Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 17, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm GMT

3:00 pm
theresa may sets out her objectives for withdrawal from the european union — saying the uk will leave the single market. the not partial membership of the european union, associate membership or anything that leads as half in and half out. scotlands first minister says the move could be move could be economically catastrophic — labour claims the prime minister is trying to have her cake and eat it. she has said that to leave the single market, but did the same time city wants access to it. how is that going to go down in europe? inflation went up sharply last month, pushed by rising food prices and air fares. winger secretly at beach hotels in tunisia was criticised in a report from the government months before 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack. and we will report about how
3:01 pm
donald trump's latest week brought unsuspecting fame to a women in brighton. and, the rambling reptile. what happens when a giant alligator crosses your path? good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the prime minister has the uk believe the eu singer market when it quits the european union. in his speech on the impact of britain leaving, theresa may said she will seek a new free—trade agreement with europe for a global britain. she also confirmed that both houses of parliament will get to vote. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says mrs made was to have her cake and eat it. this report from our political
3:02 pm
corrupt —— correspond. you've heard the slogan, brexit means brexit. today we saw the substance. theresa may voted to remain, but he consulted leading leave campaigners. boris johnson and david davis of the most important speech she has made since becoming prime minister. she did give aid to plan for brexit, but she did give a direction of travel. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership, or anything that needs as half in, half out, i wa nt to that needs as half in, half out, i want to be clear. what hat and proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. inside the single market there are no trade barriers between member states but they do have to abide by cop —— common rules including free movement of people,
3:03 pm
that makes it difficult to limit immigration. the prime minister said he wanted a new free—trade deal, but control of borders was important. the message from the public during the campaign was clear. wrexham must mean the control of the number of people who come into britain from europe. she said britain would have to come out of some aspect of the eu's customs union leave it completely. as full membership would limit to do trade deals that she favours. whatever changes the government makes, she wants to give business time to adjust. it is in no one's interest for there to be a cliff edge a threat to stability as we change from our existing relationship to a new partnership with the eu. she had this uncompromising message for the remaining 27 members of the eu. while i am sure a positive agreement can't be reached, i am equally clear
3:04 pm
that no dealfor can't be reached, i am equally clear that no deal for britain is better than a bad dealfor britain. that no deal for britain is better than a bad deal for britain. she that no deal for britain is better than a bad dealfor britain. she has given us a bit more clarity on her negotiating position, but in doing so negotiating position, but in doing so she has given more ammunition to her opponents for their attack denouncing statements such as a red white and blue brexit being a bit like bottling a fork. today the battle lines seem firmly drawn. there seem to be an implied threat that somewhere along the line that all her optimism of a deal would it work, we would move into a lewd —— bargain basement economy on the shores of europe. the prime minister said mps would get a vote on the final deal, but the liberal democrats claim she has no mandate to ta ke democrats claim she has no mandate to take britain out of the singer market and it should be another vote. all the polling that we have, shows that 90% of the british people believe we should be any single market. this is a set of democracy.
3:05 pm
politicians get to vote on it, but british people don't. if this process started with democracy, it must not end with a stitch up. we must not end with a stitch up. we must trust the people with the destination. you flagged up concerns that britained eu exit could happen to slowly. she spoke about interim measures and a phasing which will only start in april two —— 2017. we wa nt only start in april two —— 2017. we want this done quickly. we want a free—trade deal sorry we can get on as an independent nation. the prime minister has face of criticism, but the really difficult task is to persuade 27 eu countries to listen to the uked demands. it political correspondent is a westminster. think it is sinking in, the vote was six months ago, but lots of mps at westminster who are
3:06 pm
the other side of the argument had been coming to terms with it. i think what is a is hoping is that eu leaders will realise that as well and that they will realise that you had to do a deal, as he hopes it will do a deal that will be good for the uk and for them. i am joined by the uk and for them. i am joined by the former northern ireland secretary, trees and billionaires. presumably you are happy with what reason may have had to say.|j presumably you are happy with what reason may have had to say. i think bs is closer to being an independent country again with control of our own laws. that is great news for others. she says... what happens it is going to be disruptive, is that? it doesn't have to be. i believe we will still be doing billions of lbs worth of business with you, hopefully to a free—trade agreement, and if that doesn't happen immediately and then to wto rules. we still have great services and
3:07 pm
goods to sell to europe, that will still happen. even after leaving the u's market. baulk she seemed to be saying the eu partners that we have work together closely and is no need can continue, but she is banking on a goodwill. we all know that many of them believe that they can't give them believe that they can't give the uk as good a deal as they would have inside the eu, because that would encourage others to leave. there are some political tensions, but it is so much in the interests of both sides in this negotiation to come out with a close trading relationship, collaborating on areas of butyl interest, we are all better off with that outcome. it is not a o—sum game. if you really want to act in its own interest, then it will give a reasonable deal to the uk as we leave. she has also said that we will be out of the customs
3:08 pm
union. she perhaps was the backend. you have any inside of what you might be thinking about? the prime minister problem foresees that we will have the freedom was again to reach trade agreements with other countries, and be seen interest in this for the president—elect. but there is a spectrum of options which we could go down, assuming we take control of our trade agreements again, andl control of our trade agreements again, and i think it is reasonable for the prime minister to want to explore all of those, whether it is a customs agreement of some sort, but it is pretty clear that staying full members of the customs union is now off the cards, and i think that decision is a says will one. she did talk about the situation in ireland, the border, the hard border that is talked about, and the common travel area, the idea that people will be interisland as aeeu country and it would not be able to go to northern
3:09 pm
ireland because we have left. she says it is appointed keeper travel area. how can that were? and leave the keep it, we've had it for more than 100 years. it predates membership of the u. there are risks that we already managed in relation to the potential for illegal migration. i don't think they are substantially different in the event of leaving the eu. what is crucial is that the uk authorities co—operate with the irish authorities in the management... people coming in and out of ireland and the uk. with sensible arrangements, we can maintain that area and keep the border free flowing. do you think there is any chance that parliament after all the work has been done could reject this? there is a chance that
3:10 pm
parliament would potentially vote it down. my understanding is that article 50 is irreversible. the likelihood is that the choice that faces parliament is either the deal on the table on no deal at all. that would probably make a difference in terms of how it might go, but i hope we are going to get a good deal from the eu and one which mps and peers will be happy to support. the eu and one which mps and peers will be happy to supportm the eu and one which mps and peers will be happy to support. it has been interesting talking to mps on both sides of the argument, it does seem both sides of the argument, it does seem to be a move that people are coming together the realisation that we are leaving. even some critical mps on theresa may's side feel that they have to get behind her negotiating position. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon said that reza may‘s strategy is not in
3:11 pm
scotland's interest and that it is now clear that the uk is heading for a hard brexit that could be economically catastrophic. she scared —— scotland has to be able to choose a different future. directly in response to what to reza they had to say about consulting the devolved institutions, nicola sturgeon said she had not seen evidence that scotland's voice is being listened to and that the uk government can ta ke to and that the uk government can take that i cannot take out scotland out of the eu without scotland having the ability to consider its future. at the end of last year, nicola sturgeon laid out her preferred options on the hectic negotiations, she wanted to uk tuesday, but that it should lease be possible for scotland to stay and that extra powers should be devolved to make that possible. it did not sound like that is under consideration. what does that mean? nicola sturgeon just weaselly ruled
3:12 pm
out the idea of having another independence referendum in 2017, i see others who stated that she is very much not bluffing about having another referendum on scottish independence at some point if scotla nd independence at some point if scotland is driven off a hard brexit cliff. perhaps what she has seen today from theresa may sounded very much like the kind of hard brexit that she said could provoke another vote on scottish independence. let's get reaction from other european countries, specifically let's head to berlin. the foreign ministry has been talking about this speech in the last little while, given as a sense of how theresa may's comments are going down. the foreign minister has expressed relief that seven months after this decision was first made, finally europe is starting to getan made, finally europe is starting to get an idea of what britain might want. that is the overriding sense
3:13 pm
at the moment. more than one mp has started to make the point that perhaps theresa may's plans are overambitious. one has said that this idea of thejewish dating a trade deal with the rest of the eu within that two year timetable is probably not going to be possible. there is a lot of concern amongst mps about what happens. no one wants to see this go off the edge of a cliff. whether bn interim agreement? lots of questions. mrs may raise this herself, should the ub punishing britain fund leaving? perhaps heading for the door themselves, other eu states. they echo missy may‘s language when they say they want friendship and alliance with britain. they are voices here who say that no one who
3:14 pm
leaves can be rewarded with collaboration, we don't want imitators. i get a says this isn't going to be a simple negotiation. for now, there is relief. germany has formed a special brexit committee. it is fond of some of the most senior ministers. they will meet tomorrow for the first time, no doubt they be going through what theresa may had to say. they be working out how to prepare their response. the line here is they are not responding just yet but awaiting until article 50 is triggered. politically, that is fascinating. i gather that the german industry association, dia hk, you'll know this better than me, german
3:15 pm
companies will now scaled back investment in the uk because of brexit. that is all we are hearing. german companies will scale back investment. that's interesting. potentially worrying. last night angela merkel made a speech to one of the branches of that chamber of commerce and industry. she urged businesses in germany to support the government's line, not to allow britain to start cherry picking deals with german companies independently. you get the sense from german business that it has supported the german line. there are vast parts of business like the car industry who see britain as a valuable market that they don't want to upset, but they are very courses about giving britain too many
3:16 pm
concessions because it could upset the rest of you, and that upsets their business. with that is lobbying for an easy time for britain, it is also very conscious of the political ramifications of what exactly does a practice. this doesn't surprise me. it's an interesting time for germany. germany will be taking a leading role in these negotiations, but mrs may will have to work hard to support the other states. must know one and beryl unwanted brexit to happen, theyjust one and beryl unwanted brexit to happen, they just want to one and beryl unwanted brexit to happen, theyjust want to get on with it now. they want to move on with it now. they want to move on with negotiations because they want to ensure the integrity of the rest of the eu, they don't want anyone else heading for the exit. they want to solve the door —— problems facing the eu. thanks for now. that is the view from germany. our headlines
3:17 pm
this afternoon. theresa may sets out her objectives for withdrawal from the european union. security at beach hotels in tunisia was criticised in a report from the governmentjust a few months before 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack. inflation hit its highest rates ofjuly 20 14th last month. sam warburton replaces wales captain. seven uncapped players in his squad. while number nine, johanna konta is sued in the second round of the italian open. that's the second time that has been achieved in 1987. six time paralympic champion david weir says he will never compete for great
3:18 pm
britain again after voicing his frustrations at the governing body. at the back with more and all these stories in 15 minutes. a libyan man has won the right to sue the british government, including the former foreign secretary jack straw, over claims of kidnap and torture. abdul hakim belhaj, a former opponent of colonel gaddafi, was arrested in bangkok, taken to libya and questioned by agents from m16 and the cia. mr straw has denied any involvement. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds has more. libya 2011. colonel gaddafi has been toppled and it is chaos. a document comes to light, suggesting britain played a part in the ab duction and torture of the libyan dissident. he was once regarded as a terror suspect, now here's been told by
3:19 pm
britain's highest court that he can sue mi6 britain's highest court that he can sue m16 and the government which try to halt the case. the supreme court denies the appeals. normally the english courts cannot keep consider cases involving foreign governments. she the supreme court has concluded that this doesn't prevent because here from considering british involvement in what has happened. these are serious allegations, it says, of torture regarded as a poor it in english law. in this jail, he was tortured after he and his pregnant wife were intercepted by us agents and flown to libya. in the key document, and m16 officer appears to write to a gaddafi official welcoming the safe arrival official welcoming the safe arrival of them, using his alternative name, but also describing him as a archive go. it is said the intelligence which led to his capture was
3:20 pm
british. i caught bonjovi have to consider whether british government was involved. he says it doesn't need to go that far. orly have wa nted need to go that far. orly have wanted was an apology, and indulge in from britain that what happened to him and a pregnant women at the time was wrong. labour's jack straw was foreign secretary at the time and only defended. he says he acted within the law and was never complicit in what might have gone abroad. the rate of inflation is at its highest level in two and a half years. the consumer prices index rose to 1—point—6 per cent last month. the increase in the cost of living is partly being put down to rising air fares and food. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. leg to this heathrow —based haulier, the effect is ray obvious, because the effect is ray obvious, because the lb is weaker, needed more lbs to
3:21 pm
buy the same goods in dollars. fuel had been falling in price. it is now up had been falling in price. it is now up by had been falling in price. it is now up by 10%. the company can absorb the cost but not for ever. it starts to bite eventually. we will have to put a fuel surcharge and like eve ryo ne put a fuel surcharge and like everyone else in its industry. why to go past a certain level, because the cannot afford to keep those costs in—house. the cannot afford to keep those costs in-house. the effect of the wea ker costs in-house. the effect of the weaker lb is most obvious of the supply chain where rob materials, most of them imported, up by... it has been passed on, with prices at the factory gate up by 27%. only now is that started the dude who shop prices. sculling is having an impact will stop we're seeing it being pushed up quite markedly. that has been since brexit and that is driving it. the bigger move from the sterling effect is still to come, because contracts have to be renewed
3:22 pm
and that is where inflation moves up much fartherfrom and that is where inflation moves up much farther from the 1.6% and we have seen today. met food prices are still lower than last year, but goods prices had been falling for those of the last two years, but not any more. this may be temporary, a one—off adjustment, or if workers start demanding higher wages, one—off adjustment, or if workers start demanding higherwages, it could become permanent. the weak lb has also prompted us companies who doa has also prompted us companies who do a lot of business in the uk to bump up their prices. they may be making the same money on board today and lbs, but when it is exceeded by us dollars, it is much less. the likes of apple are raising their prices to keep up. and at which now costs of the 9p will soon cost 99p. a 25% rise. more reaction to what reza may have said at lunchtime. —— theresa may.
3:23 pm
eu is ready as soon as the uk is, and talking about the need for notification in essence, saying that nothing more can be done until article 50 is triggered. it also says agreement on an orderly exit is a pre—requisite for a future partnership between the uk and the eu. my priority is to get the right dealfor the eu. that isjust coming the inquests into the deaths of 30 british tourists at a tunisian beach resort 18 months ago has heard how security in the resort was criticised in a report produced for the government just months beforehand. a second day. it is shocking testimony. it has been very interesting. we been hearing from this very senior foreign office official, she had is the head of the
3:24 pm
government's unit on international terrorism. she's experienced in the middle east. the key question, the foreign office plays the important role in travel, because it puts out an advisory is for everyone to see on the internet, so you can look on the foreign office website and work out what the risk is. but we've heard today is that the foreign office decided not to increase its travel advisory, take it to the highest level which would be advising it is national against all travel to tunisia, despite their having been a horrific attack in tunisia in march 2015th, targeting —— in which 22 foreign tourists were killed. this came just three months before the attack which is the subject of this inquest. there has
3:25 pm
been a lot of focus on that and whether the foreign office should indeed have changed is advice and not. what this line of his official saysis not. what this line of his official says is that they believe they took a decision in march 2015, across whitehall, but they would not do so because the threat was not sufficient enough. to go to the highest level. that raises questions, one of which is whether the foreign office has been raised in court was concerned about pulling all british tourist from tunisia. 400,020 14. all british tourist from tunisia. 400,02014. impact that would have in tunisia. it would have an impact on the tourist industry, which as we heard in court today would have an impact on the economy, and that in time and have impact on thejune in government, and tunisia is the one
3:26 pm
surviving member of the arab spring, in the sense that it led to change from a dictatorship to a democratic government, whereas as we know, in other counties, it has led to either absolutely hours on the of dictatorships. they are worried that democratic on decent democratic government in tunisia might be decent and i by undermining the tourist industry. the search for a malaysian airliner that vanished three years ago with 239 people on board has been called off. an underwater search for debris from flight mh370 has failed to discover a significant amount of wreckage. the families of those on board say the decision to stop searching is "irresponsible". the plane disappeared on its way from kuala lumpur to beijing, after turning off course. one of the unions behind the southern rail strikes has agreed
3:27 pm
to suspend three days of industrial action next week, while fresh talks hosted by the tuc take place. representatives from the drivers union aslef will meet for talks tomorrow. a woman from brighton who was mistaken for ivanka by the president—elect says it is all rather surreal. this is the twitter feed of the daughter of the president—elect, but because of a typo, he has directed people to the twitter feed of a different ivanka, the lady who lives in e sussex, that is her twitter page. the mistake when viral and she responded, urging the future president to be a little bit more careful in future, as she put ina bit more careful in future, as she put in a word for the problem of global warming while she was at it. now if you're a little scared of alligators or crocodiles,
3:28 pm
these next pictures may not be for you. tourists in florida filmed this enormous gator taking a leisurely stroll in a wildlife reserve near tampa. not surprisingly, no one got too close to measure its exact length. but the alligator was given a name: humpback. let's catch up up with the weather prospects. a mixed bag across the british isles. this thick band of cloud is quite a contrast in temperatures. the sunshine is doing nothing for the cabbages across kent. they're going to get away even farther. too
3:29 pm
much in the way of cloud and breeze as the template is dropped across the greater part of the british isles. it will be close to freezing across the south east corner and i suspect somebody is going to record around minus six celsius. bright and crisp. further not, a lot of cloud and the odd spot of rain across wales and the midlands. ratners on the eastern side of scotland, rain across the far north. we still got a split in the temperatures, cooler in the south—eastern quarter. high pressure is still doing its staff, the remnant of that front producing the remnant of that front producing the odd spot of rain but a lot of dry cloudy weather, not too much breeze, top temperature eight celsius. the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister has made her first major speech outlining her strategy for leaving the eu, and announced that she wants britain to leave the single market after brexit. is not partial or associate
3:30 pm
membership of the edict union on anything leaders have to not have it. labour claims the prime minister is trying to have her cake and eat it, whilst the liberal democrat leader warns the plan will be bad for britain. inflation hit its highest rate since july 2014 last month as food prices and air fares rose. the supreme court has cleared the way for a libyan man to take legal action — after he claimed britain was involved in his kidnap and rendition to tripoli in 2004. more on that to come a great note the sports news. alun wynjones has replaced sam warburton as wales captain for the upcoming six nations. warburton has captained his country for six years, and became the youngest player to lead them at a world cup in 2011. he's struggled with injury and form
3:31 pm
in recent months though, and wales interim head coach rob howley said the decision was made to allow him to "concentrate on his game". no one is counting their position. i think the one thing with alun wyn jones as he is the first name on the team sheet. i spoke to some and the tale nt we team sheet. i spoke to some and the talent we have on the back row, we feel as a coaching team and it is best for some to concentrate on being the best that you can be to get his module back. bristol say they're confident there's been no wrongdoing, after sale sharks lodged a protest with the rfu that one of their own players passed on information to bristol before the two sides played each other on new years day. the accusation is that tom arscott, seen here kicking the ball, had a conversation with brother luke the night before the game. bristol say nothing ‘of any sporting value' was passed on to the coaches. the rfu is investigating.
3:32 pm
there are five british players through to the second round of the australian open for the first time in thirty years. johanna konta, heather watson and kyle edmund join andy murray and dan evans, who won yesterday. british women's number one konta beat former wimbledon semi—finalist kirsten flipkens 7—5 6—2. iam very i am very happy to come through that. i was prepared to stay at the as long as they needed but it was a tough first set and i wasn't much in it and tough first set and i wasn't much in itandi tough first set and i wasn't much in it and i was happy that i was able to put my foot on the pedal but also just manage really well at the difficulties that the much presented. manchester city defender bacary sagna has been fined £40,000 by the fa for comments he made on social media. sagna posted ‘10 against 12‘ on instagram following city's 2—1 win over burnley earlier this month, in which city were reduced to ten men. the fa said the post ‘questioned the integrity of the match official' lee mason.
3:33 pm
city have not ruled out the possibility of appealing against the severity of the fine. liverpool are still uncertain about whether they‘ re able to play defenderjoel matip while the africa cup of nations is taking place. matip was named in cameroon's squad, but liverpool believe he has retired from international football. the club asked fifa for clarification, but the governing body referred to its regulations, leaving liverpool unclear. they face plymouth argyle in an fa cup replay tomorrow night. it is unbelievably hard for me, because we considered the offset goal at manchester united but sometimes you scored an offset goal and sometimes you concede one, it doesn't feel good but it isn't like it is. in this case we cannot do more obviously and it is really
3:34 pm
hard. scotland women's head coach anna signeul will step down after this summer's euro 2017 finals. signeul has managed the side since 2005 and has led them to their first major tournament. her next role will be head coach of the finland national side. british athletics say they're confused as to why david weir has used social media to criticise them today. the six—time paralympic champion voiced his frustration with the governing body saying he doesn't want to race for his country again. weir wrote "i have been let down again. today is the day i officially retire from gb i will never put a shirt on again. thanks british athletics. what a joke." weir had won four gold medals at london 2012, but returned from rio last summer empty handed. he had already said that he'd retire this coming april after the london marathon. that's all sport for now. olly foster will have more in the next hour. thank you.
3:35 pm
theresa may has been outlining her plan for the uk after we leave the european union. let's remind you of the main points from her speech. the prime minister said the final deal on the uk‘s departure from the eu will be put to both houses of parliament. she also said the government's plans cannot allow uk to stay in single market. mrs may has also announced that the uk will seek a free—trade agreement with the eu. the pm went on to say that she will seek an end to uk jurisdiction of european court ofjustice she told the audience at lancaster house that the uk will refuse to pay in billions of pounds to the eu year after year. and finally she said the uk will seek a ‘phased period of implementation'. let's hear more of what she had to say. the most significant speech of theresa may's career. much more detail and nearer than some expecting, telling us that the uk will be leaving the single market
3:36 pm
because she people voted to control immigration. let's speak to the labour chairman of the brexit select committee hilary benn who joins us. there was always a conflict between the government's wish to control free movement and the eu saying this is indivisible and the government has decided to deal with that by saying we will be leaving membership of the single market but will still wa nt of the single market but will still want access to it and we must not forget that is very important because 80% of our economy is services. we have over1 million jobs in financial services and he wants to continue to sell into europe. a lot of family incomes depend on that. we have learned some new things, i welcome in particular the commitment to seek transitional arrangements because that is clearly sensible. and you are engaging in a complex negotiation like this that
3:37 pm
could lead to fundamental change and a welcome the fact parliament will be givena a welcome the fact parliament will be given a vote on the final deal when it has been negotiated. and one respect, we are still not much wiser and that is in relation to the customs union. the government says we want to be partly and that partly out but we want to ensure that there are no tariffs are barriers to trade. business has said to us at the select committee that we don't wa nt the select committee that we don't want that to happen, how can you ensure that europe is going to agree toa ensure that europe is going to agree to a deal that allows negotiations outside the eu but gives you the tariff and barrier free access and comes to the largest single market. people look at that and say that the government is looking for it but i be absolutely sure they can achieve it? repayments that is relying on the goodwill of the partners of the eu and don't think of it in terms of what the uk might lose funny to think about what is good for your economies as well, is that any evidence of goodwill from the eu partners? there was disappointment
3:38 pm
at the referendum result but europe has said let's be absolutely clear, but more not have as good a deal once you have left us compared to being in and secondly they are worried about contagion, worried about, if it is too good a deal for britain and other european countries might say they want some of themselves. that is what they are waking up and they are hoping this negotiation we will get to a sensible negotiation that works for both us and the 27 and the task of politicians regardless of whether reported leave remained in the referendum is to come together to get the best deal for britain because this is the most chance complex and challenging negotiation the country has faced in decades and a great deal rests on the outcome, including a lot ofjobs and incomes. the government must and can set out at the ditch today in the speech what it wants but what we get in the
3:39 pm
end is going to depend on the 27 member states and that is a long way yet to go. the negotiation hasn't even yet to go. the negotiation hasn't even started. do think there's any prospect parliament will vote against the final deal?” prospect parliament will vote against the final deal? i think it depends on the deal. and what it says. it is important we get to see video consider that and a further aspects we don't like them we consider the government, can you try and sort this particular bit out and come back to us. once article 50 is triggered in the process is started and either the triggered in the process is started and eitherthe end triggered in the process is started and either the end of the two years will be leaving the european union one way or the other. thank you very much. people here digestive and all the things that theresa may had to say, i head of those negotiations we have had from the eu's chief negotiator who says that they are ready to start negotiating as soon as the uk has. charlie mullins is the founder of pimlico plumbers and was a prominent remain campaigner — who helped
3:40 pm
fund the brexit legal challenge in the high court. hejoins me from our central london studio. good afternoon. theresa may called you undemocratic, and you havejust blogged that anti—democratic claimants that leaves us leading out slowly you are not that impressed? weight she hasn't told us anything we didn't already know. all she has confirmed is that we are leaving the eu and single markets and it will be ha rd eu and single markets and it will be hard brexit. ithink eu and single markets and it will be hard brexit. i think it will be a disaster. she wants a divorce from the eu and to still be friends with them and have her cake and eat it and it is not going to happen. she made it quite clear that she wanted to work for both the uk and the eu? she is also saying she parliament vote on the final deal but that is going to be pointless, the dealer will be done and recover parliament agree don't agree, once really. we
3:41 pm
we re agree don't agree, once really. we were in the position and only have a knock on the door to settle on the table. good news at all.|j knock on the door to settle on the table. good news at all. i am wondering which part of it you are most cross about? is it the single market or is itjust that... obviously you were a domain campaign so obviously you were a domain campaign so ewart against it but are you unhappy with the slightest development? she is totally cutting us development? she is totally cutting us off from the eu completely and fire they going to want to trade with us. other people will set up a deals than we can and it has been said that negotiations could take up to ten years. it will be a long hard road and i think the coaches heading over the cliffs and it is a long way down. the driver of the coach thinks a lot of foreigners from the eu might want to be part of the journey and she is making the point that it wouldn't be in europe's and tourists to cut themselves off from us. we
3:42 pm
will have other members of the eu that may say it up a better deal and be mist the bargaining chip. that is also free movement stopping that, we have a mass of the skills shortage and it will make matters worse. the only saving grace we have is when the supreme court make the decision and parliament get the opportunity to decide on the negotiations whether to go with the article 50 or not. she said this morning that is exactly what will happen. not at all, she said they have a say on the negotiation deals, she never said they will have an option on article 50 or not, she has not said that. that will be decided in the supreme court and hopefully we are in a better bargaining position because i don't think the end mps will vote for it. she was being rather patriotic, but against the eu and we
3:43 pm
have plenty to offer, what do you say to that? she is a great talker but that is nothing proven and we have learned nothing today other than we are leaving the single market. we are putting ourselves off completely. 500 million people we have been trading with, why would you want to close the door on that? what would you message be to theresa may right now? the message will be once the supreme court come up with the verdict and she must negotiate something better. the last thing we wa nt something better. the last thing we want is a hard brexit. thank you. we can now speak to two brothers who voted differently in the eu referendum. ian and nigel baxter are businessmen from nottingham. ian voted to remain, and nigel voted to leave the eu. ian, click to start you and see
3:44 pm
whether you are as upset about all of this is charlie was the?” whether you are as upset about all of this is charlie was the? i have a lot of time for charlie but has a response to this point is a bit over the top. i am a remainder supporter but i am also a democrat and the people voted to leave the european union and the prime minister is right to recognise that that means we have to take back control of immigration and our laws and take back control of money. if she is do that then i think unfortunately and it is not what i wanted but i think it is not what i wanted but i think it is not what i wanted but i think it is an inevitable consequence that we leave the single market and then the question is what kind of deal can we do going forward? i also
3:45 pm
think that if you are going to negotiator then you have to start from one end of the spectrum and i think she has done that but she has also indicated with regard to the customs union which i think from my business perspective and the freight industry moving goods to europe is a really important thing, she has indicated that that is where the compromise may lie. nigel, can i ask you did you vote to leave the single market, is that one of the issues?” voted for a multitude of reasons but it has become clear that remaining in the single market was impossible. we can't cherry pick our way through the freedoms and a clean brexit was what theresa may has set out today andl what theresa may has set out today and i welcome it, and i fully support what she has said. in terms of negotiating trade deals and talking about a customs unionjewish
3:46 pm
eating serious trade deals which will take a long time, as theresa may on the money for you or is she being optimistic? i think we have a queue forming for trade deals with the rest of the world and that is fantastic news for great britain. i never fantastic news for great britain. i never have believed that if trading arrangement is sensible for both sides that can't be achieved. it is complicated and complex and it will ta ke complicated and complex and it will take time and they will have to be a transitional period, i am absolutely certain that the trade we enjoy with europe today will continue i hope and a tariff free and free trade management. you see that is what you hope but ian baxter, we have helped comments from some german industry voices saying that they believe that german industry will not be
3:47 pm
investing in the uk as much? any suggestion like that economically has to be a concern? i argued as pa rt has to be a concern? i argued as part of the domain campaigner that are leaving the single market would mean that some companies invested less in the uk in the future so i will not contradict my arguments. i would like to see us try to stay in the customs union at least for a time. it is already talking about free trade agreements with the protectionist president elect for example in the united states china where we know that we have with the dumping of steel and those things are complicated. you trade with the udp union is real and present and almost half our exports so i think from my point of view, let's try and stay in the customs union and at least stay there until we have clear
3:48 pm
direction in terms of other trade arrangements that can compensate us and also lets make sure and theresa may given insurance on this that there would be a cliff edge for business. once that is an agreement that will be an ample mentation phase and if we have two years of negotiation is written in terms of leading the single market and the customs union, then what the business wants to hear is that there would then be an implementation phase for another two or three years on top of that so that people can adjust the arrangements. we need to have a business friendly government because otherwise we are going to lose some foreign investment and jobs. thank you very much a night baxter and nigel baxter. we will perhaps chat again later. in strasberg is the
3:49 pm
ukip nep my reaction to mrs may's speech, is that she started very well. and it is gratifying to see a single kind of things that ukip has been saying for someone. but it became apparent she will not deliver fix it very quickly. she is talking about not triggering a party call 50 until much forward by two more years of negotiations and then she will ask the parliament to vote on her deal so they could turn it down. the council of the european union could turnit council of the european union could turn it down and we're back to square turn it down and we're back to square one turn it down and we're back to square one like a game of snakes and
3:50 pm
ladders. what she said that struck me as very important was that she would negotiate a deal, when that has been voted on then repeal the act of parliament nexus members of the eu. she is also going to transpose all the law of the eu into british law. that is odd because it already is british law under acts of parliament. if she was serious about leaving then she would put forward a bill for the repeal of the european communities act no. that would force parliament to actually confront the issue of whether they are going to implement the will of the people in the referendum are not under do repeal that bill and we can amend or repeal that bill and we can amend or repeal every act of parliament that as transpose eu law into british law and that would put us in and extremely strong position for talking to the eu about the things that you want to continue with for pure cooperation between us and them. all of the bargaining chips
3:51 pm
have been given to the eu. what she said this morning was that perhaps a harder and stronger than many ukip thought she would go. she is saying we are out and that is that. but when? at the end of this long and implicit negotiation period when parliament can vote against the deal, rather than seizing the initiative and saying, we have legally left under our own war by repealing the act, though we are going to first of all take immediate action by things like immigration and farming and fishing, trade and defence. she has not done any of that, she has put all the bargaining chips onto the table of the eu to tell us what we are going to do. that is exactly what she said she wasn't going to do. she said britain is in wasn't going to do. she said britain isina wasn't going to do. she said britain is in a much stronger position and
3:52 pm
the eu will still want thanks from us the eu will still want thanks from us and that is what the negotiation will be part of. it isn't a eu wins everything deal. i capture you very well, it is not a very good reception. i said don'tjudge by what she says she is saying things she wants people to hear. what i am looking at is what has processed means and reality and when we will end up and another two and a half yea rs end up and another two and a half years and we have no reason to trust theresa may and mike should... she says she doesn't want to be half and and half out and she actually delivers that and i will be very happy along with my party. if she really wa nts happy along with my party. if she really wants to do that she should be going about this process and an entirely different manner, i described earlier. thank you very much. we will take a couple of minutes to try to assess what opinion polls tell us about what people but britain want out of this
3:53 pm
process. what does your research tell us?- all the government needs to achieve its full access to the sum goal, control of immigration and an end to freedom of movement and no contributions to the eu and the majority of people will be happy. u nfortu nately a majority of people will be happy. unfortunately a reality means that is not going to be possible. it comes down to the priorities in the negotiation and if you get a big difference between people who voted to leave and those who voted to remain. those looking to weaver looking for control over was and the negotiations and sovereignty ofjobs and prospects. and contrast people who wished to remain looking instead to protect eu relationships, to protect something that is good for the economy and protectjobs in the
3:54 pm
eu. as for when it should happen thenif eu. as for when it should happen then if you voted to leave you wa nted then if you voted to leave you wanted to happen as soon as possible, if you voted to remain you wa nted possible, if you voted to remain you wanted to happen as late as possible. remember this is 52% to 48% of the population so it is evenly divided across the piece. the start of you and amid me chuckle because that is one heck of a list. you suggest it is not possible because theresa may has led on the line, britain will leave the single market. we have to drill down on that topic and assess what people wa nt that topic and assess what people want from that in terms of the cost to us financially and the impact on jobs? matters when it gets difficult for the public and the leave 50% of people less engaged to actually get a handle on what is going on. we tend to look at various different scenarios, we say do think this will be good for britain, these two
3:55 pm
important elements and public commentary comes to settlement. if you go to the hard brexit approach then rules... the good news is a majority of people think it does respect to the result of the referendum, the bad news link wonder under one certificate will be good for britain and read about one third will be happy with that settlement. if theresa may can achieve tariff free access to europe on top of the otherwise hard brexit negotiation, then the increase in support starts to rise. once you gain a lot of trade deals with other countries and a good trade deal with the eu, he led a round of two thirds of people supported. that is not overwhelming but it is certainly better than one third. the theresa may be able to deliver that sand wedge you have outlined the scale of the task. thank you very much. it is an
3:56 pm
allusion to think britain could have allusion to think britain could have a single market advantage without obligations, theresa may client clarifying that uk will seek to sign if free trade agreement with the eu even though she says what she was proposing could not mean membership of the single market. more reaction from europe throughout the afternoon. that is after we have found out about the weather from nick. some sunshine in the uk at the moment but and really whether this afternoon are particularly a crossed north—west england and the midlands. the outbreaks of rain with low cloud and fog but the greater part of the uk are down towards east anglia and south—east england but also be called. —5 with a sharp frost on wednesday. elsewhere with the cloud
3:57 pm
again patchy rain and drizzle and the temperatures will be holding up. asimilar the temperatures will be holding up. a similar picture tomorrow with brighter spells in east of scotland and north—east england were in the cloud is thick and will be patchy light rain but many places despite the cloud will be dry, fairly mild farther north but it surely feel despite any sunshine across parts of england. high pressure and the weather is looking settled at the end of the week with dry weather and cloud. it is not until next week but things started to more changeable once again. this is bbc news, the headlines at four: theresa may sets out her objectives for withdrawal from the european union saying the uk will leave the single market. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the european union, or anything that leaves us half in, half out. scotland's first minister says the move could be
3:58 pm
economically catastrophic. labour claims the prime minister is trying to have her cake and eat it. she has said that to lead the single market and at the same time she wa nts to market and at the same time she wants to have access to the single market, i am wants to have access to the single market, iam not wants to have access to the single market, i am not quite sure that will go down in europe. inflation went up sharply last month, pushed by rising food prices and air fares. security at beach hotels in tunisia was criticised in a report for the government, months before 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack, an inquest hears.
3:59 pm
4:00 pm

8 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on