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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 18, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am. countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain after brexit, according to foreign secretary borisjohnson. thousands of tourists — including people from britain — are being flown out of gambia after a state of emergency is declared. unemployment has plunged to its lowest total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work has also fallen. average earnings have risen since next year —— last year. president obama has cut the sentence of chelsea manning, who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets. also, the new silk road... for the first time, freight has travelled from china to the uk just by train. having travelled around 7500 miles. the australian open tennis championships goes into its third day, with britain's dan evans and andy murray in action. good morning.
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it's wednesday 18 january. iamjoanna i am joanna gosling. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. borisjohnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly after the article 50 negotiations are concluded, and said the uk would not be "hauling up the drawbridge", despite the new migration controls promised by theresa may. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminsterfor us. over to you. thank you. what is striking this morning is the confidence oozing from number ten about yesterday's big speech by theresa may on brexit, insisting there has been a positive reaction
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from other senior eu leaders such as angela merkel and francois hollande, both of whom theresa may spoke to last night. this despite the fact that she has thrown down the gau ntlet that she has thrown down the ga u ntlet to that she has thrown down the gauntlet to the rest of the eu saying if you do not give me the deal, i want, saying if you do not give me the deal, iwant, i saying if you do not give me the deal, i want, i walk. saying if you do not give me the deal, iwant, iwalk. this saying if you do not give me the deal, i want, i walk. this morning we heard david davies] suggesting that even though there will be a vote on the final deal, even if mps vote on the final deal, even if mps vote down that deal, britain will still leave the european union but have a listen to mr davies who dig that are losing confidence about his chances of getting the sort of deal outlined by mrs may yesterday. firstly i have every intention of bringing back a deal that parliament will vote for but before we get to that point we will have a whole series of other posts on other elements of this policy so there would be a surprise, we wonder where we are going and understands his la st we are going and understands his last thing, the decision to leave
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the european union was taken by the british people last year and we must expect that. meanwhile foreign secretary boris johnson expect that. meanwhile foreign secretary borisjohnson who is in india today suggested that other countries were in his words during a to—do free trade deals with britain and despite eu rules we could begin pencilling in some of the outlying arrangements of those trade deals even before we left the eu.” arrangements of those trade deals even before we left the eu. i think the prime minister set up a very powerful and positive vision yesterday for how we can do a deal that will notjust yesterday for how we can do a deal that will not just benefit our friends in the rest of the eu but also drive growth in the rest of the world and one of the points they are meeting here in india is we think we can do free trade deals that we benefit from the above our countries. so is mrs may on cruise control to an easy successful brexit? ijoined by the labour mp west treaty member of the treasury select committee and quite the
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reverse , select committee and quite the reverse, you suggest the package she has put forward a month to economic vandalism. the big risk with theresa may's speech yesterday if she has put the company —— country on a course for hard brexit outside the single market which would have given britain the best possible chance of succeeding outside the european union and on a wing and a prayer all of these trade deals that the prime ministerand of these trade deals that the prime minister and foreign secretary claim are lining up and can be negotiated as quickly as we need to be negotiated, trade deals often take anywhere between five to ten years or more to anywhere between five to ten years or more to secure a anywhere between five to ten years or more to secure a deal, but also i am not sure how the prime minister or the foreign secretary could claim with a straight face that the deals we could negotiate with the rest of the world would be anything like as beneficial to british businesses, the economy, as the relationship we have with our european partners, a single market of half a billion people at our own doorstep and that
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is why i think unfortunately as we see is why i think unfortunately as we see throughout much of this debate, politics is trumping economics and britain will be worse off as a result. help me out here. i understand your view but i am confused by your partymight be because yesterday we had the shadow brexit secretary kera starmer saying this was not hard brexit and that mrs may had taken on board the many concerns about best possible access to single market, and then your leaderjeremy corbyn saying this was a road to bargain basement economy. i thinkjeremy corbyn is actually quite right to spell out the risks of where britain could end up, one of where britain could end up, one of the threats we have made to partners and european union is that britain would effectively become an offshore tax haven. but not only potentially means deregulation and arrested them in terms of taxes and raising questions about how we fund public services, but also questions about employment rights and other areas so about employment rights and other areas so i thinkjeremy is quite right to make that particular warning. but that is not where we
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wa nt warning. but that is not where we want to be ultimately. the idea that as theresa may has said, that we could end up defaulting to world trade organisation laws on the basis that no deal is better than bad deal well i don't think she is being straightforward because relying on wto rules is in fact a very bad deal for britain and we need to do better than that. i think lots of businesses thinking about the prospect of britain on wto rules but we have a shiver down their spying and will be thinking very carefully about where they choose to locate jobs and economic activity and whether britain is to do that. are you sanguine about the prospect that evenif you sanguine about the prospect that even if parliament votes against whatever mrs may manages to achieve, but will not stop britain leaving the eu, are you ok with that?” think the vast majority of parliamentarians were though new but did leave remain expect ayes accepted the verdict of the british people. ourjob is to hold the
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government to account to get the best possible to deal that gives britain the best possible chance of success outside the european union andl success outside the european union and i am not at all sanguine about the fact that theresa may has ruled out membership of the single market and the customs union. all of those trade benefits that frankly on the doorstep people always say to me we we re doorstep people always say to me we were happy to vote for membership of the eec because it was about trade but it is about something else now. many people in the government, the brexiteer is, are complacent at the fa ct brexiteer is, are complacent at the fact that many brits were very comfortable with the trading relationship. thank you. you don't have to be a particularly insightful political commentator to guess that pmq political commentator to guess that pmo ‘s, what willjeremy corbyn tackle, i think it is almost certainly going to be about this brexit steel. we can bank on that. pmq brexit steel. we can bank on that. pmo ‘s bad midday. full coverage as usual here. speaking in the last half an hour,
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the eu commission presidentjean claudejuncker said... he was addressing european parliament intros board and he wa nted parliament intros board and he wanted the best outcome for negotiations. translation:” wanted the best outcome for negotiations. translation: iwelcome what the prime minister of the uk said yesterday. i said yesterday a speech alone can trigger negotiations. once the uk has activated article 50, the negotiations will start and they should be concluded within two years according to the treaty and negotiations are going to be a great difference to that country but also the 27 member states and i will do everything to make sure that the negotiations will be according to rules and will yield good results. jean—claude juncker reacting to theresa may's speech on brexit. thomas cook chartered planes are heading to the gambia to bring home nearly 1000
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british holidaymakers. it's because of the worsening political crisis. the firm plans to bring home nearly 1000 customers over the next 48 hours. only 2500 flight only customers will be offered the earliest available flight. the foreign office is now advising against all but essential travel to the west african country — where president yahya jammeh is refusing to accept defeat in last month's election. dan johnson reports. it is a country on the move. under a state of emergency, gambians are fleeing their capital. and amongst all this are thousands of british tourists who have been told to get out. thomas cook has a team heading out there to help. four extra flights are expected to leave today. the company said in a statement, "we will operate a programme of additionalflights into banjul airport over the next 48 hours." it is bringing 985 package holiday customers home. that also means cancelled trips.
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a surprise for some passengers at manchester airport first thing this morning. i'm just disappointed. i could be wrong. i understand, i knew there were problems with the president over there. he said he isn't going to stand down. but i've got family and friends over there and they say it's all right. there's no problem. this man is the problem — president yahya jammeh. refusing to step down and warning about foreign interference in his country. he had conceded last month's election and was due to hand over, but then he challenged the result and is now resisting pressure to go. the threat of violence has been growing. this is why tourists come. it calls itself the smiling coast of africa, but it's a worrying time for holiday—makers waiting to leave and for gambians who can't. let's go to our correspondent thomas
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fesseyin let's go to our correspondent thomas fessey in neighbouring senegal. tell us more fessey in neighbouring senegal. tell us more about the concerns over potential unrest in the gambia. what is going on is that the regional bloc, the grouping of all these west african states, has repeatedly warned that it would be ready to launch a military action against the president if he refused to step down after his term comes to an end tomorrow. that is when his opponents we re tomorrow. that is when his opponents were supposed to be sworn in. we have yet to see whether he will be able to fly back to the gambia. he is currently here but his safety. is he able to fly back to the gambia tomorrow to be sworn in? that is more unlikely. is he going to be sworn in here at the embassy of the gambia in synagogue was like these
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are unanswered questions for now and what will west african states do at the end of yahya jammeh's turn? will they launch military action? we understand a nigerian warships already on its way to the gambia. will they be sick in the uk un for example before they decide anything? these are all questions that i believe will be answered in the next 24 hours or so. it doesn't sound like anything is likely eminently. potentially what sort of time frame are you looking at? it is very hard to say. president yahya jammeh's term ends tonight at midnight, so legally speaking he is still in power today. he has got the national assembly to extend his term in office for three months. the time of a state of emergency. but obviously
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west african leaders are having none of it. they are saying this is not constitutional and he must go. diplomats have been talking and told me that he will go. the question is the timing and the manner. is he going to go through a military action from west african states? is he going to opt for a managed exit thatis he going to opt for a managed exit that is being offered by west african states? we don't know yet. anything could be decided within the next 24 hours i think. we will obviously keep checking with all the latest updates. thank you very much. the latest jobless figures have just come out. the number of people out of work now stands at 1.6 million. that was down by 52,000 on the previous three months to november. it's the lowest total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work also fell slightly during the same period. average earnings were up by 2.7%
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compared with a year earlier. rachel foreigners with me now. explain these figures. the period we are looking at is september to november and we are comparing it tojune to august. it is important to look at the office for national statistics imagine these figures. they look at everybody in the uk over the age of 16 and they assume they are either employed, unemployed or economically inactive. economically inactive means you could work but are not looking for work. what is interesting is that the number of unemployed has fallen but equally the number of people looking for work, not forward, has risen. overall the core number of people in work has changed very little compared to those summer months. it is just compared to those summer months. it isjust under 32 compared to those summer months. it is just under 32 million. compared to those summer months. it isjust under 32 million. if compared to those summer months. it is just under 32 million. if you compare it to this time next year the number of people work is up almost 300,000. what is interesting is the wage growth, that is up by 2.8% which is good news for workers.
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we did the inflation figures yesterday. inflation at 1.6% so if wages were up yesterday. inflation at 1.6% so if wages were up 2.8% we are earning more than the amount of money rising higher than prices and services are raising so that means we should feel we have got more money in our pockets. the question is why i wages going up? fewer people are looking for work which means the labour market is tightening and there are fewer people for employers to choose between. so if players are having to pay higher wages in order retain staff and also to attract staff. that is no relevant if we look at that through the prism of brexit. freedom of movement. what people are going to be coming into the country to help workers. there was another really interesting statistic in the figures and it was comparing july september 20 15th and 2016. it said that uk born people working in the uk in that period increased by 36,000 but non—uk born people are people outside the uk in the eu and
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further afield increased by 430,000. so in terms of people coming into the uk and looking forjobs, employers will be looking for clarity from theresa may on where they are going to source workers. i think if there are fewer people coming in, fewer people to apply for those jobs, that is good for me and you and our wages could go up. the plot employers might not be able to afford that. equally if wages increase any more and starts putting up increase any more and starts putting up inflation even higher than inflation already starting to rise could go away above the bank of england 2% target and could cause other problems. thank you. some breaking news to bring you. hearing a 26—year—old woman has been arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender in connection with the death of a 16—year—old girl named michael the as leon wiggs who was found dead on a pad in dinnington. south yorkshire police have released that news. a 26 women arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender
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in connection with the death of a 16—year—old girl. an 18—year—old man was dubiously arrested on suspicion of her murder and remains in police custody. —— was previously arrested. as we've heard, the foreign secretary boris johnson is on a trip to india. our correspondent sanjoy majumder is in delhi for us. he said countries are queueing up for trade deals with britain. is india among them? certainly that is what the foreign secretary hopes. he is here mainly to make a very keynote speech and he just concluded about an hour ago. a global security conference service was attended not just by senior indian government officials but also politicians, diplomats and military officials from around the world from a number of countries from the united states and russia, major asian countries,
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it was a chance for the foreign secretary to lay out his vision of british foreign policy and brexit. as borisjohnson british foreign policy and brexit. as boris johnson often british foreign policy and brexit. as borisjohnson often does he spoke eloquently and passionately about how this was a chance for britain to again become the nerve centre of global affairs, london he pointed at was a major financial centre and therefore this was as he suggested therefore this was as he suggested the best possible time to do business with britain. countries like india but they have very strong relationships with the uk and a feeling in whitehall that but —— perhaps india is a country that button has some average over because of the number of indians who travel to the uk to work or study. there has been some concern here in india over immigration quotas and that is a leveraged that perhaps britain feels it can use to promote trade with india. thank you. the headline. the foreign secretary borisjohnson says countries are queueing up to sign trade deals with the uk once it leaves the eu. thousands of thomas
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cook holiday makers will fly back to the uk from the gambia as a state of emergency is declared. unemployment has fallen to its lowest total in more than a decade according to the latest figures. let's catch up before the sport with jess. latest figures. let's catch up before the sport withjess. thank you. where else to start but the tennis. there has been a huge upset at the australian open because britain's dan evans has knocked out the seventh—seeded marin cilic. evans produced some incredible tennis against the czech coming from one set down to earn the biggest win of his career. he has never beaten a top ten player at a grand slam but evans has been in such good form of late reaching the final of the syd ney late reaching the final of the sydney international in the last month. after despatching the 2014 us champion, evans was quick to share his good news and he will now face either victor estrella burgos are
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tomas berdych. andy murray has rarely been tested by the world 152. he took the first set 6—3 and has just won the second set 6—0. there are three more third—round fa cup replays tonight. newcastle play birmingham, southampton was norwich and lead to plymouth argyle will hope to pull off a shock when they host liverpool at home pack. they will hope to emulate non—league lincoln city who beat ipswich town last night. the drama was that the 9ist last night. the drama was that the 91st minute when that man nathan arnold scored a well deserved winner of the lincoln. they will be at home to brighton in the fourth round. and not to be outdone, another long —— non—league side sutton united beat afc wimbledon 3—1 in their replay and that burns sutton a the good of televised tie at home to
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championship side leeds. it has been announced that europe's captain will be able to choose for players in next yea r‘s be able to choose for players in next year's ryder cup in france. thomas bjorn will get to pick more than. it is part of a revamp of the court thanks system after the uk lost heavily. that is obvious but for now. back in the next hour. thank you. wheelchair user doug paulley has partially won his case at the supreme court against bus operator first group plc. the case was triggered when doug paulley attempted to board a bus in 2012, but was unable to when a woman refused to move her buggy. we can speak now to our correspondent clive coleman, who's outside the supreme court in central london. tell us more. this so-called legal battle between the wheelchair and the body has been one today here at the body has been one today here at the supreme court by the wheelchair. at the heart of this case was the
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policy that the bus company was operating on the day doug paulley tried to board the bus and that was a policy of requesting but stopped requiring someone who was in the wheelchair, the dedicated wheelchair space to move on that occasion, a woman with a buddy who refused to move and said the body was not collapsible and doug paulley wasn't able to get on the bus. initially doug paulley brought a legal action and won it and the policy was declared to be unlawful disability discrimination. the case went to the court of appeal and they reversed that and today it has come to the supreme court. the supreme court has ruled that that policy simply doesn't go far enough. a driver simply requesting someone to move is not sufficient. the driver has to do he has to now make a judgment. as the person who refuses to move acting unreasonably and if they are he has to take further action and the court gave a couple of examples here, perhaps to change his request
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into a requirement to stop the bus entirely to try and shame the passenger into moving from that space, so it is a significant victory and it will mean that service providers up and down the country will have to look at their policies in relation to wheelchair users and will have to make sure they are sound and make sure they are properly enforced. outside court doug paulley gave his reaction. are properly enforced. outside court doug paulley gave his reactionm has been amazing, the amount of support i have had so many people, disabled people, organisations, lawyers, family, allies, this hopefully is going to make a major difference to disabled people's travel. it is brilliant. so doug paulley absolutely delighted. with me is david isaac is the chair of the equality and human rights commission. you funded this case. why was it so important to bring it? we we re very why was it so important to bring it? we were very keen to support dog but also to clarify his position in relation to the 1.2 million wheelchair users in england and wales. ayes doug. to establish
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whether or not they would have priority in relation to the use of those spaces. today barossa is a victory because i think the court has actually clarified that wheelchair users do have priority. they don't have an absolute right as they absolutely set out, but it will empower those they absolutely set out, but it will empowerthose1.2 they absolutely set out, but it will empower those 1.2 million wheelchair users to live independently and to encourage them to feel confident to use public transport. does it go far enough? we have been talking about it with various lawyers outside court and it seems to put a lot of onus on the driver to make a judgment call as to whether someone in the wheelchair space shouldn't be there is acting unreasonably because they may be circumstances where it is reasonable the court said for someone who is doing wheelchair user to be in that space. it is putting a lot of onus on them to make that judgment call and then to enforce it. there is a risk that it will make the bus driver, the arbiter of
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a difficult decision between passengers, but i think it is a question of training and clarification, of the rules that bus companies actually develop. we are very keen to work with them to clarify that is much as possible. but actually for us it is more to do with the fact that we want people to empathise that disabled people don't feel confident about using public transport, primarily those spaces offer them. but not in all cases. on a case—by—case decision on the bus driver might actually need to encourage people to talk and understand that wheelchair users do need to have reasonable adjustments made with them to enable them to live independently. thank you. as i say this will be looked at by service providers, notjust bus companies, train companies, supermarkets were disabled spaces and they will have to ensure that the policies are sound and they are properly enforced. back to you.
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thank you. thousands of grandparents who help raise their grandchildren could be missing out on valuable national insurance credits. a freedom of information request submitted to hmrc found only a low number of applications had been made for "grandparents' credit", which could be worth over £230 a year. royal london, the group behind the research, say the scheme needs to be better advertised. a lot of these schemes are well intentioned but contacts and poorly publicised and this is a classic example. many people who are grandparents looking after children to help a mum go back to work or to benefit from this but they never heard of the scheme so we need to make sure they know about it. leaders of the train drivers union, aslef, are meeting southern rail bosses this morning in a new attempt to resolve their long running dispute. next week's three—day strike by drivers on southern rail has been suspended ahead of the talks. the union is in dispute with southern's parent company gtr over the role of conductors on driver—only operated trains, amounting to britain's worst rail strikes in 20 years. mobile operator ee has been fined
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£2.7 million for overcharging tens of thousands of customers. more than 30,000 customers have been affected, overcharged by £250,000. they found customers were incorrectly charged as if they had been calling the us. more on that at 1145. a baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in ukraine using a new type of "three—person ivf". doctors in kiev are reported to have used a method called pro—nuclear transfer in what is a world first. it is not the first baby born with dna from three parents, however. another child was created using a slightly different method in mexico last year. the headlines are coming up next but
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first a look at the weather. most of us pretty cloudy today and not too cold but the extreme south—east of the uk right now is very chilly but at least some sunshine here. colder air still coming out of the continent here. temperatures of lifted since this morning but not for a freezing. the rest of the country a lot milder and a lot more cloud but not everywhere will it be cloudy across more northern areas. across the north—east of scotland should be some sunshine around. through the lowla nds some sunshine around. through the lowlands around nine celsius, but that 10 celsius and briefly touching five celsius in london but was of the day barely above freezing. tonight another fast on the way across the southern and south—eastern areas of the way from east anglia down towards the far south—west. the left probablyjust barely above freezing tonight but to the north that we are talking at sixes and sevens. tomorrow and into friday very little change, best of
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the weather probably the further south you are. you're watching bbc news. the headlines at half—past 11. the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, has said that countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. he suggested that agreements could be achieved quickly after negotiations on leaving the eu are concluded. british tour operator thomas cook has started to evacuate about a thousand tourists out of the gambia, where president yahya jammeh is refusing to step down and has declared a state of emergency. unemployment has fallen to its lowest total in more than a decade. average earnings were up by 2.7% compared with a year earlier. let's get more on brexit. the foreign secretary has said countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with britain when it leaves the european union. joining us now from central london
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is professor anand menon from uk in a changing europe — a think—tank on uk—eu relations. thank you very much forjoining us. suggesting, then, that brexit means effectively economic liberation and the potential for trade deals that haven't been possible so far. how do you see it? it is certainly true that once we leave the eu we can do something which we can do before, which assign our own trade deals. other countries will be keen to sign those deals but the devil will be in the detail. trade deals can advantage one party more than the other, and it remains to be seen how generous our new partners will be when negotiating. obviously that's inevitable, but when it comes to negotiating, how long did it take to negotiate? it varies tremendously. not least in terms of the ambition of the deal you're talking about. .
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simple tariff reductions can be done quite quickly. more complex deals involving the regulation in a different countries involved is far more tuck thing. if we start negotiating now we could have something in place relatively soon, evenif something in place relatively soon, even if relatively small—scale, quite soon after we leave. people are saying that cannot be any negotiations until we are actually out, but boris johnson negotiations until we are actually out, but borisjohnson is saying that there cannot be formal negotiations but there can be sort of precursor talks, he says, nothing to say that ideas cannot be pencilled in. specifically, you spoke about what each country will wa nt spoke about what each country will want out of the trade deal. donald trump has said he thinks that a deal could be done between the us and the uk quite quickly, what would be the issues on a trade deal like that? it issues on a trade deal like that? it isa issues on a trade deal like that? it is a complicated wide picture but what would be the obvious obstacles that might prevent something being
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done simply and quickly? at its most simple, signing a trade deal with a president who campaigned on the basis of america first will show you the problems involved. donald trump will be out to show that he landed a win for america. he will have to show that he's signed a deal that benefits american workers. he will benefits american workers. he will be out to help america sign a deal with us which might not be the best for our economy. how long can trade deals take? some people say 5—10 yea rs, deals take? some people say 5—10 years, others say a couple of years. that is a how long is a piece of string type of question. some such as the eu talks with canada took seven yea rs. as the eu talks with canada took seven years. it depends where you start from, whether you have got any treaties in place already. when we negotiate with the eu, because we start off in a position that the legal systems are the same, it might actually be relatively easy to
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negotiate some aspects of the deal. if we negotiate with a country like china, it could be quite complicated because we have do start from a far lower base, if not from scratch. what is your perspective one who has the stronger hand to play on that trade deal? theresa may were saying yesterday if she doesn't get the sort of deal after then we willjust walk away because no deal is better than bad deal. that might be the case, politically as much as economically. more of our exports go to the eu than the proportion of eu exports that comes to us, so on that simple level we are more dependent on them than them on us. but it will va ry on them than them on us. but it will vary by sector, it will vary on the political mood in different countries. both sides have an interest in maintaining trade. but how many sacrifices is either side willing to make to keep that trade going? professor, thank you very much. let's get more now on the case of chelsea manning,
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who was imprisoned for revealing classified secrets and who's sentence has just been commuted by outgoing president obama. president obama reduced sentence in one of his final acts before leaving office. chelsea manning was responsible for one of the largest leaks of government secrets in american history. born bradley manning, it was while serving in iraq that the low—ranking private hacked government databases, handing more than 700,000 classified documents to julian assange's wikilea ks organisation. manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release. they maintain she is a whistleblower, not a traitor. the reduction of chelsea manning's sentence means she has only served three years out of a 35—year term she was handed in 2013. shortly after the trial,
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bradley announced she would be known as chelsea, and live as a woman. she was being held at a male prison, and tried to take her life on two occasions. i'd say 12 to 16 months, her mental condition deteriorated significantly, and she became depressed. there was a risk to her well—being, if not her life, if she had remained in this prison. julian assange thanked those who campaigned for chelsea's release, and edward snowden, who also leaked government secrets, tweeted his thanks to president obama. but the republican speaker, paul ryan, said the decision to cut short chelsea manning's sentence was outrageous, and sent a message that those who compromise national security won't be held accountable for their crimes. one of president obama's final acts in office will please, as much as it will anger. with me is our security
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correspondent, frank gardner. there has been no explanation about why this has been done. it is a move that has divided observers. why do you think the white house is doing this? let's be clear about this. president obama has commuted the sentence. it is not the same as a pardon. a pardon means that you're exonerated of all guilt. this is not quite the same. it is not saying that chelsea manning is an innocent person. it is simply letting him or her off the remainder of a very long sentence. so it is an act of clemency rather than actually saying this person is no longer guilty. it is part of quite a wide—ranging series of clemency acts that president obama is doing in his last few days in office. it has been greeted with a pretty mixed
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reaction. a number of republican figures have condemned it, saying that this encourages military people do leak secrets, but it has been praised by people like michael moore, the film—maker, edward snowden, who has tweeted. he is in a similar position although he is a much more serious position, because he leaked national security agency secrets and fled to moscow man not toa secrets and fled to moscow man not to a neutral country but a country that many in the us would consider as an adversary of the united states. remind us a bit more about what exactly was leaked and what the impact was that the leak. chelsea manning, who was originally named bradley manning, was a veryjunior intelligence analyst in baghdad in 2010. he, at the time, before he changed his gender to become see, was given access to an extraordinary amount of diplomatic and classified
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documents, cables, basically, which bradley manning, at the time, should never have been given access to. so much of the fault with this lies with the chain of command. bradley manning was already very unhappy about the role that she had, then, in the military, wasn't happy with it, was very uncomfortable with what the us military was doing in iraq and afghanistan. these leaks were incredibly embarrassing for the united states, not just incredibly embarrassing for the united states, notjust for them but for other countries. there were things like someone from saudi arabia seeing to the us, you should cut off the head of a snake, referring to a run. journalists had a field day. the media love this because it exposed the inner workings and showed what people really thought about countries and governors. ambassadors have to be
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moved, some of them had to change countries altogether. it also meant that some informants in afghanistan and iraq had to be moved to other countries for their own safety. the state department had to move them. it exposed abuses such as the pacioli copper gunning down of innocent civilians in iraq, and other details that might not have got out. it was controversial and it launched wikilea ks to got out. it was controversial and it launched wikileaks to fame, as part of the huge amount of documents that they release. and it has been said thatjulian they release. and it has been said that julian assange would they release. and it has been said thatjulian assange would be prepared to be extradited to the us. he has been hiding in the ecuador embassy. the us has not asked for his extradition, sweden has, because of accusations of rape. he welcomed
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the move but he has not said that he will leave the embassy. thank you very much, thank you. central italy has been hit by three powerful earthquakes within an hour, petting area is recovering from a huge tremor in august. the shock was felt in rome. the epicentre was in the town of mcafee. the quakes had a magnitude of 5.4, and the depth of 9.2 kilometres. so far, no casualties have been reported although there has been some damage to buildings. the latest figures for a&e waiting times show departments in wales have failed to hit their target. in december, 81% of patients spent less than four hours waiting to be admitted, transferred or discharged, compared with 82.9% in november. the target is 95%. let's speak to our correspondent tomos morgan, who's in cardiff. fill in a bit more of the detail
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force, thomas. yes, again, it appears as though hospitals across wales and a&e the apartments are failed to reach their targets. there seems to be a slight deterioration in those figures for four—hour target 12 hour targets. one area has not declared the figures for technical reasons in north wales, but the overall figures for november, year—on—year, it appears as though there has been a slight deterioration. some hospitals we have seen a 10% rise in admissions over december this year, compared to last year, with 20% of patience in a&e departments such as this one in the university hospital of wales being over 85, summarising the number of older patient is coming. record numbers handled by the ambulance service as well, the
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highest number of welsh ambulances carried out in that period, that and the 27th of december saw the busiest day on record for a&e departments for the past five years. the winter pressure is taking its toll on a&e departments in wales. there's been a deterioration across the hall of the services here. the statistics are slightly similar and can be comparable with england for the four—hour targets, patients should be spending less than four hours here, and a 12 hour target is not directly comparable with england but the welsh government have responded by saying that the winter period is a lwa ys by saying that the winter period is always putting pressure on hospitals across the uk, notjust wales. during the us election campaign donald trump pledged to make america great again, but as he prepares to take office can he deliver on that promise? in the week that donald trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the united states we're taking a road trip through the heart of america
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on the iconic route 45 to find out how americans are feeling about obama's legacy. today, jon kay is heading south towards tennessee. if you want to understand donald trump's election win, this is a good place to come. next to route 45, the ohio river meets the mississippi. it's an essential artery for the us economy, carrying 18 million tonnes of cargo every year. but things aren't what they used to be. the locks which boats pass through here have seen better days. nearly 100 years old, they regularly break down, causing long and costly delays. so around 52 hours at one time.
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a boat could be waiting out for 52 hours before coming through? yes, sir. mark, the lock keeper, says it's a struggle to keep trade moving. the concrete is starting to break up and crumble. every time it gets hit by a boat as it lands on it, it puts pressure on it and causes more cracks and stress on it, we patch it together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last for ever. donald trump has pledged $1 trillion to rebuild america's rivers, roads and railways. a promise that's won him plenty of support round here. but he hasn't said where the money will come from. we drive or on into america's rural south. there are 2 million farms in this country. willa property developer president understand this business?
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at the university of tennessee, students are learning how to weigh and vaccinate cattle. stick it in, press it forward, pull it out. some are gonna be more willing to go forward and some are wanting to hold back. sounds like politicians! i guess so! donald trump won nearly 80% of the vote in the martin area. they like his confidence and in turn they have confidence in him. he might have a few mess—ups on the way but eventually he'll figure it all out. but is farming compatible with trump's plans for building? what about the land, the environment? donald trump is a man you associate with skyscrapers and new york city, not with farming and places like this. do you think he understands you and what you want to do? i think he's going to help small town people also out. i don't think he's going to be the big city man
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when he gets in office. what about farming, does he understand farming? not as well as some agriculture people. whether it's agriculture or infrastructure, in these communities away from washington, many feel trump will be a president who finally speaks for them. someone not just following the political herd. jon will be continuing his road trip tomorrow, when he travels deeper south to mississippi. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. foreign secretary borisjohnson says countries are "queuing up" to sign trade deals with the uk once it leaves the eu. thousands of thomas cook holiday—makers will be returned to the uk from gambia after the foreign office changed its travel advice. unemployment has fallen to its lowest total in more than a decade, according to the latest figures. and now the business news.
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more now with rachel. average weekly earnings increased by 2.8% in the three months to november, compared with a year earlier. and its 2.7% if you minus bonuses. that means wages are rising faster than inflation so we should have more money in our pockets. meanwhile the number of people looking for work fell slightly — by 52,000, to 1.6 million. mobile operator ee has been fined £2.7 million by the telecoms regulator, ofcom, for overcharging more than 30,000 customers a total of around £250,000 in billing errors. before the watchdog stepped in ee had decided not to reimburse the majority of affected customers, instead proposing to give their money to charity. the majority of customers have now been refunded. grandparents are missing out
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on national insurance credits which could top up their pension by more than £200 a year. mothers who give up work are given ni credits while their children are under 12, to help them get a state pension. if they return to work, relatives under pension age who care for their children can claim the credits instead. as we've been hearing, the office for national statistics has released the latest set of employment figures. the number of people unemployed in the uk has fallen — but at the same time the number not looking for work has risen so overall the number in work is little changed. perhaps the most striking piece of news is that average pay went up by 2.8% in the year to november — well above the rate at which overall prices are rising. joining me now is sue noffke, a uk equities fund manager at schroders. thank you forjoining us this morning. let's start with those wage increases. what is pushing it and it should we see as good news? we should we see as good news? we should see it as good news, first
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and foremost. those are numbers. maybe not as high as historically has been the case, but, given the slowdown in employment growth that we have seen over the past 12 months also, these numbers of 2.6%, 2.8%, ahead of inflation at 1.6% yesterday, mean that people do have real spending power at the current time. the question is how much will this spending power be eroded by the likely rise that were going to see in inflation, as we go through 2017. what is pushing wage increases? is it employers trying to attract workers from an ever decreasing pool? it's a couple of things. when i looked at the data, it looked like there was a stronger rise in permanent employment rather than temporary part—time permanent employment rather than temporary pa rt—time employment. permanent employment rather than temporary part—time employment. that carries with it higher overall wage growth and higher wage levels so, i think the quality of the data is
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pretty robust. the labour market is getting tighter. the number of people looking for work is falling. ata time people looking for work is falling. at a time when brexit could limit the number of potential workers coming into the uk, what does that mean for employers? it could mean employers could be facing headwinds of having to pay people more. we know that there is a national minimum wage, and national living wage, automatic enrolment pension contributions as well. lots of pressures on employers but i think what we will be looking for some of the productivity statistics, whether workers are actually going to step up workers are actually going to step up and be more productive as they are in work, are they producing more? you said the figures are robust. what is keeping the jobs market so buoyant? along with the other economic data we have seen in the last couple of months, confidence, both from consumers and
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businesses, has remained well ahead of where people's worst fears were, after the uk decision to leave the eu in the summer. and what we are seeing is that, although things have moderated a bit from the highs of 2015, they are not nearly as bleak as people had feared. thank you for your time this morning. let's take a look at some of today's other business stories. if you like your mr kipling's or bisto gravy listen up, because shares in the brands owner premier foods, have fallen sharply after the firm said it expects profits to be significantly lower this year. the uk food manufacturer predicts a 10% fall in profits this year due to rising costs. that includes a weaker pound pushing up the price of imported ingredients like sugar, cocoa and palm oil. deliveroo has said it will increase its staff by a third when it opens a new london head office later this year. the uk—based food delivery company is the latest tech firm to expand in the capital, planning to hire more than 300 "high—skilled,
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high—tech" recruits. a committee of mps has published correspondence showing that the administration of bhs cost £1.3 million more than estimated. the chair of the work and pensions committee, frank field, said that his committee was investigating administrators' charges. let's ta ke let's take a quick look at the markets. the ftse100 is up ever so slightly. the pound has fallen slightly. the pound has fallen slightly against the dollar, it went up slightly against the dollar, it went ‘7 slightly against the dollar, it went up 3% yesterday against the dollar on the back of theresa may boz mac speech, giving a bit more clarity to brexit. but it has fallen back today, down at $1.23. i will be back with more throughout the day. prime minister's questions will begin in a few minutes, the first since theresa may outlined her brexit strategy in her speech yesterday. let's join our assistant political editor, norman smith. it is pretty obvious what we
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are expecting today, isn't it?” thinkjeremy corbyn will go on brexit even though his party have been at sixes and sevens on the issue, going back tojeremy corbyn's relaunch a few days ago. yesterday, we had keir starmer saying that we are on the way to a bargain basement economy. let's just start with the risk that theresa may does not get a deal. she says that if she doesn't get deals, she will walk. what other consequences that? the first thing is, in contrast to labour, the prime minister has set out a clear plan. it is notjust clear but realistic, it isa it is notjust clear but realistic, it is a plan that accepts we have to leave the single market, and the customs union, so we are dealing with hypotheticals here. it is a deliverable scenario. the prime minister is not going to recommend
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it to the british people, to the house of commons, unless she thinks it is deliverable. given that she set out that realistic scenario, it will be delivered. she depends on other eu leaders saying, we're happy to deal with you on that basis. already we've had the prime minister of malta, which holds the eu presidency, accusing her of detachment from reality. of course, in negotiation, each side is going to take a hard position, but the clarity that we have got from the speech yesterday was to say, if that position persists all the way through, the europeans not willing to do through, the europeans not willing todoa through, the europeans not willing to do a deal, we are able to walk away and we in a stronger position to do that now for reasons. many nations around the world, particularly the us, have said that they are going to do a free—trade deal. britain is not going to stand alone. the economy has shown incredible resilience. we're not going to fall off the edge of a
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cliff. the economy can survive. we would love to have a free—trade deal with europe. we have one at the moment, there is the reason why it can't continue, but if it doesn't happen then we are not going to die. we are not going to die but he may face significant tariffs and half to revert to wto rules, and if you are a business or a bank, aren't you going to be thinking, i did like the look of that? i think this is a realistic scenario. it is deliverable. it is not something thatis deliverable. it is not something that is unachievable. for businesses and banks and so on, they have seen and banks and so on, they have seen a plan now. they can see what we are seeking to achieve. they can plan according to that, knowing that we will not be in a single market, we will not be in a single market, we will not be fully within the customs union, and they can have an expectation that that is something that can be achieved. stand-by for brexit round in prime minister's questions, coming up. we will have
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full coverage shortly. before we go to the weather, time to tell you that andy murray is through to the third round of the australian open. he has beaten the russian qualifier andrey rublev and will next play the american, sam querrey. and now the weather forecast. it is a tale of two halves across the uk. we have lovely, crisp sunshine on the one hand, but also, lots of cloudy, mild weather in other parts of the country. it is not exactly split evenly. for most of us, it is a pretty cloudy and mild day. look at this wind coming off the atlantic. you have that little cold blob across the south east, east anglia, down to the south coast this morning where it was around minus seven degrees. sunny here, at least, through this afternoon. then around the south midlands northwoods, that is where you have cloudy skies.
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having said that, in the far north—east of scotland and one or two other areas, there is some sunshine poking through. there's some sunshine and it will turn frosty tonight, even in town centres, london will fall to 0 celsius or below. in the north, temperatures holding up at around seven celsius. some drizzle around as well. thursday friday, no major change, but across southern most areas of the uk, it. to become that little bit more cloudy, so that crisp weather across the south and the south east at the moment will tend to turn a little bit more cloudy. and the outlook for the week and, no real change, remaining cloudy, into next week, then perhaps a change on the way with something a little bit more unsettled. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday. european commission president jean—claudejuncker promises to seek a "balanced" brexit deal, following theresa may's speech setting out her goals. thousands of british tourists are being flown out
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of gambia after a state of emergency is declared. unemployment falls to its lowest level in more than a decade — average earnings have risen compared with last year. and this is the scene live in the house of commons where prime minister's questions is about to kick off. mid—afternoon. i'm john gosling. welcome to bbc news live. let's take you live to the house of commons —— joanna gosling. theresa may is about to start asking questions for prime minister questions so we will listen in. —— answer questions. minister questions so we will listen in. -- answer questions. this
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morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to make duties in this house. i will have further such meetings later today. thousands of babies are born each year and damaged flag by alcohol consumed in pregnancy. patients infected by well put huge pressure on the nhs and it isa put huge pressure on the nhs and it is a factor in attacks on women. does the prime ministers recognise the damage caused by alcohol problems and was she instructed her government to now address these problems urgency and as a matter —— ican problems urgency and as a matter —— i can say aye recognise the problem is alcohol cause. he would reference not just problems for is alcohol cause. he would reference notjust problems for pregnant women but also the issues around domestic violence and the part that alcohol cannot play on domestic violence and abuse. that is why when i was home secretary we produced an alcohol strategy, we on this issue of alcohol and the government continues to recognise the importance of this
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issue and to work on it. will the prime ministerjoin me in paying tribute to the nhs staff who provide us with such magnificent treatment day in and day out? but will she also agrees me that people who miss nhs appointments without cancelling them cost the nhs a great deal of money and also take up slots which would otherwise be used by other patients and will she consider how she might let those people know of the inconvenience they are causing to the nhs? by honourable friend makes to the nhs? by honourable friend ma kes two to the nhs? by honourable friend makes two important points. first i am buried pleased tojoin makes two important points. first i am buried pleased to join with them in paying tribute to the dedication and hard work of all those who work in our national health service. secondly he is right to point out that if somebody misses an appointment that is a cost on the nhs. there are many ways, a number of ways in which this is now being dealt with including in some hospitals sending out text messages
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reminding people appointments, not just of the appointment but time them how much it costs if they miss them how much it costs if they miss the appointment. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. yesterday the prime minister snubbed parliament and snubbed the brexit committee's recommendations to bring forward a white paper while at the same time describing the referendum as a vote to restore our parliamentary democracy. this is about ourjobs, living standards and future prosperity. why will it not be scrutinised by this has? -- house. what i did yesterday was set out a plan for a global britain. i set out a plan that will put the divisions
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of last year behind us, that will show a vision for a stronger, fairer, more united, more outward looking, prosperous, tolerant and independent truly global britain. it was a vision that will shape a stronger future and build a better britain. mr speaker, restoring parliamentary democracy well sidelining parliament —— while sidelining parliament —— while sidelining parliament. it is not so much the iron lady is the irony lady. yesterday, mr speaker, the
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prime minister finally provided some detail. can i urge her to stop her threat of a bargain basement brexit, a low pay tax haven on the shores of europe? it won't necessarily damage the eu but it would certainly damage this country. businesses, jobs and public service. she demeans herself and her office and our country standing by making these kind of threats. what i set out yesterday was a plan for a global britain bringing prosperity to this country and jobs to people and spreading economic growth across the country. but actually yesterday we also learned a little more of the right honourable gentleman's thinking on this issue. what he said was the following. she has said that leave the single market, then at the same time says she wants to have access to single market. i am not quite
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sure how that is going to down in europe. i think we have to have a deal that ensures we have access to the market! laughter . i have got a plan. he doesn't have a clue. mr speaker, she made the threat, she was the one who made the thread about slashing corporation tax. if you reduce corporation tax to the lowest common denominator, this country loses £120 billion in revenue. how then to fund public services as a result of that? last year the prime minister said leaving the single market would make trade deals considerably harder. and while
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we could certainly negotiate our own trade agreements, there would be no guarantee that they would be on terms as good as those we now enjoy. but yesterday the prime minister only offered us vague guarantees. cani only offered us vague guarantees. can i ask the scene of disagree with herself? —— does she disagree with herself? —— does she disagree with herself? the right honourable gentleman might also have noticed that when i spoke in the remain campaigni that when i spoke in the remain campaign i said that if we voted to leave the european union the sky would not fall in and what —— look at what has happened to this economic situation since we wanted to leave the european union. he talks about the future of this economy. i want us to be an outward looking nation trading around the world bringing prosperity and jobs here to the united kingdom. the one thing would be bad the economy is the answer is the right honourable gentleman has. he wants a cap on wages, no control on immigration and
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to borrow an extra 500 billion pounds. that would not lead to prosperity, it would lead to no jobs, no wages and no skills. the chancellor said after the referendum that to lose single market access would be catastrophic. a few days later the health secretary said the first part of the plan must be clarity that we will remain in the single market. the prime minister said something about frictionless access to the single market and a bespoke customs union deal. could the prime minister give us a bit of certainty and clarity about this? as she ruled out paying any kind of access they do achieve access to what she describes as a frictionless market? i can say that access to the single market is exactly what i was talking about yesterday in my speech. one of the key principles
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and objectives is that we negotiate and objectives is that we negotiate a free trade agreement with the european union that gives us the widest possible access for trading with an operating within the european union will stop he talks about frictionless access, this was about frictionless access, this was a separate point it was like frictionless borders in relation to the customs issue. a very important issue for us in relation to our relationship between northern ireland and the republic of ireland. the taoiseach and i and all parties are absolutely on the same page on this that we want to ensure we have the best possible arrangement that does not lead to a borders of the past for northern ireland. the question was would we have to pay for access to the market or not. the prime minister has not given an answer on that. yesterday she set out a wish list on immigration referring to skills shortages and high skilled migration. does she now disagree with her secretary of state
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for rural affairs who told an employer '5 conference, don't worry, you can still have cheap eu labour after we leave the european union. the right honourable gentleman talks about access. yes, the whole point is we will negotiate a free trade agreement with the european union but is about the best possible access for british business to operate in the european union member states and for european businesses to operate here in the united kingdom. it is about sitting down and negotiating the best possible dealfor the united and negotiating the best possible deal for the united kingdom. and negotiating the best possible dealfor the united kingdom. that is what i'm committed to and that is what i'm committed to and that is what this government is going to deliver. my question was about how much we're going to have to pay to have access to the market. no answer. yesterday she talked about the pressure put on public services by migration. can ijust remind her, as one of her honourable friends did earlier, that at the moment there
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are 55,000 eu citizens working in our national health service helping to treat all of the people of this country? are 80,000 care workers helping our mainly elderly people. there are 5000 teachers educating our children. the real pressure on public services comes from a government that slashed billions from the social care budget, that is cutting the schools budget, disclosing a&e apartments and walk—in centres and start centres. so instead of threatening to turn britain into an offshore tax haven that's welcome those who contributed to our public services and fund our public services properly so that we do have the fully functioning nhs that we all need and deserve.” do have the fully functioning nhs that we all need and deserve. i made clear yesterday we value those who have come to the united kingdom and contribute to our economy and
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society and there will still be people coming to the united kingdom from the european union when we leave the eu. the crucial issue is that it leave the eu. the crucial issue is thatitis leave the eu. the crucial issue is that it is this government that will be making decisions about our immigration system for people from the european union. but yet again i say to the right honourable gentleman there is indeed a difference between us. it is very simple. when i look at the issue of brexit, or indeed at any other issue like the national health service or social care, i consider the issue, i set out my plan, and i stick to it. it is called leadership. he should try it sometime. thank you. i am sure my right honourable friend noted in her busy day that lincoln city got into the fourth round of
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the fa cup. i warmly welcomed, i also mentioned her recent comments about white working—class boys in university. in ten years have a million fewer males or innocent gone to university. fewer males than females apprentices. the debate with the education minister, former, so nothing has happened. i asked the education minister, former, so nothing has happened. iasked my right on the bed when can we expect to see a gap closing —— right honourable friend. can ijoin him on congratulating lincoln city last night? it was a fitting tribute to graham taylor that they want that much. he has raised an important point and much. he has raised an important pointandi much. he has raised an important point and i have indeed highlighted theissue point and i have indeed highlighted the issue of white working—class boys who are at the group in society least likely to go to university. we are committed to making sure that every child gets the opportunity to fulfil their full potential. it is ensuring apprentices are as successful as possible. the number
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of offensive started by meals has increased this year to almost 30%. also —— apprenticeships started by males. improving access and success to disadvantaged students. we want everybody to achieve their potential whatever their background and gender. angus robertson. shortly after the prime minister confirmed she wants to take the uk out of the single european market the scottish parliament voted by a large cross—party majority to remain in the single european market, just as a large majority of people in scotland voted to remain in the european union. the prime minister has said that scotland is an equal partner in the united kingdom. does she still believe this is true or is she still believe this is true or is she just stringing the people of scotland along? i might refer the
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right honourable gentleman to my speech yesterday where i reiterated my commitment to working with devolved administrations to ensure that their voice is heard and their interests are ta ken into account that their voice is heard and their interests are taken into account as we proceed along the spark of negotiating our exit from the european union. and also i specifically referenced the scotland plan and! specifically referenced the scotland plan and i understand the welsh government will be but using a plan for wales still a gap as well. that scotla nd for wales still a gap as well. that scotland plan will be considered by thejnc scotland plan will be considered by the jnc on european scotland plan will be considered by thejnc on european negotiations tomorrow. we'll be looking at it seriously and looking at the scottish government on the proposals they bring forward. scotland's leading economic forecaster says and i quote, but real wages... tories jeering and cheering, when the hmmfi jeering and cheering, when the forecast for peoples income is as likely to drop by £2000 and that 80,000 people may lose theirjobs in
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scotland as a result of the hard tory brexit plan of the prime minister will stop does the prime minister will stop does the prime minister believed that this is a price worth paying for her little britain brexit? i repeat what i said earlier. we will be working to make sure we get the best possible deal in terms of access to the single market and continuing to incorporate in partnership with member states of the remaining 27 member states of the remaining 27 member states of the european union. the right honourable gentleman once again called talks about the possibility ofa called talks about the possibility of a negative impact on scotland, if scotla nd of a negative impact on scotland, if scotland were not part of the single market. his party is dedicated to taking scotland out of the single market i take it out of the united kingdom. —— by digging it out of the united kingdom. this week directors of our companies were told by
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investors to rein in senior executive pay which is too often distorted by long—term incentive plans which are too complex to manage and to excessive and their rewards so will my right honourable friend the gut such schemes as part of her conference governors reviewed the fact. my honourable friend has raised an important issue and i am pleased to say this government has already taken action on executive pay giving shareholders the power to be to pay policies and force companies to disclose pay their board of directors and introduce tough transparency measures for bank. i want to build on that and that's why i have published a green paper on at to strengthen shareholders influence on executive pay and introduce greater transparency and i look forward to receiving representatives on this issue. we'll be prime minister provide a commitment today that no pa rt of provide a commitment today that no part of the great repeal bill will be subject to english votes for english laws? the honourable lady might recognise
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that the great repeal bill will have a number of complex issues that it will be dealing with. it will be ensuring added that would be the repeal of the european communities act, part of and one of the issues we will need to look at as we look at that bill and as we look at negotiating our way out of the european union is the whole issue of reserved matters and devolved matters. but there are many aspects for that. order! members of the scottish national party led by the right honourable gentleman on the front bench who is supposed to be a statesman—like figure should demonstrate some calm and reserve while they are being answered by the prime minister who was questioned. prime minister who was questioned. prime minister... the honourable lady will know full well that any
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legislation brought before this house if any part of it only applies to england, then it will be subject to england, then it will be subject to the english votes on english laws. may i congratulate the prime minister on laws. may i congratulate the prime ministeron her laws. may i congratulate the prime minister on her delivery yesterday ofan minister on her delivery yesterday of an historic, definitive, pragmatic outward looking speech which saw the pound rise to its highest level in two years and the ftse up to date? which she agreed with me that a strong and prosperous uk as she has planned would be a nightmare for the leader of the opposition and the eu ruling class? i agree with my honourable friend that a strong and prosperous britain is exactly what we want to build as we leave the european union. it's only a pity that it seems the labour party are interested in doing that and they want to do the exact opposite and bring this economy down. closed question, mr chris bryant. i always enjoy members to
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wales and i hope to visit in the future. i am happy to accommodate. i can do her bacon and eggs. more importantly i could take to seek the best brass band in the world, the cory band. 0r best brass band in the world, the cory band. or i could take to the local food bank which is based in the closed down conservative... what is happening at the moment is since 2010 the government has closed the local courts, the local tax office, the dwp office and the driving centre. now the government is intending to close all be tax offices in wales and centralise them in cardiff. we deal in the valleys as if we are just ignored by the government. bat feel in the valleys. cani government. bat feel in the valleys. can i urge change direction and start putting officers in the smalls
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dance, valleys and villages of this country? can i say that the last timei country? can i say that the last time i looked cardiff was actually in wales. he says we are picking officers away from wales but we will put them in cardiff. i think you mightfind put them in cardiff. i think you might find the whole point of what the hmrc is doing is they are taking moving from outdated offices to large modern regional centres. that will make it possible for them to modernise their ways of working and make things more impatient and improved customer service is back hmrc. -- improved customer service is back hmrc. —— things more efficient.” welcome the speech setting out a plan for global britain. it clearly shows the side of the house is listening to the british people. with my right honourable friend commend this approach to the council leaders now considering the greater manchester special framework consultation responses? as the need to listen to the people, give us
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better infrastructure and protect our green spaces. i think my honourable friend for his comments but also for raising this issue. i understand the consultation on this special framework closed earlier this week. i understand there has been a huge amount of interest among local people on this and i would simply echo his comment that it is absolutely right to say local leaders take all representations made into account. ian blackford. thank you. in the united kingdom we have 14 regional markets for electricity distribution and they are facing higher prices because of where we live. the city distribution charges for the north of scotland are charges for the north of scotland a re 48% charges for the north of scotland are 48% higher than distribution charges for london. the prime minister talks about fairness. will she introduce a universal market for alec is depressing and stop penalising highlanders and islanders? those of us that live in the coldest and windiest places are
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discriminated against by her government and it must end. the honourable gentleman draws attention to the fact that of course durably does have an impact on these matters. he talks about living in the coldest and windiest places. one of the issues that is interesting to look at in relation to scotland is the whole question of renewables and the whole question of renewables and the opportunities for renewables that appear in scotland. but i can tell him that we are looking at the impact... we are looking at making sure that energy markets in the uk are indeed working properly.” sure that energy markets in the uk are indeed working properly. i am very pleased that the prime minister has said she will take the necessary action on air quality to deal with the 40,000 premature deaths it causes across our country every causes across our country every year. as i know she believes in her government leading by example, will she make sure that all diesel cars
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are removed from the government car service as soon as possible? he is absolutely right in that improving air quality is a priority for this government. we are determined to cut harmful emissions. we have committed money since 2011 to supporting the take—up of low emission vehicles. the government car service is indeed working to remove diesel vehicles from its peak. it is so far replaced a quarter of its vehicles with petrol hybrid cars and this work continues to remove those diesel vehicles. is the prime minister aware that i totally agree with what she said yesterday? it is the... wait for it. we end this has have a real responsibility for our children and grandchildren to have a bright future but is she aware that there are dark clouds looming on the horizon in terms of intolerance, racism across europe and the
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pandering and box of many of our great institutions that have kept peace and prosperity since the last world war? the united nations and nato and indeed the european union, are we fit for purpose in keeping this country safe, secure in our world ? this country safe, secure in our world? i absolutely recognise the important issue that the right honourable gentleman has raised in this area. it is precisely as we move out of the european union and the united kingdom will be more productive, we will be looking globally and we want to ensure we continue to play our part in the united nations, that the united nations itself is able to do the job that everybody wanted to do. obviously nato has been the most important in terms of maintaining the safety and security across european continent. that desire we are continuing to support nato and indeed british troops are in estonia, the jewish indeed british troops are in estonia, thejewish voters in
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holland, romania, continuing to show our commitment to nato. —— we want a strong strategic partnership with the european union. we want access to single market, the free trade agreement but we also want to continue to work with them on justice and security matters because now is not a time to cooperate less it isa now is not a time to cooperate less it is a time to incorporate more. the third round replay where sutton united beat wimbledon 3—1. the pressing issue is what would make the rally happy is to be able to get into work on a day—to—day basis. does the parameter gemma cautious optimism that the return to talks with aslef and sutherland could provide a solution for hard—pressed commuters? is a former rwandan councillor i am not sure i could shared enthusiasm my honourable friend flooded the defeat of afc wimbledon but on the pointy raised about the train strikes, yes i do. i hope those sitting around the table
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are going to ensure we can see an agreement reached which enables passengers to actually be able to get on with their lives, get on with theirjobs and not suffer the misery that has brought about by the strike in the first place. can i agree with the prime minister and disagree with the prime minister and disagree with the last member about the reference to last nights meeting and asc's results? if the prime minister really believed that gp surgeries should be open seven days a week, 12 hours a day, which she'd be my guest ata hours a day, which she'd be my guest at a residence meeting against department of health diktats which will close a 6000 strong mission motions surgery? even better, could she just tell her government to stop cuts to gp services which forced thousands to attend hard—pressed a&e like those at saint georges anderson tell your is she just happy to oversee the possible collapse of the nhs on her watch? —— santelli. oversee the possible collapse of the nhs on her watch? -- santelli. she
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andi nhs on her watch? -- santelli. she and i sat on a council together where we tried to keep wimbledon playing in wimbledon will stop. gps are part of the solution in terms of the nhs for the future. that is why we have seen more gps coming into the nhs, 5000 more gps being trained and will be in place by 2020. what we do want to ensure is that gps are open and providing the service at times when the patients want to access them. it was quite clear from the prime minister's speech yesterday that she is six to build a brexit consensus and to bring our country back together and i thank her for that. to that end and indeed to strengthen the prime minister's igor sijsling hand, before article 50 is triggered, which she please —— negotiating hand. would she published her 12 objectives in a
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white paper so that we can debate them here on this place on behalf of all our constituents. i honourable friend is right. i absolutely understand the point she raised about pa rliament‘s desire understand the point she raised about parliament's desire to be able to debate those objectives which i set out very clearly in the plan that i set out yesterday. one of the objectives and principles i said was about certainty and clarity and it continues to be the government's intention that we will provide clarity wherever and whenever it is possible we will ensure that at appropriate times both the public and parliament are kept informed and are able to consider and properly scrutinised these issues. while dedicated and talented staff at the royal liverpool hospital's accident and emergency departments struggle to find beds for sick people, around 135 patients are unable to be
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discharged solely because of government cuts to social care. when the recognised its responsibilities and not tried to blame gps a problem of the government's on making? there is pressure on social care.” have accepted and recognise that in this house. that is why the government has put in improved funding through the better care fund and the social care preset. on top of that liverpool will receive £40 million from the improved better ca re million from the improved better care fund by 2019—20. it's notjust a question of money but of having a sustainable social care system for the future, and that is what the government is working on. can i commend my right honourable friend for her remarks yesterday, not least the constructive tone she took towards the eu and the future of the eu, in marked contrast to others that we have heard from other
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quarters in the uk? which she confirmed that that constructive tone will remain as the best way of getting an agreement with the eu for mutual interest and that the default position of no deal will remain a default position and not be the government's preferred option? absolutely. we want to get that good deal and we expect to be able to get that good deal. it is absolutely right that it is through goodwill and a positive approach on both sides of these negotiations that we will achieve that. i am very clear that the uk wants to see a continuing strong, european union with 27 member states, we want to have a strong strategic partnership with that european union and continue to work bilaterally with individual member states, and i made this point to a number of european leaders yesterday when i spoke to them after my speech, that we want to approach this in a positive and optimistic passion, because i believe that a deal that is good for
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the uk will be a deal that is good for the european union. this week the national audit revealed the abject failures in the fiasco involving concentrix that involve lots of people wrongly denied their tax credits. this was a system designed by government to pursue and chase down claimants for profit. does the prime minister agree that the chief executive of hmrc, that payment by results has no place in our welfare system, and will see review this model although she wait for the next scandal to hit vulnerable people ? for the next scandal to hit vulnerable people? -- or will she wait. i recognise many people received poor service from concentrix. it's not the first time this has been highlighted in this chamber. this is not acceptable and i apologise for the worry and distress caused to people. we have been clear about that service operated by concentrix. hmrc will learn lessons from a contract and
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remain committed to providing a high quality service. it will not use a private sector supplier to undertake those checks again. further to questions from my honourable friend, the prime minister yesterday confirmed their commitment to parliamentary democracy and she therefore, i assume, parliamentary democracy and she therefore, iassume, accepts parliamentary democracy and she therefore, i assume, accepts the long—standing convention that the executive, the government, is continuously accountable to this house for the policies that it is pursuing. could she therefore clarify whether or not she intends to make any further statement of policy intentions to this house and whether she anticipates this house having an opportunity to vote its approval for those policies earlier than two years away when the whole negotiation has been completed? my right honourable friend obviously
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raises a matter that not only the memberfor brock raises a matter that not only the member for brock stijl has raised but others as well. if i can make this point, the secretary of state for exiting european union spent two hours answering questions to members in this house. there is a further general debate on exiting european union matters taking place today. there have been a number of these debates already, looking at the issues that are part of the objectives that we have set. we will have to consider the result of the decisions of the supreme court, which may, if it goes against the government, require legislation to be brought before this house. there will be an opportunity in the great repeal bill to look at a number of positions around exiting the eu but as to voting on the actual deal that we have, we can't vote on that until we have, we can't vote on that until we know what that deal is so we will have a vote when we know what that deal is. mr speaker, the prime
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minister's passing reference to the interests of spanish fishermen rather let the cat out of the bag yesterday that our fishing opportunities are already on the table as a bargaining chip before the brexit negotiations have started. what exactly does the prime minister want to for the spanish fishermen? i made a very simple point yesterday which is that this negotiation is not just point yesterday which is that this negotiation is notjust about the united kingdom. there will be others in the european union who will be looking for ensuring that the deal we get is good for the uk and good for the european union. i have to say to the honourable lady, you see, in any sense, thanks continued membership of the common fisheries policy is what we should be looking for, that is ik certainly not the case and that is certainly one of the things that we will vote against. the people of staffordshire stoke—on—trent are again being confronted with a possible loss of emergency services confronted with a possible loss of emergency services in stafford or burton when acute hospitals are
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consta ntly burton when acute hospitals are constantly under intense pressure. will the prime minister agree with me, and are other local mps that closing a&es is no way to deal with the increased real, not imagined, need? i would say to my honourable friend the important issue is a level of service available to people in any particular local area. that's why the transformation plan, sustainability and transformation plan, being considered and published are taking into account and are being considered at a local level, for local clinicians and people to be able to agree what is best in their particular area. mr speaker, la st their particular area. mr speaker, last friday i went to blackpool's victoria hospital where the number of people waiting 12 hours or more in a&e doubled last year. trust managers told me that the biggest delay is discharging patients cannot get community care. will she stop
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waffling about a shared society and listen to her own budget watchdog saying that we will need £30 billion for older people in the next ten years and put that money not into corporation tax cuts but into local aduu corporation tax cuts but into local adult care and the nhs? just looking at the figures for what has happened in his particular area, there are more doctors in his nhs foundation trust, significantly more nurses in the nhs foundation trust, but the... i know what the honourable gentleman is talking about and i am about to comment on it. the honourable lady you are shouting from a sedentary position might have recognised that he started talking about the nhs, which is what i am also talking about. order! i'm not having an exchange across the dispatch box at this point. order. the prime minister was asked a question and...
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order! i require no help from the honourable gentleman. the prime minister will answer and she will be heard with courtesy, including by the honourable gentleman. the prime minister. the honourable gentleman asked me about pressures on the nhs. we are seeing more nurses and doctors in his nhs foundation trust and there will be 3 billion this year rising up to a further 450 million by 2000 20—21. with the issue of social care, i have said in this house before, we're giving local authorities the opportunity to raise money and spend it on social care. this is notjust about more money. it is about a long—term solution for social care for the future, an issue that has been done
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by governments, including a labour government, for 13 years. on by governments, including a labour government, for13 years. on friday the east coast of england threatened “ was the east coast of england threatened —— was threatened by a tidal surge that injane —— was threatened by a tidal surge that in jane didn't —— was threatened by a tidal surge that injane didn't tens of thousands of homes and lives. a simple change in the weather meant that flooding was averted. will the prime ministerjoin me in praising the response of the emergency services planning ahead, involving the army, the coast guard, the fire service and the ambulance and police to make sure that the best possible plans were made and will see further join with me in making sure that the public know that these warnings, in future, should always be taken seriously? my honourable friend raises an important point. i'm happy tojoin with them raises an important point. i'm happy to join with them commending the action of all those in the emergency services and armed forces and local authorities who work so hard to make sure that this problem was being dealt with. as he said, a change in the weather took place but it is absolutely crucial that when these
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warnings are given, people recognise that they are given for a very good reason, because there is concern about the danger that could take place, and the efforts put in to protect tens of thousands of properties, i am protect tens of thousands of properties, iam pleased protect tens of thousands of properties, i am pleased to see that the work that we have learned from previous flooding incidents, and the work between emergency services, local services and the armed forces was much better coordinated than perhaps has been the case in the past. mr speaker, in response to the honourable member, the primus talk about the desire to give clarity around exit of the eu. many of my constituents are eu citizens paying taxi when bringing up families. what reassuring sketchy give them about their future, reassuring sketchy give them about theirfuture, particularly reassuring sketchy give them about their future, particularly if they change employer or if they are freelancers? wannabe objectives i set out in my speech yesterday was, asi set out in my speech yesterday was, as i have said before, about the guaranteeing of rights for eu
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citizens living here in the uk, but i also want to see the rights of uk citizens living in a 27 member states being guaranteed, as well. i remain open and i would encourage others to agree with me, others across europe to agree with me, that this is an issue we should look at atan this is an issue we should look at at an early stage, an early stage as possible, to give people the confidence and reassurance that she is looking for. in supporting my right honourable friend and facing difficult challenges in both social ca re difficult challenges in both social care and the national health service, can i invite her to endorse the concept of continuance of community hospitals in our market towns across the country? they perform and provide a vital piece of the jigsaw in our national health service such as that of the westminster memorial in shaftesbury in my constituency. i'm sure that as my in my constituency. i'm sure that as my honourable friend says, the westminster memorial in shaftesbury is providing good services for local people. the structure of the local
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services, that is a matter for discussion about local level, and what is crucial is that local clinicians agreed, and others, that we have a safe and secure service for people, and that they are provided with the nhs services they need at the most appropriate level. i fully accept that point my honourable friend is making, that very often we think of only major district general hospitals and acute hospitals but the nhs is made up of many different parts and we need to ensure that patients are being treated at the most appropriate level for their needs. how can abandoning membership of the customs union which affects 60% of exports from wales, including 90% of food and drink exports, and supports 200,000 jobs, cause anything other than calamitous self harm? what we will be doing is negotiating a free trade agreement with the eu to get the best possible access for trade
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with it, but we also want to be able to negotiate trade agreements with other countries around the world. a number of countries have already expressed interest in doing that with us. we want to do that open up and see new export markets been delivered for businesses here in the united kingdom, including for the sort of trade that he is talking about in wales. and the customs aspect with the eu, we want to have aspergillus borders as possible. —— as frictionless borders as possible. let me bring you a couple of lines from the president of the european commission that have been coming through were asked theresa may was answering questions in the house of commons. he said that he welcomes clarification on brexit. theresa may
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phoned them yesterday after her speech saying that the uk will be seeking the greatest possible access to single market through a new, comprehensive, bold and ambitious free trade agreement. he said that there must be a fair deal for those involved in the single market. let's go back to what was said in prime minister's questions. there was a battle of the sound bites, because we had jeremy corbyn singh not so much the iron lady as the irony lady, and she said, i got a plan, he doesn't have a clue. theresa may look pretty comfortable, she has pretty much nailed her colours to the mast. she is not budging, and she's banking on being able to deliver her vision on brexit. she pretty much snap to one side criticism from jeremy corbyn saying, i have a plan, iam criticism from jeremy corbyn saying, i have a plan, i am sticking to it,
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it is called leadership, you should try it. mr corbyn try to pick up individual threads of the package announced yesterday, questioning whether we would have to pay for access to the single market, questioning whether curbs on emigration, the implications on the nhs and for social care, those individual little strands he tried to pick up, it seems he didn't get much traction. likewise, suggesting that parliament had been snubbed, because there was not going to be a brexit white paper. that was picked up brexit white paper. that was picked up by brexit white paper. that was picked up by some of the pro—european tories like ken clarke and anna soubry. because jeremy tories like ken clarke and anna soubry. becausejeremy corbyn had a range of different questions on brexit he didn't manage to nail down theresa may. for now at least, mrs may has got back home arejoe when it comes to the eu, and is on
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something of a role. —— she has got back her mojo. but there is a long, long, difficult way to go. thomas cook is flying home nearly 1,000 british holiday—makers from the gambia — because of the worsening political crisis there. the firm plans to bring home nearly 1,000 package customers over the next 48 hours. another 2,500 flight—only customers will be offered the "earliest available flight". the foreign office is now advising against all but essential travel to the west african country, where president yahya jammeh is refusing to accept defeat in last month's election. the bbc‘s umaru fofana sent this report from banjul international airport. thousands of european tourists are streaming out of the gambia, with flights having been arranged for them. they are mostly from the united kingdom, which has nearly 1,000 tourists in this country at present, but there are also others from france and the netherlands. some of them have reacted negatively to having been asked to leave,
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but others say that it is safety first, therefore they are pleased to go back home at the insistence of their governments and their families. all of this comes one day after the president declared a state of emergency. he has extended his mandate, which should have ended at midnight tonight. all of this comes amid uncertainty as to what will happen next with a massive troop build—up by senegal and nigeria to install as president adama barrow as elected president which yahya jammeh has challenged. we arejoined by we are joined by one holiday—maker from liverpool who is in the gambia, ronnie 0rd. thank you very much for joining us. you are there on holiday but hoping to come in very soon? yet, the situation with us
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personally, we came out a week last saturday and we have had ten days of holiday but it has been cut short because of the situation in the gambia and we have been told we would be getting sent home tomorrow by thomas cook. had you be concerned about the fact of what is going on there, that it has led to this new advice from the foreign office, and what has it seemed like for you, there? we got told yesterday that a state of emergency had been declared. we were informed by the owner of the holiday venue we stayed at that we would be getting shipped out tomorrow and we would be getting shipped out by the package tour holiday company. have you seen or heard anything prior to that that had given me any cause for concern? not really. we have been coming here for 11 years. over the past 11 years
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we have been going out and about. out and about yesterday, the only difference i found was that we saw a lot more troops about, we saw many more armed troops but that was the only difference we have seen on the roads. locally, it is very quiet, even more quiet today, obviously, because of the situation that eve ryo ne because of the situation that everyone staying in hotels, and nobody out and about. will you be glad to get out, having seen that sort of evidence of armed troops? on the advice of the foreign office, i think it is the right thing to do. we are best going home. we will see how it goes from there. we are lucky, we have had a bit of our holiday anyway, ten days in the sun, but some people came out yesterday and it was like they are going to be going home in the next 48 hours. that's bad on them. the situation at the moment is quite an calm and we
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can get on our flight and the moment is quite an calm and we can get on ourflight and go home. alsojoining me is david snoxell, a former uk ambassador to neighbouring senegal. what is your take on the situation and how concerned people should be about it? from what your interviewer has just revealed, it seems calm and there is no violence going on, and there is no violence going on, and there are no roadblocks, but obviously it is prudent to leave the gambia, that is why the foreign office has recommended that there should be no travel to gambia unless in an emergency. it is an area that you know well. the situation has arisen, obviously, because there is arisen, obviously, because there is a refusal by the current leadership to leave and neighbouring states are saying, if you don't go voluntarily, we will force it militarily. can you fill in some of the background to
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the political situation knowing how volatile it could be? clearly the economic community of west african states, 15 members, have decided that they will take some sort of action and intervene, if the new president adama barrow is not put in office tomorrow. however, there has been just announced an extension of the current president's mandate for a further three months by the national assembly. i don't know to what extent that will influence the views of adama barrow and the senegalese government is unable intervene or whether they will give ita intervene or whether they will give it a bit longerfor intervene or whether they will give it a bit longer for further discussions. why is president yahya
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jammeh refusing to go? difficult question to answer. he has been in power for 22 years, he clearly likes being in power and doesn't want to give it up. he might fearfor his future. if he does, i understand various refuges have been offered to to leave office. thank you very much. ok, thank you. unemployment has plunged to its lowest total for more than a decade, but the number of people in work has also fallen. the number of people out of work now stands at 1.6 million. that's down by 52,000 on the previous three months. average earnings were up by 2.7% compared with a year earlier. rachel home is our business presenter. she explained what the figures mean. it's important to look at how the ons measure these figures. they look at everyone in the uk over the age of 16. they assume they are either
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employed, unemployed or economically inactive, which means that you could work but you are not looking for work. with the figures today, the number of unemployed has fallen but equally, the number of people not looking for work, economically inactive, has risen, so overall, the co re inactive, has risen, so overall, the core number of people in work has changed very little compared to the summer months, at just changed very little compared to the summer months, atjust under 32 million. compare to this time last year, the number of people in work is up almost 300,000. it's interesting that you mentioned wage growth. it is up 2.8%. that is good news for workers. we did inflation figures yesterday. inflation at 1.6%. if wages are up 2.8% were earning more and it is rising higher than prices and services are rising so shoot, we should feel like we have more money in our pockets. why are wages going up? fewer people are going and looking for work so the labour market is tightening, there are fewer people for employees to
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choose between so they are having to pay higher wages in order to retain staff, and also in order to attract staff. that is very relevant if we look at it through the prism of brexit, freedom of movement, what people will be coming into the country to help workers. another interesting stat today, comparing july to september 2015, and the same period in 2016 and it said that people born in the uk working in that period increased by 36,000, but people not born in the uk, people born in the eu and further appeal, increased by 430,000, so, in terms of people coming into the uk and looking forjobs, employers will be looking forjobs, employers will be looking forjobs, employers will be looking for clarity from theresa may on where they are going to source their future workers. you on where they are going to source theirfuture workers. you might think, if there are fewer people coming in, that is good for me and you, our wages could go up. employers might not be able to afford those wage increases. equally, if wages increase any more
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and it starts pushing up inflation even higher, then inflation, which is already rising significantly, could go above the bank of england's 296 could go above the bank of england's 2% target and that could cause other problems. some breaking news about british sprinters who are in hospital in tenerife after being involved in a road accident. their injuries are not life—threatening but there are fears about the ability to compete again at the highest level. james ellington has needed surgery on a broken leg. it is understood that they were on motorbikes and they were hit by a car, coming at them around a bend on the wrong side of the road. a british athletics spokesman said, regretfully, we can confirm that james ellington and nigel levine have sustained injuries following a road accident in ten of. both applets are receiving medical treatment and they are conscious and stable. this athletics medical staff are liaising with hospital staff over their treatment. we will keep
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you updated that. all the very latest coming up on the news at one inafew latest coming up on the news at one in a few minutes. let's catch up with the weather. a pretty cloudy start for many parts of the british isles today. but there were exceptions to that rule, across parts of east anglia and down into the south east of england. very clear skies give a bright start. that came at a cost with temperatures in kent dipping 2—7dc. in the north, cloud kept temperatures up at eight celsius. for the rest of the day, not a great deal changes. pretty much, what you have got is what you keep. high pressure still trying to dominate, but there are still a week old weather front. i say that it is weak but it will still have another about it to produce cloudy skies with the odd piece of rain and drizzle. not an issue across the south, plenty of sunshine here, but that doing nothing for the temperatures.
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further north, through wales, the midlands and the north of england, cloudy skies. further north, little bit of brightness in the far north of scotland. a band of rain there, away from the western isles, it may be some botherfor away from the western isles, it may be some bother for shipment. away from the western isles, it may be some botherfor shipment. coming south, we pick up on those cloudy skies again across the north wales into the north of england, where there is the prospect of some hill fog and drizzle. during the course of the evening and overnight, not a great deal changes. we will keep clear skies for the most part across the south of england. further north, enough cloud, for the most part, to keep temperatures up. one or two spots in the east of scotland with temperatures dribbling away. so it is another cold, crisp start here. perhaps more extensively towards the west tha n perhaps more extensively towards the west than was the case on wednesday. elsewhere, it is going to be pretty cloudy again. temperatures just
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beginning to even up, you sense. we have had extremes from north to south. 7—10 covers it for thursday, and not a great deal of difference on friday. other than that we will start to see some seeping away of those temperatures. into the weekend, that high pressure, having moved its centre slightly offers the prospect of a watt of dry weather. those points towards the west threaten but do not become the main event. it will be mainly dry with sunny spells. the eu will seek a balanced deal for britain after brexit says the head of the european commission. jean claude juncker says he'll try to ensure a good deal — but malta's prime minister says it shouldn't be better than eu membership. we wa nt we want a fair deal for the united kingdom. that deal necessarily needs to be inferior to membership. here, theresa may defensor brexit
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plan to mps, but is accused of bypassing parliament over any eventual deal. we will have the latest from westminster and brussels. also on the programme this lunchtime... thousands of british tourists are being flown out of the gambia after a state of emergency was declared there.
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