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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 18, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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on what it wants from europe, and what it will be able to get. good morning, it is wednesday 18 january. also this morning: thousands of british holidaymakers are to be flown out of the gambia, as the foreign office warns of the growing risk of unrest in the country. wikilea ks whistle—blower chelsea manning has her prison sentence cut by more than 30 years, in one of barack obama's last acts as american president. in sport: non—league lincoln city shock ipswich town with an injury—time winner, to reach the fourth round of the fa cup for the first time in a0 years. good morning from tennessee on brea kfast‘s good morning from tennessee on breakfast‘s road good morning from tennessee on brea kfast‘s road trip good morning from tennessee on breakfast‘s road trip across america. today we are asking what president trump can do for
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infrastructure and agriculture. also this morning: natalie portman on playing jackie kennedy in her new film, and preparing for the oscars hype. and carol has the weather. good morning. for some of us it is a cold and forest the start. patchy fog but in the south and south—east in particular there will be some sunshine —— frosty start. for the rest of the uk, fairly cloudy with some light rain or drizzle but some sunshine. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the foreign secretary has said countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be hauling up the drawbridge, despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. our political correspondent tom bateman has more. theresa may's brexit speech brought the most clarity yet on her approach to the negotiations. she told ministers and european diplomats she wanted ambitious trade
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deals with the rest of the eu, but she confirmed britain would leave the union's formal free—trade area. i want to be clear. what i am proposing can't mean membership of the single market. the uk would have control of immigration policy, she said. and, in an unexpected move, the prime minister revealed she would be prepared to walk away from the talks if the deal wasn't good enough. the foreign secretary, boris johnson, writes this morning that countries are queueing up to do trade deals with britain. today, attention turns to the response from the rest of the eu. the head of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, is due to speak. some in the european parliament believe mrs may's demands are unrealistic. it creates an illusion. yhe illusion that you can go out of the single market, that you can go out off the customs
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union, and that you can cherry—pick, and you can have still a number of advantages. the prime minister will face mps later, with some opponents saying her plan risks an economic catastrophe. she has called for unity over brexit. so far, at least, that seems some way off. let's get the latest now from our political correspondent iain watson, in westminster. iain, the prime ministerfaces mps for the first time since giving her speech. what is likely to be the reaction? theresa may will be facing mps for the first time. it is prime minister's questions at lunchtime, and she is likely to be challenged on the content of that speech. labour's challenge will be first of all that she should have given that speech to mps rather than those invited audience of ambassadors. they will call for more parliamentary scrutiny, and thirdly they will say that they do not
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welcome her warning that she will make written into some kind of low tax, low regulation economy if she doesn't get her way. but some of the backbenchers, some of the mps in jeremy corbyn‘s party, are not too pleased with the fact that they think he should be taking a stronger line on the argument that britain should stay inside the single market and effectively the labour leadership was giving an alibi to theresa may for a bad brexit. liberal democrats will call for a second referendum when she has negotiated the deal and the snp warned that there could be another scottish referendum because they are not at all pleased at the suggestion britain is coming out the single market. just after 7:00am this morning, we will hear from shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer, and get his thoughts on theresa may's plan. thousands of british holidaymakers are being flown home from the gambia, because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down and declared
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a state of emergency. dan johnson reports. it isa it is a country on the move. under a state of emergency, gambians are fleeing their capital. and amongst all this are thousands of british tourists, who have been told to get out. thomas cook has a team heading to the country to help. four extra flights are expected to leave today. the tension has built because this man has refused to leave office. president yahya jammeh went on television to warn about foreign interference in this country. this may lead to a state of public emergency. he had conceded last month's election after ruling for more than 20 years. the opposition leader was due to take power
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tomorrow, at the president challenged the result and has resisted pressure from neighbouring countries to stand down. now the threat of violence is growing. that is why the foreign office updated its travel advice last night, warning against all but essential travel, saying the potentialfor military intervention and civil disturbance is high, and could result in international airport being closed at short notice. this is why tourists come. it calls itself the smiling coast of africa. but it is a worrying time for holidaymakers waiting to leave, and for gambians who can't. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. our correspondent in washington is rajini vaidyanathan. chelsea manning was responsible for one of the largest leaks of government secrets
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in american history. born bradley manning, it was while serving in iraq that the low—ranking private hacked government databases, handing more than 700,000 classified documents to julian assange's wikilea ks organisation. manning's supporters have campaigned for yea rs manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release. they maintain she is a whistleblower, not a traitor. the reduction of chelsea manning's sentence means she has only served three out of 35 year term she was handed in 2013. shortly after the trial, bradley announced she would be known as chelsea, and live as a woman. she was being held at a male prison, and tried to take her life on two occasions. i'd say 12 to 16 months,
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her mental condition deteriorated significantly and she became depressed. there was a risk to her well—being, if not her life, she had remained in this prison. release, julian assange thanked those who campaigned for chelsea's release, and edward snowden, who also leaked government secrets, tweeted his thanks to president obama. but the republican speaker, paul ryan, said the decision to cut short chelsea manning's sentence was outrageous, and sent a message that those who compromise national security won't be held accountable for their crimes. one of president obama's final acts in office will please, as much as it will anger. an infertile couple have given birth to a baby which was conceived with the genetic material of three people. it is the first time the controversial procedure has been used to overcome infertility, rather than protect a child from inheriting disease. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the supreme court is ruling today
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on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies in buggies on board. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. first says it is the most reasonable decision, but mr pauli insists it is discriminant. it is a big issue for disabled people. it is amazing that so few cases make it to the supreme court and it is the first time that it's ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services for disabled people.
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yeah, i never thought about five years ago when i tried to catch that bus that we would still be talking about it now. the first freight train to travel directly to the uk from china is due to arrive in london today. it's taken over a fortnight to get here, but that's around half the time a journey by sea would take. the train, which has 3a wagons, travelled through russia, kazakhstan, poland and many other countries to get here, as andy moore reports. the train began itsjourney the train began its journey at a giant container depot in china. 3a carriages were loaded with goods such as clothes, bags and other household items. china has been operating trains to 14 european capitals from this depot for many yea rs. capitals from this depot for many years. now london has been added to the list. it was a different rail gauges along the way, the containers have to be offloaded and reloaded several times, but china sees this asa several times, but china sees this as a new version of the silk route. the journey goes through a tunnel to the uk. in all, the train carrying £4 million worth of goods pass through eight countries on its journey of more than 7500 miles. the
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uk is china's seventh biggest trading market, so the boost to chinese enterprise is clear, but it is also hoped the train will make the journey back to china laden with british goods. what is the longest train journey you have ever been on? i think it was three days and three nights, it was with bill turnbull. i like the way you drank your tea when you said that. we ended up in vladivostok, as you do. it was the work! thank you for that, louise. i went to london once. i don't think i have done anything quite as significant as that. that is the new bonding thing we do with presenters, put them on the trans— siberian railway and see how they get along.
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what is happening in the wide world of sport? well, there was drama in the fa cup. did you stay out late? i did, foolishly. there will be two non—league sides in the fourth round of the fa cup. sutton united beat afc wimbledon whilst lincoln city shocked ipswich town, with nathan arnold scoring a 91st—minute winner to stun the championship side. andy murray is due on court at around 9:30am this morning, for his second—round match at the australian open. he takes on russia's andrey rublev. dan evans faces the seventh seed, marin cilic. wales have a new captain for the six nations. alun wynjones takes over from sam warburton in a squad that includes seven uncapped players. and marco fu had luck on his side when he knocked world number three judd trump out of the masters snooker. he will play mark allen next. lots of the papers have fantastic
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teachers from last night's football. we will show you those in the second. as good as lincoln were, ipswich were appalling. looking at a business stories, one story which dominates all the front pages, in the daily mail, the steel of the new iron lady. that is after theresa may's brexit speech, in a cartoon version of the pantsuit. the daily express, deal or no deal, lots of them using that kind of headline. and the front page of the sun, brexodus. the times, give us a fair deal or you will be crushed. another picture of theresa may, crash test
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dumb—may, is their headline. picture of theresa may, crash test dumb—may, is their headlinelj picture of theresa may, crash test dumb-may, is their headline. i have dealt inside and i love this picture in the financial times this morning. all of these televisions on sale, but theresa may departing from europe. i will be talking about how easy it might be to come up with some of those deals. some are fiendishly complicated and take many yea rs fiendishly complicated and take many years to negotiate. i will be talking to an international trade lawyer about how that will work in practice. and a potential strike by referees. if you could just hold that side for me, that would be brilliant. an incredible story from a manchester —based referee who has only just turned 18 a manchester —based referee who has onlyjust turned 18 this month but tell the story of how he has been punched, headbutted, spat at several times since becoming a referee three yea rs times since becoming a referee three years ago and has launched a facebook campaign and been contacted
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by 675 other officials who say that the treatment of referees and officials across the country can be appalling and very distressing. the football association are looking into the possibility of giving referee is the same type of protection as spectators at a football match, which they don't currently have. i think we all have a story, don't we, of seeing appalling abuse of referees, situations where perhaps some are quite young, who is having a go at this and just wants to try and make an effort and help in the game, is treated badly. and it is horrible to see. it is normally parents losing their rag, isn't it? i have seen that happen, and it is horrible. i want to quickly look at this, borisjohnson i want to quickly look at this, boris johnson writing i want to quickly look at this, borisjohnson writing in the telegraph, if you want this point of view. lots of them going through point by point. can you help me? thank you so much! this is how complicated these things are, pages of coverage. for example, another
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example from the times, going through lots of different issues along with a bit of analysis, so much analysis if you want to see more. but it's not all about brexit today, this is from the inside pages, an x—ray of a dog who swallowed an entire knife, the dog is called macy. they operated on the dog for hours. the good news is the dog for hours. the good news is the dog swallowed the knife handle first, if it happened the other way it would have been game over. they operated, took their time and macy is fine and doing very well. it's horrible, you can see how big the knife is, half the length of the dog's body but everything is ok, don't panic. a quick one, it is all about forgiveness, how to make things not awkward. here we have cost training with chelsea yesterday. training with this teammates instead on this own, which
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he had done after asking for a move to china, he's back in the fold and has to play until the end of the season and get along very nicely. when is the last time you cried, dan? apparently meant crime or at work than women. when i snapped my achilles tendon. -- apparently men cry more. they work harder than women so are more cry more. they work harder than women so are more likely to cry and 25% admit blubbing after speaking to their manager. 18% of women. also when bouncer died on neighbours. —— neighbours. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. there was the promise of some sunshine? yes, for some, but for many it will be another cloudy day and that is the note we start on. cloudy, some mist around, a beautiful weather watchers picture from yesterday sent in by many will
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be looking at that scenario this morning. but for some clear skies, a touch of frost and patchy fog. once again we have a weather front draped across us, a cold front, behind it the cold air is coming in so parts of east anglia and southern england will have the frost and also clear skies. in the south—west, a bit more cloud, helping the temperature through the night, but some parts fell to almost —6 last night, cold and frosty with shallow mist and fog patches, which should lift readily through the morning. north of that into the midlands and northern england, back into the cloud, like rain and drizzle, especially in parts of northern england and north midlands. then in scotland, a lot of cloud around but some clearer skies in the north—east, sony phn. rain in shetland today, which will be fairly persistent, and a lot of cloud in northern ireland but not a particularly cold start. the light
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rain and drizzle associated with the weather front will tend to fizzle inland through the course of the day and it will be coasts more likely to see it in the north and west. the wind that bit stronger but nothing much to write home about, and we have the rain affecting shetland primarily. the sunshine will be the brightest if you liked down in the south, but the shelter of the welsh hills and the north—east of england and the grampians could mean we see brightness and indeed sunshine. through the evening and overnight, once again under clear skies we see frost forming. not quite as cold a night as tonight. and we're also looking at the risk of patchy mist and fog forming as well. temperatures under the cloud once again still holding up, but as we push further south, it will be cold enough for that touch of frost, particularly in rural areas. so we start tomorrow as we finished the night with some drizzle, light rain around winwood coasts, particularly in the west. again tomorrow there
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will be a lot of cloud around. some brea ks will be a lot of cloud around. some breaks around the moray firth for example and in southern england and parts of wales, northern ireland also potentially getting some breaks tomorrow. temperatures getting down because they are high for this stage in january. if you want to see what tomorrow is like, more of the same, cloud around, some spots of rain and drizzle but for most of the uk, dry with some sunshine, particularly across the northeast. this looks like it will carry on until the early pa rt like it will carry on until the early part of next week. but we will keep listening! how many ways ca n but we will keep listening! how many ways can i say it's going to be cloudy? lots! she will be telling us it will be cloudy through the morning! during the us election campaign donald trump pledged to make america great again, but as he prepares to take office can he deliver on that promise? we're taking a road trip through the heart of america on route 45 to find out how
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americans are feeling about obama's legacy in the week that donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states. today, breakfast‘sjon kay is heading south towards tennessee. if you want to understand donald trump's election win, this is a good place to come. next to route a5, the ohio river meets the mississippi. it's an central artery the us economy, carrying 18 million tons of cargo every year “— economy, carrying 18 million tons of cargo every year —— it's an essential artery. but things aren't what they used to be. the locks which boats pass through here have seen better days. nearly 100 years old, they regularly break down,
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causing long and costly delays. around 52 hours at one time. causing long and costly delays. around 52 hours at one timem could be waiting out for 52 hours before coming through? yes, sir. mark, the lock keeper, says it's a struggle to keep trade moving. the concrete is starting to break up and crumble, every time it gets hit by a boat and it lands on it it puts pressure on it and more cracks and the stress on it, we patch it together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last for ever. donald trump has pledged $1 trillion to rebuild america's rivers, roads and railways. a promise that swung him plenty of support round here. but he hasn't said where the money will come from —— that's won him. we head back on route a5 to see the kind of project the new president wa nts to kind of project the new president wants to encourage. a huge dam and lock system to replace the failing one downriver. it's nearly 20 years
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behind schedule and $2 billion over budget. many here believe donald trump's life in business will mean he can deliver. i think he can iffley road wants to put his mind with it and really wa nts to put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people, for sure, why not busy —— if he really. if you have —— why not? if you have good listening skills he can accomplish anything. had he got those skills? i hope so. from's critics say his pledges are unrealistic and unaffordable —— trump's critics. but in an area wherejobs can trump's critics. but in an area where jobs can be scarce, they're prepared to give him a try. we drive on into america's rural south. there are2 on into america's rural south. there are 2 million farms in this country. willa property developer president understand this business? at the university of tennessee,
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stu d e nts at the university of tennessee, students are learning how to weigh and vaccinate cattle. stick it in, press it forward, pull it out. some are more willing to go forward and some are wanting to hold back. sounds like politicians!|j some are wanting to hold back. sounds like politicians! i guess oh! donald trump won nearly 80% of the vote in the martin area. —— i guess so. they like his confidence and in turn they have confidence in him. he might have a few mess ups on the way but eventually he'll figure it all out. we're always going to need agriculture, that's what feeds us, so agriculture, that's what feeds us, so we're going to need it to keep going. but is farming compatible with trump's plans for building? what about the land, the environment. donald trump is a man you associate with skyscrapers and new york city, not with farming and
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places like this. do you think he understands you and what you want to do? he's going to help small people out i think. i'd don't think he's going to be the big city man when he gets in office —— i don't think. what about farming, does he understand farming? not as well as some agriculture people. whether its agriculture or infrastructure, in these communities away from washington, many feel trump will be a president who finally speaks for them. someone notjust following the political heard. jon kay, bbc news, tennessee. it is good to hear from real americans. projects like that as well many years overdue. jon will be continuing his road trip tomorrow when he travels to mississippi. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: striking new trade deals will be at the heart of britain's success post—brexit. we'll be hearing from one of the biggest trade lawyers in the business about how to strike a deal with the eu. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. 70% of schools in london could face extra budget cuts under government changes to the way they're funded. that's according to london councils, which says schools in the capital will need to make savings of 360 million in the first year. but the government argues london is the highest funded part of the country and that inner—city schools here will be allocated 30% more funding per pupil than the national average. drones are to be used to carry out surveys and do repairs on buildings in west london in order to save time and money. hammersmith and fulham council, who have already trialled the idea, says it will save them thousands of pounds as erecting scaffolding is slow and expensive.
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they'll use a specialist company to maintain and operate the drones. plans to build nearly 8,000 new homes in haringey may be put on hold overfears it could price local people out of the area. as part of the regeneration of wood green the council would provide land it owns, like the library, while a private company would put in the cash. some councillors called on the town hall to pause the project over concerns about its scale. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes, there's a good service on all lines, except for the overground which has no service between romford and upminster because of a faulty train. if we look at the roads now. this is greenwich. as you can see there's queueing towards blackwall tunnel, that's from blackwall lane. in limehouse there's a lane blocked
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westbound at limehouse link tunnel between aspen way and the highway. that's because of an accident there. in chelsea, gunter grove is down to one lane northbound at edith terrace for water main repairs. and finally, in spitalfields the traffic lights are not working on the a10 bishopsgate at primrose street. let's have a check on the weather now with. a cold start, —5, but cold so the risk of mist and freezing fog patches but they should last for too long. plenty of blue sky today, the wind... the temperatures struggles, feeling chilly, between three and five celsius the maximum temperature. overnight tonight, clear in the most part, temperatures falling away quickly when the sunsets, not as cold as last night, we see a little bit more cloud starting to feed in. towns and cities should hover above zero, between one and three celsius but
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still the chance of frost tomorrow morning. the next couple of days high pressure continues to dominate but it doesn't mean this glorious wall to wall sunshine will maintain, a bit more cloud. tomorrow afternoon, a bit more cloud around, temperatures a touch more mild thursday into friday but that cloud hanging around into the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to breakfast. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: could clean eating be the latest food fad to face a backlash? we will be looking at the scientific evidence behind some healthy living claims. a row over whether wheelchair—users or baby buggies should get priority on buses reaches the uk's highest court today.
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we will analyse the implications after 8:00am. and natalie portman talks to us about oscars, pregnancy, and portraying one of the most iconic first ladies in history. all that still to come. but now, a summary of this morning's main news: the foreign secretary has said countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be hauling up the drawbridge, despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. well, many of the world's movers and shakers are at the world economic forum in switzerland at the moment. so is davos buzzing with talk of theresa may's brexit plan? our business correspondent tanya beckett is there, and joins us now. good morning to you. is it buzzing with brexit? it is. for a long time
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i think many financial firms based in the city of london, or at least to have large footholds in the city of london, have been thinking that they need to keep a foothold within they need to keep a foothold within the single market. and now they seem to be very open about saying we have been thinking about this for a long time and after what theresa may has said we need to crystallise those plans. that is part of what is being said. also the acceptance that if you are talking about leaving the single market and the customs union, to negotiate your way back in, to have some sort of trade deal, is going to take time. question is therefore about what is going to happen in that void. and also within davos, they are notjust happen in that void. and also within davos, they are not just focused happen in that void. and also within davos, they are notjust focused on the uk's plans, but what it might mean. it is one part of a jigsaw puzzle within the eu whereby we have seen similar stories developing in france, germany, with afd, and also italy where there is even talk about the prospect of italians being asked
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whether they want to stay within the euro. that would cause, if they were to leave, significant dislocation. the overriding theme, is globalisation of the thing? davos says yes, but recognises, and especially with the president toeing the line, it recognises that there are adjustments that need to be made to capitalism. the pressing question, therefore, is what are those adjustments? just after 7:00am we will be talking to keir starmer, the shadow brexit secretary. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years the leaking intelligence secrets. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she is a whistleblower and not a traitor. the former military analyst who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison will be released in may. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holidaymakers home from the gambia, because of a worsening political crisis there.
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the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down, and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers, on additional flights over the next a8 hours. we expect to speak to simon calder about that in a minute or two. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type of three—person ivf. doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pronuclear transfer, in what is a world—first. it is not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the supreme court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies in buggies on board. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus, but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy.
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first group says its current policy of requesting, not requiring other passengers to move is the most feasible solution, but mr paulley insists it is discriminatory. so few cases make it to the supreme court, and it's the first time that it's ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services for disabled people. yeah, i never thought about five years ago, when i tried to catch that bus, that we'd still be talking about it now. the duke of cambridge and prince harry honoured the achievements of wounded servicemen and women at a special ceremony last night. the event, held at the royal geographical society, celebrated excellence through awarding prizes to individuals who have excelled in their endeavour fund sporting challenges. talking about sporting challenges, lincoln city were up against it last night but they are through to the
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fourth round of the fa cup. and haven't there been some wonderful tributes over the last few days to the late graham taylor? i think that result last night is possibly one of the most fitting. it was his first club, a0 years ago. it makes me feel very grown up. what a night for lincoln city. the non—league side beat ipswich town of the championship, 1—0, in their fa cup third—round replay, the first time they have got this far since graham taylor managed them in 1976. the drama was left until the 91st minute, when nathan arnold scored a well—deserved winner for lincoln, who will be at home to brighton in the fourth round. i think we fully, really, deserved that over the two legs. and you know, i was really pleased to get the goal, obviously. and my mrs actually had a dream that we were 1-0, actually had a dream that we were 1—0, and! actually had a dream that we were 1—0, and i scored. and another non—league side, sutton united, also made it through. they beat league one's afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay. that earned sutton a lucrative televised tie at home
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to championship side leeds. i thought our supporters, as well, we re i thought our supporters, as well, were magnificent. they stuck with us and what a reward for them. and really, you know, this team, it's just a fantastic group of players, a great spirit amongst them. and you know, they deserve all the credit. sam allardyce won his first match as crystal palace manager. they were a goal down at home to one of his old sides, bolton, but christian benteke scored twice to earn palace a home tie against manchester city. there were also wins for blackpool burnley and bristol city. manchester city midfielder yaya toure has turned down £a30,000 a week to play for a chinese club. it is the second time a club in the chinese super league has tried to tempt him away. his contract at manchester city runs out at the end of the season, but it is believed he wants to stay in the premier league. scotland women head coach
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anna signeul will step down after this summer's euro 2017 finals. signeul has managed the side since 2005, and has led them to their first major tournament. her next role will be head coach of the finnish national side. number one seed angelique kerber and 2003 finalist venus williams are safely through to the third round of the australian open. andy murray and dan evans play in the next few hours. evans faces the number seven seed, marin cilic, and murray takes on russia's andrey rublev. he is the son of a former professional boxer, and ranked 152nd in the world, but he is one of the most promising young players on the circuit. i have never hit with him. but i have seen him play, and he goes for it. you know, he really rips the
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ball. he is a clean ball striker. and i guess i will get a better idea of how good he is when i play against him, but he is obviously one of the better up—and—coming youngsters, and he has obviously got a bright, bright future. so yes, i will need to be ready, because he does take a lot of chances out there, and he goes for it. murray is in roger federer‘s side of the draw, so they could meet further down the line. and federer is in action this morning, against american qualifier noah rubin. the four—time champion went two sets up, but has struggled in the third, and has had to fight back from a—1 down. alun wynjones will take over the wales captaincy from sam warburton for the six nations. jones has led the team five times before, and captained the lions in the final test against australia in 2013. wales interim head coach rob howley has included seven uncapped players in his 36—man squad. neil robertson beat ali carter to set up a quarter—final
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against defending champion, ronnie o'sullivan, in the masters snooker at alexandra palace. and marco fu benefited from a bit of luck as he knocked out world number three judd trump. the pair were tied at 5—5 all when the red fu was trying to sink bounced out of the pocket, off the opposite cushion, and back into the same pocket. that set him up for a century break, and gave him a 6—5 victory. finally, from me... british athletics say they are puzzled by david weir's critical remarks on social media. the six—time paralympic champion said, "i have been let down again. today is the day i officially retire from gb. i will never put a shirt on again. thanks, british athletics. what a joke." he had already planned to retire after the london marathon in april. he had, of course, already announced plans to retire so the news he is retiring is not new news. but something has happened to make him very unhappy and disappointed, in
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order to make those remarks yesterday. i am sure we will find out in due course. thousands of holidaymakers are to be flown back to britain from the gambia, because of the political crisis there. the foreign office advised against all but essential travel to the west african country, after the outgoing president declared a state of emergency. he has refused to accept defeat in last month's election and is challenging the result. let's talk now to the independent‘s travel editor simon calder, who's in our carlisle newsroom this morning. talk about the practicalities. how are they going to get people back, how do they even tell people? right, well let's start with the 985 package holidaymakers who thomas cook have in the gambia at the moment. they are by far the biggest operator to the country and that operation actually gets under way in the next few minutes just before 7am, the normal, a scheduled flight from manchester to the capital of the gambia is going out. it will be empty of passengers. they were all told last night, sorry, your holiday
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is not going ahead but there will be a special team going out to the country to help to bring everybody else back. in addition to that, there is a flight going out from gatwick this morning, and two other aircraft who are being sent down from the ca nary aircraft who are being sent down from the canary islands. and the idea is, thomas cook tells me, that if everything on the ground works, they should be able to bring back those package holidaymakers. now, u nfortu nately those package holidaymakers. now, unfortunately that still those package holidaymakers. now, u nfortu nately that still leaves several thousand other people. they are people travelling with other package tour operators, who perhaps won't be able to bring people back, and also maybe 2500 people who are there independently, having bought flight there independently, having bought flight only tickets. they don't have quite the same duty of care, but i do understand that thomas cook and possibly other airlines are going to be trying to get flights back in the last couple of days. so what do they
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do? do they turn up to the airport, what do they do? don't go to the airport, it is going to be chaotic enough, thank you very much. so i absolutely agree. there you are, thousands of miles from home where a state of emergency has been declared and the foreign office says get out. it is natural to think we had better get to the airport, but stay put. the holiday companies will be addressing everybody‘s concerns as best they can. it is a very fluid situation. as far as i can tell there is no immediate danger. this isa there is no immediate danger. this is a precautionary move by the foreign office and as soon as the foreign office and as soon as the foreign office and as soon as the foreign office says we advise against all but essential travel than basically people have to get out. it is a matter of staying put and then waiting to be told the buses are on their way. you will be taken to the airport. and there are tens of thousands of people booked to travel to the gambia for the rest of the winter. at the moment, of course, several 100 people were told
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last night your holiday is not going ahead. they will get full refunds. other people in the next few days should get full refunds, and tour operators will be offering the chance to switch to alternative destinations. thank you very much. sorry about that, just punched you in the arm that! you are watching brea kfast in the arm that! you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, claims countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. thousands of british holidaymakers will be flown home from the gambia because of the country's worsening political crisis. the foreign office now advises against all but essential travel there. only a straight punch! it's not like we haven't got enough sofa!
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. for many parts, not everywhere, but it will remain cloudy for most of the uk today. some patchy mist and shallow fog as well but also clear skies and where we have those we have frost as well. in gravesend, the temperature at the moment is quite low. london, —a. but manchester, not quite as cold, six. in edinburgh, even milder, nine. if you've got the cloud cover it isn't as cold to start. today we have a weather front which is across the central swathe of the uk and where we have that is where the thickest cloud is producing some light rain and drizzle. that will fizzle as we go through the day so it will be the coasts that see it more than anywhere else. a lot of cloud in the south—west and wales, then we come under clear skies as we go over to kent and east anglia and this is
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where we have the low temperatures. you may have to scrape your car this morning and watch out for shallow fog patches as well. north of that through the midlands and northern england, a lot of cloud and where we have the front we have the light rain and drizzle and some hill fog. clear skies in north—east scotland but for much of scotland, a cloudy start but temperatures not particularly low at this stage in the morning and the same for northern ireland, a cloudy start but not particularly cold. across the irish sea into wales, again we're under the influence of the weather front so a fair bit of cloud and light rain and drizzle. through the day where we have the weather front the rain in it will fizzle, we'll still see sandra is all and rain along the coasts and hills but the brighter skies will be the south—east to the south—west. despite the sunshine and light breeze it will be a pleasant day but it will feel cold. further north, high temperatures but you're under the cloud. persistent rain will continue through the day, across shetland, we will have that through the night as well. rain and drizzle
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along the coasts and hills but where we have clear skies, a cold night, not as cold as the nightjust gone but still cold enough for a touch of frost and again patchy mist and fog. move away from that, temperatures generally holding their own but under clear skies in the north—east of scotland, aberdeenshire and murray, again it will be cold. tomorrow morning we start off with some sunshine, some sunshine in the south as well and tomorrow we could see some breaks in parts of wales, northern england and also parts of northern ireland. a brighter day for more of us but the emphasis is still onafairly more of us but the emphasis is still on a fairly cloudy day and temperatures just coming down a touch in the north, similar as we come further south. thanks, carol, see you later on. as we've been discussing, the prime minister has said the uk will seek a new trade agreement with the eu after leaving the single market. so what does that actually involve? ben's been talking to a top trade negotiator about what trade talks might achieve. what's he been saying? it's been
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dish and the conjugated to try to negotiate all these trade deals. if you think back to the 19705, that was the last time we negotiated trade ourselves —— it's fiendishly, located. yesterday we heard from theresa may about this. —— fiendishly complicated. i've been speaking to a top international trade lawyer and she's been looking at how the process might work and she says we need to stop prioritising which industries we think are most important in the uk and what they may get. crucially she says the process will take a long time. we begin that process, the divorce proceedings begin when we trigger are to go 50 perhaps at the end of march, we have two years from then to do those deals —— article 50. she said she doesn't think we will be ready in time. it's important to remember international trade agreements are
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about deals. so you get something so that you can take something. the only problem is that this is obviously a very technical thing with lots of legal details and discussion, which has a political context and an economic content and the legal technical underpinning. the agreement for example between the eu and south korea is, kind of, 2000 or more pages and it's not even a very sophisticated one.“ 2000 or more pages and it's not even a very sophisticated one. if we're not part of the european union, not subject to agreeing it with 27 member states, if it's one—on—one negotiating with another country, does that make it easier and more simple? the key interest for the uk is services and services is the most difficult bit with negotiations, services is about nontariff barriers, what we call nontariff barriers, what we call nontariff barriers, the hidden insidious
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barriers, the hidden insidious barriers that mean you may tell me i can come to your country freely, actually you have a license provision or a condition somewhere, safety provisions or whatever it is, that make it impossible for me to actually have open access to your market. these are incredibly complex. where will trade negotiators come from? have we got enoughin negotiators come from? have we got enough in this country to do the job? the question is the other way round, how many people do we have, therefore what can we realistically do and what are we going to prioritise? i think in government you don't have limitless resources, but we don't, we are where we are. is it but we don't, we are where we are. isita but we don't, we are where we are. is it a case it's a mismatch between what we want and what we'll probably get. i think we're going to have to compromise between three things, what we want, what we have to get to that and also what the others are
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willing to give to us. yes, at some point i think there will be a reality check. assuming we trigger article 50 at the end of march, we then have two years to negotiate. how hopeful argue that deals will be in place at the end of those two yea rs ? in place at the end of those two years? the likelihood that at the end of two years the uk will have a fully fledged sophisticated agreement with the european union, and also agreements, or the beginning of agreements, with various countries, is very low. maria gonzales speaking about the complex tee of the deals. it's worth bearing in mind the trade deal canada has just signed with canada took seven years to negotiate and it's not yet done —— complexity. it does mean we can start looking elsewhere, it could be good for trade deals with the likes of india, china and the us. clearly a lot of work to do and a lot of negotiation starting to take place. we can only begin that negotiation when we trigger article 50, so those two yea rs trigger article 50, so those two years will be crucial in shaping the
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relationship we have with europe. that's seven years to get the trade deal between canada and the eu! it's all about negotiation, it will take all about negotiation, it will take a long time, and do we have the right people to do it? if not then are we getting the skills we need to do that negotiation? so many questions. thank you, ben. jackie kennedy is best remembered for her style and elegance, as well as for the events in dallas on the 22nd of november 1963, but a new film examines what life was like for the wife ofjfk before and after his assassination. natalie portman, who plays the former first lady, has been speaking to tom brook about the role, and about her thoughts on president—elect donald trump. you're getting masses of praise for this role. did you know a lot about jackie kennedy before you began working on the film? i really didn't know anything beyond
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the popular conception, sort of, this 2—dimensional icon. preparing for the role was really what let me now about her. isaid now about her. i said i'll change my mind, we will have a procession and i'll walk to the cathedral with the casket. the really interesting aspect i noticed when i began watching while she had a little girl voice. why did she do that and was that difficult for you to get right? she did have this very breathy voice, especially when she was doing public interviews like the white house tour in particular. there's audio tapes that she did with a friend of hers and jfk pass who was doing an oral history of the white house after the assassination. and with him her voice was deeper, she spoke faster. you see that she was sort of cultivating this very classic image of femininity and
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coyness that she was projecting to the public. this article will bring you a great deal of attention. in that case, any advice? yes. don't marry the president. i think it's very much a portrait of grief and the way that it's not exactly grief and the way that it's not exa ctly a n grief and the way that it's not exactly an arc or anything, it's this very fragmented experience of incredible sorrow and then an intrusive memory and then anger and a bit of dark humour and all of those, sort of, different sides of the grieving process. you know, she is one of the most popular first ladies. why does she have such a hold on people?” popular first ladies. why does she have such a hold on people? i think she really had an exquisite understanding of public image and i think one of the most shocking things in the movie is when you see
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at the end the plaque on the door, they were only there for... jfk was only president for a little over two yea rs. only president for a little over two years. and to see the kind of import that they've meant to the american people shows how strong the story she told was. while the kennedys we re she told was. while the kennedys were in the white house, her husband was having to content with some quite severe racial tensions in the country, like the birmingham church bombing. how will racial tensions or civil rights there under president trump do you think?” civil rights there under president trump do you think? i have no idea. it's not new unfortunately for this country and it's something that we seriously need to find a positive way forward. are you not a fan particularly? of? trump? i did not vote for trump. i do not know him personally. and i really pray for
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the best for our country, and not just pray, but, you know, i'm energised to do whatever i can to make my own community and my own country... and, and the world, i think, country, patriotism, nationalism, it's not our way to go. i'm guessing you won't allow me to write any of that? no. because i never said that. jackie is in cinemas this friday. plenty more from natalie portman later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. 70% of schools in london could face extra budget cuts under government changes to the way they're funded. that's according to london councils, which says schools in the capital will need to make savings of 360 million in the first year.
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but the government argues london is the highest funded part of the country and that inner—city schools here will be allocated 30% more funding per pupil than the national average. drones are to be used to carry out surveys and do repairs on buildings in west london in order to save time and money. hammersmith and fulham council, who have already trialled the idea, says it will save them thousands of pounds as erecting scaffolding is slow and expensive. they'll use a specialist company to maintain and operate the drones. plans to build nearly 8,000 new homes in haringey may be put on hold overfears it could price local people out of the area. as part of the regeneration of wood green the council would provide land it owns, like the library, while a private company would put in the cash. some councillors called on the town hall to pause the project over
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concerns about its scale. deliveroo has promised to increase its staffing numbers by a third when it opens its new london head office later this year. the online food delivery company, which was founded in the capital, is the latest tech firm to expand here, saying it plans to hire more than 300 high—skilled recruits. let's have a look at the travel situation now. at the moment there's a good service on all tube lines, except for the overground, which has no service between romford and upminster because of a faulty train. elsewhere on public transport, london midland is running a replacement bus service between watford junction and st albans abbey. onto the roads now, and in limehouse there's a lane blocked westbound, which is causing delays at limehouse link tunnel. let's have a check on the weather now with. good morning. it's a very cold start to the day with temperatures in some spots overnight down at —5.
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so a widespread frost this morning. it's feeling cold but we have plenty of sunshine. there is the risk of maybe some mist and freezing fog patches out there but they shouldn't last for too long. plenty of blue sky day. the wind is light. a bit more cloud the further north you are but the temperature against ruggles, feeling chilly, between three and five celsius the maximum temperature. overnight tonight, clear in the most part, temperatures falling away fairly quickly when the sun sets, not as cold as last night, we see a little bit more cloud starting to feed in. towns and cities should hover above zero, between one and three celsius. still the chance of frost tomorrow morning, though. for the next couple of days high pressure continues to dominate but it doesn't mean this glorious wall to wall sunshine we've been having. it does mean a little bit more in the way of cloud. so towards the end of tomorrow afternoon, as i said, a bit more cloud around. temperatures a touch more mild overnight thursday into friday but that cloud hanging around through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louis minchin and dan walker. countries are queuing up for trade deals with britain when it leaves the eu, says the foreign secretary, after teresa may's confirmation that britain will quit the single market. borisjohnson says the uk will not be hauling up the drawbridge. one top trade negotiator tells me britain needs a reality check on what it wants from europe, and what it will be able to get. good morning, it is wednesday 18 january. also this morning: thousands of british holidaymakers are to be flown out of the gambia in the next a8 hours, as the foreign office warns of the growing risk of unrest in the country. wikilea ks whistle—blower chelsea manning has her prison sentence cut by more than 30 years,
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in one of barack obama's last acts as american president. in sport: non—league lincoln city shock ipswich town with an injury—time winner, to reach the fourth round of the fa cup for the first time in a0 years. good morning from tennessee, on breakfast‘s road trip across america. today we are asking what the new president, donald trump can do for infrastructure and for agriculture. and we examine the scientific evidence behind some of the healthy—eating claims grabbing the attention of millions on social media. and carol has the weather. good morning. for many of us another cloudy day with some light rain and drizzle here and there but they will be some sunshine, the best of which will be across east anglia and southern counties of england where it is clear but frosty start, and we
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will see the lion's share of the sunshine during the day. more details and 15 minutes. —— in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: the foreign secretary has said countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be hauling up the drawbridge, despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. we will speak to our europe correspondent gavin lee, in brussels, injust a moment. but first let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson, whojoins us from westminster. so the day after the key speech, what are people waking up to this morning? what will be the talk in westminster today?” morning? what will be the talk in westminster today? i think theresa may will be pleased by the reaction in the newspapers, the daily comparing her to mrs thatcher. many of her own mps will be delighted by the tone she has struck, even those who are very much against her coming out of the single market, and there
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are some in the conservative party, they will be pleased with the tone she has adopted. that will not be universally welcomed. labour say they are not too chuffed by this idea, that she has perhaps antagonise european allies by saying that no deal is better than a bad deal. the liberal democrats will be repeating their call for a second referendum when the deal is finally done, notjust a vote of mps in parliament, and they warned there could be another scottish referendum, the snp. theresa may wa nts to referendum, the snp. theresa may wants to come out and will face mps herself at prime minister's questions this lunchtime, and we will be able to gauge the reaction ofa will be able to gauge the reaction of a better them. gavin lee is our europe correspondent. people reacting there as well. what is most striking? i think it has taken a bit of time on the side of
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the channel to digests. it was something of a surprise. a few days ago i was talking tojuncker, and whether britain will want to leave the single market, and the president was briefed only a short while before the speech was made and we will have some of the biggest reaction, first of all from jean—claude juncker, he avoided reaction, first of all from jean—claudejuncker, he avoided any questions yesterday. we will also hear from angela questions yesterday. we will also hearfrom angela merkel, i expect. she is meeting with the new italian prime minister. some of the european papers, the spanish and french papers, the spanish and french papers talk about a hard brexit, and the contradiction that you can have a situation where britain isn't in or out but at the same time has aspects or an association agreement when it comes to the customs union. so picking up on that as well but in brief what this allows is all of a sudden the negotiators on the eu side will start to formalise the explicit points that theresa may has
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made out. just after 8:30am we will be speaking to brexit secretary, david davis. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holidaymakers home from the gambia, because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down, and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers on additional flights over the next a8 hours. it is a country on the move. under a state of emergency, gambians are fleeing their capital, and amongst all this are thousands of british tourists, who have been told to get out. thomas cook has a team heading to the country to help. four extra flights are expected to leave today. the company said in a statement... it is bringing 985 package holiday
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customers home. that also means cancelled trips, a surprise for some passengers at manchester airport first thing this morning.” passengers at manchester airport first thing this morning. i am just disappointed. i understand there are problems with the president saying he isn't going to stand down, and obviously i have family out there and friends out there saying it is all right, there is no problem. the tension has built because this man has refused to leave office. president yahya jammeh went on television to warn about foreign interference in this country. if it is allowed to continue, may lead to a state of public emergency. he had conceded last month's election, after ruling for more than 20 years. opposition leader adama barrow was due to take power tomorrow. but the president challenged the result, and has resisted pressure from neighbouring countries to stand down.
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now, the threat of violence is growing. this is why tourists come. it calls itself the smiling coast of africa. but it is a worrying time for holidaymakers waiting to leave, and for gambians who can't. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she is a whistle—blower and not a traitor. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. i'd say 12 to 16 months, her mental condition deteriorated significantly, she became depressed. she tried to commit suicide twice, and was punished for it by the prison authorities.
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there was a risk to her well—being, if not her life, she had remained in this prison. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type of three—person ivf. doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pronuclear transfer, in what is a world—first. it is not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the supreme court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies in buggies on board. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus, but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. first group says its current policy of requesting, not requiring other passengers to move is the most feasible solution, but mr paulley insists it is discriminatory. so few cases make it to the supreme court, and it's the first time that it's ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services for disabled people.
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yeah, i never thought that, back five years ago, when i tried to catch that bus, that we'd still be talking about it now. in the last few minutes, we have had some breaking news from the regulator ofcom. ben has more. what can you tell us? this hasjust come through to us. news from the regulator ofcom that it will find the telecoms giant ee £2.7 million because they overcharge customers. they call it a fundamental billing mistake. this is to do with customers who are using customer service and numbers while roaming in the eu. they have been overcharged to the tune of £250,000. they suggest nearly a0,000 customers were affected. so they are imposing the
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spine, £2.7 million for overcharging those customers. let's speak to ofcom. lindsey fussell from ofcom joins us now. good morning to you. so they have just announced a fine for ee. i have touched on some of the details of what they did, but why did they get it so wrong? good morning. we all rely on big companies to get the most basic thing right for us, and thatis most basic thing right for us, and that is the charge us the right amount of our phone bills. our investigation found that ee had broken out billing rules notjust once but on two occasions. that is clearly completely once but on two occasions. that is clearly com pletely u na cce pta ble a nd we have levied this fine of £2.7 million today. it is notjust a small mistake. customers were charged 1.20 pounds a minute instead of 19p a minute. charged 1.20 pounds a minute instead of19p a minute. how charged 1.20 pounds a minute instead of 19p a minute. how did they get it so wrong? absolutely, well, we uncovered a catalogue of errors at ee. firstly, as you say, they charged customers who are travelling
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abroad, who are trying to call the helpline number, presumably because they needed some support, they charge those customers as if they we re charge those customers as if they were making a call to the united states of america, which is clearly a much more expensive phone call. and when the calls to that line were made free later, they continued to charge some customers to make those calls. that is why, as well as the fine today, we have required ee to trace every one of those customers and make sure they get their money back. you have said in a report that you are happy that the majority of customers have now been refunded. let's talk about the fine, £2.7 million. the proceeds of that will go to the treasury but many people watching this will think you find a big telecoms firm, i will end up paying because my bill will go up. we think this is a significant fine and that fines are a good deterrent for companies. we know that they don't like to be on the receiving end of finds like this. but i think what really matters to consumers is
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that companies get the services they provide and have bills right first time. we hope this sends a clear message not just time. we hope this sends a clear message notjust to ee but across the industry that we won't hesitate to step in and levy large fines if they get that wrong for customers. you have said it is clearly a large fine. £2.7 million, would you like it to be more? i know you have limits on how large the fines you are allowed to levy, but would you like to send a message that you will not tolerate this sort of behaviour? we obviously have to look at the fa cts we obviously have to look at the facts of each case and each investigation and decide on the appropriate level of fine. we are satisfied that £2.7 million is the right deterrent. but as i say, we won't hesitate to step in and issue further fines if we see that companies are failing to give their customers the most basic standards of customer service. good to talk to you, thank you very much. just to recap what you can see on the
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screen, ee charged £2.7 million for overcharging customers who phoned a customer service helpline, they were find much more than they should have been, £1.2a find much more than they should have been, £1.2 a minute instead of 19p. ofcom, the regulator, are happy that most of those have now been refunded. at £2.7 million fine imposed on the telecoms giant ee. no dealfor britain is better than a bad deal, according to theresa may, but her hard line hasn't been welcomed by everybody in westminster. in a minute we will be talking to shadow brexit secretary keir starmer about the prime minister's proposals, but first let's hear what our own breakfast brexit panel thought about theresa may's big plan for leaving the eu. i thought the prime minister's speech today was very good. quite rightly, she has made it plain to the eu that, should they try to
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punish us for leaving, we have other means by which we can achieve brexit. i said i wanted clarity, and we do have clarity. but the single market, we are completely out of it. whether it is good or bad is going to come down to detail negotiations, at there is no doubt about it, we are going to lose our biggest trading partner without tariffs, but so trading partner without tariffs, but so is the european union. to be honest, i feel positive, and so is the european union. to be honest, ifeel positive, and it so is the european union. to be honest, i feel positive, and it was expected we would look after british people living in the european union, as we do in the uk. sol people living in the european union, as we do in the uk. so i feel safe, and all! as we do in the uk. so i feel safe, and all i need to do now is cook great food and enjoy britain. i'm extremely disappointed by the speech, and i knew i would be. there was not a single mention from theresa may about the issues with racism, with homophobia, with attacks against disabled people, because they are all on the rise at the moment, after brexit. let's speak now to shadow brexit secretary, keir starmer, in westminster.
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thank you very much for your time. cani thank you very much for your time. can i ask you to clear up what labour's position is on what we heard yesterday, we were hearing noises that you were happy with some of what you heard from theresa may and the former shadow chancellor chris leslie was saying there's a danger you might be giving theresa may an alibi for a brexit deal by not arguing for single market membership. what is your view on that? it's important just membership. what is your view on that? it's importantjust to stand back and assess what we're trying to achieve here. the labour party's been clear from the start that of course we accept the result of the referendum but nobody voted to be poorer and everyone wants our businesses to succeed in their dealings with the eu, whether they're trading in goods or services. what i was highly critical of yesterday was theresa may's bargain basement tax haven threat, no deal and out of any meaningful
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relationship with the eu. that would make people poorer, there's no mandate for it and it's totally inconsistent with what she's saying about the protection of workers' rights and a fairer britain. so we're very critical of that. what she did say, though, which was important, is she intends to have as one of her objective tariff free access to the single market and what she calls frictionless access to the single market. that's really important for business. i've been all over the country talking to hundreds of businesses, trade unions and working people and they know how important those things are, tariff free and red tape free access and what i said yesterday is it's delivering on that that really matters. today we need to think about how we ensure the government brings a plan, brings those objectives to the house of commons so they can be properly discussed and also how we frame or amend any article 50 legislation to make sure
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those important objectives are achieved and also that we criticise heavily the bargain basement fallback threat that theresa may made, and she shouldn't have made. do you not think there is a point, which i number of people have been making, about a united front in terms of opposition from some of the major parties so the british public have a choice, it's notjust mps that get to vote on this, people can see there's clear lines of demarcation? we've been clear that the continued success of businesses, whether it's the continued success of businesses, whether its manufacturing, whether it's selling goods or services, is absolutely critical to the outcome and we've been saying that for months. we've pushed for a plan, we pushed for those objectives to be in the plan. we've got both now. but now we need to push to make sure they're delivered. we only had a plan or objectives yesterday because we'd been pushing for them. now we've had a concession that tariff free access to the single market will be an objective, that something
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again we've been pushing for four months. it's important people appreciate what we have been doing, what we've achieved so far, and what we now need to do is make sure that is delivered in a way that, as i say, so that people are not poorer and businesses can continue to trade successfully. we've been talking this morning about trade deals and canada's most this morning about trade deals and ca nada's most recent this morning about trade deals and canada's most recent book seven yea rs canada's most recent book seven years to negotiate, and miriam goddard is knows all about international trade and she says it's highly unlikely a fully fledged trade deal can be sorted out in two yea rs. trade deal can be sorted out in two years. is there a danger these negotiations could take many years and paralyse the uk economy?” negotiations could take many years and paralyse the uk economy? i don't think there's any realistic prospect ofa think there's any realistic prospect of a fully fledged trade deal, a comprehensive trade deal being finished within the two—year period. not least because the deal has to be agreed by about october or november of next year. and what's important is we get it right. again, the
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labour party has been clear saying transitional arrangements, implementation phase is really important and recognising that we need time to get this right. what is needed is a trade agreement, but make sure our businesses can succeed in the future in the way they succeed now. that is a prize that we have to fight for. keir starmer, appreciate your time this morning, thank you very much. we'll be speaking to brexit secretary david davis just after 8:30am. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. some frost, sunrise, lots going on, good morning. good morning, a wee bit of everything this morning, a cloudy day for most. some patchy mist and shallow fog as well as sunshine. codedin shallow fog as well as sunshine. coded in the south under clear skies. we're importing this cold easterly from the near continent —— cold in. that's reflected nicely in these temperatures. some frost around in london.
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edinburgh hasjust edinburgh has just dropped a edinburgh hasjust dropped a degree at eight degrees. compare to do the rest of the country, much milder. a 14 rest of the country, much milder. a 1a degrees difference there. you can see the weather front draped across lincolnshire, the north midlands, wales, producing a lot of cloud and like patchy rain and drizzle. south of that, we've also got a fair bit of that, we've also got a fair bit of cloud across south—west england. but drift over to dorset, heading to the isle of wight, hampshire and into kent, essex, east anglia, this is where it's particularly cold where there's frost and also shallow mist and fog. that will lift through the morning. north of that through the morning. north of that through the rest of the midlands and northern england, much of scotland, a cloudy start with hill fog and where we have the front we have like rain and drizzle. north—west pollen has a cold start where we have clear skies but through the day we have outbreaks of rain in shetland national press cloud and. northern
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ireland starts on a cloudy relatively mild —— north—west scotland. in wales, we start on a cloudy note with drizzle in east wales. rue the day where we have the weather front, it is fairly weak, the rain —— through the day. there will still be a lot of cloud around and in the moray firth towards aberdeenshire we see some breaks and we see them from the word go in parts of southern england to the south—west and east anglia. temperatures are still highest in the north and lowest in the sunshine in the south. as we head on through the evening and overnight, under clear skies once again there will be some frost. not as cold a night as the one just gone. we'll see shallow mist and fog patches forming but away from that a lot of cloud and still dampness around the coasts, so as a result not particularly cold, except where we have clear skies in scotland, and cold as we go further south. tomorrow, more of the same, still a
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cloudy picture. some breaks in the north—east and the south but tomorrow we're likely to see more brea ks tomorrow we're likely to see more breaks in northern ireland, parts of wales and northern england and temperatures where they've been high coming down a touch. thank you very much! during the us election campaign donald trump pledged to make america great again, but as he prepares to take office can he deliver on that promise? in the week that donald trump will be sworn in as the a5th president of the united states, we're taking a road trip through the heart of america on route a5 to find out how americans are feeling about obama's legacy and today, breakfast‘sjon kay is heading south towards tennessee. if you want to understand donald trump's election win, this is a good place to come. next to route a5, the ohio river meets the mississippi. it's an essential artery for the us economy, carrying 18 million tons of cargo every year.
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but things aren't what they used to be. the locks which boats pass through here have seen better days. nearly 100 years old, they regularly break down, causing long and costly delays. so around 52 hours at one time. a boat could be waiting out for 52 hours before coming through? yes, sir. mark, the lock keeper, says it's a struggle to keep trade moving. the concrete is starting to break up and crumble. every time it gets hit by a boat and it lands on it it puts pressure on it and causes more cracks and stress on it, we patch it together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last for ever. donald trump has pledged $1 trillion to rebuild america's rivers, roads and railways.
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a promise that's won him plenty of support round here. but he hasn't said where the money will come from. we head back on route a5 to see the kind of project the new president wants to encourage. a huge dam and lock system to replace the failing one downriver. it's nearly 20 years behind schedule and $2 billion over budget. many here believe donald trump's life in business will mean he can deliver. i think he if he really wants to put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people, for sure, why not? one person can't do it but if you take a group of people and you've got good conversation communication skills, good listening skills, you can pretty much accomplish anything. has he got those skills? i hope so. trump's critics say his pledges are unrealistic and unaffordable. but in an area wherejobs can be scarce, they're prepared to give him a try. we drive on into
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america's rural south. there are 2 million farms in this country. willa property developer president understand this business? at the university of tennessee, students are learning how to weigh and vaccinate cattle. stick it in, press it forward, pull it out. some are gonna be more willing to go forward and some are wanting to hold back. sounds like politicians! i guess so! donald trump won nearly 80% of the vote in the martin area. they like his confidence and in turn they have confidence in him. he might have a few mess—ups on the way but eventually he'll figure it all out. we're always going to need
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agriculture, that's what feeds us. so we're going to need it to keep going. but is farming compatible with trump's plans for building? what about the land, the environment? donald trump is a man you associate with skyscrapers and new york city, not with farming and places like this. do you think he understands you and what you want to do? i think he's going to help small town people out. i'd don't think he's going to be the big city man when he gets in office. what about farming, does he understand farming? not as well as some agriculture people. whether it's agriculture or infrastructure, in these communities away from washington, many feel trump will be a president who finally speaks for them. someone not just following the political herd. jon kay, bbc news, tennessee. a fascinating journey.
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jon will be continuing his road trip tomorrow when he travels deeper south to mississippi. then he continues his route all week before donald trump's inauguration on friday. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. 70% of schools in london could face extra budget cuts under government changes to the way they're funded. that's according to london councils, which says schools in the capital will need to make savings of £360 million in the first year. but the government argues london is the highest funded part of the country and that inner—city schools here will be allocated 30% more funding per pupil than the national average. plans to build nearly 8,000 new homes in haringey may be put on hold overfears it could price local people out of the area. as part of the regeneration of wood green the council
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would provide land it owns, like the library, while a private company would put in the cash. last night campaigners held a protest urging the council's leadership to pause the project. drones are to be used to carry out surveys and do repairs on buildings in west london in order to save time and money. hammersmith and fulham council, who have already trialled the idea, says it will save them thousands of pounds as erecting scaffolding is slow and expensive. deliveroo has promised to increase its staffing numbers by a third when it opens its new london head office later this year. the online food delivery company, which was founded in the capital, is the latest tech firm to expand here, saying it plans to hire more than 300 high—skilled recruits. now let's take a look at this morning's travel. at the moment there's a good service on all tube lines, except for the overground which has no service between romford and upminster because
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of a faulty train. some potential good news for southern commuters. talks will be held later today. the drivers' union suspended three days of strikes next week and agreed to lift its overtime ban. it was after southern accepted its offer of talks hosted by the tuc. on greater anglia there are delays of up to half—an—hour between liverpool street and shenfield. onto the roads, the a13 has long delays westbound due to an earlier accident at limehouse link tunnel. as you can see here queues are back to prince regent lane. let's have a check on the weather now with. good morning. it's a very cold start to the day with temperatures in some spots overnight down at —5. so a widespread frost this morning. it's feeling cold but we have plenty of sunshine. there is the risk of maybe some mist and freezing fog patches out there but they shouldn't last for too long. plenty of blue sky today. the wind is light. a bit more cloud the further north you are but the temperature again struggles, feeling chilly, between three and five celsius the maximum temperature. overnight tonight, clear in the most part, temperatures falling away fairly quickly when the sun sets,
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not as cold as last night, we see a little bit more cloud starting to feed in. towns and cities should hover above zero, between one and three celsius. still the chance of frost tomorrow morning, though. for the next couple of days high pressure continues to dominate but it doesn't mean this glorious wall to wall sunshine we've been having. it does mean a little bit more in the way of cloud. so towards the end of tomorrow afternoon, as i said, a bit more cloud around. temperatures a touch more mild overnight thursday into friday but that cloud hanging around through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. the foreign secretary has said countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be hauling up the drawbridge, despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. earlier the shadow brexit secretary,
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keir starmer, set out labour's stance. what i was highly critical of yesterday was theresa may's sort of bargain basement, tax haven threat. no deal, and out of any meaningful relationship with the eu. that would make people poorer, there is no mandate for it, and it is totally inconsistent. the telecoms giant ee has been fined £2.7 million for overcharging customers. more than 30,000 thousand customers have been affected, overcharged by £250,000. the regulator explained why they had taken action. they charged customers who are travelling abroad, who are trying to call the helpline number, presumably because they needed some support, they charged those customers as if they were making
quote quote
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a call to the united states of america, which is clearly a much more expensive phone call. and then secondly, when the calls to that helpline were made free, some months later, they continued to charge some customers to make those calls. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she is a whistle—blower and not a traitor. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. thomas cook is preparing to bring thousands of british holidaymakers home from the gambia, because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country after its president refused to step down, and declared a state of emergency. thomas cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home all its uk customers on additional flights over the next a8 hours. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type
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of three—person ivf. doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pronuclear transfer, in what is a world—first. it is not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the supreme court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies in buggies on board. the case was triggered when wheelchair user doug paulley attempted to board a bus, but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. first group says its current policy of requesting, not requiring other passengers to move is the most feasible solution, but mr paulley insists it is discriminatory. the duke of cambridge and prince harry honoured
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the achievements of wounded servicemen and women at a special ceremony last night. the event, held at the royal geographical society, celebrated excellence through awarding prizes to individuals who have excelled in their endeavour fund sporting challenges. coming up on the programme, carol will have a full weather forecast for you. sally is here with all the day's sport. really nice to be back from our holiday, and some sporting drama last night. what a night for lincoln city. the non—league side beat ipswich town of the championship, 1—0, in their fa cup third—round replay, the first time they have got this far since graham taylor managed them in 1976. the drama was left until the 91st minute, when nathan arnold scored a well—deserved winner for lincoln, who will be at home to brighton in the fourth round. people obviously talk about the finances but for me it is not about
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the money, it is the moment. it is about nights like this and smiles on people's faces. that is what football is about, so that to me has been a great part of this journey. and another non—league side, sutton united, also made it through. they beat league one's afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay. that earned sutton a lucrative televised tie at home to championship side leeds. i thought our supporters, as well, were magnificent. they stuck with us, and what a reward for them. and really, you know, this team, it's just a fantastic group of players, a great spirit amongst them. and, you know, they deserve all the credit. sam allardyce won his first match as crystal palace manager. they were a goal down at home to one of his old sides, bolton, but christian benteke scored twice to earn palace a home tie against manchester city. there were also wins for blackpool burnley and bristol city. manchester city midfielder yaya toure has turned down £a30,000 a week to play for a chinese club. it is the second time a club
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in the chinese super league has tried to tempt him away. his contract at manchester city runs out at the end of the season, but it is believed he wants to stay in the premier league. number one seed angelique kerber and 2003 finalist venus williams are safely through to the third round of the australian open. andy murray and dan evans play in the next few hours. evans faces the number seven seed, marin cilic, and murray takes on russia's andrey rublev. he is the son of a former professional boxer, and ranked 152nd in the world, but he is one of the most promising young players on the circuit. i have never hit with him, but i have seen him play, and he goes for it. you know, he really rips the ball. he is a clean ball—striker, and i guess i will get a better idea of how good he is when i play against him. but he is obviously one of the better up—and—coming youngsters, and he has obviously got a bright, bright future. so yeah, i'll need to be ready, because he does take a lot of chances out there, and he goes for it. murray is in roger federer‘s side
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of the draw, so they could meet further down the line. and federer is in action this morning, against american qualifier noah rubin. the four—time champion went two sets up, but has struggled in the third, and has had to fight back from a—1 down. alun wynjones will take over the wales captaincy from sam warburton for the six nations. jones has led the team five times before, and captained the lions in the final test against australia in 2013. wales interim head coach rob howley has included seven uncapped players in his 36—man squad. it has just been announced that europe's captain will be able to choose four players for next year's ryder cup in france. thomas bjorn will get to pick one more player than darren clarke was allowed last year. it is part of a revamp of the qualifying system, after europe lost heavily to the united states in hazeltine. before i go, the day's daily
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express. we spoke to alex thomson backin express. we spoke to alex thomson back in november. he is taking part in the vendee globe round the world yacht race and it is due to end this time tomorrow. he is in second place. in a yacht race you can be quite far behind, is the close? he was making great progress but has fortu nately stall at was making great progress but has fortunately stall at the moment, a lot of drama in the last few months. one thing! lot of drama in the last few months. one thing i have to mention is he hasn't washed since november. so we would like to speak to him. i'm not sure we would! there could be some wet wipe action going on. best of luck to him in the next 2a hours. he is sleep deprived, hasn't slept for more than a5 minutes in a row at one time, feeling quite queasy, hasn't
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walked in a straight line in all that time. i can't imagine. good luck to him. in the last few years clean eating has become a big deal in the food world, and the hashtag of choice for trendy food bloggers. but, as the movement has grown, so too has the list of options that clean eaters should and shouldn't be eating, and the claims and promises about what it can do for our health. giles yeo has been investigating the science behind the diets, and speaking to some of the famous faces behind the movement. i'm going to argue that a significant proportion of those, even though there are intelligent beings and should understand that this is actually a brand is putting it out, think that you are actually living like this. but i do. that is the point, that is why it is a snapshot rather than 24 a day documentary. it was that is what i
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eat, that is my breakfast. i made it a little prettier because i am showing a picture of it. i think it is there for inspiration. i don't think it is their to share my day to day, like, my dog appeared lebed, i missed the train, i'm going to miss an important meeting —— my dog peed on the bed. as a scientist working with obesity, a narrow our relationship with food can be complex. is there a danger of social media driving this sort of eating? —— i know our relationship.” media driving this sort of eating? -- i know our relationship. i think there can be and it is up to us to be as responsible as we can be, to do everything to allow people not to ta ke do everything to allow people not to take it out of context. to me that doesn't stop at food. that is the whole of social media. we have some examples of the food here. presenter giles yeo joins us now. good morning. i don't think there is
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a definition, particularly, but clea n a definition, particularly, but clean eating. what does it mean? a definition, particularly, but clean eating. what does it mean7m doesn't mean these two, no dairy, cubs... —— carbs. doesn't mean these two, no dairy, cubs... -- carbs. ithink it is the three second role. it used to be entirely about weight loss. whatever, atkins, south—west, low gi. this is different, and i think from the investigation we have done what we have found out is, although there are a number of different kinds of clean eating, clean eating on the whole uses food as medicine. they believe that food can make you better. not just they believe that food can make you better. notjust healthy, but actually healthier, actually cure diseases. that is what clean eating is. let's take a look at these plates here. clean eating would involve what we have on the left or right of your screen here, the fruit and veg, rather than the hefty carbohydrates, cornflakes, diskettes, things like that and dairy products as well. just
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promoting generally a more healthy lifestyle, there is nothing inherently wrong with that, is that, in terms of what you put in your body? no, absolutely not. although you put it out and say it vegetables are clean and broadly speaking they are, depending on which of the strains of clean you are looking at, there are subtleties. you are absolutely right, there is nothing wrong with promoting a healthy diet. a study of obesity and the biology of food and tac, which is what i do. but i realised, and i think we have all realised, that you can't fix the obesity problem just by understanding biology. we also need to fix our food environment. understanding biology. we also need to fix ourfood environment. in understanding biology. we also need to fix our food environment. in this i agree with the food gurus i have met, where we have a broken food environment that we need to fix before we can fix the obesity epidemic. that is a big driving force behind white i wanted to look at this to begin with. you have looked at people involved in these
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ideas and there are some people who ta ke ideas and there are some people who take it quite far. what can be the effect of that? so when things go beyond dietary advice, which i think if we are sensible it is going to be fine. the problem with thinking that you can use certain things for medicine, and! you can use certain things for medicine, and i actually went and interview the guy who thought that using the alkaline diet, one of the diet so looked at, you could cure cancer. and the problem is, if you think along those lines of actually trying to cure cancer, instead of using medicine, by using some unproven thing to try and do it, people end up dying. i think that is the tragedy that actually comes when you take it to the extreme. that is the difference, as you say, between healthy eating for the sake of healthy eating for the sake of healthy eating for the sake of healthy eating and those people who ta ke healthy eating and those people who take it a step further and think if i balance my body's ph, or apply this to every aspect of my life, i
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can cu re this to every aspect of my life, i can cure an illness or save myself from something. that's right. as i said, do! from something. that's right. as i said, do i think i eat too much meat? i do eat too much meat. i am a carnivore. do people think that eating more vegetables is a good thing? of course, that is uncontroversial. but why all means say that you are selling a vegetarian cookbook or trying to promote healthy eating. the main issueis promote healthy eating. the main issue is when you try and wrap it up into some pseudoscientific babble to try and explain something. the big problem behind that is, when something goes wrong or something changes and you need to tweak it, it is not raced on truth, not based on evidence. it is difficult to try and work out what went wrong, what went right, and how you can make it better. there are lots of people who leave out certain food groups. people may have very serious problems with gluten. what do you think about that? do you need to go down the route were you see your gp? what do you think people should be doing? you mentioned gluten. 1% of
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people are coeliac, they have to give up gluten. about a% of people have an intolerance to gluten. 25% of us by gluten—free products. i just saw something in forbes magazine saying that since 2009, triple the number of americans have gone gluten—free completely, whether or not they have two or not. i think you should get yourself tested out if you think you have a problem with gluten, before giving it up. because it may have nothing to do with gluten at all. it something com pletely gluten at all. it something completely different. yes, absolutely. what would you have for brea kfast absolutely. what would you have for breakfast on here? my wife is watching, i can't answer the question! strawbridge, avocado? -- strawberry. and those chocolate biscuits looked magnificent. clean eating: the dirty truth is on bbc two tomorrow evening at 9:00pm. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. this morning for some it is a mild but cloudy start, for others, patchy mist, clear skies and some frost. the reason is we are pulling in cold continental air across east anglia and southern counties of england, but for the rest of the uk, we have south westerlies, a milder direction. that is doing the following to the temperatures: there's quite a difference in the temperatures up and down the land. we've also got this weather front draped across lincolnshire, parts of the midlands into wales, producing quite a lot of cloud, light rain and drizzle and that will fizzle out through the day, eventually becoming confined to coasts. the sunshine continuing in east anglia and southern counties. the shallow mist and fog patches lifting and we see further breaks developing in parts
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of north—east scotland but for most it will remain fairly cloudy. through the day we see bits and pieces of cloud in south—west england but there will be quite a bit of sunshine, as they will be in hampshire heading into kent and east anglia but through the day more cloud rolling into norfolk and we see more of that into the north midlands and. still fairly cloudy in northern england, some hill fog, the same in scotland but around the moray firth, heading to aberdeenshire, we could see sunshine but some persistent outbreaks across shetland. for northern ireland this afternoon, not much change in the temperature from now to the maximum is later. still fairly cloudy, any bright breaks will be at a premium. —— maximums. in wales, a cloudy afternoon. through the evening and overnight, the temperature will drop in the clearer sky areas, not as bad as the other evening but still damp
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along the coasts and where we have brea ks along the coasts and where we have breaks in north—east scotland, that will be an area prone to being colder. for tomorrow, while we start with sunshine in the north—east, we will see sunshine in the south. tomorrow, although it will be another cloudy day, we're more likely to see more breaks in that cloud. parts of northern ireland, wales and northern england will see some too. the cloud thicken of fear and therefore the odd spot of rain but you'll be lucky if you catch one. temperatures starting to come down, double figures in the north and west and going into single figures like we should be seeing at this stage in mid—january. thank you, carol. bolellli to see you this morning. —— lovely to see you. as we've been discussing, the prime minister has said the uk will seek a new trade agreement with the eu after leaving the single market. so what does that actually involve? ben's been talking to a top trade negotiator about what trade talks might achieve.
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we really need to know what it actually involves. ben, you've been speaking to someone who hopefully knows the answer, a top trade negotiator? it's been visually complicated, trying to strike trade deals with all the countries around the world —— fiendishly. if we leave the world —— fiendishly. if we leave the single market and we have to strike trade deals... theresa may has talked about the freest kind of trade with europe, it sounds simple but it's all about the nitty—gritty of the deals we strike. once we trigger article 50, that's expected at the end of march, we then have two years for these negotiations so do we have enough trade negotiators with the experience to sit around the negotiating table and represent britain and get what we need out of it? i been speaking to a top trade negotiator and she's been telling me how this process works and what's
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involved. you might recognise her, she's the wife of nick clegg, the former deputy prime minister and the leader of the liberal democrats. this is what she told me. it's important to remember international trade agreements are about deals. so you get something so that you can take something. the only problem is that this is obviously very technical with lots of legal details and discussion, which has a political context and an economic content and a legal technical underpinning. the agreement for example between the eu and south korea is, kind of, 2,000 or more pages and it's actually not even a very sophisticated one. if we're not part of the european union, not subject to agreeing it with 28 member states, if it's one—on—one negotiating with another country, does that make it easier and much more simple? the key area of interest for the uk is services and services is the most difficult bit with negotiations. with goods it'sjust looking at tariffs. it's a figure up and down and you just trade the figures
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in the sectors. services is about nontariff barriers, what we call nontariff barriers, the hidden insidious barriers that mean you may tell me i can come to your country freely, actually you have put in a license provision or a condition somewhere, safety provisions or whatever it is, that make it impossible for me to actually have open access to your market. those are incredibly complex. where will trade negotiators come from? have we got enough in this country to do the job? the question is the other way round. it is, "how many people do we have? therefore what can we realistically do and what are we going to prioritise?" i think in government you think you have limited resources, but we don't. we are where we are. is it a case it's a mismatch between what we want and what we'll probably get. i think we're going to have to compromise between three things, what we want, what we have to get to that and also what the others
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are willing to give to us. and yes, at some point i think there will be a reality check. so assuming we trigger article 50 at the end of march, we then have two years to negotiate. how hopeful are you that deals will be in place at the end of those two years? the likelihood that at the end of two years the uk will have a fully—fledged sophisticated agreement with the european union, and also agreements, or the beginning of agreements, with various countries, is very low. so it's interesting, miriam gonzalez, telling me about how this process works. it's worth bearing in mind the free trade deal canada has just done with europe took seven yea rs just done with europe took seven years to negotiate, lots of pages and complicated bits to work through. the big question, do we have the right people and enough of
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them and do they have the right experience to make sure we're well represented dealing with the eu? ——, compensated. we will be speaking to the brexit secretary david davis later so we will try and get some of those questions. —— complicated. jackie kennedy is best remembered for her style and elegance, as well as for the events in dallas on the 22nd of november 1963, but a new film examines what life was like for the wife ofjfk before and after his assassination. natalie portman, who plays the former first lady, has been speaking to tom brook about the role, and about her thoughts on president elect donald trump. you're getting masses of praise for this role. did you know a lot about jackie kennedy before you began working on the film? i really didn't know anything beyond, sort of, the popular conception, this 2—dimensional icon. preparing for the role was really what let me know about her more. i said i've changed my mind. we will have a procession and i'll
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walk to the cathedral with the casket. the really interesting aspect i noticed when i began watching while she had a little girl voice. why did she do that and was that difficult for you to get right? she did have this very, sort of, breathy voice, especially when she was doing public interviews, like the white house tour in particular. there's audio tapes that she did with a friend of hers and jfk's who was doing an oral history of the white house after the assassination. and with him her voice was deeper, she spoke faster. you see that she was sort of cultivating this very classic image of femininity and coyness that she was projecting to the public. this article will bring you a great deal of attention. in that case, any advice for me? yes. don't marry the president. i think it's very much a portrait of grief and the way that it's not exactly an arc or anything,
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it's this, sort of, very fragmented experience of incredible sorrow and then unintrusive memory and then anger and a bit of dark humour and all of those, sort of, different sides of the grieving process. you know, she is one of the most popular first ladies. why does she have such a hold on people? i think she really had this exquisite understanding of public image and i think one of the most shocking things in the movie is when you see at the end the plaque on the door, they were only there for... jfk was only president for a little over two years. and to see the kind of import that they've meant to the american people shows how strong the story she told was. while the kennedys were in the white house,
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her husband was having to contend with some quite severe racial tensions in the country, like the birmingham church bombing. how will racial tensions or civil rights fare under president trump do you think? i have no idea. it's not new unfortunately for this country and it's something that we seriously need to find a positive ways forward. are you not a fan particularly? 0f...? trump? i did not vote for trump. i do not know him personally. and i really pray for the best for our country, and notjust pray, but, you know, i'm energised to do whatever i can to make my own community and my own country... and, and the world, i think, country, patriotism, nationalism, it's not our way to go. i'm guessing you won't allow me
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to write any of that? no. because i never said that. jackie is in cinemas this friday. she has had high praise for her portrayal of jackie kennedy. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. 70% of schools in london could face extra budget cuts under government changes to the way they're funded. that's according to london councils, which says schools in the capital will need to make savings of £360 million in the first year. but the government argues london is the highest funded part of the country and that inner—city schools here will be allocated 30%
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more funding per pupil than the national average. plans to build nearly 8,000 new homes in haringey may be put on hold overfears it could price local people out of the area. as part of the regeneration of wood green the council would provide land it owns, like the library, while a private company would put in the cash. last night campaigners held a protest urging the council's leadership to pause the project. drones are to be used to carry out surveys and do repairs on buildings in west london in order to save time and money. hammersmith and fulham council, who have already trialled the idea, says it will save them thousands of pounds as erecting scaffolding is slow and expensive. they'll use a specialist company to maintain and operate the drones. deliveroo has promised to increase its staffing numbers by a third when it opens its new london head office later this year. the online food delivery company, which was founded in the capital, is the latest tech firm to expand here, saying it plans to hire more
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than 300 high—skilled recruits. now let's take a look at this morning's travel. on the tubes the overground has no service between romford and upminster because of a faulty train. on greater anglia there are delays of up to 20 mins between liverpool street and shenfield. if we take a look at the roads now, in hammersmith there are delays on the aa talgarth road because of an earlier breakdown with queues back to hogarth roundabout. two accidents on the m25 anticlockwise means one lane is blocked atjunction 5 for sevenoaks and atjunction 29 for romford. and there are delays on the a13 westbound from beckton flyover into town. let's have a check on the weather now with. good morning. it's a very cold start to the day with temperatures in some spots overnight down at —5. so a widespread frost this morning. it's feeling cold but we have plenty of sunshine. there is the risk of maybe some mist and freezing fog patches out there but they shouldn't last for too long.
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plenty of blue sky today. the wind is light. a bit more cloud the further north you are but the temperature again struggles, feeling chilly, between three and five celsius the maximum temperature. overnight tonight, clear in the most part, temperatures falling away fairly quickly when the sun sets, not as cold as last night, we see a little bit more cloud starting to feed in. towns and cities should hover above zero, between one and three celsius. still the chance of frost tomorrow morning, though. for the next couple of days high pressure continues to dominate but it doesn't mean this glorious wall to wall sunshine we've been having. it does mean a little bit more in the way of cloud. so towards the end of tomorrow afternoon, as i said, a bit more cloud around. temperatures a touch more mild overnight thursday into friday but that cloud hanging around through the weekend. that's it for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. countries are "queuing up" for trade deals with britain when it leaves the eu says the foreign secretary
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after teresa may's confirmation that britain will quit the single market. labour warn the uk could become a bargain basement tax haven, but speaking in india borisjohnson praises the prime minister's announcement. one of the points i'm going to be making in india, we think we can do free trade deals which will be for the benefit of both our countries, both britain and india as well. good morning. it's wednesday, 18th january. also this morning: thousands of british holiday—makers are to be flown out of the gambia in the next a8 hours as the foreign office warns of the growing risk of unrest in the country. wikileaks whistleblower chelsea manning has her prison sentence cut by more than 30 years in one of barack obama's last acts as american president.
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telecoms giant ee is fined £2.7 million by the regulator for what it calls a "catalogue of errors" and overcharging customers for calls. i'll have the details. in sport, non—league lincoln city shock ipswich town with an injury time winner to reach the fourth round of the fa cup for the first time in a0 years. and carol has the weather. good morning from tennessee on brea kfast‘s road trip good morning from tennessee on breakfast‘s road trip across america. we will be asking what the new president donald trump can do for truck and for agriculture. and carol has the weather. across east anglia and southern counties, it is a cold and frosty start to the day. for the rest of the uk, it will be mostly cloudy with light rain and drizzle here and there and it will feel quite mild, but i'll have more details in 15
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minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. speaking in india in the last hour, boris johnson echoed the prime minister's vision, saying brexit would benefit the eu and other global trading partners. well, i think that the prime minister set out a very powerful, a very positive vision yesterday for how we can do a deal, that will notjust benefit our friends in the rest of the eu, but also drive growth in the rest of the world and one of the points i will be making here in india is that we think we can do free trade deals which will be for the benefit of both our countries, both britain and india as well. earlier the shadow brexit secretary keir starmer warned the prime minister's approach could leave people poorer. what i was highly critical of yesterday was theresa may's sort of bargain basement tax haven threat.
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no deal and out of any meaningful relationship with the eu. that is, that would make people poorer. there is no mandate for it and it is totally inconsistent. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. good morning. it is nice to see sunlight behind you. can theresa may expect more of the same at prime minister's questions today? expect more of the same at prime minister's questions today7m expect more of the same at prime minister's questions today? it is the first time she will face mps since giving that speech. a new dawn has broken as you suggested. her own backbenchers will think so. she will get praise from them. they will be echoing what borisjohnson was saying. so many of them, not all of them, i think will be supportive. some have got concerns about leaving the single market, whether that would make britain poorer, leaving a market of 500 million people. i think some of them will bite their tongues at prime minister's questions, not so, the labour party, they'll criticise theresa may for not making that speech to parliament
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yesterday. as you heard from keir starmer, they will say she was wrong to threaten our eu partners, but keir starmer himself and jeremy corbyn, the labour leadership will come under pressure from their own backbenchers who believe they should be taking a stronger line against theresa may arguing more strongly to stay inside the single market and from the liberal democrats, well, they will say thank you very much, theresa may for giving mps a vote on the final deal, but that vote should be put to the british people too. in other words, they will be calling for a second referendum. iain, thank you. we'll be talking to the brexit secretary david davis in just a few minutes. thousands of british holiday—makers are being flown home from the gambia because of a worsening political crisis there. the foreign office is advising people to avoid all but essential travel to the country, after its president refused to step down and declared a state of emergency. dan johnson reports. it is a country on the move. under a state of emergency, gambians are fleeing their capital. and mongst all this are thousands
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of british tourists who have been told to get out. thomas cook has a team heading out there to help. four extra flights are expected to leave today. the company said in a statement, "we will operate a programme of additionalflights into banjul airport over the next a8 hours." it is bringing 985 package holiday customers home. that also means cancelled trips. a surprise for some passengers at manchester airport first thing this morning. i'm just disappointed. i could be wrong. i understand, i knew there were problems with the president over there. he said he isn't going to stand down. but i've got family and friends over there and they say it's all right. there's no problem. this man is the problem — president yahya jammeh. refusing to step down and warning about foreign interference in his country. he had conceded last month's election and was due to hand over,
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but then he challenged the result and is now resisting pressure to go. the threat of violence has been growing. this is why tourists come. it calls itself the smiling coast of africa, but it's a worrying time for holiday—makers waiting to leave and for gambians who can't. in the last hour, the regulator ofcom has imposed a pretty hefty fine on telecoms giant ee for overcharging their customers. how much is it, ben? £2.7 million is the fine. this relates to ee overcharging customers for the use ofa overcharging customers for the use of a helpline number. this was a number that ee set—up, but they were supposed to be charged 19 pence a minute. many people got their bills and realised they were charged £1.20 and realised they were charged £1.20 a minute to call that number. ofcom
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says that cost customers about £250,000 more than it should have done. they have given them this fine and ee said they have contacted the customers and anyone who has been out of pocket, we've refunded, but this big fine will send a message to other companies that they need to get it right. well, we think this is a significant fine and fines are a deterrent for companies. they don't like to be on the receiving end of fines like this, but i think what really matters to consumers is that, companies get the services they provide and our bills right first time and that's why we hope that this fine today sends a clear message, notjust to ee, but right across the industry that we won't hesitate to help in and levy fines if they get that wrong for customers. ee has 20 days to pay the fine and as always, everyone wonders where
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the money goes? the money will go to the money goes? the money will go to the treasury, but critics will say, we'll end up paying it through higher bills from ee. ee says it contacted everybody who needs to be contacted, but not great. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. the former military analyst, who was born bradley manning but had hormone therapy in prison, will be released in may. our correspondent in washington is rajini vaidyanathan. chelsea manning was responsible for one of the largest leaks of government secrets in american history. born bradley manning, it was while serving in iraq that the low—ranking private hacked government databases, handing more than 700,000 classified documents to julian assange's wikilea ks organisation. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release. they maintain she's
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a whistleblower, not a traitor. the reduction of chelsea manning's sentence means she has only served three years out of a 35—year term she was handed in 2013. after the trial it was announced that bradley would be known as chelsea and live as a woman. she has been held at a male prison and tried to ta ke been held at a male prison and tried to take her life on two occasions.” would say 12 to 16 months her mental state and her condition has deteriorated. she became depressed and there was a risk to her well—being, if not her life if she remained in this prison. jewel assange thanked those who campaigned for chelsea's release and edward snowden who also leaked government secrets tweeted his thanks to president obama. but the republican speaker of the house, paul ryan said president obama's decision to cut
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short chelsea manning's sentence was outrageous and sent a message that those who compromise national security won't be held accountable for their crimes. one of president obama's final acts in office will please as much as it will anger. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type of "three—person ivf". doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pro—nuclear transfer in what is a world first. it's not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the first freight train to travel directly to the uk from china is due to arrive in london today. it has taken over a fortnight to get here, but that's around half the time a journey by sea would take. the train, which has 3a wagons, travelled through russia, and many other countries to get here.
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andy moore reports. the train began itsjourney at a giant container depot in china. 3a carriages were loaded with goods, such as clothes, bags and other household items. china has been operating trains to 1a european capitals from this depot for many years. now, london has been added to the list. because of different rail gauges along the way, the containers have to be offloaded and reloaded several times, but china sees this as a new version of the silk route. then it was on to germany and through the channel tunnel to the uk. in all, the train, carrying £a million worth of goods, passes through eight countries on its journey of more than 7,500 miles. the uk is china's seventh—biggest trading market, so the boost to chinese enterprise is clear, but it's also hoped the train will make the journey back to china laden with british goods. it is an incredible journey that,
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isn't it? it is a beast. but much quicker than going via sea. the sub—prime court is ruling on whether wheelchair users should be allowed priority spaces on buses. five years ago, wheelchair user doug paulley tried to get onto a bus in yorkshire. he couldn't because the space was taken up by a mum with a pushchair, and the driver refused to force her to move. what began as one man trying to catch a bus has turned into a nearly five—year legal battle, in a bid to clarify a grey area when it comes to wheelchair spaces on buses. thank you! back in 2012, doug was unable to catch a bus because the space for wheelchairs was taken by a mum with a pushchair. she refused to move, which meant doug couldn't get on. his case centred around the bus company first group and their policy of requesting,
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not requiring, someone to move out of the wheelchair space if a disabled person wants to get on. it's a big issue for disabled people. it's pointless having fully accessible bus services when in fact people can't use the space. today's final ruling at the supreme court could have wide implications that stretch further than public transport. it's amazing that so few cases make it to the supreme court and it is the first time that it's ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services for disabled people. yeah, i never thought about five years ago when i tried to catch that bus that we would still be talking about it now. if found in doug's favour, it would mean any company that provides a space for disabled people would need to make sure they are prioritised for disabled people. if not they could open themselves up to legal action. so many of you getting in touch. we
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will talk about it now. good morning. sarah, so many people getting in touch. from your keith, relating to this case. first group's policy states where a pushchair or buggy is occupying the space, a driver will ask that it is re—positioned and they make the point that a driver has no power to ask passengers to move and is relying on the goodwill of passengers. they say if a fellow passengers. they say if a fellow passenger refuses to move, the wheelchair user needs to wait for
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the next bus. you could argue they are following policy? what are the bus compa ny‘s policies. are following policy? what are the bus company's policies. there are a range of different policies across the country. if you come back to basics and this is what this case was about, there is already a legal requirement and regulations to provide physical access to buses. so it is not just provide physical access to buses. so it is notjust about provide physical access to buses. so it is not just about the provide physical access to buses. so it is notjust about the width of the doorways and ramps, it is about a designated wheelchair accessible space. that's what the regulations call it, so each bus has to have that space. if then in practise, there becomes a battle between the person for whom that space is designated the wheelchair user and everybody else who might want to use it, that includes passengers wanting to stand, people with luggage and people with children in buggies, it becomes a very practical battle over the use of that space. you come back to the law. the law says that should bea to the law. the law says that should be a wheelchair designated space. if we do not have properly trained
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drivers who understand the needs of disabled people but also are prepared to have a conversation with people who may be in that space you are not wheelchair users and take whatever steps reasonably necessary to try to get them to move so the wheelchair user can occupy the space, that becomes a very problematic issue on a day—to—day basis for wheelchair users. there is no consistency and confidence that space will be usable. it is interesting. in some ways, if they we re interesting. in some ways, if they were given the power to make people move, how do you enforce it? it seems so ridiculous to get to this point when someonejust seems so ridiculous to get to this point when someone just won't move when they are being asked. absolutely. they are all the arguments which are being put before the supreme court. the first court case doug pooley one and was awarded compensation for her to feelings will do the supreme court overturned
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that. there are hopes that having been consistent in bringing this case to the supreme court, he will win. having said that, you are absolutely right. what is really needed is a fresh look at the design of buses so there is more flexibility around the space available, so it is notjust one limited space, the possibility to use other space. it is about properly trained drivers who are prepared to do whatever they need to encourage people to move and making sure that passengers, who are occupying space, are fully aware that space is the only space available to people in wheelchairs and they have no other options. nicola has said wheelchairs should definitely get the priority. when my children were little we did not have a choice. sarah says, what if your child is also disabled and uses a wheelchair that looks like a pushchair? we cannot get out of
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wheelchairs like babies and toddlers can be helped out of theirs. i have been told there are pushchairs and the driver asked someone politely to move and they get the same answer, my buddy or pushchairjust not fold down. the viewers says, first come first serve —— served, so it is therefore everyone. it comes to something when others will not move for you. actually we have had a pretty difficult day. getting on a bus is a difficult issue you have to go through in your everyday life. thank you for your time. thank you. thanks to you both. we'll keep you up thanks to you both. we'll keep you up to date on what has happened. keep your coming in. —— keep your comments coming in. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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it is cold. we have a weather front draped across lincolnshire, the midlands were into wells producing cloud, light rain and drizzle. to the south of that, we have lower temperatures. to the north of that, temperatures. to the north of that, temperatures are higher. in kent it is minus seven. in oxygen, minus five. in bournemouth, minus four. in stornoway it is plus ten. as we go through the day, any missed yunis in the south and south—east will lift. we have fog. —— misti nass. the south and south—east will lift. we have fog. —— misti mass. the cloud will break across north east scotland. we will see some sunshine but it will be wet across shetland for the in the afternoon sunshine across southern counties. bits and pieces of cloud. a bit more cloud
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will encroach across norfolk, coming in across the north midlands by afternoon. you can see how the light rain fizzles and will become confined to the coast. hill fog in the north of england. the rain continuing across shetland. around the murray first we will see some sunshine. across northern ireland any brighter breaks will be a premium. it would be cloudy and mild. the same across wales. inland it will remain fairly cloudy. by evening and overnight, under the clearer skies we will see return to mist and fog patches. elsewhere there will be too much cloud around for that to happen and it will be milder and colder, as you would expect in the south. into tomorrow more of the same. another cloudy day. brighter with sunshine in the south, brighter with sunshine across north—east scotland for that we could see sunshine across northern ireland, parts of rain across england tomorrow. similar to today.
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see you in half an hour. during the us election campaign donald trump pledged to make america great again, but as he prepares to take office can he deliver on that promise? in the week that donald trump will be sworn in as the a5th president of the united states we're taking a road trip through the heart of america on route a5 to find out how americans are feeling about obama's legacy. today, breakfast‘sjon kay is heading south towards tennessee. if you want to understand donald trump's election win, this is a good place to come. next to route a5, the ohio river meets the mississippi. it's an essential artery for the us economy, carrying 18 million tons of cargo every year. but things aren't what they used to be.
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the locks which boats pass through here have seen better days. nearly 100 years old, they regularly break down, causing long and costly delays. so around 52 hours at one time. a boat could be waiting out for 52 hours before coming through? yes, sir. mark, the lock keeper, says it's a struggle to keep trade moving. the concrete is starting to break up and crumble. every time it gets hit by a boat as it lands on it it puts pressure on it and causes more cracks and stress on it, we patch it together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last forever. donald trump has pledged $1 trillion to rebuild america's rivers, roads and railways. a promise that's won him plenty of support round here. but he hasn't said where the money will come from. we head back on route a5 to see the kind of
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project the new president wants to encourage. a huge dam and lock system to replace the failing one downriver. it's nearly 20 years behind schedule and $2 billion over budget. many here believe donald trump's life in business will mean he can deliver. i think he if he really wants to put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people, for sure, why not? one person can't do it but if you take a group of people and you've got good conversation communication skills, good listening skills, you can pretty much accomplish anything. has he got those skills? i hope so. trump's critics say his pledges are unrealistic and unaffordable. but in an area where jobs can be scarce, they're prepared to give him a try. we drive on into america's rural south. there are 2 million
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farms in this country. willa property developer president understand this business? at the university of tennessee, students are learning how to weigh and vaccinate cattle. stick it in, press it forward, pull it out. some are gonna be more willing to go forward and some are wanting to hold back. sounds like politicians! i guess so! donald trump won nearly 80% of the vote in the martin area. they like his confidence and in turn they have confidence in him. he might have a few mess—ups on the way but eventually he'll figure it all out. we're always going to need agriculture, that's what feeds us. so we're going to need it to keep going. but is farming compatible with trump's plans for building?
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what about the land, the environment? donald trump is a man you associate with skyscrapers and new york city, not with farming and places like this. do you think he understands you and what you want to do? i think he's going to help small town people also out. i don't think he's going to be the big city man when he gets in office. what about farming, does he understand farming? not as well as some agriculture people. whether it's agriculture or infrastructure, in these communities away from washington, many feel trump will be a president who finally speaks for them. someone not just following the political herd. tomorrow, john is off to mississippi. good morning. the weather hasn't
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really changed a lot since this time yesterday. for most of the uk, indeed, it is going to be a cloudy and relatively mild day. in the south east this morning, we are waking up to a frost and the reason for it is because the winds are coming out of the continent here so it is just that little portion of the uk that remains cold, but many northern and western areas with the south—westerly winds and the cloud, it isa south—westerly winds and the cloud, it is a lot milder. you can the greens and the slither of blue in the south east which is the frost this morning. minus six celsius in
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essex this morning. so we keep the crisp and the sunny weather across south—eastern areas of the uk including east anglia and possibly as far south—west as cornwall and devon, but north of that, you can see where cloud starts around about the south midlands. there will be sunshine across north—eastern parts of scotland. it is not cloudy everywhere a cross of scotland. it is not cloudy everywhere across more northern parts of the country. this coming night, the same thing happens. again, it is clear and cold across southern areas. i suspect the temperatures won't be as low as last night, but still a touch of frost around for sure, but for leeds, manchester and birmingham, temperatures will be closer to five to seven celsius. tomorrow, again, the best of the sunshine will be across southern areas of the uk. a few glimmers perhaps eastern parts of scotla nd few glimmers perhaps eastern parts of scotland and maybe one or two other areas as well, but generally speaking most of the uk again cloudy and temperatures no higher than around eight or nine celsius for newcastle, for leeds and for belfast. so that's thursday. let's
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ta ke belfast. so that's thursday. let's take a look at friday. it does look as if that area of sunshine starts to sort of shrink a little bit in the south so it maybe the south coast, but generally speaking very little change for most of the uk. bye— bye. this is business live from bbc news with rachael horne and sally bundock. weighing up the "wish—list", business leaders give us their take on theresa may's plans for brexit. live from london, that's our focus today on wednesday, 18th january. businesses have praised theresa may for offering clarity with her vision of britain's post—brexit place in the world, but will she be able
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to seal the deal she wants? also in the programme, samsung in the dock. a court in seoul is set to decide if it will detain the company's boss for offering millions of dollars in bribes to get approval of a controversial company merger.
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