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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 17, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11: a sharp rise in inflation as the prime minister prepares to give a major speech on the government's objectives for brexit negotiations. theresa may will speak this hour — and rule out a deal which leaves the uk "half in and half out" of the european union. we will be coming out of the formal structures of the customs union and the single market, because that's the way we can really grasp the golden opportunities that brexit presents. the prime minister must not wave the white flag and give up on our membership of the single market. if she cares about britain's future and is going to fight our corner, then she's going to need to be fighting for britain to be in the single market. theresa may will set out her plans for brexit, including a pledge to leave the single market, but there will be no clarity on the customs union or curbing immigration. sorry for that technical hitch.
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a libyan man has won the right to sue the former foreign secretary, jack straw, over claims of kidnap and torture. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl in rotherham. three years after the malaysia airlines flight mh370 went missing, the search is called off, leaving families devastated. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is due to set out her strategy for brexit this lunchtime. in a speech in central london, the prime minister is expected to signal she wants a full break from the european union rather than a deal that leaves britain "half in, half out". her speech comes as new figures show the rate of inflation
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increased sharply last month, exceeding some economists‘ predictions. the cost of living was 1.6% higher than a year earlier. that's up from an annual rate of 1.2% the previous month. we can go to vishala sri—pathma in the city. tell us more about these figures? as you say, it is higher than the previous month. and it has been the highest rate for about two yea rs. been the highest rate for about two years. the last time it was this high was in july years. the last time it was this high was injuly 200014. what years. the last time it was this high was injuly 2000 1a. what has been driving the higher inflation rate has been higherfood and airfares. as you said, it comes ahead of prime minister theresa may's speech. there has been much spec edition about what that speech
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might contain about britain's future relationship with the single market. here to talk through those details is the ceo of the brokerage where we are at the moment. stephen, we got a lot of reaction yesterday in stirling. we saw a 1.5% drop in stirling. we saw a 1.5% drop in stirling in reaction to that news of britain potentially leaving the single market. it has reversed this morning, actually. sterling is back to where it was. we had a lot of chat over the weekend on the sunday morning tv programmes and yesterday's press over pretty much the whole of what theresa may is likely to say. so the sting has been taken out. markets like certainty. if she is more defiant about what works it will look like and what our future will be in the single market, whether we leave or not and if she is complete about that, do you think
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we will see a positive reaction? in a way, the word hard brexit has been out so much, and that is a good thing. at least we are decisive, and as you point out, markets don't like uncertainty. the hard brexit word that caused the drop in sterling yesterday, what you see the inflation figures as a direct consequence of that, including food prices and airfares, that is a natural consequence. finally, a point on what the city will be looking for in that speech. as we know, a movement in sterling have been traced to comments on the single market. is everything the city once contained in that move? do you think there will be anything specific here people will want from that speech? everyone likes the idea ofa that speech? everyone likes the idea of a huge curve ball coming up and the big surprise. last year was an example. brexit itself was a big surprise, the trump election victory was a big surprise. volkswagen and glencore going bankrupt were big
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surprises. the market found it hard to deal with those. we are a lot more settled now. there is more knowledge and the fact that word ha rd knowledge and the fact that word hard has been used is very telling. i will be back with more business news throughout the afternoon. that news on inflation comes as theresa may prepares to give a much anticipated speech setting out her strategy for brexit. that's expected in just over half an hour's time and we'll bring it to you in full here on the bbc news channel when it happens. the prime minister's expected to signal she wants a full break from the european union, rather than a deal that leaves britain "half in, half out". here's carole walker. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain which gets out into the world. after months of pressure to tell us more about her brexit plan, theresa may will strike an optimistic note, telling us she wants a truly global britain,
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which gets out into the world. the prime minister may not be explicit but she will again signal that she's ready to take britain out of the european single market, and perhaps the customs union, too, in order to gain control of immigration and freedom from european law. she'll tell eu leaders... ..but she'll say she wants a new and equal partnership, declaring... donald trump's offer of a quick, fair trade deal with the uk got the thumbs up from leading brexiteers, but whilst the president—elect said the uk was so smart to vote for brexit, those who disagree want britain to fight to stay in the single market. theresa may will set out 12 priorities for a deal. but she faces two years of hard bargaining with 27 members determined to safeguard the future of the eu without britain. so it seems today, we're being told the prime minister wants britain
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to leave the eu single market and most probably pull out of the customs union as well. but what do those terms actually mean? rachel home is here to explain the key phrases we will keep hearing during the brexit process. hard, soft or scrambled — how do you like your brexit? the vote to leave has created a whole new lexicon for us to get to grips with. first up — article 50. this is the agreement in the lisbon treaty signed by all eu members, which outlines how a country can leave the european union. under its rules, the exiting country and the rest of the eu have two years to agree the terms of the split. theresa may has said she intends to trigger this process by the end of march 2017, so technically, the uk should be out by summer 2019. another key phrase is the single market — this is a key part of the eu and it guarantees the free movement of goods, capital, services, and people throughout
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all member states. however, the uk government has indicated that it wants to limit the movement of people as part of any brexit deal. it's unlikely that this sort of cherry—picking will be allowed, which is why theresa may is expected to say that britain will leave the single market. but she might stop short of saying we will leave the customs union. that's an arrangement between countries who agree not to impose tariffs on each other‘s goods. they also agree to impose common external tariffs on goods from countries outside their customs union. that would make continued trade with eu states straightforward, but would limit the uk's ability to negotiate deals with other countries worldwide. as many have noted, like eggs and cheese, it seems you can have your brexit hard or soft. here, the definitions are a little hazy, but in an eggshell, a "soft" brexit could see the uk retaining some form of membership of the european union single market in return for a degree of free movement. hard means leaving the single market and trading with the eu as if it were any other country outside
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europe, based on world trade organisation rules. hard, soft or scrambled — we'll have to wait and see what theresa may serves up. lots of clarity there. just to add the latest buzz phrase as well, clea n the latest buzz phrase as well, clean brexit! let's talk to the conservative mp maria caulfield, who campaigned to leave the eu and now sits on the brexit select committee. also labour mp phil wilson, who backed remain and it is a leading supporter of the campaign group ( on. phil wilson, you were backing remain. it now seems that brexit, when theresa may says brexit means brexit, it means hard brexit or clea n brexit, it means hard brexit or clean brexit, whichever phrase you like. well, let's wait until we hear her speech. but i would like to see the prime minister fight for jobs
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and business. and that means to me that we should make an effort to stay in the single market, which is 40% of our trade and also supplies millions ofjobs in the country. to put that at risk without attempting to save it is something i wouldn't expect to see from a prime minister standing upfor expect to see from a prime minister standing up for the interests of all people in the united kingdom. maria caulfield, how do you see it? people in the united kingdom. maria caulfield, how do you see mm people in the united kingdom. maria caulfield, how do you see it? it is a great opportunity for this country to start trading with the rest of the world. currently, our membership of the eu prevents us doing free trade deals with, 12 countries and places like the us. if we stay in the customs union, we will still be hampered by that. sol the customs union, we will still be hampered by that. so i am waiting to hear what the prime minister says, but this is an opportunity for this country to grow jobs but this is an opportunity for this country to growjobs and make links with countries that we currently can't do. philwilson, what with countries that we currently can't do. phil wilson, what about the point that stay in the customs union would hamper the uk's ability to have the sort of deal that donald
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trump is saying he wants to have quickly between the uk and the us? we talk about this deal with the united states. we can't actually start negotiating with the united states until we have left europe, two years down the line. why not? because we can't do that until we have finished negotiations. that is halfway through trump's presidency. he may not be president in 2020. it ta kes he may not be president in 2020. it takes four he may not be president in 2020. it ta kes four yea rs he may not be president in 2020. it takes four years on average to negotiate these deals. no business -- all negotiate these deals. no business —— all business is looking for certainty, and that implies greater uncertainty. to turn your back on 44% of your trade straightaway, without knowing what sort of deals you are going to have in the future, seems to me a great deal of uncertainty for british industry. maria caulfield, on uncertainty, the pound has lost 20% of its value since the referendum result and we
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are seeing that filter through into inflation with those latest figures highlighting that inflation is higher than had been anticipated. how much of a concern is that? there seems to be a misunderstanding that if you leave the eu or stop trading with europe —— if you leave the eu, you stop trading with europe, and thatis you stop trading with europe, and that is not the case. this isn't about stopping trading with europe, it's about trading in a restricted single market that stops us trading freely with other countries. we heard evidence in the brexit select committee that if there isn't an agreement on that by the end of two years, transitional arrangements could allow us to trade at zero tariffs with the eu until a free—trade agreement is reached. so there is plenty of scope for opportunities and we need to explore all of those to get the best deal for the british people. some say she is throwing in the towel by not
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trying to get the best sort of terms to stay in the single market while exploring the potential for freedom of movement at the same time, and then move into the final position of dropping out completely. is she throwing in the towel?|j dropping out completely. is she throwing in the towel? i don't think so. throwing in the towel? i don't think so. all of us recognise that having access to the single market would be access to the single market would be a good thing. that doesn't mean you have to have membership of the single market. they are different things. theresa may has made it clear that immigration controls of free movement are something she is concerned about. if we stay members of the single market, we will not have control of that. if we can trade with eu still control our borders, we must have access. theresa may has indicated that there will not be a half in, half out, it will not be a half in, half out, it will be a clean brexit. what is your perspective on what the risks and opportunities are? the risks are
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that you are turning your back on the eu, which gives you 44% of our trade. we will end up having to renegotiate a new deal which will not be as good as we have got now. we can't start negotiating until we have left the eu with the rest of the world. that is unprecedented amounts of uncertainty going forward. yes, we need a transitional arrangement after 2019 after we have negotiated leaving for a period of time to get us through all of that, but i do not see us getting a better deal out of europe than we have at the moment. as far as free movement is concerned, the least that this government could do is start implementing the rules around free movement, which so you can't come to the uk unless you have a job. that has not been implemented. also, we 110w has not been implemented. also, we now have an eu which is prepared to talk about what free movement is. so instead of just talk about what free movement is. so instead ofjust walking away, we need to see a prime minister who is prepared to fight for the best interests of the british people, for
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business and the millions ofjobs that rely on the eu. thank you both very much. let's go to our european correspondent gavin lee in brussels. it isa correspondent gavin lee in brussels. it is a widely anticipated speech. how is it being seen there? it is fascinating, because while here you may hear the constant mantra of brexit means brexit, in europe, the phrase is no negotiation without notification. that includes commenting on whether theresa may says they will leave the single market. it is rare for all 27 leaders to say one thing. if financial markets have to go somewhere else, you might have the french and dutch competing. whether
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it is twitter or social media, it is rare to see that there aren't leaders twitching their opinions on this. there is an anticipation. come the next half—hour, there will be leaders all over europe picking away at the speech. i spoke a short while ago to seniorfigures at the speech. i spoke a short while ago to senior figures within the european commission, who will be the conduit for the talks. they have said they will note everything theresa may is saying today. they don't expect any big rabbit out of the hat. they expect that there will be nuanced talks so that she basically unveils her hand at the end of march, not today. let's go to a assistant political editor norman smith. how much clarity will we get from her? limited is the honest answer. we know theresa may will confirm that were leaving the single market. that has always been
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unavoidable once it may signalled that she wanted to end freedom of movement and the jurisdiction of the european court. retaining membership of the single market always looked like a from the perspective of other eu members. in terms of the other issues, though, ithink eu members. in terms of the other issues, though, i think we will get remarkably little clarity. and something like the customs union, it is clear that mrs may wants to be in a position where britain can negotiate new trade deals with other countries, something we cannot do if we remain in the customs union. equally, it is clear that there are alarm bells ringing about the prospects for some sections of british industry if we pull out of the customs union, because of the potential for border checks, for ta riffs potential for border checks, for tariffs to be imposed on british goods. so i suspect that that is going to form a critical part of the negotiations. can we cut a deal which gives us a special deal on the customs union, where we enjoy the benefits of the customs union while perhaps not being a full member of
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it? similarly, on immigration, what has been central to theresa may's case on brexit, do not expect clarity today on what the mechanism will be for driving down the numbers, because there is still a debate going on within government about whether to have in effect freedom of movement lite, in other words to say eu nationals can still come here if they have a job, or to have a restrictive system where the government sets quotas and limits the number of people who can come in particular professions and occupations. that is still up for debate. likewise, a transitional deal. mrs may has talked about what she calls an implementation period. what we don't know is how long she envisages that that will be and the price we might have to pay to secure that. so what we will get today is more big picture stuff, more aspiration, ambition and overriding principles, than the nitty—gritty of the deal theresa may hopes to cut.
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thank you, norman. she will be speaking at around 11.110 five. we will have full coverage of her speech here on bbc newsroom live. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: a sharp rise in inflation as the prime minister prepares to give a major speech on the government's objectives for brexit negotiations. a libyan man has won the right to sue the former foreign secretary, jack straw, over claims of kidnap and torture. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl in rotherham. she's been named locally as leonne weeks. former foreign secretary jack straw faces being sued over allegations of illegal arrest and torture brought by a former libyan dissident. abdul—hakim belhaj alleges that mi6, which mr straw was then responsible for, helped the us abduct him in asia in 2004 to return him
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and his wife to tripoli. the supreme court backed a court of appeal ruling allowing his action. the government had fought to stop the case being heard. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani is outside the supreme court. this is clearly a significant ruling, going back to something that happened many years ago. bring us up—to—date with the history of this. what happened ? up—to—date with the history of this. what happened? this is arguably a devastating ruling for the government, which has fought for yea rs government, which has fought for years to keep allegations of alleged british complicity in rendition out of our domestic courts. it settled a lot of cases many years ago. this is the one that has gone on and on. in 2004, abdul—hakim belhaj and his wife were effectively living in hiding in china. he was a libyan dissident, effectively on the run from the dictator colonel gaddafi's
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forces, fearing for his life. he decided with his wife, who was then pregnant, to try to leave asia to get to the uk to claim asylum. en route, he says he was effectively kidnapped by us secret service is in bangkok, bundled onto a flight and taken to libya, where he was delivered to gaddafi's intelligence services, held in prison, tortured over the course of six years. what was the uk's involvement in this? when gaddafi fell, documents were uncovered in tripoli which revealed that mi6 had been communicating and paid a part in identifying where mr belhaj was. that is the core allegation, that the uk played a key role in identifying this man's whereabouts and helping deliver him to the libyan regime. the government argued that this should stay out of the courts because it involved the act of a foreign state. the supreme court said today that it is not
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having that, because the magna court —— magna carta says no one should be detained ina —— magna carta says no one should be detained in a allegations are serious and. joining me now is a representative of the human rights organisation reprieve. you have been working with mr belhaj‘s y for many yea rs. working with mr belhaj‘s y for many years. what is your reaction? working with mr belhaj‘s y for many years. what is your reaction7m working with mr belhaj‘s y for many years. what is your reaction? it is a resounding win for mr belhaj and his wife, 7—0 in favour of the idea ofjustice and his wife, 7—0 in favour of the idea of justice and a his wife, 7—0 in favour of the idea ofjustice and a trial for this family. that was a unanimous judgment from the justices. exactly, they agreed that the family should have a trial over these issues and that it was vital that they have a trial. 0n the eve of the cupboard ministry, a man who has promised to bring back torture, it is not a moment too soon —— on the eve of the trump administration. for many yea rs, trump administration. for many years, there have been all sort of allegation is much of complicity in rendition from the uk. none of them have gone before the courts. the government will fight on in this case. do you think the allegations
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that mr belhaj and his wife have made will ever be publicly aired before our high court? will we ever find out the full facts of what happened in 2004? we would like to have an open trial. i suspect if it goes to trial, the uk government will try to have a lot of it in secret. but as you pointed out, a huge percentage of the evidence was found in tripoli in 2011 and has been public for years. it is important to remember that this case could have been closed years ago if the uk government would simply have apologised. that is what the family want. they said this isjust apologised. that is what the family want. they said this is just about justice for them, but the uk government hasn't done it. what remains to be seen is whether theresa may will now take another look and decide to say sorry to this family. that is for the government to decide. jack straw is the former foreign secretary. he has issued a statement this morning and he says this case is about a very technical issue on whether the case could proceed. he said the allegations have not been tested, but he says he
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stands by his words to the house of commons that whatever he did at the time as foreign secretary was consistent with the law and he denies wrongdoing. this case will go on for some years to come. the huge search for malaysia airlines flight mh370, which disappeared almost three years ago, has been called off. the plane took off from kuala lumpur for beijing with 239 people on board, but it turned off course and was never seen again. families of the victims have called it an "irresponsible" move and are calling for it to be reconsidered. from sydney, phil mercer reports. an exhaustive deep sea search of a vast swathe of the southern indian ocean has failed to find a single trace of flight mh370. in a statement, australia, malaysia and china said the decision had been taken with sadness. the boeing 777 vanished almost three years ago after taking off from kuala lumpur on what should have been a routine flight to beijing. relatives of some of those on board believe the mission should be
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extended further north in the indian 0cean. voice 370, a family support group, said it was dismayed that the hunt had been called off. it's appealed to australia and its international partners to reconsider their decision. australian authorities have previously rejected calls to look elsewhere, claiming there was a lack of credible evidence. the suspension of the australian—led mission raises the prospect that modern aviation‘s greatest mystery may never be solved. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after the body of a teenage girl was found in south yorkshire her body was found yesterday morning on a path in the dinnington area of the town. she has been named locally as 16—year—old leone weeks. 0ur correspondent is in rotherham for us. danny savage, what can you tell us?
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it was about 10.55 yesterday morning that police revealed that they found the body of a teenage girl along a public footpath alleyway behind this scene of crime investigation van thatis scene of crime investigation van that is now here. it is blocking the view down the alleyway. there is still a tent there where leone was fun. prior to that, the family had been making facebook appeals for anyone who knew where she was to come forward. she was reported missing about 20 minutes beforehand at about 10.30 yesterday morning. her body was found short time later. 0vernight, south yorkshire police say a 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. he is now being questioned by detectives. there is no further back as to what happened here, while happened or anything like that. we just know that this teenage girl was found in this path behind us yesterday morning. a man has
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subsequently been arrested. people have been leaving flowers nearby and m essa 9 es have been leaving flowers nearby and messages for leone. police have not officially named her as leone weeks, but she has been named locally and all the local people know who she is and where she was from and the area she lived in. so an investigation is ongoing, with the 18—year—old being questioned by south yorkshire police detectives. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with a look at the weather. actually, let me to remind you that that theresa may speech is coming up at 11.40 five. we will have full coverage here on the bbc news channel. she is going to be saying that she wants the uk to trade freely with other european countries, but there will not be a half in, half out of the eu approach. that speech is 15 minutes away. let's catch up with the
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weather. it looks quiet on the weather. it looks quiet on the weather front, lots of clouds out there across the majority of the uk. but a very different story across south—eastern areas as well as east anglia. beautiful weather right now and the sun is shining from norwich through london all the way down to the south coast. but that is the exception. the majority of the uk has cloudy outbreaks of rain. some missed in places across the north. a big contract in the temperatures as well. —— a big contrast. that is because that cold air from the continent is still trying to leak into the south—east. tonight, there will be a frost. you can clearly see the frost across the south—eastern portion of the uk. the further north and west you go, you can see how much higher the temperatures are. the outlook for the next couple of days — very little change, staying cloudy. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines at 1.30: prime minister theresa may will give more details of her vision of a post—brexit britain in a speech in london shortly. we'll cover it live. inflation hit its highest rate since july 2014 last month as food prices and air fares rose. the supreme court has cleared the way for a libyan man to take legal action after he claimed britain was involved in his kidnap and rendition to tripoli in 2004. an 18—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murdering a teenage girl in rotherham. she's been named locally as leonne weeks. now for the sport. three british players have got to the australian 0pen overnight after five players
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since 1987 and it could be six because naomi rowley is in court. . first up on court wasjohanna konta. she beat kirsten flipkens. the world number nine will face a japanese player next. and what a game for heather watson. up next to her is americanjennifer heather watson. up next to her is american jennifer brady. heather watson. up next to her is american jennifer bradylj heather watson. up next to her is american jennifer brady. i knew it wasn't going to be an easy match. i played sam a couple of times before and she has beaten me both times. she has a different style of play to most players. she has a great serve. i knew i was going to have to return well and be the first one to dictate otherwise she would have been all over me. kyle edmund won in straight
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sets. the rfu are investigating a complaint from sale sharks. there was a narrow defeat earlier this month. it is their former bristol wing. they win the game 20 4—23 on new year's day. david waite has voiced his frustration with governing body british athletics and says he doesn't want to race his countries again. after winning four gold medals at 2012, he returned empty—handed last month from rio. seven sports are challenging the
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removing of their funding for the paralympics and 0lympics removing of their funding for the paralympics and olympics in 2020. mike —— badminton is among five sports which lost funding after rio 2016. they'll joined by sports which lost funding after rio 2016. they'lljoined by gold ball and table tennis which only gets paralympic funding. that is all the sport. naomi brodie is still one set up sport. naomi brodie is still one set up and a breakdown in the second set 4-2. the department for transport has welcomed the offer. aslef said they would suspend action if they agreed to new talks. we are hearing that in response to that announcement, it is offering to
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suspend the industrial action. the chief executive of thames link railway says, we have always made clear our willingness to engage in meaningful talks to find a loop —— route forward to end the dispute. together with our passengers are businesses, we welcome the decision to spend next week's planned industrial action. this is an important development for the public and the regional economy. 0ur effo rts and the regional economy. 0ur efforts will be on productive talks with the union and trying to find a solution and a way forward. we are grateful to sir frances 0'grady and others to chair this round of talks and they have our unequivocal support. thames link railway are saying they're one be no more further statement until those talks have concluded. the implications seem to be those strike days for the 23rd, 24th, 25th and 27 are off.
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that was the offer that aslef were putting forward, that industrial action would be suspended if talks we re action would be suspended if talks were agreed to be hosted by the tuc. that agreement has been reached. we will watch what happens and keep you updated. all week we are looking to donald trump's inauguration on friday. we will be finding out what americans are feeling about eric 0bama's legacy and how they feel about donald trump being sworn in. getting a sense. we are in chicago. i could do with some breakfast. this
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is barack 0bama's favourite diner. he lived round the corner before he was president and still comes back. what does he eat here? egg whites, turkey sausage, hash browns. what does he eat here? egg whites, turkey sausage, hash brownslj what does he eat here? egg whites, turkey sausage, hash browns. i hope you are hungry. very. he is humble, he is strong. she is a barack obama fan and like the changes he made to health care giving poorer people better access. he thinks donald trump will overturn the reforms. they will not have adequate care, they will not have x —— access to doctors, they will have to come to emergency services and many of them will be very sick, can't get medicine. some of them will die. her
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son thought having a black president would mean a more inclusive america but he fears donald trump's brand of populism is encouraging division. but he fears donald trump's brand of populism is encouraging divisionlj populism is encouraging division.” feel my safety may be in danger. you feel my safety may be in danger. you feel more vulnerable now? in certain situations i do. it is something that you can see from the energy that you can see from the energy that donald trump built and the people that express themselves who support trump. a lot of them have certain beliefs and things like that, which do not alone with my existence. some question the obama legacy and think change is overdue. aspiring businesswoman, erica, hopes donald trump will help people like her. i believe it will open up doors for business owners that are trying to create big businesses. maybe you
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will be as rich as donald trump. we head to the suburbs where nearly half the population is hispanic. donald trump's plans to build a giant wall along the mexican border mean many here cannot support him. never, never. never the mean many here cannot support him. never, never. neverthe wall.” mean many here cannot support him. never, never. never the wall. i am concerned what he thinks about us, especially mexicans. some views here may surprise you. rosa hopes a wall will stop illegal immigrants. we have our own problems here in america. to add more with them coming over here, i don't think it isa coming over here, i don't think it is a good thing. in the choir, margarita hopes donald trump will safeguard herb pro—life catholic
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values. i am so excited and happy for him and we should not be afraid of anything. elissa confirmed the hispanic community is split right now just as hispanic community is split right nowjust as america is split. it is a scary time because we don't know what is going to happen. the unforeseen future, with the hispanics and a lot of people are scared of what will happen. we don't wa nt scared of what will happen. we don't want a vision. look where we are. time to get back on route 40 five. an update now on the update on southern trains. there was due to be strike action next week, 23rd, 24th, 25th, 27th of this month. we are getting confirmation that it is being suspended ahead of fresh
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talks. the tuc has made that announcement earlier. aslef had offered to suspend industrial action on southern motorway if the company agreed to new talks hosted by the tuc. that has been agreed. there is an agreement between all parties that there will be no further statement or comment until the talks have concluded. for commuters on that line, some welcome news that the strike action that was scheduled for next week has been suspended. a second day of evidence has begun in an inquest into the deaths of 30 british holiday—makers who were shot dead on a beach in tunisia 18 months ago. yesterday the court was told that lives could have been saved had local security forces acted more quickly. it will also examine whether travel advice issued by the foreign office and tour operators was adequate. in a few minutes theresa may will give a much anticipated speech setting out her strategy for brexit.
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this is theresa may as she heads to the venue where she will be giving that speech in which she was signalled that she wants there to be a clean break from the signalled that she wants there to be a clean breakfrom the european union rather than the deal that leaves britain half in, half out. we have heard the brexit means brexit mantra many times. there are calls for further mantra many times. there are calls forfurther clamour mantra many times. there are calls for further clamour could —— clarification on what that means. it is going to be clean brexit. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is getting ready for ms may's speech in central london. clea n clean brexit seems to be the new buzz phrase. sounds like a boiled egg. i think what we will get today is more overarching aims than a menu of policies that mrs may hopes to
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achieve, objectives that she wants to get out of the negotiations. we will get more of her ambitions, aspirations, message to the rest of the world that britain is not retreating in on itself, not turning its back on the rest of the world. a message to european countries that we wa nt message to european countries that we want to be friends. we are not wishing ill on the european union and a message to british voters that she is going to deliver. if you want detail, i suspect today is going to bea detail, i suspect today is going to be a bit ofa detail, i suspect today is going to be a bit of a desert because so much of the key issues are going to be crucial call —— critical to the negotiations. theresa may doesn't wa nt to negotiations. theresa may doesn't want to show items like the customs union. we want to be out of the customs union to strike our own trade deals but we don't want to lose all the benefits of the customs union, namely tariff free trade
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throughout the european area. similarly on immigration, we know theresa may wants to drive down the numbers but she has not southern belle tout the mechanisms are doing that. the reason is because there is still an ongoing debate within government over the best way to do this. also she is keeping her options open in terms of how hard ball she has to play with the rest of the eu. whether we try to play tough on immigration or whether we are willing to have a freedom of movement. all those things will be central to the negotiations and theresa may is not going to want to speu theresa may is not going to want to spell out what her detailed plan is. that said, be in no doubt there will be many mps who take the view, hang ona be many mps who take the view, hang on a second, theresa may promised there would be a plan. where is the plan? i suspect we are not going to get it today. in terms of the big
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picture and getting out of the single market, will back give the start of a clearer picture that will start of a clearer picture that will start to put a bit of flesh on the bones? in the absence of that comment you could argue brexit means brexit and it is implicitly saying exactly that but in the absence of that, there has been the talk about whether it should be soft brexit or ha rd whether it should be soft brexit or hard brexit and what the british people meant when they voted out.” don't think the confirmation of leaving the single market takes as much furtherforward. leaving the single market takes as much further forward. that is a statement of the inevitable. there is no way we can stay in the single market if we want to end freedom of movement and if we want to end the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. 0ther jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. other eu leaders have made it clear that is a no. you can stay in a single market if you want
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to backtrack on freedom of movement. we don't have an option. we have to leave the single market. i don't think that takes us much further forward. ina think that takes us much further forward. in a way, we have almost known that since theresa may mater party conference speech. it has been clear that our continued membership of the single market was looking pretty unlikely. that was always something we would not be able to sustain. whatever theresa may says today may be totally overwritten, overshadowed, overtaken by events in europe and by decisions of other eu leaders about the sort of slack they wa nt to leaders about the sort of slack they want to cut, the deal they are willing to agree. and by—elections in the rest of europe. there are critical elections coming up and that could change the international dynamic which could change the deal that theresa may might get. there
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are all sorts of elements in flight which means today... theresa may says he doesn't and a running commentary and today is a running commentary and today is a running commentary because it is far too seemed to know what deal we might be able to get and other eu leaders are willing to cut us. we are still awaiting her arrival. everybody is sitting and waiting patiently but no sign of theresa mayjust sitting and waiting patiently but no sign of theresa may just yet. sitting and waiting patiently but no sign of theresa mayjust yet. she is due to start speaking imminently. lancaster house, this is the building where mrs thatcher came to launch britain's membership and guess what, the single market. today, it is the day theresa may has come to end britain's membership of the single market. there is a certain paradox in the location for
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the speech today. she saying she has come here because it is a building which often hosts major international moments. it hosted the lancaster house talks where we granted independence to rhodesia as it is now zimbabwe. theresa may wa nted it is now zimbabwe. theresa may wanted to use this venue to set the backdrop for her speech to address the wider world, to be seen to be making a bigger global point about britain's place in the world, not just talking to the westminster village. that is why she has chosen lancaster house as a venue. there is an irony that this is the birthplace of our membership of the single market. it is going to mark the end of our membership of the single market. whether it is coincidence or not, really interesting history to her speaking there. we can see some
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significant figures involved in the process as we go forward including the uk's new ambassador to the eu, said tim arrow. going back, going back to margaret thatcher and every political leader, there has been issues between the leadership and the mps about the relationship with europe. how does that play right now? what is the dynamic? are mps going to coalesce around theresa may when she spells it out with clarity? you will have to hold that thought. she is about to speak. a little over six months ago, the
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british people voted the change. they voted to shape a brighter future for our country. they voted to leave the european union and embrace the world. and they did so with their eyes open. access dingbat the road ahead would be uncertain at times come about believing that it leads towards a brighter future for their children and their grandchildren also. it is the job of this government to deliver it. that means more than negotiating our new relationship with the eu. it means taking the opportunity of this great moment of national change, to step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be. my answer is clear. i want this united kingdom to emerge from this period of change
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stronger, fairer, more united and more outward looking than ever before. i want us to be a secure, prosperous, tolerant country, magnificent national talent and a home to the pioneers and innovators who will shape the world ahead. i wa nt who will shape the world ahead. i want us to be a truly global britain, the best friend and neighbour to our european partners but a country that reaches beyond the borders of europe also. a country that goes out into the world to build relationships with old friends and new allies alike. i want britain to be what we have the potential talent and ambition to be, a great global trading nation that is respected around the world and strong, confident and united at home. that is why this government has a plan for britain. 0ne home. that is why this government
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has a plan for britain. one that gets us the right deal abroad but also ensures we get a better deal for ordinary working people at home. it is why that plan sets out how we will use this moment of change to build a stronger economy and a fairer society by embracing genuine economic and social reform. why our new modern industrial strategy is being developed, to ensure every nation and area of the uk can make the most of the opportunities ahead. why we will go for that to reform our schools, to assure every child has the knowledge and skills they need to thrive in post—brexit britain. why as we continue to bring the deficit down, we will take a balanced approach by investing in our economic infrastructure because it can transform the growth potential of our economy and improve the quality of people's glides across the whole country. it is why we will put the preservation of our
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precious union at the heart of everything we do. it is only by coming together as one great union of nations and people that we can make the most of the opportunities ahead. the result of the referendum was not a decision to turn inward and retreat from the world. because britain's history and culture is profoundly internationalistjust britain's history and culture is profoundly internationalist just a wee re european country and proud of our shared european heritage but we are also a country that has always looked beyond europe to the wider world. that is why we are one of the most racially diverse countries in europe, one of the most macho culture members of the european union and why, whether we are talking about india, pakistan, bangladesh, america, australia, canada, new zealand, countries in africa or those closer to home in europe, so many have close friends
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and relatives from across the world. instinctively, we want to travel to study and trade with countries not just in europe but beyond the borders of our continent. even now, as we prepare to leave the eu, we are planning for the next biennial commonwealth heads of government ministers in 2018, a reminder of our unique and proud global relationships. it is important to recognise this fact. june 23 was not the moment britain chose to step back from the world, it was the moment we chose to build a truly global britain. i know that this and the other reasons britain talks such a decision is not always well understood among our friends and allies in europe. and i know many fear this might herald the beginning ofa fear this might herald the beginning of a great unravelling of the eu. we have to address the people of
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europe directly. it is not simply because our history and culture is profoundly internationalist, important though that is. many in britain have always felt that the united kingdom's place in the european union came at the expense of our global ties and a bold embrace of free trade with the wider world. there are other important reasons also. 0ur political traditions are different. unlike other european countries, we have no wrinkles tuition but the principle
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of parliamentary sovereignty is the basis of our unwritten constitutional settlements. we have only a recent history of devolved governance, though it has rapidly embedded itself. we have little history of coalition government. the public expect to be able to hold their governments to account very directly. as a result, supranational institutions, as strong as those created by the european union, sit very uneasily in relation to our political history and way of life. and while i know britain might at times have been seen as an awkward member state, the european union has struggled to deal with the diversity of its member countries and their interests. it bends towards uniformity, not flexibility. david cameron's negotiation was badly and final attempt to make it work for britain. i want to thank all those elsewhere in europe who helped him
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to reach an agreement. but the blunt truth is we know is that there was not enough flexibility on many important matters for a majority of british voters. i do not believe these things apply uniquely to britain. britain is not the only member state where there is a strong attachment to accountable and democratic government, an international mindset or a belief that diversity within europe should be celebrated. i believe there is a lesson in brexit, notjust for britain but if you want to succeed for the eu itself. 0ur continent's great strength has always been its diversity. there are two ways of dealing with different interests. you can respond by trying to hold things together by force, timing a vice like grip that ends up trash —— crushing the things you want to protect. you can respect difference, cherish it and reform the eu so it deals better with the wonderful diversity of those member states. to
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our friends across europe, diversity of those member states. to ourfriends across europe, let diversity of those member states. to our friends across europe, let me say this, our vote leave the european union was no rejection of the values we share. the decision to leave the eu represents no desire to become more distant to you, our friends and neighbours, it was no attempt to do harm to the eu itself or to attempt to do harm to the eu itself orto any of attempt to do harm to the eu itself or to any of its remaining member states. we do not want to turn the clock back to the days when europe was less peaceful, less secure and less a ble was less peaceful, less secure and less able to trade freely. it was a boat to restore, as we see it, our parliamentary democracy, national self—determination and to become even more global and internationalist in action and in spirit. we will continue to be reliable partners, willing allies and close friends. we won't buy your goods and services, so you hours, trade with us freely as possible and work with one another to make sure
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we are all safer, more secure and more prosperous through continued friendship. you will still be welcome in this country as we hope our citizens would be welcome in yours. at a time when together we face a serious threat from enemies, britain's unique intelligence capabilities will continue to keep people in europe safe from terrorism. at a time when there is growing concern about european security, britain's servicemen and women based in european countries including estonia, poland and romania, will continue to do their duty. we are leaving the european union that we are not leaving europe. that is why we seek a new and equal partnership between an independent self—governing global britain and our friends and allies in the eu. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the european union or anything that leaves as half in,
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half out. we do not seek to adopt a model already enjoyed by other countries and stop we do not seek to hold onto bits of membership as we leave. no, the uk is leaving the european union and myjob is to get the right deal for britain as we do. today, i want to outline our objectives for the negotiation ahead. 12 objectives that amount to one big goal, a new positive and constructive partnership between britain and the european union. as we negotiate that partnership, we will be driven by some simple principles. we will provide as much certainty and clarity as we can at every stage and we will take this opportunity to make britain stronger, to make britain fairer and to build a more global britain. the first objective is crucial. we
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will provide certainty whenever we can. we are about to enter a negotiation. that means there will be give and take. there will have to be give and take. there will have to be compromises. it will require imagination on both sides. and not everybody will be able to know everything at every stage. but i recognise how important it is to provide business, the public sector and everybody with as much certainty as possible as we move through the process. so where we can offer that certainty, we will do so. that is why last year, we acted quickly to give clarity about farm payments and university funding, and this is why, as we reveal the european communities act, we will convert the body of existing eu law into british law. this would give the country maximum certainty as we leave the
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eu. the same rules and laws will apply on the day after brexit as they did before. and it will be for they did before. and it will be for the british parliament to decide on any changes to that law after full scrutiny and proper parliamentary debate. and when it comes to woman, there is one other way in which i would like to fight certainty. i can confirm today that the government will put the final deal that is agreed between the uk and the eu to about in both houses of parliament before it comes into force. 0ur second guiding principle is to build a stronger britain. that means taking control of our own affairs, as those who voted in their millions to leave the european union demanded we must. so we will take back control of our laws and bring an end to thejurisdiction of control of our laws and bring an end to the jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice in britain. leaving the european union will mean that our laws will be made in
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westminster, edinburgh, cardiff and belfast. and those laws will be interpreted byjudges not in luxembourg, but in courts across this country. because we will not have truly left the european union if we are not in control of our own laws. a stronger britain demands that we do something else — strengthen the precious union between the four nations of the united kingdom. at this momentous time, it is more important than ever that we face the future together, united by what makes us strong — the bond that unites us as a people and our shared interest in the uk being an open, successful trading nation in the future. and i hope that same spirit of unity will imply in northern ireland in particular over the coming months in the assembly elections, and the main parties will work together to re—establish a partnership government as soon as
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possible. foreign affairs are of course the responsibility of the uk government, and in dealing with them, we address all parts of the united kingdom. as prime minister, i ta ke united kingdom. as prime minister, i take that responsibility seriously. i have also been determined from the start that the devolved administration should be fully engaged in this process. that is why the government has set up a joint ministerial committee on eu negotiations, said ministers from each of the uk's devolved administrations can contribute to the process of planning for our departure from the european union. we have already received a paper from the scottish government and look forward to receiving a paper from the welsh government shortly. both papers will be considered as pa rt both papers will be considered as part of this important process. we will not agree on everything, but i look forward to working with the administrations in scotland, wales and northern ireland to deliver a brexit that works for the whole of the united kingdom. part of that
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will mean working carefully to ensure that as powers are repatriated from brussels back to britain, the right powers are returned to westminster and the right powers are passed to the devolved administrations of scotland, wales and northern ireland. as we do so, our guiding principle must be to ensure that as we leave the european union, no new barriers to living and doing business within our own union are created. that means maintaining the necessary common standards and frameworks for our own domestic market, empowering the uk as an open trading nation to strike the best trade deals around the world and protecting the common resources of our islands. and as we do this, i should equally be clear that no decision is currently taken by the devolved administrations will be removed from them. we cannot forget that as we leave, the united kingdom
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will share a land border with the eu, and maintaining that common travel area with the republic of ireland will be an important priority for the uk in the talks ahead. there has been a common travel area between the uk and the republic of ireland for many years. indeed, it was formed before either of our two countries were members of the european union. the family ties and bonds of affection that unite our two countries mean that there will always be a special relationship between us. so we will work to deliver a practical solution that allows the maintenance of the common travel area with the republic while protecting the integrity of the united kingdom's immigration system. nobody wants to return to the borders of the past, so we will make it a priority to deliver a practical solution as soon as we can. the third principle is to build afairer can. the third principle is to build a fairer britain. that means ensuring that it is fair to everyone
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who lives and works in this country. that is why we will ensure that we can control immigration to britain from europe. we will continue to attract the brightest and best to work or study in britain. indeed, openness to international talent must remain one of this country's most distinctive assets. but that process must be managed properly so that our immigration system serves the national interest. so we will get control of the number of people coming to britain from the eu. while controlled immigration can bring great benefits, filling skill shortages, delivering public services, making british businesses are world beaters they often are, when the numbers get too high, public support for the system falters. in the last decade, we have seen record levels of net migration in britain, and that volume has put pressure on public services like schools, stretched our
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infrastructure, especially housing, and put a downward pressure on wages for working class people. as home secretary for six years, i know that you cannot control immigration overall when there is free movement to britain from europe. written is an open and tolerant country. we will always want immigration, especially high skilled immigration. we will always want immigration from europe, and we will always welcome individual migrants as friends. but the message from the public, before and during the referendum campaign, was clear. rex it must mean control of the number of people who come to britain from europe, that is what we will deliver. fairness demands that we deal with another issue as soon as possible too food. we want to guarantee the rights of eu citizens who are already living in britain, and the rights of british nationals in other member states as early as we can. i have told other eu leaders
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that we could give people the certainty they want straightaway and reach such a deal now. many of them favour such an agreement. 0ne reach such a deal now. many of them favour such an agreement. one or two others do not. but i want everyone to know that it remains an important priority for britain and for many other member states to resolve this challenge as soon as is all, because it is the right and fair thing to do. and a fairer britain is a country that protects and enhances the rights people have at work. that is why, as we translate the body of european law into our domestic regulations, we will ensure that workers' rights are fully protected and maintained. indeed, under my leadership, not only will the government protect the rights of workers set out in european legislation, we will build on them, because under this conservative government, we will make sure legal protection for workers keeps pace with the changing labour market and that the voices of workers are heard
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by the boards of publicly listed companies for the first time. but the great prize for this country, the great prize for this country, the opportunity ahead, is to use this moment to build a truly global britain, a country that reaches out to old friends and new allies alike, a great global trading nation and one of the firmest advocates for free trade anywhere in the world. that starts with our close friends and neighbours in europe. so as a priority, we will pursue a bold and ambitious free trade agreement with the european union. this agreement should allow for the freest possible trade in goods and services between britain and the eu's member states. it should give british companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within european markets and let european businesses do the same in britain. but i want to be clear.
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what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. european leaders have said many times that membership means accepting the full freedoms of goods, capital, services and people. and being out of the eu but a member of the single market would mean complying with the eu's rules and regulations that implement those freedoms without having a vote on what those rules and regulations are. they would mean accepting a role for the european court of justice that would see it still having directly to authority in our country. it would, to all intents and purposes, mean not leaving the eu at all. that is why both sides in the referendum campaign made it clear that a vote to leave the eu would be a vote to leave the single market. so we do not seek membership of the single market. instead, we
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seek the greatest possible access to it through a new, comprehensive, bold and ambitious free trade agreement. that agreement may take in elements of current single market arrangements in certain areas — on the export of cars and lorries, for example, or the freedom to provide financial services across national borders, as it makes no sense to start again from scratch when britain and the remaining member states have adhered to the same rules for so many years. but i respect the position taken by european leaders who have been clear about their position, just as i am clear about mine. so an important pa rt clear about mine. so an important part of the new strategic partnership we seek with the eu will be the pursuit of the greatest possible access to the single market, on a fully reciprocal basis through a comprehensive free trade agreement. and because we will no longer be members of the single
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market, we will not be required to contribute huge sums to the eu budget. there may be some specific european programmes in which we might want to participate. if so, and this will be for us to decide, it is reasonable that we should make an appropriate contribution. but the principle is clear. the days of britain making vast contributions to the european union every year will end. but it is notjust trade with the eu that we should be interested in. a global britain must be free to strike trade agreements with countries from outside the european union too. because important though our trade with the eu is and will remain, it is clear that the uk needs to increase significantly its trade with the fastest—growing export markets in the world. since joining the eu, trade as a percentage of gdp has broadly stagnated in the uk. that is why it
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is time for britain to get out into the world and rediscover its role as a great global trading nation. this is such a priority for me that when i became prime minister, i established for the first time a department for international trade, led by liam fox. we want to get out into the wider world, to trade and do business all around the globe. countries including china, brazil and the gulf states have already expressed their interest in striking trade deals with us. we have started discussions on future trade ties with countries like australia, new zealand and india. and president—elect trump has said britain is not at the back of the queue for a trade deal with the united states, the world's biggest economy, but front of the line. i know my emphasis on striking trade agreements with countries outside europe has led to questions about whether britain seeks to remain a member of the eu's customs union. it
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is true that full customs union membership prevents us from negotiating our own comprehensive trade deals. i want britain to be able to negotiate its own trade agreements. but i also want para free trade with europe and cross—border trade to be as frictionless as possible —— tariff free trade. that means i do not want britain to be part of the common commercial policy, and i do not want us commercial policy, and i do not want us to be bound by the common external tariff. these are the elements of the customs union that prevent us from striking our own comprehensive trade agreements with other countries. but i do want us to have a customs agreement with the eu. whether that means we must reach a completely new customs agreement, become an associate member of the customs union in some way or remain a signatory to some elements of it, i hold no preconceived position. i have an open mind on how we do it. it is not the means that matter, but
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the ends. and those ends are clear. i want to remove as many barriers to trade as possible, and i want britain to be free to establish our own tariff schedules at the world trade organisation, meaning we can reach new trade agreements notjust with the eu, but with old friends and new allies from outside europe too. a global britain must also be a country that looks to the future. that means being one of the best places in the world for science and innovation. 0ne places in the world for science and innovation. one of our great strengths as a nation is the breadth and depth of our academic and scientific communities, backed up by some of the world's best universities. and we have a proud history of leading and supporting cutting—edge research and innovation. so we will also welcome agreement to continue to collaborate with our european partners on major
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science, research and technology initiatives, from space exploration to clean energy to medical technologies. britain will remain at the forefront of collective endeavours to better understand and make better the world in which we live. and a global britain will continue to cooperate with its european partners in important areas such as crime, terrorism and foreign affairs. all of us in europe face the challenge of cross—border crime, a deadly terrorist threat and the dangers presented by hostile states. all of us share interests and values in common, values we want to see projected around the world. with the threats to our common security becoming more serious, our response cannot be too cooperate less, but to
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work together more. i therefore want our future relationship with the european union to include practical arrangements on matters of law enforcement and the sharing of intelligence material with our eu allies. i am intelligence material with our eu allies. iam proud intelligence material with our eu allies. i am proud of the role britain has played and will continue to play in promoting europe's security. britain has led europe on the measures needed to keep our continent secure, whether it implement its actions against russia following its action in crimea, working for peace and stability in the balkans or securing europe's external border. we will continue to work closely with our european allies in foreign and defence policy, even as we leave the eu itself. these are our objectives to shipafairer itself. these are our objectives to ship a fairer global britain that we wa nt to ship a fairer global britain that we want to see. they are the basis for
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a new, strong, constructive partnership with the european union, a partnership of friends and allies, of interests and values, a partnership for a strong eu and a strong uk. but there is one further objective we are setting. for as i have said before, it is in no one's interests for there to be a cliff edge for business or a threat to stability as we change from our existing relationship to a new partnership with the eu. by this, i do not mean that we will seek some form of unlimited transitional status in which we find ourselves stuck forever in some kind of permanent political purgatory. that would not be good for britain. but nor do i believe it would be good for the eu. instead, nor do i believe it would be good forthe eu. instead, iwant nor do i believe it would be good for the eu. instead, i want us to have reached an agreement about our future partnership by the time the two—year article 50 process has concluded. from that point onwards, we believe a phased process of implementation in which both britain
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and the eu institutions and member states prepare for the new arrangements that will exist between us arrangements that will exist between us will be in our mutual self—interest. this will give businesses enough time to plan and prepare for the new arrangements. this might be about our immigration controls, custom systems or the way in which we cooperate on criminal justice matters. 0r in which we cooperate on criminal justice matters. or it might be about the future legal and regulatory framework for financial services. for each issue, the time we need to phase in the new arrangements may differ. some might be introduced quickly, some might ta ke be introduced quickly, some might take longer. and the interim arrangements we rely on are likely to bea arrangements we rely on are likely to be a matter of negotiation. but the purpose is clear. we will seek to avoid a disruptive cliff edge, and we will do everything we can to phase in the new arrangements we require as britain and the eu move towards our new partnership. so
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these are the objectives we have set — certainty wherever possible, control of our own laws, strengthening the united kingdom, maintaining the common travel area with ireland, control of immigration, writes for eu nationals in britain and british nationals in the eu, enhancing rights for workers, free trade with european markets, new trade agreements with other countries, a leading role in science and innovation, cooperation on crime, terrorism and foreign affairs and a phased approach delivering a smooth and orderly brexit. this is the framework that will herald a new partnership between the uk and the eu. it is a comprehensive and carefully considered plan that focuses on the ends, not just the considered plan that focuses on the ends, notjust the means, with its eyes fixed firmly on the future and on the kind of country we will be once we leave. it reflects the hard work of many in this room today who
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have worked tirelessly to bring it together and to prepare this country for the negotiations ahead. and it will, i know, be debated and discussed at length. that is only right. but those who urge us to reveal more, such as the nude blow by blow details of our negotiating strategy, the areas where we might compromise, the places where we think there are potential trade—offs, will not be acting in the national interest. because this is not a game, or the national interest. because this is nota game, ora the national interest. because this is not a game, or a time for opposition for opposition's sec. it isa opposition for opposition's sec. it is a crucial and sensitive negotiation that will define the interests and the success of our country for many years to come. and it is vital that we maintain our discipline. that is why i have said before and will continue to say that every stray word and every had top media report is going to make it harderfor media report is going to make it harder for us media report is going to make it harderfor us to get media report is going to make it
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harder for us to get the right deal for britain. 0ur opposite numbers in the european commission know it, which is why they are keeping their discipline. the ministers in governments know it, which is why we will also maintain arts. so however frustrating some people find it, the government will not be pressured into saying more than i believe it is in our national interest to say, because it is not myjob to fill column inches with daily updates, but to get the right deal for britain, and that is what i intend to do. i am confident that a deal and a new strategic partnership between the uk and the eu can be achieved. this is firstly because, having held conversations with almost every leaderfrom having held conversations with almost every leader from every single eu member state, having spent time talking to the senior figures from the european institutions, including president tours, president juncker and president schultz, add after my cabinet colleagues david davis, philip hammond, borisjohnson
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have done the same with their interlocutors, i am confident that the vast majority want a positive relationship between the uk and the eu after brexit, and i am confident that the objectives i am setting up today are consistent with the needs of the eu and its member states. that is why our objectives include a proposed free trade agreement between britain and the european union and explicitly rule out membership of the eu single market. because when the eu's leaders say they believe the full freedoms of they believe the full freedoms of the single market are indivisible, we respect that position. when the 27 member states say they want to continue their journey 27 member states say they want to continue theirjourney inside the european union, we not only respect that fact, but support it. we do not wa nt to that fact, but support it. we do not want to undermine the single market, and we do not want to undermine the european union. we want the eu to be
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a success, and we want its remaining member states to prosper. and of course, we want the same for britain. the second reason i believe it is possible to reach a good deal is that the kind of agreement i have described today is the economically rational thing that both britain and the eu should aim for, because trade is not a 0—sum game. more of it makes us all more prosperous. free trade between britain and the european union means more trade, more trade means morejobs european union means more trade, more trade means more jobs and european union means more trade, more trade means morejobs and more wealth creation. the erection of new barriers to trade, meanwhile, means the reverse — less trade, fewer jobs, lower growth. the third and final reason i believe we can come to the right agreement is that cooperation between britain and the eu is needed notjust when it comes to trade, but when it comes to our security too. britain and france are
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europe's only two nuclear powers. we are the only two european countries with permanent seats on the united nations security council. britain's armed forces are crucial part of europe's collective defence. and i intelligence capability is unique in europe and have already saved cou ntless europe and have already saved countless lives in many terrorist plots that have been thwarted in countries across our continent. after brexit, britain wants to be a good friend and neighbour in every way, and that includes defending the safety a nd way, and that includes defending the safety and security of all of our citizens. so i believe the framework i have outlined today is in britain's interests, it is in europe's interests and it is in the interests of the wider world. but i must be clear. britain wants to remaina must be clear. britain wants to remain a good friend and neighbour to europe. yet i know there are some voices calling for a punitive deal that punishes britain and
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discourages other countries from taking the same path. that would be an act of calamitous self—harm for the countries of europe, and it would not be the act of a friend. britain would not, indeed we could not, accept such an approach. and while i am confident that this scenario need never arise, while i am sure a positive agreement can be reached, i am equally clear that no dealfor britain is better than a bad dealfor britain, because we would still be able to trade with europe. we would still be free to strike trade deals across the world and we would have the freedom to set the competitive tax rates and embrace the policies that would attract biggest companies and investors to britain. if we were excluded from accessing the single market, we would be free to change the basis of britain's economic model. but for the eu, the basis of britain's economic model. but forthe eu, it the basis of britain's economic model. but for the eu, it would mean new barriers to trade with one of
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the biggest economies in the world. it would jeopardise investments in britain by eu companies worth more than half £1 trillion. it would mean a loss of access for european firms to the financial services of the city of london. it would risk exports from the eu to britain worth around £290 billion every year. and it would disrupt the sophisticated and integrated supply chain is upon which many eu companies rely. important sectors of the eu economy would also suffer. we are crucial profitable export market for the european automotive industry as well as many others. these sectors employ millions of people around europe, andi millions of people around europe, and i don't believe that the eu's leaders will seriously tell german exporters, french farmers, spanish fishermen, the young unemployed of the eurozone and millions of others that they want to make them poorer just to punish britain and make a
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political point. for all these reasons, and because of our shared values and the spirit of goodwill that exists on both sides, i am confident that we will follow a better path. i am confident that we will reach a positive agreement. it is right that the government should prepare for every eventuality, but to do so in the knowledge that a constructive and optimistic approach to the negotiations to come is in the best interests of europe and the best interests of britain. we do not approach these big additions expecting failure, but anticipating success , expecting failure, but anticipating success, because we are a great global nation with so much to offer europe and so much to offer the world. one of the world's largest and strongest economies, with the finest intelligence services, the bravest armed forces, the most effective ha rd bravest armed forces, the most effective hard and soft power and friendships, partnerships and alliances in every continent. and another thing that is important —
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the essential ingredient of our success , the essential ingredient of our success, the strength and support of 65 million people willing us to make it happen. because after all the division and discord, the country is coming together. the referendum was divisive at times, and those divisions have taken time to heal. but one of the reasons that britain's democracy has been such a success for many years is that the strength of our identity as one—nation, the respect we show to one—nation, the respect we show to one another as fellow citizens and the importance we attach to our institutions means that when a vote has been held, we all respect the result. the victors have the responsibility to act magnanimously. the losers have the responsibility to respect the legitimacy of the outcome, and the country comes together. that is what we are seeing today. business isn't calling to
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reverse the result, but planning to make a success of it. the house of commons has voted overwhelmingly for us to get on with it, and the overwhelming majority of people, however they voted, want us to get on with it too. so that is what we will do. not merely forming a new partnership with europe, but building a stronger, fairer, more global britain too. and let that be the legacy of our time. the prize towards which we work, the destination at which we arrive once the negotiation is done. and let us not do it for ourselves, but for those who follow, for the country's children and grandchildren too. so that when future generations look back at this time, they willjudge us not only by the decision that we made, but by what we made of that decision. applause
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i think we have a few members of the press here who might have some questions. during the referendum campaign, you said plainly that you believed if we left the eu and the single market, the country would be worse off. either you have changed your mind oras worse off. either you have changed your mind or as prime minister, you have made a decision that you believe will leave the country and its citizens poorer. which is it? look at what has happened in terms
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of the economic information we have seen since the breakfasts —— brexit folk. 0r seen since the breakfasts —— brexit folk. or the economic indicators have been more positive than people predicted. it is only this week that the imf confirmed we are the fastest—growing economy last year and what i'm talking about today is the country coming together and looking for that brighter future as a global britain. this isjust about is leaving the european union, we are leaving the eu, we are not leaving europe. we will be embracing the world. this is about a confident future, trading nation that is out there bringing prosperity head to there bringing prosperity head to the uk. in doing that, i think that would be a benefit to other countries in europe and also benefit across the world stage. is the question of whether there is a preferential access the eu nationals
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pa rt preferential access the eu nationals part of the negotiation or do you commit today to treating the successful immigration system and it will treat eu... does britain believing that two state solution in the middle east? we do continue to believe in a two state solution in the middle east and we will be working for it and will continue to working for it and will continue to work for it. on immigration, i have set out we want to control immigration from the uk to the eu. i have set out clearly today that we do recognise the importance of us welcoming people to come here into the uk. we want to welcome the brightest damned the best and we know the benefits it can bring and recognise the value of the contribution made by people from the european union who have come here to the uk in the past and are still here. we will set our immigration
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rules according to the objectives i have set out. is there anybody from the european press? on this immigration issue, will there be an exemption for certain british sectors, british business sectors according to their needs? we are looking at the exact walls and structure that would be for the immigration system but the way we have always looked at the issue of control in our immigration is recognising the need to bring the brightest and the best of the uk and that value people can bring into the uk. i think of what was clear from the 23rd ofjune vote is as we leave the 23rd ofjune vote is as we leave the eu, people want us to be able to make those decisions ourselves as to what our immigration system is and we will dojust what our immigration system is and
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we will do just that. sorry to press you want this but are you saying that when you argue that we would be worse off from leaving the eu and the single market, that you now recognise you were wrong about that? you have confirmed parliament will have a vote on the final deal. if parliament were to reject the final deal, will we still be in the eu? everybody knows i campaigned on the remain side of the agreement and the government is formed of people who come “— government is formed of people who come —— argued on both sides. what we are now doing is saying the economic situation has been more positive than what we predicted in advance of the vote being taken. we come together and saying what are the opportunities we can embrace
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across the world and in our future relationship with the eu? 0pportunities that will increase that prosperity that the united kingdom and we will go out there across the world, we will search them out and bring them home. there will be a vote for the british parliament when it comes to the deal. we have already had... if you think about it, the british parliament voted for this to be a choice for the british people. they voted overwhelmingly for the government to get on with it and i'm sure the british parliament will wa nt to sure the british parliament will want to deliver on the views of the british people and respect the democratic decision that was taken. i will take one more question. in the negotiation of the customs agreement, can you confirm you rule out any financial contribution to
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the european union and that migration will be out of the table and with the main negotiation weapon be the threat of becoming a tax haven? as i made clear, another of the people voted for was to stop us co nsta ntly the people voted for was to stop us constantly paying very large amounts of money to the eu. there may be aspects that we may want to be members of and it may be that contributing to the costs of those is appropriate. i think you use the phrase that it is about a weapon that we may use. it is not about a confrontation. it is about two sides coming together to negotiate and agree a deal that is going to be in the interests of both sides. this is crucially important. we don't look at this as saying what is going to be right that the eu —— uk. i
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believe we will also see a deal that is right that the european union as well. i want to approach this in a positive, optimistic way. i think there is goodwill on both sides and we can sit down and come to a partnership that the future that will be both to both of our mutual benefits. thank you. applause. a more detailed speech than had perhaps been anticipated. theresa may they're confirming that leaving the eu does mean the uk leaving the single market. the government hasn't explicitly spelt that out previously. brexit means brexit means the buzz phrase but theresa may saying what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. 0ther cannot mean membership of the single market. other key points emerging from her speech, the customs union. there have been speculation about what she would say on the customs
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union. that is the agreement that means tariff free trade within europe. 0n means tariff free trade within europe. on that, putting out what she would envisage the future situation wanting their to be tariff free trade within europe but not being bound by part of the common external tariffs. saying that the focus is about embracing the world, leaving the eu but being able to have trade agreements with the rest of the world. that phrase, global britain, repeatedly used by theresa may throughout her speech. the third very interesting point that emerged from her speech there is the fact that there will be a vote in the commons and in the lords. she was questioned about what would happen if that boat saw a rejection of the deal that had been agreed. didn't and is about. also the cost of membership of the eu saying we will
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not be paying billions in the future and talking also about there being no cliff edge once agreement is reached. the agreement would be done in two years and a phased implementation. there would not be purgatory forever but a period to allow business to plan and avoid that cliff edge. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is at westminster. it was stronger and meatier than had been anticipated. we were told it was going to be a significant speech. she was bringing together all the hints we have had over the last few months and come to a logical conclusion. the thing she has not said before was that the uk would be leaving the single market. the reason she is saying matters
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because of the other things she wa nts to because of the other things she wants to achieve. she has always said that referendum result came about because people wanted to control immigration, they wanted the uk to control its own borders and she said the rest of the eu has made it clear that we cannot do that if we stay in a single market. she is saying we will have to leave but making it clear she wants to have a tariff free trade deal and wants to continue to have a very close relationship with the eu. her argument being we have been close friends and allies and trading partners that over 40 years and she says there was no reason why that cannot continue. i am joined by tim farron. what is your reaction to what theresa may said. she has confirmed we are leaving the united kingdom towards a hard brexit, ripping us out of the single market. all the polling we have in the last poll shows 90% of the people believe
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we should be in the single market. this is a presumption for the 51.9% of people that voted to leave, it was the most extreme version of brexit available. theresa may has scrabbled around, found nigel farage's plan and adopted it. there will be at the end a vote in parliament. politicians get to vote on the stitch up but the british people don't. if this process starts with democracy last june, it people don't. if this process starts with democracy lastjune, it must not end up with a stitch up. we must trust the people with destination also. mps are sent to parliament by people and you will have a chance to block the deal. you're saying that you will block it? we have to look at what is on the table. it is very clear we' re at what is on the table. it is very clear we're not going to get as good
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a deal outside the single market than we currently have. the real concerning thing is the constant mantra we were becoming global trading nation. it is an insult to british business large and small. we area british business large and small. we are a great trading nation and that is because we are members of the world's largest traders to block. without arguing our case to waive the right clave and giving up what is best for britney zai in salt to business and damaging to britain's future and theft of democracy. this was not on the ballot paper and this is an outrage. i am also joined by 0wen paterson who has a different view. what did you make of the speech? tremendous. over 70 million voted to leave the european union. that meant leaving the single market with all its constraints and burdens but wanting to do free trade with
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europe and with the rest of the world. tim is talking nonsense. the single market is important that we have access to it. 20 countries have accelerated their sails into the single market from outside, faster than we have within. it is the internal market of the european union. 0ur internal market of the european union. our sales have gone down 43% today and we will be making it clear we want access to the single market but theresa may sees the world growing and that is where the long—term future is. growing and that is where the long-term future is. she fears they will try to punish britain and we will try to punish britain and we will end up with tariffs on our trade which could only be detrimental to our economy. detrimental to them. they want to keep the eu together and i want britain to be seen to be having a
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better deal outside. they are not necessarily going to do what she wa nts. necessarily going to do what she wants. they have to respect the will of the british people who voted to leave. the right was stated by the british people. that means leaving the european union, the internal market of the european union. the single market. they have a massive interest in continuing to do a sensible deal with us. what we want is reciprocal free—trade. that is in their interest as they sell so much more to us than we sell to them. senior figures are making it clear they do not want a recession constructed in berlin and forced on bavaria bike cack— handed negotiation. to reza made it clear from the beginning. she could have made it more clear that we want the
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best trading relationships with our european unions but we will do it from outside the european union. you can see the different reactions to this speech but it is clear the government is saying to the eu, think about your own interests. there is a practical reason why a decent open trade deal would be good if everybody. we are getting some reaction from the irish government to have put out a statement on the speech saying the government welcomes the fact that it provided greater clarity on the proposed approach of the british government to the brexit negotiation process. reminisced ma has made it clear she wa nts to reminisced ma has made it clear she wants to secure the best possible future for britain with the eu, goal that ireland shares the island. in process that lies ahead is unchanged. the government notes the
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british approach is now firmly that of the country which will have left the eu but which seeks to negotiate a new close relationship with it. this will be seen by many as a hard dexit. the analysis across government has covered all models for the future relationship with the eu. that statement through from the irish government. while theresa may was speaking, the pound was nudging up. it has lost 20% of its value since the vote last summer to leave the european union. let us get more reaction from the city. vishala sri—pathma is in the city for us. sterling is slightly up on yesterday. that is largely because more reaction happened yesterday because we had that speculation of what theresa may was going to say and hints that she wanted to
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indicate she was going to seek to leave the european single market. that has recovered today during the speech because it is like uncertainty and she has confirmed that. the ftse, trading is fairly flat. a lot of reaction priced in ahead of the speech. thank you very much. let us bring you right up to date if you missed it with the key elements of that speech by the prime minister on what brexit will mean that britain's future relationship not just with the that britain's future relationship notjust with the eu but with the rest of the world in terms of trading. britain will be leaving the single market. it is the first time there has been clarity on that. the indications previously that remaining within the single market would not be compatible with the
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views of what the government wants to see on immigration and freedom of movement. there is confirmation that the uk will lead the single market. also on the customs union, that is the green that allows tariff free trade within europe. it also binds members of that by common external ta riffs members of that by common external tariffs which then interned block different independent trade deals outside of the eu. theresa may effectively cherry picking what she once on that. she does one that free trade within europe but does not wa nt to trade within europe but does not want to be bound by that external tariff in order to be able to have wider trade agreements. we have from donald trump talking about the us agreeing a swift trade deal with the uk. there will be a vote in the commons and the lords on this. we heard from tim farron for the lib
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dems welcoming that focusing then is to bea dems welcoming that focusing then is to be a wider vote. saying that politicians are getting to vote on the stitch up. she was talking about the stitch up. she was talking about the cost of membership of the eu and said leaving the single market, leaving the eu will mean billions will not be continued to be paid in in terms of membership and also with a phased period of implementation, avoiding a cliff edge so business can plan but not a situation that would mean being forever in purgatory. let us hear now what theresa may said about the single market. this agreement should allow for the freest possible trading of goods and services between britain and the eu's member states. it should be british companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within european markets and
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let european businesses do the same in britain. i want to be clear. what iam in britain. i want to be clear. what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. european leaders have said that membership means accepting the freedoms of goods, capital services and people. being out of the eu but and people. being out of the eu but a member of the single market would mean complying with the eu's rules and regulations that implement those freedoms without having a vote on what those rules and regulations are. it would mean accepting a role for the european court ofjustice that would see it still having direct legal authority in our country. it would, to all intents and purposes, mean not leaving the eu at all. that is why both sides in the referendum campaign made it clear that a vote leave the eu would
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bea clear that a vote leave the eu would be a vote to leave the single market. we do not seek membership of the single market. instead, we seek the single market. instead, we seek the greatest possible access to it through a new comprehensive, bold and ambitious free—trade agreement. that agreement may take in elements of current single market arrangements in certain areas, on the expert of —— export of cars and lorries and financial services across borders as it makes no sense to stop again from scratch when britain and the remaining states have a dear to the same rules for so many years. i respect the position taken by european leaders who have been clear about their position just asiam been clear about their position just as i am clear about mine. an important part of the new strategic partnership we seek with the eu will be the pursuit of the greatest possible access to the single market and are fully reciprocal basis through a consequence of ——
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comprehensive free trade agreement. theresa may so was not seeking to become a partial member of the eu or adopt any existing model. we are leaving the european union but we are not leaving europe. that is why we seek a new and equal partnership between an independent self—governing global britain and our friends self—governing global britain and ourfriends and self—governing global britain and our friends and allies in the eu. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the european union or anything that leaves us half in, half out. we do not seek to adopt a model already enjoyed by other countries. we do not seek to hold onto bits of membership as we leave. no, the uk is leaving the european union and my job is to get the right deal for britain as we do. the prime minister said her government will ensure that uk can control immigration to
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britain from europe. we will continue to attract the brightest and the best to work our study in britain. 0penness to international talent must remain one of this country's most distinctive assets. that process must be managed properly so immigration system serves the national interest. we will get control of the of people come to britain from the eu. while controlled immigration can bring great benefits, filling skill shortages, delivering public services, making british businesses the world beaters they often are, when the numbers get too high, public support for the system fought us. in the last decade or so, we have seen record levels of net migration in britain and that sheer volume has put pressure on public services like schools. stretch our infrastructure and put downward pressure on wages for working class people. as home secretary, i know
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you cannot control immigration of raw when there is free movement to britain from europe. britain is open and tolerant country. we will always wa nt and tolerant country. we will always want immigration, especially high skilled immigration. we will always wa nt skilled immigration. we will always want immigration from europe and we will welcome individual migrants as friends. the message from the public before and during the referendum campaign was clear. brexit must mean control of the number of people who come to britain from europe and that is what we will deliver. some of the key moments from the speech earlier. there will be more coverage and full analysis in the news at one o'clock inafew analysis in the news at one o'clock in a few moments. first, the weather. there is no great urgency in the weather over the british isles. we have an old weather front dangling ona
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have an old weather front dangling on a diagonalfrom have an old weather front dangling on a diagonal from the have an old weather front dangling on a diagonalfrom the north—east have an old weather front dangling on a diagonal from the north—east of england through the midlands to wales and the south—west. it is a wea k wales and the south—west. it is a weak affair. if you are spending any time near it, it is pretty miserable fare. much of scotland, northern ireland, it will be a half reasonable day and temperatures around 10 celsius. you can only dream of those if you are sat under the influence of that weather front. it is cooler, miserable, there will be some hill fog and the best of the sunshine throughout the day will have been found across east anglia and the south—east. it will never have done anything for the temperatures. as soon as that sunnis down, the temperatures will slide away. too much in the way a breeze for the north of scotland for there to be an issue with fog and frost. further south, the blanket of cloud keeping the temperatures up. that is the towns and cities and in the countryside, minus five celsius could be the order of the night. we
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have tapped into some cold air across continental europe. how is it getting from over there to the south—east, it is this high—pressure which is feeding in the cold air into that south—eastern quarter of the british isles. it will take a little while before we see that influence beginning to recede. in the second half of the week, we will gradually see a loss of that influence. this is how we start of wednesday. a cold, frosty start but some sunshine here. a lot of cloud around and a spot of rain from that weather front. predominantly dry for the four north of scotland and it is mild again. we continue on into thursday with it being pretty similar. we are closer to seven to
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10 celsius. we will carry that on towards the weekend but perhaps with a drop in the temperatures overall. the prime minister says the uk cannot remain a member of the single market after it leaves the eu. in her most detailed speech since the brexit vote, theresa may said instead a global britain would seek a bold and ambitious free trade agreement with the eu. and the prime minister confirmed that a final eu deal will be put to the vote in both houses of parliament. the united kingdom is leaving the european union and myjob is to get the right deal for britain as we do. there's been mixed reaction to the speech. the lib dem leader, tim farron, said the plan would be, "bad for britain". this is a theft of democracy, a presumption that those people, the 51.9% of people who voted to leave injune 51.9% of people who voted to leave in june last year 51.9% of people who voted to leave injune last year meant the most extreme version of brexit available. also this lunchtime.
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the rate of inflation rose sharply last month,
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