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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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scotland, 13 degrees. as soon as the sun is done, the temperatures will fall away again in the south—eastern quarter. with the breeze and more cloud across northern and western parts it keeps the temperatures up. the towns and cities will be around about zero, 1 degrees or so. in the countryside across the south—east and night, —li—macro or five. there is something going on here. there is something going on here. the last significant influence for the south—eastern quarter was tapping into a relatively cold continent. those are the daytime maximum is yet again across the heart of the continent. the reason for the connection between the tumour grows a high without getting too. 7 ?nospace ‘s without getting too. 7 7nospace ‘s army, there is that flow, so as was the case again,, it will be dry, bright and frosty again. breezy, wetting cloudy across the north west of scotland. the old fronts might have never voted for rain across the midlands and wales.
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again we have a different she asian by day and night and the temperatures between the rest of the country on the south—eastern quarter. we begin to smooth that i somewhat into thursday, we lose some of the flow from the continent, still a lot of cloud. temperature is just beginning to even up a touch, seven 01’ just beginning to even up a touch, seven or 8 degrees pretty much covers it. still a lot of cloud towards the weekend, not much breeze for many of us but temperatures beginning to settle in the middle of that wide disparity, around about seven will cover it. a reminder of our main story this lunchtime... the prime minister says the uk cannot remain a member of the single market after it has left the eu. the united kingdom is leaving the european union, and myjob is to get the right deal for britain as we do. mixed reaction to the speech. labour leaderjeremy corbyn has called on
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the premised to be clearer about her long—term objectives on the uk's withdrawal from the eu and say she wa nts to withdrawal from the eu and say she wants to have her cake and eat it when it comes to the single market. lib dem leader tim farron said the plan would be bad for britain. this is a festive democracy, a presumption that the 51.9% of people who voted to leave injune last year meant the most extreme version of brexit possible. more on the bbc news channel, but thatis more on the bbc news channel, but that is all from us. goodbye from me, now the news where you are. good afternoon. time for the latest sports news with me jessica creighton. start with rugby union, where we've had confirmation this lunchtime that alun wyn jones will captain wales instead of sam warburton in the upcoming six nations. let's cross straight to our rugby commentator chrisjones whojoins me live. the squad has been announced and he
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has been at the helm of the team for the past six years. are we surprised he has been replaced? this news has beenin he has been replaced? this news has been in the public domain in the past week. it was a case of it being confirmed by the interim head coach. it is still a very significant development in welsh rugby. warburton has been their heart and soul of the side. he first captained wales in 2011. he has captained them on 49 occasions, weighed more than the next contender. he really has been a stall wart of the wales side. howley has made this decision himself. there were suggestions warburton has instigated this. listening to rob howley, it is clear he wants warburton to get back to the form of a few years ago as a
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player. howley confirmed warburton is under pressure for his place and wa nts is under pressure for his place and wants him to concentrate on his job asa wants him to concentrate on his job as a flanker. alun wynjones is highly respected and the first name on the team sheet. that is why rob howley is to captain wales. thank you very much. sale sharks now. tom plays first sale sharks now. tom plays first sale sharks now. tom plays first sale sharks while luke is still at the club. the brothers met the night before the game but tom, seen here in blue kicking the ball, past nothing of any sporting value to the coaches nor did it change bristol's strategy in the game against sale. they fought back to win the game on
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new year's day. the rf you say they are investigating. another good day for british players at the australian open. five are through to the second round, which hasn't happened since 1987. three players progressed overnight, and it wasjohanna konta, first up on—court. she beat the former wimbledon semi—finalist kirsten flipkens 7—5 6—2. the world number nine will now face japanese teenager naomi osaka. a brilliant win for heather watson against an opponent 60 places above her in the world rankings — she beat home favourite and 18th seed sam stosur in three sets. up next is americanjennifer brady. naomi broady couldn't join her though. she took the first set against another australian daria gavrilova, but eventually lost after a gruelling third and deciding set — 3—6, 6—4, 7—5 the final score. in the men's draw, kyle edmund beat colombia's santiago hiraldo in straight sets, taking just under two hours to do it. he'll face 30th seed
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pablo carreno busta next. british athletics say they are confused as to why david weir has used social media to criticise them today. the six—time paralympic champion voiced his frustration with the governing body saying he doesn't want to race for his country again. but this morning, on twitter, weir wrote, "i have been let down again. today is the day i officially retire from gb i will never put a shirt on again. thanks british athletics. what a joke." weir had won four gold medals at london 2012, but returned from rio last summer empty handed. he had already said that he'd retire this coming april after the london marathon. you can find those stories on the bbc sport website including the first round of the masters snooker. i will have more for you in the next hour. good
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afternoon. you are watching bbc news. we will hear more about the story that is dominating here today. theresa may outlining her plan for the uk after we leave the european union. here are the main points. the final deal on the uk's departure will be put to both houses of parliament. she said the government's plans can't allow the uk to remain in the single market. she also announced the uk will seek a free trade agreement with the eu. she went on to say she will seek an end to uk jurisdiction she went on to say she will seek an end to ukjurisdiction of she went on to say she will seek an end to uk jurisdiction of the european court of justice. end to uk jurisdiction of the european court ofjustice. she told her audience at lancaster house in london that the uk will refuse to pay billions of pounds to the eu pf after yea r. pay billions of pounds to the eu pf after year. she said the uk will seek a phased period of implementation. we are leaving the
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european union but we are not leaving europe. that is why we seek a new and equal partnership between an independent self—governing global britain and our friends and allies in the eu. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the european union or anything that leads us half in, half out. we do not seek to adopt a model already enjoyed by other countries. we do not seek to hold onto bits of membership as we leave. no, the uk is leaving the european union and my job is to get the right deal for britain as we do. we will get control of the number of people coming to britain from the eq. while controlled immigration can bring great benefits, filling skill shortages, delivering public services, making british businesses the world beaters they often are, when the numbers get too high,
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public support for the system fought us. public support for the system fought us. in the last decade or so, we have seen record levels of net migration in britain and gnashing of volume has put pressure on public services like schools, stretched our infrastructure and put downward pressure on wages for working class people. as home secretary for six yea rs, people. as home secretary for six years, i know you cannot control immigration overall when there is free movement to britain from europe. britain is an open and tolera nt europe. britain is an open and tolerant country. we will always wa nt tolerant country. we will always want immigration, immigration from europe and always welcome individual microns as friends. the message from the public before and during the referendum campaign was clear. brexit must mean control of the number of people who come to britain from europe and that is what we will deliver. we will provide certainty whenever we can. we are about to
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enter a negotiation. that means that there will be give and take, compromises, imagination on both sides. not everybody will be able to know everything at every stage. i recognise how important it is to provide business, the public sector and everybody with as much certainty as possible as we move through the process. so where we can offer that certainty, we will do so. that is why last year we acted quickly to give clarity about farm payments and university funding. it is why as we repeal the european communities act, we will convert the key, the body of its existing eu law into british law. this will give the maximum certainty as we leave the eu. the same rules and laws will apply on the day after brexit as they did before. it will be for the british
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parliament to decide on any changes to that law after careful scrutiny and proper parliamentary debates. and when it comes to parliament, there is one other way in which i would like to provide certainty. i can confirm today that the government will put the final deal thatis government will put the final deal that is agreed between the uk and the eu to vote in both houses of parliament before it into force. that was part of what theresa may had to say. jeremy corbyn has been given his reaction to that speech. he was asked how his party's mps would respond in the commons. why wasn't it and said to parliament7 she should have been there. throughout the speech, there seemed to be an implied threat that somewhere along the line if all her optimism of a deal with the european union didn't work, we would move into a low tax corporate taxation,
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bargain basement economy on the of europe. i think she needs to be clearer about what the long—term objectives. after the negotiations are done, will have a vote on the final brexit deal and that deal will mean britain is out of the single market. the prime minister has been explicit about that. we leave over britain to lead the single market? we have said we will not break article 50 coming in and that would be very soon within parliament. we will put in a case the market access to europe and regulation of labour market and all the issues that go with that. we will be putting a very strong case to the british people and parliament. this is two years away and it is quite nice that we have confirmation that 27 member state parliaments will get a vote including ours and the european parliament also gets a vote. on leaving the single market, that is something you accept now will happen7 something you accept now will happen? she said lead the single
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market but says she was to have access to the single market. i am not sure how that will go down in europe. we have to have a deal that ensures we have access to the market, british jobs ensures we have access to the market, britishjobs dependent ensures we have access to the market, british jobs dependent on that market and that is what we will be pushing for. whether it is specifically this single market, i don't know. she seems to be wanting to have her cake and eat it. grissom freeman and —— could some free movement... we depend on people that come to work in this country and she makes the correct point which is parliament has voted on this and people should be allowed to remain here just as people should be allowed to remain herejust as much people should be allowed to remain here just as much as british national ‘s of which there are 1.5 million bid and across europe are able to continue living there. there will have to be a close relationship with europe. we will hold them to come because they're rather enormous dangers in this. when she talks about future change—up —— trade
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arrangements, she said donald trump will be first in the queue. i don't know what she has in mind. will labour produce its blueprint for brexit7 you said you can't because the government hasn't an up their desperation. we will be responding to the statement in parliament today. we have been making the point that there has to be proper parliamentary scrutiny. we will be doing all of that and when the major debate comes up, which i hope will be very soon, we will be setting out ouridea be very soon, we will be setting out our idea of future relationships with europe but our ideas about future trading relationships with the rest of the world. we want to ensurejobs and the rest of the world. we want to ensure jobs and markets are protected in this country, we want to assure british manufacturing industries have a chance to explore. every economic indicator is going in the wrong direction at the present time. the labour leader talking to
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us. a continuing reaction to that speech throughout the afternoon here. in a moment, we will catch up with the latest business news and reaction. first, a round—up of the headlines. theresa may says the uk cannot remain a member of the single market after it leaves the eu. instead she hopes to negotiate a free trade agreement. the rate of inflation rose sharply last month. due to higher prices for fuel and food and the fall in the pound. a libyan man has won the right to sue the former foreign secretary, jack straw, in connection with claims of kidnap and torture. we will catch up with the business news.
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iam here i am here in the heart of the city of london. lots of traders behind me monitoring movements of markets across europe. in terms of market reaction, the ftse 100 across europe. in terms of market reaction, the ftse100 is flat at the moment. sterling moved up to $1 22. much of the reaction was seen yesterday when we had the speculation over what was going to be in that speech about theresa may hinting that we were going to lead the single market. in that speech she confirm that. joining me now is henrietta pod and ian williams. you cover bond markets. what reaction has there been on bonds? the sterling bond market has been quite with the inflation figures. a bit of movement now as people are absorbing what theresa may has been saying. saying that england is still a good place to keep your money, is
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investment still coming through? the institutional investors, the big insurers and pension funds have got a lot of cash. that has been increased by the bank of england's asset scheme. retail investors are putting money into bond funds because they can get return from banks. in terms of overseas investors, we are seeing good support their that the uk government bond market will stop the statistics show foreign investments increasing again aftera show foreign investments increasing again after a lower the end of 2014. back up to 20% ownership of the uk government bond market. that is a great sign of confidence. ian, we saw a fall in the pound on monday as selling drop to 1.5%. that is because of speculation that theresa may was hinting we were going to leave a single market. we have seen
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a recovery. what has caused that7 those confirmation we will get a vote in parliament before the final decision is taken. secondly we have clarity about the nature of the future trading relationship of the uk outside the european union. there is element of dollar weakness as well which is making the go higher. i will be back in an hour's time with more business news. thank you very much. we will see you after 2pm. we will stay with continuing reaction to this speech. more from westminster and rejoin vicky young. westminster and rejoin vicky young. we said this was going to be a significant street —— speech and there was a lot of nephron theresa may. confirming she says the uk will have to be outside of the single market because she knows some of the things she wants, she can't get in
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the uk stays in it. let us speak to amber rudd who joins the uk stays in it. let us speak to amber rudd whojoins me. a lot of the speech was appealing to our european colleagues. we have been partners for years, let's carry on that close cooperation. is there evidence they have that good will towards us? what she set out was a positive tone and showing us what our opportunities are but how this can work for our european friends, for the eu can work for our european friends, forthe eu and european can work for our european friends, for the eu and european countries. the audience was made up of ambassadors and i think we are beginning to hear much more encouraging noises from europeans about how they would like to work with us. nobody wants to have a new relationship with the uk which will be bad for them. relationship with the uk which will be bad forthem. it relationship with the uk which will be bad for them. it is up to estimate shall we set it out clearly that the eu that what we want is good for them as well. she said we wa nt good for them as well. she said we want the widest possible access to the single market. that would be good for us and the eu. we want strong trading partners. there
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seemed to be a bit of a threat saying we will walk away if you don't give us a good deal. issue really prepared to walk away without a deal? would businesses have to prepare for that? she set out the key policy objectives but also said if we can't achieve those, we are nevertheless leaving the european union. we can't have a set of objectives that we hide behind and if we didn't achieve, we wouldn't leave. this is a one—way direction and we want the best with everybody else. they could be concerned about that. she gave a very optimistic, excited and positive picture of the negotiations we can have with the european union. that is our preferred way forward. she said she had an open mind on the customs union. there is no agreement around the table mats. if we want the best from british industry, we would like
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to have access to certain parts of it if can. it is not at any cost but we will try and approach that in a way that would deliver the best for the uk, best of british industry. she has an open mind. the cabinet is deep —— is united behind her. we will support her. your critics will say you want to have your cake and eat it. today she set it out clearly and is not saying let's have our ca ke and is not saying let's have our cake and eat it. she is saying we are leaving the single market, we will be controlling immigration and we will be having a vote in parliament at the end of it. that was very positive and she made the case for why this will work for the eu. this isn't about a combat arrangement between us and the eu, it is about making sure it works the both of us. cake all round. on immigration, her view is the referendum was about controlling immigration. will they have the
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right to stay? also when it comes to it, will immigration numbers actually go down? businesses will wa nt to actually go down? businesses will want to come and work here. she has said we want to protect uk citizens living in the eu. she set out today that we want to move forward as early as possible on delivering that. in terms of innovation, we will be controlling our freedom of movement. she set out the fact that we will have businesses in mind when we will have businesses in mind when we do that and we want to continue to attract the brightest on the best so to attract the brightest on the best so they build our business, start new ones and we continue to be a great place to come to and we will be making those choices. confirmation of a vote in parliament at the end of this process. what if they decide not to approve it? that
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is for us to make sure we do a deal with the eu which we can demonstrate is good for the uk, good for businesses and we have to make sure we win it in parliament and i am confident we will. thank you very much. repeating that positive view from theresa may today saying that britain's place in the world will be secure, will be outward looking and will be able to do global trade deals. critics saying it will not work out like that and uncertainty could be a big problem for the uk. thank you. let us see the scene in the commons this lunchtime. there has been a lot more about this. david davis has been making his remarks to mp5. he has been telling mps that britain's approach to this is not about cherry picking and labour's keir starmer is responding. let us listen in. as the prime
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minister knows, setting out ambitions is the easy bit, delivery is more difficult. the prime minister has taken a precarious cause of taking the uk out of single market membership and changing the customs arrangement. this will cause concern to businesses and to trade unions. the prime minister should have been more ambitious. i accept form follows function so let me set out in terms what labour will hold the prime minister to account for so far as trade is concerned. tariff free access to the single market, access to the single market unencumbered by impediment. this is what was in the exchange of letters with nissan. it is what all businesses want and all trade unions wa nt businesses want and all trade unions want for those dealing in goods and services. alignment of red beetroot bodies to avoid jewel bureaucracy or
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divergences and a deal that works for goods and services to stop that is the test we set out today and the test that we will return to throughout the negotiations and it is the test to be applied when a deal is reached. that is why the concession on a vote at the end of the negotiations is significant. we have been demanding that for months. it has not been given before today and it is significant because it means we can ensure those tests are met throughout the process and at the end of the process. the sting in the end of the process. the sting in the tail this morning is the threat to destroy the economic model that has been in place for many decades if the ambition is not reached. this isa if the ambition is not reached. this is a very serious threat. that model, a shared model about which there has been consensus the decades across this house, is designed to share prosperity, protect worker's ryde sands improve living standards. there is no mandate for reckless
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disregard of the model and of so much that this country stands for. the prime minister described that model and result as an act that we would be one of self harm that the eu. it would be an act of huge self harm that the uk to abandon the economic model that we've had in place for so many years. it is also totally inconsistent and totally inconsistent with any meaningful commitment to worker's nights and a fairer society. that sting in the tail, that threat undermines the ambition and the plan i recognise. keir starmer therefore labour. we will be back in the commons after 2pm. we have continuing reaction to that speech about their departure from the eu with theresa may. now,
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we will catch up with the weather. good afternoon. there is some decent sunshine here at the moment outside my front door but you get the sense that it my front door but you get the sense thatitis my front door but you get the sense that it is not the case everywhere. the discerning point is there is more contiguous thicker swathe of cloud in the midlands to the north—east. if you have spent the day underneath that, you will not see any sunshine. the sky is pretty leaden. it is on the cool side and there is some bits of rain as well. east anglia and the southeast including london, what cloud7 it is glorious here at the moment. 0ur weather watchers have captured that weakening weather front. i say it is wea k weakening weather front. i say it is weak but if you are under it, you will know all about it. further
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north and west, the milder air is flooding in from the atlantic. 13 celsius across the north—east of scotland. despite the sunshine, three celsius in london. 0nce scotland. despite the sunshine, three celsius in london. once the sun is down, the temperatures will drop away. that would be the coast —— case drop away. that would be the coast —— case where you have that duvet of cloud for western parts. in the south, 0 celsius in the heart of london. a couple of miles outside and you will be down to minus five celsius. the reason we have got this disparity in our weather types and temperatures is the continent has been feeding the sum of this cold air in towards the british isles and that south—eastern quarter. it is the flow around that area of high pressure which is sucking the cold airand that is pressure which is sucking the cold air and that is the transportation mechanism to get it across the channel. it doesn't have a chance to warm up. straight into that south—eastern quarter again on
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wednesday morning, a cold and frosty start. a crisp start and elsewhere, a lot of cloud. the blow coming in from the atlantic. some rain for the northern isles and scotland. that differentiation in the temperatures. things somewhat improved come thursday because the flow is more around and around rather than out in the continent. it is boosting those temperatures a touch in the south—east. there is loss —— less of a demarcation. this is the weekend where it will still be offering dry, cloud around still and not too much for many of us in the way of breeze. this is bbc news.
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anything that leaves us half end, half out. bowl the liberal democrat leader says the plan will be bad for britain. labour claims the prime ministers try to have her cake and eat it. she is saying she might leave the single market but was access to it. how is that going to go down in europe? inflation went up sharply last month, pushed by rising food prices and air fares. the libyan man who claims britain was involved in abducting and transporting him to tripoli is given the go ahead to take legal action.

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