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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 17, 2017 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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this is outside source. here are some of the main stories. the british prime minister, theresa may, has ruled out membership of the eu single market, when britain leaves the european union. she said staying in would mean accepting the eu's rules without having any say in making them. china's president, xijinpig, has defended globalisation and free trade at the world economic forum in davos. it's the first time a chinese head of state has visited the event. turkey says this is the man who entered a nightclub in istanbul on new year's eve and shot dead 39 people. we'll find out more about him. we speak to bbc uzbek about the claims he's from uzbekistan. and in os sport we've got baseball, squash, badminton and weightlifting. there have been some criticisms that
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we've not given enough detail what have brexit actually is by theresa may and her government. that criticism is going to be lessened by a speech today in which we got plenty of detail. it was billed as the most important speech of her term in office. it was certainly the clearest exposition yet of what britain wants from brexit. not partial membership of the european union, associate membership of the european union, or anything that leaves us half in, half out. i want to be clear — what iam half out. i want to be clear — what i am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market. but, she said, britain would push for the freest possible trade with european countries and other nations around the world. for the first time, mrs may confirmed that the british parliament would get to vote on the final deal at the end of the negotiations. sitting in the
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audience were some of the ambassadors to the uk. mrs may emphasised she didn't what to undermine the eu, but she also warned against those who wanted to see the uk punished for voting to leave. while i am sure a positive agreement can be reached, i am equally clear that no deal for britain is better than a bad deal for britain. the opposition labour party said mrs may wanted to leave the single market, yet still have access to it. that, they said, was like having your cake and eating it. they warned against her negotiating position. throughout the speech, there seemed to be implied threat that somewhere along the line, if all her optimism of a deal with the european union didn't work, we would move into a low—tax, corporate taxation bargain basement economy on the off shores of europe. that implication of a warning was picked up implication of a warning was picked up by implication of a warning was picked up by the european parliament's chief negotiator on brexit. up by the european parliament's chief negotiator on brexiti up by the european parliament's chief negotiator on brexit. i don't think we're going to make a lot of
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progress if this has to happen under threat, because i, so saying, ok, if oui’ threat, because i, so saying, ok, if our european counterparts don't accept it, we gonna make from britain a sort of free zone or tax haven. i don't think that is very helpful. it creates also an illusion, the illusion that you can go out of the single market, that you can go out of the customs union and that you can cherry—pick, that you can have still a number of advantages and yeah, i think that is, will not happen. the german foreign minister said at least the british position was now much clearer, a sentiment echoed in the irish parliament. i welcome the statement today in that it brings clarity in a number of areas. this is the start of the process now. europe is now going to have to respond to the statement made by the
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prime minister today. that response is only just prime minister today. that response is onlyjust beginning. the tough negotiations will take many years. let me bring you breaking news in the us. this is a significant story, a decision made by president obama, who according to ap, but this is being extensively covered, president obama has commuted the sentence of chelsea manning, who leaked army dock upts and is serving 35 years. i'm certain you'll know who chelsea manning is. she was responsible. she served as a soldier in iraq, formerly known as bradley manning. in 2010, a huge cache of documents was published by wikileaks and she was published by wikileaks and she was primarily responsible for that leak. she was given a sentence of 35 yea rs. by leak. she was given a sentence of 35 years. by far the longest sentence given to someone in the us for a crime related to leaking. but we're 110w crime related to leaking. but we're now understanding that she'll be released in may. sojust
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now understanding that she'll be released in may. so just in a few months‘ time. there had been speculation about whether president obama might do this. some commentators thought that this was chelsea manning‘s last charles kennedy to get out of praise —— chance to get out of prison for a long time. it‘s impossible to know the thinking of current president—elect, but we know president obama has decided to commute a very long sentence. we understand chelsea manning will be free come may. we speak to our collea g u es free come may. we speak to our colleagues in washington being in a few —— few dc colleagues in washington being in a few dc in a few minutes. the chicago cubs have visited the white house, just as president obama said they would. a few months ago, the cubs won their first world series for 108 years. they‘re also the last sporting team to visit president obama while he is in office. here‘s what he had to say. they said this day would never come.
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laughter . here is something none of my predecessors ever got a chance to say, welcome to the white house the world series champion chicago cubs. applause now interesting insight into the system of the uk‘s amazing run of success at the olympics. seven sports have been told they‘re not going to be getting any funding ahead of the rio games in 2020. all seven are now appealing. they are: in no particular order, badminton, fencing, weightlifting, also table tennis, plus archery and goalball and wheelchair rugby. let‘s speak to olly foster live in the bbc sports
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centre. what did they do wrong? well, uk sport, who dish out something like a third of a billion pounds every four years to all these olympic sports, it‘s a brutal business there. what they‘ve done wrong is that they cannot guarantee more than one medal at the tokyo olympics in 2020 or paralympics. this from uk sport, they say, "we have to prioritise to protect and enhance the medal potential in the system. if we underinvest, we will underperform at the games. the rest of the world will catch us up and medal success will be put at risk." the argument for those seven sports, para power lifting only has a small amountand are para power lifting only has a small amount and are appealing as well for more. if they don‘t get the funding that they require, for seven sports no funding at all, it‘s their sports that will be put at risk. table tennis say this will be a tipping
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point. you have to feel for badminton because they exceeded their expectations in rio. they got a bronze medalfor the men‘s doubles. they got no funding whatsoever. table tennis, they wa nted whatsoever. table tennis, they wanted some funding. they did very well. they‘ve doubled their ranking in the world over the last four yea rs. in the world over the last four years. but again, uk sport are really prioritising where the medals will come. there‘s no coincidence that since all these billions of lottery funding was poured into uk sport, it‘s the envy of every other world governing body that the uk teams, the british teams have gone right to near the top of the medals table. they‘ll all have an hour each, these governing bodies in the next fortnight to put their case to uk sport and perhaps save their sport. let's talk about that again after their appeals have been heard. thank you very much. next, to a sport that would love to have the problem of whether it gets funding ahead of the rio olympics or not. squash, it‘s not an olympic
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sport. one of its big pro—championships, the tournament of champions is taking place in new york. it‘s got a great venue in grand central station with the court in the middle of it. each day this week we‘re playing the best rally of the day. here is the latest rally that i picked out for you. commentator: that's well done. she's absolutely gone for that. that‘s america‘s amanda sobie. she lost against the uk‘s sarah—jane perry. they are now at the quarter finals in new york. another rally for you tomorrow from that tournament. in a few minutes i play jon kay‘s latest report. he‘s weaving his way across the us ahead of donald trump‘s inauguration on
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friday. he‘s been to president obama‘s favourite diner. now the uk voted to leave the european union by 52% to 48. the leave camp won the majority of votes in england and wales. while every council in scotland saw remain majority. so is theresa may‘s vision of britain‘s future what voters had in mind when they went to the polls for the referendum? our midlands correspondent has more. it's correspondent has more. it‘s the correspondent has more. it's the 50-50 correspondent has more. it‘s the 50—50 city, where half the population voted to leave the eu and the other half voted to remain. today in her speech, the prime minister said people who had voted for brexit had done so with their eyes open. out. out of course, absolutely. country seems like it‘s slipping, slipping. we lost
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everything, didn‘t we. everything to the european. everything is going up. we seem to be slipping away. she spells out her vision for britain after it leaves the eu. but not everybody‘s clear about what she means. unless it's laid out in lehman‘s terms, we don‘t —— layman‘s terms, we don‘t understand the jargon. might as well speak chinese to us. at the market, locals were digesting the headline announcement. she‘s just digesting the headline announcement. she‘sjust said digesting the headline announcement. she‘s just said that the uk will be leaving the single market. what do you think about that?” leaving the single market. what do you think about that? i don't think the uk should leave. i think things are all right the way it is. because personally, they‘re rocking the boat quite a lot. diversity is a good thing. you bring all kinds of different ways of life. and the jobs that some of the people in england don‘t want to do, other people are happy to come and do, it to keep the country going. the leave campaign won by a whisker here. 4,000 votes
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made the difference. no matter which way people voted, the question many wa nt way people voted, the question many want the answer to is what brexit really means. —— means for them. want the answer to is what brexit really means. -- means for them. we need still even more information. i don‘t think we will fully understand until we have made that complete break away. then we will understand what it means. you know, at the moment, it‘sjust pie in the what it means. you know, at the moment, it‘s just pie in the sky. the prime minister says she wants a smooth and orderly brexit. but the process could take years. and for some of those who voted out, patience could be wearing thin. this is outside source. hello, i‘m ros atkins. our lead story, as we‘ve been seeing, the british prime minister, theresa may has ruled out membership of the eu‘s sing the
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market, when britain leaves the european union. she‘s saying staying in would mean accepting the eu‘s rules without having any say in making them. a quick look at what‘s coming up: if you‘re outside of the uk, it's coming up: if you‘re outside of the uk, it‘s world news america next. it has a great interview with the outgoing us ambassador to the un samantha power. she‘s not known for mincing her words. she says russia is threatening the rules based international order. here in the uk, it‘s the news at ten. it will have extensive coverage of theresa may‘s speech on brexit. now russia has invited donald trump‘s transition team to syria peace talks that are going to happen next week. they‘ll take place in kazakhstan. sergey lavrov is the russian foreign minister. he‘s been saying today the new administration, ie mrtrump‘s saying today the new administration, ie mr trump‘s administration, judging by its statements is
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prepared to seriously fight terror, not the way it‘s been until now. so a compliment for mr trump. a dig for president obama. these peace talks are aimed at consolidating a truce, are aimed at consolidating a truce, a national truce in syria, that‘s beenin a national truce in syria, that‘s been in place since the end of the year. really you have to see everything that may happen at those peace talks in the context of what happened recently in aleppo. the syrian government recaptured the parts of the city it didn‘t control. it drove the rebels out. that was a huge moment for it. our middle east editor is in aleppo. here‘s a report from what remains of the great mosque of aleppo, which you can see marked there on the map. the battle for aleppo was the most decisive of the war so far. it is syria‘s biggest city. it‘s the key to the north of the country and both sides were prepared to destroy it to possess it. the cost has been very
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high, in blood and in the ruin of a city that can trace its history back 50 centuries. now this is the great mosque in aleppo. it dates back to the 700s and as you can see, it‘s been used as a military position. there‘s heavy damage here. it‘s a un world heritage site. but now it‘s covered in sandbag, bullet holes. can you see from the number of bullet holes how much fighting went on here. over in that corner stood the famous minarette that looked out over this mosque. it was built in 1090. it was destroyed in april of 2013. at the time, there were a lot of reports saying it was done by regime shelling. the people here, who are representatives of the syrian government, who are with us, say it was done by the rebels, who blew it up deliberately. now this is
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one of the sides of the mosque. it was used as an entrance and an exit. there‘s a lot of damage around here, a lot of bullet holes. evidence of sheu a lot of bullet holes. evidence of shell fire and the fact that was used as a military position is very clear. you can see this from this line of oil drums. they were used to shield the people who were inside here. if you look at the ceiling, it is absolutely pitted with shrapnel marks. that means there were big explosions here, right inside the mosque. you can see the damage right up mosque. you can see the damage right up there now. the damage done to these really important religious, cultural, historic sites is tragic, way more tragic, though, is the fact that so many of the people who used to pray in this morphing, who shoppedin to pray in this morphing, who shopped in these —— in this mosque, who shopped in these streets are now dead. in terms of the progress of the war, capturing aleppo was a
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vital moment for the regime and its allies, the russians, iranians, lebanese, hezbollah. for the allies, the russians, iranians, lebanese, hezbollah. forthe first time, i think, lebanese, hezbollah. forthe first time, ithink, president lebanese, hezbollah. forthe first time, i think, president assad can now sense victory. the war is in a new phase. it‘s not over, but from the point of view of the regime in damascus, this is the strongest they‘ve been since it started. jermey bowen, bbc news, aleppo. let‘s return to an important story from washington. this is a picture of chelsea manning. this is copy telling us that president obama has commuted the sentence of chelsea manning who leaked the army documents and is serving 35 years. chelsea manning was the person behind a huge leak to wikileaks that gave wikileaks a global profile, this caused a huge amount of diplomatic tension between the us and some of its closest partners. well, she had been serving or is
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serving a 35—year sentence. we understand she‘ll now be released in may. twice last year she tried to commit suicide and there were lots and lots of question marks about her future incarceration as a transgender woman future incarceration as a tra nsgender woman currently serving time ina tra nsgender woman currently serving time in a men‘s prison. we‘ll bring you more information as we get that. as we understand it, she‘ll be released in may and will not serve the rest of her sentence, which was going to go on for a very long time. this time yesterday, if you were watching, you‘ll know that we started to get information through from curbingy that police had —— turkey that police had found the man they said carried out the attack on new year‘s eve. they did have the man they were looking for, it‘s this man. according to the authorities he‘s admitted the attack. here‘s for details from the istanbul governor. translation: his name is abdulkadir masharipov. he was born in
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uzbekistan in 1983 and trained in afghanistan. the terrorist spoke four languages and was well educated. it is clear that this attack was carried out for daesh. the turkish government said this man is from uzbekistan. we contacted bbc uzbek to see if they can confirm that. he certainly looks uzbek. his name sounds uzbek. but we haven‘t seen any evidence in terms of for example a passport photo or any other evidence to show that he is actually national of uzbekistan. he may be uzbeki, from tajikhistan or any other part of central asia. there was another suspect earlier in the year whose name was similar. later he was found and it turned out he was innocent. he wasn‘t linked at all to the whole thing. later, we
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had more reports about people, suspects, maybe from tajikhistan or even from china. this time, istanbul mayor is saying this man is national of uzbekistan. uzbek government is saying we haven‘t had any information about this man. earlier in the year, this etold us the turkish -- in the year, this etold us the turkish —— they told us the turkish government hasn‘t made any requests about this person. if he is uzbek, would that be a huge surprise, is there an issue of radicalisation there? i don't think there is a massive radicalisation going on in central asia, because the governments that are staunchly secular, they are ex—communist leaders, who actually are accused of a lot of religious persecution against muslims. it‘s tightly controlled. there are men who go to, for example, turkey seeking religious freedoms, but the numbers are quite low. there has been some
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cases of daesh or isis recruitment in russia, for example, where there is they say about seven million uzbeks working there. they say young men who‘ve gone to russia to work there in menialjobs as migrant workers. so there‘s been some recruitment amongst those men. but compared to other parts of the world, the recruitment levels are not great in central asia. so there may be a few hundred. now for the first time vladimir putin has responded to those unverified claims that russia has compromising material on donald trump. i wanted to make sure i had time to play you the clip. translation: first of all, he's a grown up man. translation: first of all, he's a grown up man. and secondly, he‘s a person who has been organising beauty contests for many years. he communicated with the most beautiful women in the world. you know, i can hardly imagine that he went to the hotel to meet with our girls of
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reduced social responsibility. undoubtedly my girls are the best in the world, of course. but i doubt mr trump took this bait. people who order such fakes, which are now being spread against a new president of the united states, they fabricate them and use them in the political race, they are worse than prostitutes. they do not have any moral limits. i want to finish with the latest report from jon kay, in the latest report from jon kay, in the us ahead of donald trump‘s inauguration. today he‘s in chicago. he‘s been to barack obama‘s favourite diner. right through the middle of donald trump‘s america, to get a sense of the country he‘s taking over. but our next stop is not trump territory. chicago. this is barack obama‘s favourite diner. he lived round the corner before he was president and he still comes back.
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he is humble. he is strong. tahisha isafan. he is humble. he is strong. tahisha is a fan. as a nurse, she likes the changes he made to health care, giving poorer people better access. she worries donald trump will overturn the reforms, hitting the most vulnerable. many of them will be very sick, can‘t get medicine, some of them will die. some here do question the obama legacy and think change is overdue. aspiring businesswoman erica, hopes donald trump will help people like her. businesswoman erica, hopes donald trump will help people like herlj believe that he‘s going to open up doors for small business owners, hopefully, that‘s trying to create big businesses. that's you? yeah. maybe you‘ll be as rich as donald trump ina maybe you‘ll be as rich as donald trump in a few years. we head to the
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suburbs elgin, where nearly half the population is hispanic. donald trump‘s plans to build a giant wall along the mexican border mean many here cannot support him. never. never. some views here may surprise you. rosa hopes a wall would stop illegal immigrants. we have our own problems here in america. you know, to add more of them coming over here, i think, to add more of them coming over here, ithink, that to add more of them coming over here, i think, that i don‘t think it‘s a good thing. here, i think, that i don‘t think it's a good thing. it seems this hispanic community is splitjust as america is split. and look where we are — time to get back en route 45. i'll are — time to get back en route 45. i‘ll see you tomorrow at the same time. bye—bye. hello. if you‘re a fan of cold winter weather, the past few winters
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in the uk have left the waiting, waiting and wanting. you may have felt like moving somewhere else. north america has seen storm after winter storm in recent weeks. blue showing up for the next couple of days. we‘ve had an ice storm, dangerous and disruptive one moving out of the midwest into the north—east of usa and canada. to add insult to injury, while our temperatures are relatively mild, snow temperatures are relatively mild, s now cove rs temperatures are relatively mild, snow covers the greek islands, cold pushing to iberia. much of continental europe has temperatures a few degrees below average and snowfall. this is a scene from italy. it‘s all tantalisingly close, but not close enough. our winter so far has been relatively mild. only brief cold snaps. we had one last week, where some of us did see some snowfall. for many it didn‘t last very long. so overall, it‘s been mild, particularly in december. only slightly in january so far. for mild, particularly in december. only slightly injanuary so far. for much of the uk, it has been drier than average. we‘rejust at
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of the uk, it has been drier than average. we‘re just at the halfway stage. there‘s still a lot of winter to get through. but the cold air remains at a distance for most of us. it isjust remains at a distance for most of us. it is just around this area of high pressure starting to just make an in—road into the far south—east of the uk with below normal temperatures, for many of us around this area of high pressure this week, the air‘s coming back across the atlantic. it is reasonably mild. very mild across parts of scotland in particular. that‘s the set up again for wednesday. very frosty start through south—east england and east anglia. sunshine to follow. the mild day in scotland and nierl. another mainly cloudy day for many of us away from the south—east. where you have the cloud you could have patchy rain or drizzle. not as much clear weather across southern parts of england going through wednesday night. not as much frost to come. most of us going into thursday morning will be frost free, plenty of cloud again. you may get a bit of drizzle. but most places, despite the cloud, looking at a mainly dry story. a similar picture
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going into friday. what we‘re doing over the next few days is reducing those temperature differences, where we‘ve had double figures in scotland, the temperature starts to come down. it‘s been barely above freezing in southern england, the temperature creeps up a few degrees. picture for the weekend, has high pressure with us. colder air pushes backin pressure with us. colder air pushes back in from the south across the uk. temperatures come down further, particularly into scotland, just five asix degrees for some of us on saturday. real change to come, though, a greater chance of overnight frost, a few fog patches around, but plenty of dry weather to come. then, we‘re eyeing up a change for the start of next week. high pressure has been giving us this settled weather, still there for the weekend. it‘s beginning to edge a bit further south from us. especially the further north you are in the uk, you fall under the influence of low pressure systems next week that. means stronger winds, spells of wet weather to come with brighter interludes. that change beginning to affect northern
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parts of the uk, initially scotland and northern ireland. then edging further south as we go through the week. there‘s a tussle next week between low pressure to the north west and high pressure to the south. the further south you are you hold onto the settled conditions for the longest. no significant cold weather in the forecast now until the end of january. if you like the cold, there‘s still february!
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