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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. anything that leaves us half end, half out. bowl the liberal democrat leader says the plan will be bad for britain. labour claims the prime ministers try to have her cake and eat it. she is saying she might leave the single market but was access to it. how is that going to go down in europe? inflation went up sharply last month, pushed by rising food prices and air fares. the libyan man who claims britain was involved in abducting and transporting him to tripoli is given the go ahead to take legal action. baulk i am not mind we'll be reporting how donald trump eyes latest week in praise of his daughter brought internet fame to an
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unsuspecting women in brighton. and the rambling reptile: what happens when a giant alligator crosses your path it's not a joke. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister says the uk will leave the eu single market when it quits the european union. in her long awaited speech on the impact of britain leaving the eu, theresa may said instead she would seek a bold and ambitious new free trade agreement with europe for a global britain. mrs may also confirmed that any final deal could be phased in, and that both houses of parliament will get to vote on it. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn said she misses may once her cake and eat it. good morning, what is the plan?
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you have had the slogan, "brexit means brexit" and today we saw some of the substance. theresa may voted to remain in the european union but she consulted leading leave campaigners. what's the plan for brexit? borisjohnson and david davies, over the most important speech and she has made since becoming prime minister. she didn't give a detailed plan for brexit but she set out a direction of travel. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership, or anything that leaves us half in, half out. i want to be clear, what i proposing cannot mean a membership of single market. inside the european single market there are no trade barriers, no tariffs between member states but they have to abide by common rules, including the free movement of people as well as goods, making it difficult to limit immigration. the prime minister said she wanted a free—trade deal with the eu, but control of uk borders is politically important.
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the message to the public before and during the referendum campaign was clear, brexit must mean control of the number of people who come to britain from europe. she said britain would have to come out of some aspects of the eu customs union, or possibly leave entirely. it imposes a charge on products coming from outside the eu. full membership would limit the ability to do the kind of trade deals that the prime minister favours. it is in no one's interests for there to be a cliff edge to businesses or eight threat to stability as we change our existing relationship. reed she had this uncompromising message for the remaining members.
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no deal is better than a bad deal. the really difficult bit for the prime minister will be to persuade the other 27 member countries to listen to the uk's demands. she has made it clear that no deal would be better than a bad deal today the battle lines on brexit seymour drawn. nursing to be an implied threat that somewhere along the line all her optimism doesn't work, we would move into a low tax, corporate taxation bargain basement economy on the offshores of europe. prime minister said mps would get a vote in a final deal to leave the eu. the liberal democrats claimed she has the mandate to take britain out the single market and it should be another vote. batter the last poll we saw on this show that 90% believe that we should be in the single market. this is a test of
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democracy. politicians get a vote and the british people don't. it must not end up with a stitch up. we trusted the people with the vote we must trust them with this. she faces opponents in britain, but he has to persuade 27 countries to listen to the uk's demands. so, the prime minister confirming that we believe the single market with a different relationship with the european customs union. but what exactly the european customs union. but what exa ctly d oes the european customs union. but what exactly does that mean? as you know, it is economically important because we sell more goods and services to the other 27 member countries in the european countries than anywhere else. it is our biggest trading partner because it is a trading —— closes trading partner. if you are a
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british exporter, it is very obvious what the single market means. whatever you make in the uk, you can sell anywhere in the eu, no member country can block you. you can also invest capital anywhere and any member country can invest in your country. member states, is member country can invest in your country. memberstates, is not member country can invest in your country. member states, is not to block that. you also have free movement of services and, more co ntroversially, movement of services and, more controversially, free movement of people. the fear is if we leave the single market, our exporters would be able to sell as much to our main trading partner is on the economy will grow more slowly. there will be a similar effect if we are left the customs union, countries use deep—fried to stop cheap imports undercutting their industries, especially with high—value goods. they missed that a tariff on, a form of tax to make the goods more expensive. members of the eu agreed to scrap tariffs on each other‘s goods, but every exit the customs
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union, those tariffs might come back, making our car exports less competitive. that is one reason the lb drops so sharply here after the referendum, because of fears that we would export less, and damaging our economy. the panthers laugh about it —— lost about a fifth of its value. bowl thank you. live to westminster and our chief political correspondent vicki young. there's a lot for people to take in and listen to. theresa may has said for the first time that she believes that the uk has to leave the single market in order to get some of the things she wants. that includes control of immigration which he feels very strongly was behind the brexit vote last year. let's get a labour's reaction from their brexit team. that really is the most significant thing she said today. what is labour's view on this? somehow said that not everything in
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the singer market is positive.” think it is signalling very clearly that the government intends to leave the single market. they have set on a vapour the single market. they have set on a vapour cory —— precarious course of action. despite the pre—briefings, this is far short of a hard brexit. every prime minister achieves some of the things you set out to, the greatest possible access to the single market, some of the benefits of the customs union, a transitional arrangement, " collaboration on science and research, defence and foreign policy, that falls short of what some of the hardliners would have defined as a hard brexit. in that sense, it is a welcome move on. the difficult question for the prime minister is how an air can she achieve all of the objectives you set out? some of them standing contradiction to some of the red lines she set out on immigration,
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leaving the jurisdiction of the eu. alive and converted in negotiations. they haven't started. she really appealed to eu leaders, saying this isn't just about britain appealed to eu leaders, saying this isn'tjust about britain and what is good for ours. what did you make of her harder line take about as possibly ending up a tax haven? my ta ke possibly ending up a tax haven? my take on that is that it is counter—productive take on that is that it is counter— productive to take on that is that it is counter—productive to begin a complex and difficult negotiation with 27 eu states by threatening to undercut them and make bidding —— britain a deregulated tax haven. that is not how you start negotiations. she's asking for a lot. they will be incompatible and thatis lot. they will be incompatible and that is what we will be holding her to account on. you're not going to block article 15 to get the chance to vote, she has promised a vote at the end of this whole thing. what
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you think would happen if that was rejected? we welcome the fact that she had promised a deal. we've been putting her on that for months. it's unclear what that would mean. i fear it isa unclear what that would mean. i fear it is a take it or leave it to deal, meaning a hard default which leaves parliament with little choice but to approve, which is why it's so important that we get grip in the process at that stage and push the government father on how it intends to succeed in terms of the contradictory objectives. on immigration, which has caused problems for labour, it doesn't seem to be agreement and your party as to whether it is too high, but thejuly to see as the immigration arrangement? now that we're leaving the single market, what is your policy? we accept that there has to be reasonable adjustments to me freedom of movement, we think that
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means that the numbers do come down. but it is difficult because we don't know what the final deal will look like and there is an opportunity or a necessity to sit down with a blank piece of paper and think about the type of immigration system we need, once we have exited the eu, but we recognise there will need to be reasonable and just as the freedom of movement. batter but you think immigration numbers will come down, that doesn't mean you want them to. i think they will come down as a consequence of leaving. when they do, it is how we will sell sage that businesses give us is that lots of time they allegedly eu states to fill gaps in their workforces that cant be filled here. businesses need to step up at the same time to ensure that if the mothers do come down that we fill that gap across the country. do
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think that this is should be concerned about leaving? denny had to prepare for a hard brexit? if the deal is no good, it should businesses be thinking about that?|j think businesses be thinking about that?” think they've been preparing for some time. there's been a lot over the past few months to indicate that the past few months to indicate that the prime minister was good to leave the prime minister was good to leave the single market in terms of membership. what we have now is clarity and the type and scope of agreement she is seeking, which is the greatest possible access, which i take to mean full access tariff and nontariff barriers and remaining as they are. i think businesses will welcome that optimal question how the government will achieve it. thank you very much. the reason may well be hoping that as she appeals to those eu leaders to their better nature, she'll hope there is goodwill towards united kingdom as a garage in these negotiations.
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the prime minister said she would be pursuing a bold free—trade agreement. that cannot include membership of the singer market.” wa nt to membership of the singer market.” want to be clear, what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. european leaders have said many times that membership means accepting the freedom of goods, capital and people. being alt of the eu but a member of the single market would mean complying with the eu's rules and regulations that implement those freedoms without having ever on what those rules and relations are. it would mean accepting a role for the european court ofjustice that would see it still having direct legal authority in our country. it would to all intents and purposes mean not leaving the eu at
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all. that is why both sides in the campaign made clear that a vote to leave the eu would be ever to leave single market. we do not seek membership of the single market. instead be seeking the possible access to it through a new comprehensive, bold and ambitious free—trade agreement. our europe correspondent gavin lee is in brussels. i watched that speech wishing there was a camera and the european leaders to see how they reacted. batter if you'd had a camera in strasbourg, in one single room, and told by some of our colleagues there, they were all watching, all huddled round the tv there, and waiting for information.” huddled round the tv there, and waiting for information. i was sent a text by senior official who said
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this goes much further than we expected. we didn't think there would be a definitive on the single market and acting very clear. there area market and acting very clear. there are a few takeaways for european leaders including that she has made clear repeatedly to that speech that she was to maintain good relations with the eu, but there is a warning shot that before negotiators have started, no deal is worse... a bad deal would be worse than no deal. she talked about punitive action. these would damage your interests. perhaps some who are still bitter about brexit have to keep aside for that. the other thing that is worth mentioning is that there is good to bea mentioning is that there is good to be a new trade deal, but i listen to some of the voices from the european commission and elsewhere, that can
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only start after two years, after britain formally divorcee from the european union, then the can start. i've heard some commissioners talked about how that could take up to five yea rs about how that could take up to five years to get in order. that throws up years to get in order. that throws upa lot years to get in order. that throws up a lot of questions. there was a call for eu colleagues to be pragmatic, but it was a thinly veiled threats. this idea that anybody taking punitive action, i do think that is a point, this will be catastrophic for both sides. there is no nice material at the outset of negotiators will stop there is an awareness that if britain loses a grip on financial capital of europe and its markets, there is competition to try and take that on. this key transitional period at how long it might last, all sorts of things from judiciary committee
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nigel arrangements, the border as well with ireland, tweezer maze says this is absolutely a key priority. dare try to digest this, the german foreign ministry said this is welcome clarity. their brexit team will go and action. every single european capital, they have their own brexit team. there has been one negative word. some believe this will push button further from europe. looking at the nitty-gritty, but she wanted to give a guarantee that those eu citizens living in the eu could be guaranteed their positions but was unable to do so because a couple of countries within the eu are not happy with that deal. which country is she talking about? any path french have made a point of
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saying that you can't cherry pick, the germans had been along those lines also. an ally of angela merkel has pleaded that theresa may seems to be saying she was to cherry pick from the eu, whereas tweezer maze says she wants a brand—new free—trade agreement. not something existing to cut and paste. perhaps those two countries and the number of others that they can't completely haveit of others that they can't completely have it their way with the freedom of movement of people. this gives us another thing, the european union teams and are ready to negotiate. up until now, private conversations i've had with diplomats and members of the commission, they have always said they are ready but we don't know what for. is that first lifting of the fall study can get prepared. thank you, gavin. played emoticon. we had as great catch up with the
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inflation news. the increase in the cost of living is partly a result of rising air fa res is partly a result of rising air fares and food prices. a business correspondent has been getting reaction to all of this. i think we're living in an age where leaks are very common. we're living in an age where leaks are very common. we we're living in an age where leaks are very common. we had a lot of chat over the weekend, pretty much the whole of what theresa may is likely to say is in most of the day's newspapers. markets like certainty. disease modifying about what brexit will look like, do you think we're going to see a positive reaction? i think the word hard for
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ha rd reaction? i think the word hard for hard brexit has been around is a good thing. it means we are decisive and markets don't like uncertainty. the hard brexit that caused the drop in stirling yesterday was a direct consequence. food prices and airfares are most others going up as airfares are most others going up as a natural consequence. when my tweezer maker said she was a brexit that one too whole of the uk. in dealing with these, we act in the interest of all part of the united kingdom. as prime minister i take that responsibility seriously. i have also been determined from the start and that the devolved administrations should be fully engaged in this process. that is why the government has set up a joint ministerial committee on eu negotiations. so ministers from each
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of the uked in ministrations can contribute to the process of planning for our departure from the eu. we have already received a paper from the scottish government and look forward to receiving a paper from the welsh government shortly. both papers will be considered as pa rt both papers will be considered as part of this important process. we won't agree on everything but i look forward to working with the administrators in scotland, wales and northern ireland to deliver a brexit that works for the whole of the united kingdom. part of that will mean working very carefully to ensure that as part that act powers are repatriated, the right powers are repatriated, the right powers are returned to westminster and the right powers are passed to the devolved administrations of scotland, wales and northern ireland. scotland editor sarah smith is in glasgow. we also have
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correspondence in belfast and cardiff. nicola sturgeon has been speaking adjusted last few minutes about this. in her view, it looks as though it changes things. yes, directly responds to what reza may has set, —— theresa may, she says scotla nd has set, —— theresa may, she says scotland is not being listened to. she says scotland cannot be taken out of the eu without it being able to consider its future. at the end of last year, nicola sturgeon laid out her preferred options. she wa nted out her preferred options. she wanted a hail of the uk to stay in the single market, and if that wasn't possible then scotland should be allowed tuesday. it did not sound like that was under consideration in what theresa may said today. so what does that mean? nicola sturgeon rolled out the idea of having another independence referendum in
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2017, buy cialis is dated that she is not bluffing about having another referendum on scottish independence at some point if scotland is driven offa at some point if scotland is driven off a hard brexit cliff. maybe it sounded very much like the kind of ha rd sounded very much like the kind of hard brexit she said could provoke another vote on scottish independence. let's go to chris page in belfast. she did talk about the joint boundary. at the sharp end of brexit and so many ways, because this is the only part of the uk when it isa this is the only part of the uk when it is a land border with another eu member state. you'd rather across that body, you hardly know it is there. there are no customs post are barriers. what will happen to that border is a key issue here. theresa may talked about the common travel area which is an agreement between britain and ireland that predates the eu. it allows for free movement
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of people between the two countries. retaining that area she said would be one of her priorities and that the government was looking for a practical solution with protecting the integrity of the u:k.'s immigration and maintenance. some people here are questioning that, wondering what the practical solution is. can the government square that particular circles? that is one major question. another big issue is the customs union and the government's plans to leave it. theresa may talked about a new customers plan with you, associate membership, but if the deal cannot be stuck then it would look likely that there would have to be some form of customs checks along the irish border, and that would concern business people across that border every day to trade goods etc. another issue which theresa may
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mentioned its that there is no devolved government here at the moment. it fell yesterday after a big row between the dup and sinn fein. we are heading towards stormont elections. who will speak for northern ireland? at the time of all these decisions, whenever article 50 is triggered, that will be one of the key issues any assembly campaigns. less go to cardiff. the effect on the economy is something that is also creating quite a vicious rows there. we have always been discussing that here. the first minister has always said that he wanted access to the single market. and how our solar after theresa may's speech, he was here in cardiff bay holding first minister's
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questions and he was asked about his response to theresa may's speech he said that some of it was welcome, the tone was better than before, but he would like to see a vote happen here just as there will be a vote in westminster and the house of lords. the single market is the biggest issue. carwynjones has said it would damage jobs of the uk was to leave the single market. plaid cymru have also responded saying that the line by theresa may about leaving the customs union with point towards an extreme brexit. we should be hearing more information and i have any of that mike and interview with ca rwyn any of that mike and interview with carwynjones to get any of that mike and interview with carwyn jones to get his full reaction. like you very much. red we're going to find out the reaction to this speech. let's talk
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to the tuc‘s represented. good afternoon. good afternoon. clear from the prime minister that the region will leave the single market. what is your feeling? marker a lot of working families are they waited a couple but that is going to mean for the job, a couple but that is going to mean for thejob, their wages, a couple but that is going to mean for the job, their wages, and a couple but that is going to mean for thejob, their wages, and their rights at work. prices in the shops as well. my focus and the union's focus is in making sure that unions don't pay the price of this brexit. i think the prime minister has made a mistake in ruling out continued membership of the single market. she has boxed itself into a corner. we have to make sure that workers don't pay the price for it. what i used specifically concerned about? is it a complete dismantling of structures ? a complete dismantling of structures? what is your key concern? marker we know how
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important we know how important... where ourjobs are. we know the impact of hiking tariffs on goods and services. we need now is a categorical assurance from the prime minister. i am categorical assurance from the prime minister. iam pleased by categorical assurance from the prime minister. i am pleased by the way that parliament will, as it should, get a vote on a final deal, but we're going to be looking at it carefully in respect of what it means for working people's‘ writes. you know that lots of people —— countries and will break to want to carry on doing business in this country. therefore, it is not in anyone's interest to make life difficult or expensive, everyone wa nts to difficult or expensive, everyone wants to carry on trading. do you
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draw any succour from that?” wants to carry on trading. do you draw any succour from that? i think the question is, what is the price of trading? what does it mean for business decisions, investments, locating factories and places of work in britain? what does it mean forjobs and work in britain? what does it mean for jobs and wages? work in britain? what does it mean forjobs and wages? as well as what we pay for food. forjobs and wages? as well as what we pay forfood. these forjobs and wages? as well as what we pay for food. these are forjobs and wages? as well as what we pay forfood. these are important questions. i think the prime minister has taken a big gamble and made a big mistake in ruling out membership of the single market and what she should have been doing was focusing on negotiating the terms of that membership. while you're with us, you that membership. while you're with us, you are that membership. while you're with us, you are involved with the southern rail negotiations which has blighted the lives of tens of thousands of people, how much confidence do you have that some sort of deal can be brokered when those tots get underway? they starts
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begin tomorrow and we are focused on trying to get a fair resolution to this dispute. can you be more specific? this is something that is having an economic impact. think the focus now is on getting our sleeves rolled up and try to get a fair resolution and the more that we could just get on with thatjob, i think the more confident i will feel. first a look at the weather. there is a lot of cloud around. it is thick on this diagonal with vets bits simply sovereign, the boundary between male daring enough and it shall respect the sunshine. never
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better than 1 degrees and kent and if you are in between then you are somewhere in between. those temperatures are really going to follow away overnight with as low as -5 follow away overnight with as low as —5 minus six degrees, elsewhere more cloud and breeze helps keep temperatures up. if records that despite the sunshine and generally speaking lot of cloud at its thickest producing drizzle and something of a split in the temperature profile with a milder airto the temperature profile with a milder air to the north of the weakening weather front on thursday. maybe the odd spot of rain from that but generally some of those temperatures and the south—east creeping up in touch. goodbye. theresa may has confirmed
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that she wants britain to leave the single market after brexit, and says the final agreement will be put to a parliamentary vote. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the udp in union or anything that leads us half and half out. labour claims the prime minister is trying to have her cake and eat it, whilst the liberal democrat leader warns the plan will be bad for britain. inflation hits its highest rate
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since 2014 as rates rise. the supreme since 2014 as rates rise. the supreme court takes legal action against the government after involvement claims and rendition. we will catch up with the sports news. good afternoon. start with rugby union, where we've had confirmation this lunchtime that alun wyn jones will captain wales instead of sam warburton in the upcoming six nations. he has struggled with injury and form in recent months and is in the said decision was made to allow him to concentrate on his game. no one is guaranteed their position and i think the first thing with alun wyn
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jones is that he is the first name on the team sheet didn't cheat and beef yacht as best as a coaching team that is best for sam to concentrate on being the best that he can be to get his module back. little spice to say that as we are confident no wrongdoing has gone on since they played on new year's day. the accusation, mr say nothing of any sporting value was passed gotchas, the rfu is investigating. another good day for british players at the australian open. five are through to the second round, which hasn't happened since 1987. success down under has been every site for british tennis fans. they are now witnessing a strength in depth that hasn't been seen for 30 yea rs. depth that hasn't been seen for 30 years. johanna contact seems
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determined to recovery into the record books. last year she became the first british woman to reach an australian opal semifinalists sue barker in 1977. the number saying ninth seed baize desire was clear to see as she cruised past in the semifinal and straight sets.” see as she cruised past in the semifinal and straight sets. i was prepared to stay as long as i needed, but it was tough and there wasn't much of it and i was happy that i was able to put my foot on the pedal but also just manage your mobility difficulties that the much presented. that performance and spire heather watson. one year ago she went out in the first round. 12 months on she is made of sterner stuff, battling hard for two and a quarter hours. mark it is so positive for british tennis. when i saw the salt yesterday and join a win today, it motivates me that i
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don't want to be the one to lose. i think it is brilliant. it's notjust the women who are improving. edmund has been working on his fitness and soft the colombian and straight sets. andy moray is great to learn from and trying to get better and get advice from him, at the end of the day we're just trying to get better but it is definitely a positive that more british players are doing better. ultimate success in australia will be far harder. andy moray has lost five finals and melbourne and just face the only huddle of a rejuvenated roger federer and the quarterfinals. contact wants to emulate a virginia wade but may have to get past serena williams in the quarterfinals. british athletics say they are confused as to why david weir has used social media to criticise them today.
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the six—time paralympic champion voiced his frustration with the governing body saying he doesn't want to race for his country again. but this morning, on twitter, weir wrote, "i have been let down again. today is the day i officially retire from gb i will never put a shirt on again. thanks british athletics. what a joke." weir had won four gold medals at london 2012, but returned from rio last summer empty handed. he had already said that he'd retire this coming april after the london marathon. that's all the sport from no, i will have more for you in the next hour. theresa may has been outlining a plan for the uk after we leave the european union, let's remained you of the main points from that speech. the prime ministers said the final deal on the uk's departure will be put to both houses of parliament. the plans cut below the uk to remain and the single market and an
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u nsta ble and the single market and an unstable treat sick a free trade agreement with the eu and went on to say that she will seek an end to uk judas diction of the european court ofjustice. she told the audience at lancaster house in london that the uk would refuse to pay billions of pounds to the eu year after year and she added that the uk will seek a phased period of implementation. let's continue to get reaction to that speech. vicky young has more guests without at westminster. as well as all of that, a lot more detail than the forefront of theresa may, it was also interesting the tone she was stricken, appealing to eu leaders to see don't try and punish britain for leaving the european union, we have been working together for decades european union, we have been working togetherfor decades and european union, we have been working together for decades and we need to keep that close relationship going, not just because of keep that close relationship going, notjust because of the uk's and to rest but because of the countries in the eu as well. i am joined by
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former cabinet minister nicky morgan who campaigned for remain. this is what you wanted ? who campaigned for remain. this is what you wanted? i think i want to welcome the tone and clarity which the prime minister gave in her speech today. she was right when she said we may be leaving the eu but we're not leaving europe. she talked about partnership and the importance of trade and of course there are things that are disappointing, for example obviously the single market but people want to the control of immigration and what she was saying was that you can walk away from freedom of movement and think that is still going to be membership of the single market. that is a lot more detail to come out about that. i welcome the fact there will be a final vote and also that you talked about phased in fermentation. some say she is reading the white flag on the single market and she should
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have gone into negotiations to see what eu leaders would give us, how does she know they might not have given us some control?” does she know they might not have given us some control? i assume that have been lots of conversations. a number have been talked about publicly that she has had with eu leaders in the last six months and ministers have been talking to cou nterpa rts ministers have been talking to counterparts and listening to businesses and service sectors and the public sector over the course of the public sector over the course of the last six months and i think those of us who had campaigned last year to remain at up to would start with the position of recognising there should be immigration controls but also continued membership in some form of the single market was important. i hope there will be an opportunity to debate this in parliament to understand more clearly by the prime minister has reached the conclusion they have. the tone of the prime ministers used is important because people out in the country wants to know that there isa plan, the country wants to know that there is a plan, that is good to be a start of negotiations, article 50
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will be triggered by the end of march and politicians want the best dealfor them and march and politicians want the best deal for them and for the economy and household finances and i think we can all agree on that. is there any indication that the ghost will theresa may is banking on and these negotiations is really there? we have heard so much from european politicians who say britain can't have as good a deal outside is a tad inside, and we really going to give us inside, and we really going to give us tariff free trade believe the single market? we can't have ice good ideal and that was debated last year. we have the referendum results andi year. we have the referendum results and i think we need to understand that this is a very complex set of negotiations, this is multilayered so you have the eu itself, different member states‘ governments and the same way our government has been lobbied by different sectors, different industries and different parts of the public sector, that will be happening all across europe also. ultimately there will be a
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balance between what member states wa nt balance between what member states want and balance between what member states wantand can balance between what member states want and can agree to and what the eu does and that will take some time. i think tvs is may did make an important point which is that trade works to raise and first example in conversations with the irish the asking that a sensible deal is done with relation to the important border and in relation to trade and to eu citizens staying here. when it comes to immigration and there was no detail, it is probably to ian la for that. but she clearly expects there to be fewer people coming here from the eu, is that something you note back? i thought the fate was interesting, controlling numbers from the eu. and we have to wait and see the details of that. after this we re see the details of that. after this were to be a new immigration policy, but i know from my conversations with constituents that it is definitely a need for people from
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the eu and elsewhere to come and work in this country. they bring skills, they pay their taxes and we couldn‘t run services like the nhs or social care sector without overseas people. that will be the balance between making sure we control the numbers and have the right people for industries. is that any part of you that is optimistic about this process? you have been on the other side of the argument when know it is clear we are leaving, is that anything you think will actually be not too bad for britain? i welcome that the prime minister started and ended her speech by talking about an outward facing, global britain. that is important for all generations, including the younger generation who felt quickly stone by the foot. we have to be positive, let‘s start negotiations not expecting the worst outcome. this is such an important thing for the country‘s future, ask questions still make points on behalf of
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constituents but we have to see where we end up. that was the appeal from theresa may was that people should get behind the decks brexit process as she made it clear that britain is leading the european union. the question now is how we do that. a libyan man has won the right to sue the british government over claims of torture. mr straw as an divine site any involvement. libya, 2011. colonel gaddafi has been toppled, and it‘s chaos. among the files strewn across the offices of his security service, a document comes to light suggesting that britain played a part in the abduction and torture of a libyan dissident. he‘s abdul—hakim belhaj,
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once regarded as a terror suspect. now he‘s been told by britain‘s highest court that he can sue mi6 and the government, which tried to halt the case. the supreme court unanimously dismisses the government‘s appeals. normally, the english courts can‘t consider cases involving what foreign governments have done abroad. but in this judgment, the supreme court has concluded that that doesn‘t prevent the courts here from considering british involvement in what happened. after all, it says, these are serious allegations of torture, regarded as abhorrent in english law. in this jail, mr belhaj says he was tortured after he and his pregnant wife were intercepted by us agents and flown to libya. in the key document, an mi6 officer appears to write to a gaddafi official welcoming the safe arrival of mr belhaj using his alternative name, but also describing him as "a' the letter says intelligence that
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led to his capture was british. a court will now be asked to consider whether the uk was involved, but mr belhaj and his supporters say he and his wife believe it doesn‘t need to go that far. for them, it‘s really just about justice. all they‘ve really wanted is an apology, an acknowledgement from britain that what happened to mr belhaj and ms bouchar, a pregnant woman at the time of her rendition, was wrong. that‘s all they want. labour‘s jack straw was foreign secretary at the time and is now lead defendant in the case. he says he acted within the law and was never complicit with what might have gone on abroad. tom symonds, bbc news, at the supreme court. the european commission president says he will talk to today‘s may after she confirmed she was britain to leave the single market after
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brexit. as we were just heating, a libyan man has won the right to sue the former secretary jack straw and connection with claims of kidnap and torture. inflation hit its highest rates since july 2040 last torture. inflation hit its highest rates sincejuly 2040 last month as food places and it feels rose. inflation hit its highest rate since july 2014 last month as food we have that inflation news before theresa may‘s speech at the moment the study of the day as the pound. the pound has gained about 2.8% since her speech, the biggest rise in 2008. i'm since her speech, the biggest rise in 2008. i‘m here at stock brokers
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peel in 2008. i‘m here at stock brokers peel, had in the city and joining us now is the ceo, stephen, 2.8% considerable rise, what is behind that? it is a quite substantial move for stelling. then maybe a problem with shot bets placed against stelling but know we have the certainty of the hard brexit but maybe that‘s 119 was a genuine role. that certainty that we will leave the single market causing a slight uptick in sterling? ghost” the single market causing a slight uptick in sterling? ghost i think the leakage over the weekend course that initial knee jerk reaction that we saw on monday morning and the rest has been back to normal changing diversion of travel. as we feared what a brexit deal will be for the feared what a brexit deal will be forthe uk, do feared what a brexit deal will be for the uk, do you think you will see more rise in the pound, but we go back to the levels seen before
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the referendum ? go back to the levels seen before the referendum? we had a spec up to 1.49 on the eve of the referendum and the officer had that 19% fall. to revert back to those pre—brexit levels would be more to do with inflation and the trajectory of interest rates rather than just the pure brexit situation. we have been looking at how the ftse has been hitting record levels. how mcafee going to play? you may notice we had a14 going to play? you may notice we had a 14 day consecutive move and the ftse index. the aggregate was significant that is largely to do with the correlation affect foreign the dollar falling back as the pound has strengthened. but stop. cross i would back with more business in the next hour. lets get more on theresa
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may‘s speech. we can get more from the westminster. perhaps more detail than many people were expecting. what did you make of it.” than many people were expecting. what did you make of it. i think the premise that was actually right in terms of having to rule out in terms of the ten constraints of article 50, single market membership. if we are to ticket of face value, a lot of the statements from other eu you readers of controls on free movement we re readers of controls on free movement were impossible and cherry picking and given the deadline in mind, why would you go down the route of trying to negotiate controls and thenif trying to negotiate controls and then if that fails going back to if then if that fails going back to if the trade agreement. given the timing constraints, she was right to declare her hand. warning the eu not to be tempted into punitive deal? was that a field threat that the british market and financial service in the city would be closed?”
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british market and financial service in the city would be closed? i think in any negotiation you have two not com pletely in any negotiation you have two not completely sure your hand, if we had that the eu is prepared to bid only certain that any easy button is prepared to march in some areas and thatis prepared to march in some areas and that is honestly a negotiating tactic tactic to a certain extent. it is important to realise that one of the things the prime minister did set out was that after the agreement was reached level beaten decisional arrangements in place, you? being raised in response to that is that, ibe raised in response to that is that, i be trying to get the entire free trade deal done by citizens and 19? what about the cliff edge that that poses. of this free trade deal was possible in an ideal world, would it be preferable to remaining a member of the single market? if we look at what the single market actually means to various sectors, it really doesn‘t differ sulphuric at chemicals or pharmaceuticals, being a member of the single market like norway or iceland allows you to get
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your product marketed across the ee very quickly suffer them the market access is more important than setting your own legislative standards. if you look at financial services and we have heard this from the financial conduct authority, he don‘t want to be in the situation where 20% of the market is basically setting rules for 80% in the uk and we don‘t get to vote on it. control over financial services is very important so i depends on the sector. that implicit threat that the eu doesn‘t play ball on business as departure from the single market, if it doesn‘t go britain‘s way we could turn ourselves into a low regulation tax haven, is that something that would appeal to your members? it's depends. the devil is in the detail. . what does a low tax regulation economy look like? and we
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talking about stripping back employment rights? in fact, the biggest issue when it comes to the eu in terms of employment law has been the european court ofjustice, but so much actually employment legislation from the eu over the yea rs legislation from the eu over the years so i think if the eu where to go down the route of making it impossible for the uk to get any sense of a good deal, and xp home is the prime ministers to start looking at what domestic measures could be used to offset by the loss of trade. we about of the that as well?l used to offset by the loss of trade. we about of the that as well? a few hours and the single internal market thatis hours and the single internal market that is a debate about to what extent the european court of justice, the court with and the eea follows the rulings and that is one of the things the premise that want to extricate herself from. we will ta ke to extricate herself from. we will take a look at a couple of other studies today. an 18—year—old man has been arrested
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on suspicion of the murder of a teenage girl whose body was found on a pathway in rotherham. the girl has been named locally as 16—year—old leonne weeks. south yorkshire police say her body was found by members of the public yesterday morning. the search for the malaysian airliner that vanished with 239 people on board has been called off. an underwater search has failed to discover a significant amount of wreckage and families say the decision to stop searching as a responsible. the plane disappeared ennui from kuala lumpur to beijing. one of the union spearheaded the southern rail strike has agreed to suspend three days of industrial action next week while fresh talks hosted by the tuc take place. representatives from the drivers union aslef will meet for talks on wednesday. a woman from brighton who was mistaken for ivanka trump on twitter by none other than the us president—elect himself says it‘s all a bit surreal. this is the twitter feed of the daughter
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of the president elect. but because of a simple typing error, he actually directed people to the twitter feed of a different ivanka. this one lives in brighton. the mistake quickly went viral. she called it "quite amusing", and encouraged the future president to be a bit more careful in future. that‘s what happens when you tweak in the middle of the night. now if you‘re a little scared of alligators or crocodiles, these next pictures may not be for you. tourists in florida filmed this enormous gator taking a leisurely stroll in a wildlife reserve near tampa. not surprisingly, no one got too close to measure its exact length. but the alligator was given a name: humpback. very unpleasant. he would be
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terrified to, wouldn‘t you? i wouldn‘t. let‘s leave crusty old alligators and we can get the weather with phil. thank you for stop good afternoon. that is quite a bit when one across the british isles and a slow sort of way at the moment. cloud on the diagonal across england and wales and if you have been near that it has been in use you then leaden skies and the odd piece of rain and drizzle. somehow fault as well. as we move towards the south east, parts of east anglia and the south east midlands and has been a glorious day. that has been the imagery we have been receiving from weather watchers of the past few hours. having said that, it don‘t get too jealous about the
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south—east because the sunshine and clear skies come at a price, it was a frosty start and some of those temperatures haven‘t got better than one or 2 degrees. the male deerfrom the atlantic over the house of scotland, 13 degrees if you please. what of the evening? the drain from that thicker cloud to the north. to be flawless from the atlantic so it will help keep the temperature is up. that is not the case and the south—east have we had the sunshine and templates to choose falling away to those sort of values. someone and the south—east will be around —6 or so overnight. that is because the south—east never did tap in to that flow of beer from the atlantic and have been looking towards the near content where the temperatures are on the low side. underneath that area of high pressure and the floor into the south—east has been along those lines towards the south—eastern quarter of the british
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isles. it will be another frosty start for the new day on wednesday, it will be bright and sunny but it will be chilly again. a lot of cloud and the prospect of rain from the old weather front still looking with intent on the diagonal. and some brightness farther north but relatively mild in northern and western parts but some are across the south never better than 4 degrees. on thursday google starts to lose some of the influence from the continent and the bodies settle its own area of high pressure with the weather front strong through the middle so that is still at the prospect of the odd spot of rain. towards the weekend that high pressure comes to dominate with the a lot of cloud and not too much bodies of the temperatures not spectacular,. watch out for a little bit of mist and fog. goodbye. theresa may sets out her objectives for withdrawal from the european union — saying the uk will leave the single market.
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the not partial membership of the european union, associate membership or anything that leads as half in and half out. scotlands first minister says the move could be move could be economically catastrophic — labour claims the prime minister is trying to have her cake and eat it. she has said that to leave the single market, but did the same time city wants access to it. how is that going to go down in europe? inflation went up sharply last month, pushed by rising food prices and air fares. winger secretly at beach hotels in tunisia was criticised in a report from
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