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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  January 18, 2017 5:30am-5:46am GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: president obama's commuted the 35 year prison sentence of chelsea manning, the soldier behind one of the biggest leaks of classified information. manning, formerly known as bradley, will now be released in may. britain's prime minister has given more details of her government's plans to leave the european union. theresa may says she intends to pull the uk out of the single market and that no deal would be better than a bad deal. thousands of tourists are being flown out of the gambia, where president yahya jammeh is refusing to step down and has declared a state of emergency. he's scheduled to hand power on thursday to the opposition leader adama barrow. russia's main opposition leader has told the bbc he would be very unhappy if donald trump eases sanctions applied to individuals close to vladimir putin. alexey navalny also confirmed he would run in the 2018 presidential elections. now for the latest financial news with sally bundock and world business report. mark zuckerberg gets a real grilling
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in the us courtroom as he defends the origins of facebook‘s virtual reality headset. weighing up the ‘wish list‘ — business leaders give us their take on theresa may's plans for brexit, as the pound starts to sink again. welcome to world business report. i'm sally bundock. we will be live in davos in just a moment to speak to the boss of wpp about what theresa may had to say on tuesday. facebook founder mark zuckerberg has denied allegations his company's virtual reality unit stole its technology from a rivalfirm.
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he faced hours of tough questioning in a us court on tuesday. our north america technology reporter dave lee provided more details about the case. mark zuckerberg was on the stand wearing not his typical grey t—shirt but a full suit and tie and while he was there his company facebook was accused of essentially stealing technology from a firm which works very closely with oculus, that —— oculus. they say it was their input that may be oculus headset and early success that may be oculus headset and early success and presumably why facebook wa nted success and presumably why facebook wanted to buy it. facebook did by the copy for $2 billion in 2014 and shortly after that zenimax filed this lawsuit. mark zuckerberg said that was typical when a big deal was made for companies to come out of the woodwork and eventually claim some kind of credit, that he insists that all of the innovation in that headset was done by the 0culus team
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and that team alone. this trial will last for around three weeks. the defacto boss of samsung jay y lee has arrived at a south korean court. ajudge will decide today whether he should be arrested over his alleged role in a major corruption scandal. kevin kim joins us from seoul in south korea. tell us more about today. well, the head of samsung was seen rising at court with quite a grim face. after a four—hour work here in battle it has just a four—hour work here in battle it hasjust ended, so a four—hour work here in battle it has just ended, so we may hear the results later this evening. prosecutors believe samsung has committed bribery and has asked jay y lee to be jailed. the allegation is that samsung gave williams of
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dollars for the votes of the national pension fund in a big restructuring of the company. —— billions of dollars. last weekjay y lee was summoned 3s a billions of dollars. last weekjay y lee was summoned as a suspect and questioned for about 24 hours. investigators said on monday that despite concern, jay y lee's arrest may have a negative effect on the economy. establishing justice was more important. thanks very much, kevin. i know we will be up dated when we hear from the judge as to whether we should be arrested or not. us regulators claim that the world's biggest producer of mobile phone chips, qualcomm, forced apple into an exclusivity agreement in return for lower fees. the federal trade commission is suing qualcomm for unfair practices in the way it licenses its technology, especially the processors used in cell phones and other devices. the apple deal is just one case where qualcomm is accused of abusing its dominant market position. the company has denied the allegations, saying the case
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was flawed. one of donald trump's closest advisers has told the bbc the us would win a trade war with china. former wall street banker anthony scaramucci warned that if china chose to retaliate when the trump administration imposed tariffs on imports, it would cost them "way more" than it would cost the us. the comments comes as the chinese president gave a staunch defence of globalisation at the world economic forum, in davos. today, for the first time ever, a freight train from china will arrive in the uk. it wasn't intended as a symbolic statement, but with the british prime minister confirming the uk must leave the european single market, the train‘s arrival does illustrate that post—brexit britain may need to look further afield for its trading partners. theresa may used her much anticipated speech yesterday to announce the uk's priorities for upcoming brexit negotiations. leaving the single market means britain will lose the right to trade with the european union without restrictions. despite this, the uk prime minister says the government will negotiate
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the best possible access to the trading bloc. she has also said britain will aim for a new a customs union agreement with the eu. this would allow the uk to form new relationships with non—european trading partners, but it could impose higher costs on businesses based in britain. many financial firms which use london as its european headquarters have already started looking elsewhere in europe. the market reaction told another story with the value of the pound rocketing after theresa may said she would allow parliament to have a say on any final deal, so investors showing some scepticism that a hard brexit will get the go ahead of politicians. let's get the view of sir martin sorrell, chief executive of the world's largest advertising company, wpp. good morning. good morning! it is very cold and very early! but you look like you have the best possible
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gear on to withstand that challenge. tell me what you think of what theresa may had to say. is it a good plan, orare we theresa may had to say. is it a good plan, or are we on theresa may had to say. is it a good plan, 01’ are we on a theresa may had to say. is it a good plan, or are we on a rex at cliff edge? -- brexit. she has laid out to 12 point agenda and it is the beginning of the negotiation. i thought it was notable for the detail. but also because of the hard position. we will see how it pans out. i guess i sort of felt she may have laid out the agenda as the first shots in a lawn and what looks as though it will be a very hard and detailed negotiation. the prime minister set out her stall a guess in response to critics who said there was very little detail. now we know much more about the detail and as you pointed out in your preliminary peace we do have a sort of brexit check through the house of
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lords and house of commons once the details are learnt. i guess that's why the sterling started to strengthen after a week period. as you say she was talking sternly and may have learned from donald trump. donald tusk says this is a very sad day. as she set out a stall for a bitter divorce? is that the risk? she has laid out what she feels, the two big issues, immigration and the role or influence of the european court ofjustice. she said on both those points they are unacceptable, from britain's point of view. but it's a negotiation. 27 member states over two years it's a negotiation. 27 member states over two yea rs have it's a negotiation. 27 member states over two years have to agree to that deal. 20 of the 27 states have to agree. this is going to be a lawn
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and tough negotiation and, as i said, the prime minister has given her position on what will happen when article 50 is triggered, supposedly in march. those negotiations will take place. we could end up with a classic european recipe of fudge and not to wish list as it were, but in the meantime how will businesses keep going and meander through, as we have this uncertainty and volatility had a go for us? well, the uncertainty remains and that's the real problem. i think one of the principles the prime minister laid out was an attempt to reduce the attempt. but having said that there is uncertainty. this is as a result of this opening shots in the negotiation will plant for the
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lowest. . . negotiation will plant for the lowest... the worst position, which would be a wto solution. and tariffs. can interrupt you? they will plan for the worst and therefore if things turn out a little bit better, if there is a middle ground between where the eu are and where the prime minister and britain is, things may improve from the lower level, but companies are doing their content in the planning and will be planning on that basis. and eating out of london may be?l ha rd and eating out of london may be?l hard rex at as you suggest. —— meeting out of london may be? a hard brexit, as you suggest, and it isn't clear what sort of brexit check that we will have on a couple of years but we will see that more in due course. people out of london, always a possibility! always a possibility. don't give me a hard time for not
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coming to your studio! it is very cold and very early and very unfair! i wouldn't dream of it! i appreciate you getting out of bed so early from your beautiful hotel in davos. go back there and get a hot chocolate. see you soon. that was sir martin sorrell, the boss of wpp. we will be back in a moment to have a look at the papers. the supreme court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus in west yorkshire. he was left at the stop because a woman with a sleeping baby in a pushchair refused to move out of the designated area when asked by the bus driver. what began as one man trying to
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catch a bus has turned into a nearly five—year legal battle. in a bid to clarify a grey area when it comes to wheelchair spaces on buses. thank you! back in 2012 douglas unable to catch a bus because the space will wheel chairs was taken by a mum with a wheelchair. she refused to move, which meant doug couldn't get on. his case centred around the bus company first group and their policies requesting, requiring, someone policies requesting, requiring, someone to move out of the wheelchair space if a disabled person wants to get on. it is a big issue for disabled people. it is plymouth having fully accessible bus services when in fact people can't use the space. —— pointless having. today's final ruling at the supreme court could have wide implications that stretch further than public transport. it is amazing that so few cases make to the supreme court and it is the first time that it has ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services for disabled people. yeah, i never
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thought about five years ago when i try to catch that bus that we would still be talking about it now. -- if found in his favour it would fight any company to provide a space for disabled people would need to make sure they are prioritised for disabled people. if not they could open themselves up to legal action. coming up at six o'clock, dan walker and louise minchin will have more of the day's news, business and sport. and jon kay will be taking a trip down route 45 to find out how americans feel about donald trump becoming their 45th president. i'm adnan nawaz. the top stories this hour: president 0bama's commuted the 35 year prison sentence of chelsea manning, the soldier behind one of the biggest leaks of classified information. britain's prime minister has given more details of her government's plans to leave the european union. theresa may says she intends to pull the uk out of the single market. thousands of tourists are being flown out of the gambia, where president yahya jammeh is refusing to step down and has
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declared a state of emergency. he's scheduled to hand power on thursday to the opposition leader adama barrow. russia's main opposition leader has told the bbc he would be very unhappy if donald trump eases sanctions applied to individuals close to vladimir putin. alexey navalny also confirmed he would run in the 2018 presidential elections. so, in the news review, theresa may's in the 2018 presidential elections. so, in the news review, theresa may's brexit in the 2018 presidential elections. so, in the news review, theresa may's brexit speech in the 2018 presidential elections. so, in the news review, theresa may's brexit speech features in the 2018 presidential elections. so, in the news review, theresa may's brexit speech features heavily in every single media outlet around the world, at least, the ones we have seen. the financial times has excerpts from the british prime minister's address, including the quote "no dealfor britain is better than a bad dealfor britain". mrs may talked of a "global britain"
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that will be outside of europe's single market. the china daily reports on president xijinping's comments at the world economic forum in davos. he focused on the benefits of open markets and warned against trade wars. he said "practicing trade protectionism is like locking oneself in a dark room." in his final days in office, us president 0bama has commuted the 35 year prison sentence of chelsea manning, the soldier behind one of america's biggest ever leaks of classified information. republican speaker paul ryan said mr 0bama's decision was outrageous. this is in the new york times. the daily mail reports boxing world champion anthonyjoshua has been received a barrage of anti—muslim abuse after tweeting a picture showing him praying in a mosque. alongside the picture he wrote "prayer is a solid foundation".

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