
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would, but this can't be rushed. it has got to be done right. linda, would you happy with a transitional deal? 23 if it has to take longer for certain pieces, yes, of course, but they need to get on with it and make decision and not be swayed by what the butcrats in europe are going to tell us —— bureaucrats in europe are going to tell us. we should be going down a dual track which is work on getting out of europe and at the same time working on the other deals. there is a nervousness when it comes to the group in parliament who say we need a second referendum. i think that's disingenuous, i don't think you can say on one hand say we rule by officials and then say, we don't like the result and we're going to have a second referendum. there is no way we're going to have a second referendum. there is an argument about once the deal is done, there
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isa about once the deal is done, there is a referendum to put to the people to say whether we like it or not?m there is a referendum on the deal, i would be more open. if it was going back to this is the deal we could get, are you sure you want to leave? no. we have to move forward and we cannot keep going back and forwards. people voted to leave and we have to leave. do you want a referendum once the deal is done and we don't know how long it will take, a lot of european countries have to agree to it, do you want a referendum for you to be able to say, yes, i like this or no, i don't like this? 10096. what if the vote was majority, no, we don't like this deal? do we still leave or start again with the negotiations or go back to where we we re negotiations or go back to where we were on 22nd june last year, what? that's a complicated and complex thing to answer. for me, i feel as if democracy was left at the door when you know, especially what i
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would call lies basically were told in orderto would call lies basically were told in order to push the leave campaign. i know people are shaking their head, but that's where i stand with it. just initially for the big things, you know, we heard about the 350 million, that's not going to happen. you want to talk about lies and things like that. the bank of england put out a devastating projection. they have done a u—turn. the imf have done a u—turn. this little house of cards that the remain campaign had on it is going to be terrible economically is falling down every single day. one day people will realise that they believed lies about this. can i read comments from people watching you around the country? aaron says, "brexit means increased poverty, plus deeper and longer austerity. " stephen wants theresa may to get what the people voted for, to leave the eu mess and all that comes with the eu mess and all that comes with titis the eu mess and all that comes with t it is called the eu mess and all that comes with tit is called democracy. pj,
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"brexit means freeing up trade with all." jaky "brexit means freeing up trade with all."jaky on "brexit means freeing up trade with all." jaky on facebook, "brexit means freeing up trade with all."jaky on facebook, "i hope she will deliver what she says she will, but i won't hold my heth." colin says, "go with what we voted for and pull out of the eu and the single market." we pull out of the eu and the single market. " we forget that pull out of the eu and the single market." we forget that europe is pa rt market." we forget that europe is part of this too and europe is not moving in good directions when it comes to border control. i'm going to pause you there. thank you for coming on the programme and thank you for being patient as well. i really appreciate it. a statement from jack straw, former foreign secretary foreign secretary. you heard about the fact that jack straw could be sued by a libyan dissident because jack straw was in charge of mi6 back in 2004 when they tifd tipped off ed americans of the libyan's location and the libyan ended up being kidnapped. jack straw says, "thisjudgement is
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ended up being kidnapped. jack straw says, "this judgement is about important points of law related to how far it is possible to bring into a court process in the uk actions of sovereign states abroad. however, at no stage so far have the merits of the applica nt‘s case no stage so far have the merits of the applicant's case been tested before any court. that can only happen when the trial of action itself takes place. i repeat what i said in the house of commons in december 2013, that as foreign secretary i acted at all times in a manner which was consistent with my legal duties and with national and international law. i was never in a nyway international law. i was never in anyway complicit in the unlawful rendition or detention of anyone by other states." 26 democrats in the us congress have said they'll boycott donald trump's inauguration on friday. it follows his attack on the prominent civil rights campaigner and democrat congressman
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john lewis who had said he wouldn't attend the ceremony because he didn't believe donald trump was a legitimate president. congressman john lewis is the last surviving speaker from the lincoln memorial march in 1963 where martin luther king junior delivered his famous i have a dream speech in washington. in a speech to mark martin luther king day, john lewis — who you can see in these pictures with martin luther king — called on americans to always speak out against hate. we have come a distance, we made a lot of progress as a nation and a people, but we are not there yet. the scars and stains of racism are deeply embedded in american society. we must not be at peace with ourselves as a nation until we have the change that doctor king dreamed of. it is the power of the way of peace, the way of love. as dr martin luther kinng said, hate is too heavy a burden to bear. i say to you as young men, the future leaders of this state, the future leaders of this nation, the future leaders of the world, you must never, ever hate.
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the way of love is a better way. the way of peace is a better way. and john lewis had this message for a generation of voters under president—to—be trump. i say to you as role models, never give up. never give in. stand up, speak up. when you see something that is not right and not fair and notjust, you have a moral obligation to do something, to say something, and not be quiet. applause. yes, we have come a distance, we have made a lot of progress as a nation and as a people, but we are not there yet. we almost become participants in a democratic process. when you get old enough to register to vote, go and register and vote.
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the vote is precious. it is almost sacred. it is the most powerful non—violent instrument and tool that we have in a democratic society, and we must use it. dream dreams and never, ever give up on your dreams. applause. i close by saying thank you. i wish you well. just go for it. people all over this city, all over this state, all over this nation are pulling for you. stay away from violence. as i said earlier, never hate.
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the way of love is a better way. thank you very much. applause. congressman lewis. still to come... more reaction to the fact that former foreign secretary jack straw faces being sued over allegations of the 2004 kidnapped by the americans the 2004 kidnapped by the americans the libyan dissident because of a ruling in the last half—hour at the uk's supreme court. you can see the judges sitting there. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may is expected to use a speech on her brexit strategy this morning to give a clear signal that she's prepared to take britain out of the single market, so the uk can control its own borders and laws. mrs may will tell an audience in central london that she has no desire to be half—in, half—out of the european union. remain campaigners say leaving the tariff free single market would
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damage the uk economy. a government attempt to block a damages claim by a libyan dissident and his wife who allege the uk participated in there abduction to tripoli more than a decade ago has failed at the supreme court. abdel hakim belhaj and his moroccan wife fatima say they were fortunate under colonel gaddafi's regime and are claiming against the former foreign secretary jack straw. they have offered to settle for token damages and an apology. the supreme court judges said magna carta is on the couple's side. george michael's childhood best friend has told this programme that he believes drugs were responsible for the singer's death. andros georgiou claims the friend he referred to as his cousin had taken a cocktail of drugs, including anti—depressants. a post—mortem following george michael's death on christmas day proved inconclusive. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl who was found dead on a pathway in rotherham. the girl, who has been named locally as 16—year—old leonne weeks, was found by a member of the public in the dinnington area of the town,
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yesterday morning. police have arrested a man following an explosion at a house in manchester. two people were seriously injured following the blast in blackley. residents nearby we re blast in blackley. residents nearby were told to leave their homes well fire crews secured the area. more than 40 learner drivers are caught each year using impersonators to take their tests. 209 people have been convicted in the past five years, according to data published by the transport minister andrewjones. more than 100 others were convicted of taking the practical or theory tests on behalf of others. motoring experts warn that offenders are putting people's lives at risk. in the last few minutes tate galleries have announced their first female director. maria balshaw is currently director of the whitworth art gallery in manchester, where she spearheaded its £17 million transformation, winning museum of the year. she was awarded a cbe in 2015, and will become the tate's ninth director when she takes up her role injune. that's a summary of the latest
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news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o'clock. cheers, joanna. here's some sport now withjessica. three british players have reached the second round of the australian open overnight, bringing the total up to five. johanna konta beat kirsten flipkens in straight sets. the british number one will now face japanese teenager naomi osaka next. heather watson beat local favourite and 18th seed sam stosur in three sets. the british number two will face american jennifer brady or belgian maryna zanevska in her next match. in the men's draw, kyle edmund beat colombia's santiago hiraldo in straight sets. he'll face 30th seed pablo carreno busta next. the rfu are investigating a complaint from sale that one of their own team — understood to be tom arscott, seen here in the blue — passed information to the bristol camp ahead of a narrow defeat this month. seven sports are attempting to challenge uk sport's decision not to fund their programmes for the tokyo olympics and paralympics in 2020.
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badminton is among five sports which were funded for rio 2016 challenging the decision made in december. that's all the sport for now, victoria. thank you. this programme has learnt that there are still families struggling with debt after having their tax credits wrongly stopped by concentrix, a company employed by the government to reduce benefit fraud. the american firm has also been criticised in a report out today by the national audit office. it says concentrix did not have enough staff to handle all the calls from people finding out they were having their tax credits cut off. in one week alone in august the company missed 19,000 calls. we first broke the concentrix story in september when we revealed hundreds of people had their tax credits wrongly stopped — one teenage mum told us hers had been cancelled because concentrix believed she was married to a pensioner who she'd never met. he was accusing me of being married to a 74—year—old bloke who used to live here way before i did, saying that it is a normal thing for my kind of age
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and it is my sort of behaviour. 74? he was 74. you were only? 19. they seriously thought you were married to a 74—year—old? they thought i was living with him and they also stated that i was married to him. they didn't say he was my partner, they didn't say any relationship, they said married to him. when i spoke to the council, they said that he was deceased and died on the 5th ofjuly 2016 and then they said you still need to get him to make contact with us. i said heaven doesn't have opening hours, so what do you want me to do about that? the day we broke the story we were inundated with messages from you about your own problems with concentrix. i had a phone call with them and it took me three to five hours a day for a week to actually get hold of them. i lost my child tax credits and my working tax credits which is the bulk of what i get each month. how much are you done by as a result of what you say are their mistakes?
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a little over £600. a month? yes. i have had no money for two weeks now and i have had to go to a food bank, it isjust hard. because of this, my housing benefit could be stopped as well. hours after our story was broadcast, hmrc announced they wouldn't be renewing its contract with concentrix. our reporter peter whittlesea investigated and the work and pensions secretary damian green told us that hmrc had acted decisively. anyone who is dealing with people who are claiming benefits needs to be sensitive to their needs as well as enforcing the rules. sources close to this have told me thatjust before we did our report, our exclusive report, hmrc and concentrix staff were close to agreeing a new deal. really? yes, what's more, sources have told me that concentrix was only told an hour before he hmrc told the press that their contract wasn't being renewed and that's why some
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staff in belfast heard that potentially theirjobs could be at risk because the contract was not being renewed through tweets from the bbc rather than from concentrix themselves. for some of our viewers — weeks of being without enough money to live on ended when we highlighted their cases on air. about half an hour or so ago we spoke to nicola crawford, who is a viewer in belfast. she told us she was getting her tax credits reinstated after they were wrongly stopped by concentrix. but she did not know whether or not they would be backdated. since then, she has had some news, so she is back with us. what has happened? they have been trying to ring this morning. they said all of the money will be backdated and it will be in my account by wednesday.
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wow, that is terrific news. just short of £2,000. i think that is what you call a result. but others have remained in debt. right now if you are still in doubt because of the mistakes that hmrc concentrix made. i've been speaking to marie crowley, who has ended up in debt after concentrix wrongly stopped her child tax credits, and snp mp tasmina ahmed—sheikh who has many constituents affected by concentrix. marie, tell us first of all, when your tax credits were stopped, how much were you losing out on every week? it was £150 a week. why did you need that money? that was to feed, clothe my children, get them to university and school, pay for after—school activities. day—to—day living expenses. at some point it was clear that you were not going to be able to make ends meet? absolutely. as soon as it stopped, i knew it
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would be a tough month ahead. what did you do? i had to take out a payday loan, that was the only way i could get through. i assumed it was a slight error and it would be sorted out quickly and back paid, so i could pay it off. little did i know what was waiting for me. tell our audience. the fight with concentrix in september, it was so difficult, trying to get information, trying to get my child tax credits restarted. it was awful. my friends and family were bringing me food parcels. lending me money so i could drive my car to work. at one point i did not have enough petrol in the car to get me to work the next day. it was day—to—day stress, it was really tough. you won in the end, concentrix made a mistake,
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so the judgment they had made was overturned. your tax credits were going to be restored. so what has been the problem? when they restored it, instead of giving me a lump sum in back pay, they said they would spread it over the rest of the tax year, which meant my weekly tax credit went up, which impacted on other benefits, like housing benefit, because now i cannot claim housing benefit, because they have increased my weekly income. you have continued to decline in debt? yes, it took me a long time after my divorce to get myself back on track, get myself back into the black, and i have been doing really well for five years, and within a month they have wiped me and sent me back to five years ago, where i am stressing about paying debts and having to call debt companies, because they are chasing me
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for missed direct debits. it has been really stressful. what would help you is hmrc saying, "we will give you this as a lump sum"? yes, because that does not impact on the wider benefits that i receive. it would mean you can pay off some of your debts. absolutely. what did you think about the way you have been treated? it is appalling, i made a complaint to hmrc after the fiasco. the response i got, really, was, "you got the money back, so don't complain." they were not happy to look at the additional payments they were giving me every week. they said to give me a lump sum i had to provide details and copies of all of my bills for absolutely everything, my sky tv, council tax, any debts i was paying out, i had to copy it and send it in. after having to do that under my expense with concentrix i was not
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prepared to do that again. it was easier for me to just walk away and continue battling on to get myself back on track. let me bring in tasmina ahmed—sheikh, snp mp, who has many constituents affected by concentrix. they did the right thing, they restored her tax credits, but the way they are paying her back is, as we have heard, leaving her in a right old mess, and it is really stressful. her story demonstrates the ramifications of institutional incompetence and neglect at the heart of the whole contract. hmrc, the government, over—anticipated the amount of fraud they thought was in the system. they thought they would save £1 billion of money, they adjusted the figures to 400 million, gave a contract to a company who were not able to deal with the number of calls they got. what does that mean for people on the ground?
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they have been unable to get back to the position where they were before. this is a perfect example of how she found her feet, doing well, but if you are getting money back in piecemeal amounts and that is having other effects, that is not fair. these are victims of a contract that has not worked for them, they are entitled to seek compensation from the government. not only should lump—sum payments be paid back, but i have written to the prime minister and i have said there must be proper compensation paid to the victims of this scandal, and it needs to happen now. once again we asked hmrc and concentrix to come on the programme. they declined. hmrc told us, "it's absolutely committed to paying tax credit claimants all the money they're entitled to. hmrc terminated the contract
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with concentrix when it became clear it was not delivering the quality of service we expect for our customers. a concentrix spokesman told us its work for hmrc was, "a hugely complex contract and programme, and a number of issues emerged at the outset which resulted in the challenges experienced throughout". one day perhaps either concentrix or hmrc will actually speak to us. let's bring you more on that breaking news that former labour foreign secretary, jack straw, faces being sued over allegations of abduction and torture brought by a former libyan dissident. abdul hakim belhaj alleges mi6, which mr straw was responsible for, helped the us kidnap him in asia in 2004 to return him and his wife to tripoli. the supreme court backed a court of appeal ruling allowing his action. jack straw rejects claims that he had been aware of the rendition. we can speak now to conservative mp, andrew mitchell, former
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international development secretary. your reaction? it is right that the law should take its course and i understand why the courts have reached this decision, but i think it is equally important to make very clear that jack straw, though it is equally important to make very clear thatjack straw, though he is a different party to me, is a deeply honourable man who served his country incredibly well in a number of senior offices and i don't think we should question his integrity on this, but the law is the law and the court decision stands. he says he acted with integrity at all times, was never complicit in any rendition involving other states. it is feasible though, being responsible formi6, mi6 feasible though, being responsible for mi6, mi6 could tip—off the americans, who end up kidnapping somebody perhaps they shouldn't have done. jack straw may not have known about it? this is a murky story. it doesn't reflect terribly well, but i think it is important to remember in
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my opinion, thatjack straw is a deeply honourable man and he would not knowingly have done anything wrong, but you are right, it is a murky and difficult story which does not reflect well on those who were involved. we're going to talk to reprieve a human rights organisation who are outside the supreme court any moment now. we are sorting out the technicals. we want to talk to you about yemen. you havejust technicals. we want to talk to you about yemen. you have just visited there. today, the un is warning that 10,000 people could have died there in the war, millions more are starving. tell our audience what you saw with your own eyes? well, i visited yemen with the united nations and with oxfam and i was able to travel north to an area which has been most bombed in the war. what i saw was a deep humanitarian crisis on the ground. as you said, 10,000 people have been killed, but 86% of a population of 27 million are now in need of support. and the problem for britain is this — we are on the one hand
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supporting humanitarian objectives, profoundly, i think, supporting humanitarian objectives, profoundly, ithink, people supporting humanitarian objectives, profoundly, i think, people would supporting humanitarian objectives, profoundly, ithink, people would be very proud of what britain is doing to help desperate people. we're trying hard to get food and medicines in through the port... we're showing our audience pictures of some of those desperate people right now? 9096 of the food that comes into yemen is imported and 80% comes into yemen is imported and 80% comes through the port and britain has been trying very hard to get food in, but we're part of a coalition, or supporting a coalition which is bombing that port and which has disabled the five cranes which are required to unload shipping. who is in the coalition with britain? the saudi coalition, many of the gulf states, america and britain and there is a very strong feeling in yemen, a country which britain has contacts and links down the ages of horror at what britain is doing, supporting this coalition. and i think we need to use our good
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offices and from the leadership who i met when i was there, they would still today be willing for britain to use its good offices to try and ensure that there is a ceasefire to which they would strongly contribute and then that there are negotiations between yemen and saudi and then subsequently when the ceasefire is embedded negotiations between the different yemeni parties... are you saying britain should pull out of that coalition then that's bombing the port where most of the food comes through or should be more critical or... what i'm saying is that, sawed crisis is a very important ally of this country, but i think we need to try and ensure that there is now a ceasefire and use our good offices and our deep connections in this part of the world to procure a ceasefire, negotiations between yemen and saudi and subsequently yemeni, the yemeni negotiations and britain is in unique position because of our links and the respect with which we have been held in that part of the world to have a very strong impact. the
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coalition that we are supporting has virtually no support at all in yemen. the president... so we're supporting it because we're friends with saudi, is that the main reason? that's part of the reason and a major part of the reason, but the president who we are supporting cannot visit his own country. he is the only president in the world i have come across who has to make an official visit to his country, he lives either in a hotel in riyadh in saudi arabia or on a military boat lent to him off the coast of aidan, we are, they are not going to win and the position on the ground is such that britain now urgently in my view needs to ensure that there is a ceasefire and that we are part of the negotiations. the remarkable thing is that the huthis will accept british and un mediation for that today and we should take advantage of the deep links we have in that pa rt of the deep links we have in that part of the world and do that. so the british government is part of a coalition that is leading to the
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starvation of millions of people? these people are not starving. 27 million people, they are being starved... by us, partly? salt of the blockade by air, sea and land of this country and we are in danger of being complicit in the destruction ofa being complicit in the destruction of a sovereign state and of the starvation of a large number of people. the foreign secretary is really busy with brexit at the moment. is there, you know, is there, there is, there doesn't seem to be any room for anything else apart for brexit with the british government? well, i spoke to the foreign secretary when i returned who was extremely interested in what i had discovered. i am seeing his most senior officials this week. so actually, the foreign secretary does have the band width and is engaged in trying to assist in this matter andi
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in trying to assist in this matter and i hope the full power of the british government and the foreign office will be brought to bear on refocussing a policy that is not serving us or the yemanies well or indeed the saudis. we have pictures of you in yemen which you will be able to see. if you wouldn't mind talking over them so our audience can see what you saw effectively. well, this is the destruction of the centre of the administrative centre. this is the local government team there with the governor. this is a hospital from there with the governor. this is a hospitalfrom which there with the governor. this is a hospital from which sadly medecins sans frontieres had to pull out. that was a nutritional ward there and the doctor said, "do you realise that your taxpayers are funding the work that we are doing here with desperate parents and their malnourished children?" desperate parents and their malnourished children? " is desperate parents and their malnourished children?" is a camp which is being supported by oxfam who were doing brilliant work there. 5,000 people who oxfam had got clean
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water and sanitation for and also they had provided clean water and sanitation in the nearby city. so, british ngos on the ground doing brilliant work, but one half of a policy that urgently needs correcting. thank you very much for your time. andrew mitchell conservative mp, and former international development secretary. this morning one of britain's most prolific organ donors has told us that she donates because she thinks it's a "nice thing to do". traceyjolliffe is 50 and has donated a kidney, 16 eggs and 80 pints of blood to people she's never met. she intends to leave her brain to science and is now hoping to give away part of her liver to a person she may never meet. she told us that she first considered donation after changes in the law made it possible to give organs to people you don't know. i thought about it for a while before i approached the local transplant co—ordinator and chatted to her at length before i started under going the tests. right. ok. and the test involved what? quite a
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lot of blood tests. you have to have an mri, a ct scan, a lot of kidney function tests and you also to go and see a psychiatrist as well to make sure you're donating for the right reasons. and your reasons were what? i just right reasons. and your reasons were what? ijust thought it right reasons. and your reasons were what? i just thought it was a nice thing to do. just as simple as that? yeah. it don't know anyone who has kidney failure so i can't say it is a personal story. i know there are people waiting for transplants. 300 people waiting for transplants. 300 people a year die waiting for a kidney transplant and i could do something to save one of them. breaking news. it is to do with the investigation into the disappearance of the chef from york, claudia lawrence. the three year review of the investigation into the disappearance and suspected murder of claudia lawrence has moved to a reactive phase which will review any new and compelling information that
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comes to light. this is due to the proactive review and in some areas a reinvestigation being all, but complete. unless one outstanding line of inquiry relating to dna profiling estimated to take a further six weeks to finalise, provides a breakthrough, the review which cost £1 million will start to scale down next month. let's talk now to clare bolitho, a recovering alcoholic, 20 years after her last drink she decided to mark the occasion by giving something back. she donated her kidney to a total stranger. joining us from lincolnshire is the woman whose life was saved by that very kidney, marion pattinson. marion, tell us what the donation of clare's kidney meant to you? the kidney made me feel so much better. you know, it's really, really great that there is such people out there
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that there is such people out there that will donate their organs. my health has improved so much and you know, i can't say thank you enough for clare, you know, she thought of donating her organ to somebody. clare, ican donating her organ to somebody. clare, i can see the huge smile on your face, clare, i can see the huge smile on yourface, your clare, i can see the huge smile on your face, your motivation?” clare, i can see the huge smile on your face, your motivation? i really thought, why on earth not? i wanted to do something to mark my, the end of my drinking as you said and i just heard about it by chance and thought this is the perfect answer. i have had the good fortune to have good health. and why shouldn't i try and pass some of that on to someone who hasn't? now you meet every year on the anniversary, is this correct? yes, indeed. we met the first time quite a long time after i donated the kidney because it took a while for us to get into contact because you're not told who you're going to give the organ to, but i got a lovely card and letter from marion
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and an unexpected phone call and we met and it was wonderful. thank you so much both of you. i'm sorry, it was so brief, but we loved having you on the programme. thank you very much marion and thank you, clare. thank you for your company today. have a good day. good morning. well, most of the uk this morning has been shrouded with thick cloud and that's how it is going to stay through today and in fact most of this week. so it is very quiet on the weather front. a this week. so it is very quiet on the weatherfront. a bit this week. so it is very quiet on the weather front. a bit of drizzle here and there and that's pretty much it, but today, east anglia and the south east in fact, all the way to the isle of wight, some beautiful weather and sunshine in fact, in london, clear blue skies right now,
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but that's the exception. main of the major cities cloudy. cloudy in birmingham and manchester and leeds all the way to wales and northern ireland. and that's how it will stay through this evening and overnight. lots of cloud and mist and fog, and drizzle, but notice that this south—eastern portion of the uk, from east anglia south—east wards to the south coast will be chilly. temperatures will be around freezing or below. a look at the contrast in glasgow, around nine celsius. as far as wednesday and thursday is concerned, the clouds will come and go. a bit of sunshine from time to time, but on balance, a pretty overcast picture for most of us for the rest of this week. bye—bye. this is bbc news and these are the top stories
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developing at 11: a sharp rise in inflation as the prime minister prepares to give a major speech on the government's objectives for brexit negotiations. theresa may will speak this hour — and rule out a deal which leaves the uk "half in and half out" of the european union. we will be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, because that's the way we can really grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents. the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market. if she cares about britain's future and is going to fight our corner, then she's going to need to be fighting for britain to be in the single market. theresa may will set out her plans for brexit, including a

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