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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 19, 2017 5:45am-6:01am GMT

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he says, once he leaves office, he will still stand up for what he calls core values. barack hussein obama leads our news review. he spoke to the press corps at the white house for the very last time. the guardian showing him here smiling, talking about why he believes americans voted for donald trump. he says it's because they feel forgotten and disenfranchised. peace talks to try and end the bloodshed in syria are due to begin on monday in kazakhstan. in the arab news, they've got a bit there on the front page. it still seems unclear which international players will be at those peace talks. the new york times' international edition showing president—elect donald trump in
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moscow in 2013 at the miss universe contest. the paper looking at mr trump's ties to russia, also reporting on a number of polls in the us which show he has the lowest approval rating for any new american president. delegates at the world economic forum in davos have been looking into the future, with a report suggesting electric cars will make up suggesting electric cars will make up 90% of all vehicles by 2035. gulf news also writes that, five years late, by 20110, machines will be committing a majority of crimes. that's incredible, isn't it! machines will be committing the majority of crimes! 0liver cornock is editor in chief at oxford business group. good morning. good morning! shall we start with barack obama's race? the first african—american president of the united states. and it's almost all over. absolutely. and i think, in many senses, the legacy of obama will be seen by the black community in america who voted in such numbers for him eight years ago — that will
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be, in many ways, the way obama is judged. of course, it's interesting that a judged. of course, it's interesting thata numberof judged. of course, it's interesting that a number of those voters actually voted for donald trump, it seems, i'iow. actually voted for donald trump, it seems, now. ithink, in many ways, at the press conference yesterday was about addressing some of those criticisms. if you look at things like the movement of black lives matter, the fact that more black people are involved in gun crime, the disparity in earnings in household income, the unemployment level — actually, it must be very frustrating for obama. sol level — actually, it must be very frustrating for obama. so i think there's no surprise that he's addressing some of those points here. you've just come back from georgia, haven't you? yeah. the country? in the us. laughs the states, right? yes, good point. not georgia, eastern europe. what was the mood like, as we get to the point now where donald trump will be in office? well, you might think a stereotypically republican area — of course, it is — but they're not necessarily trump voters. the one message that came across from everybody i spoke to, both from
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businesspeople and people in shops — was very much, "we just want something different." was very much, "we just want something different. " if was very much, "we just want something different." if you step back, that, of course, is the theme across so much of the politics we're seeing around the world at the moment. he's absolutely reviled by one section of republican supporters, and yet another part of the united states will still be looking to him for direction, it seems. he has tapped into that, because he has said repeatedly over the past month or so, "i'm still going to speak out if i feel core valu es" going to speak out if i feel core values" — he keeps using that phrase, "core values" — are not adhered to. he looks as if he's going to have some sort of role in american society in the future. unlike some presidents, who have com pletely unlike some presidents, who have completely stepped back. unlike some presidents, who have completely stepped backlj unlike some presidents, who have completely stepped back. i think the weight of obama's promises — and the fa ct, weight of obama's promises — and the fact, actually — let's not forget, the first black president in a country that still faces such issues with racism, but is a very powerful tool for him. i don't think he wants tool for him. i don't think he wants to get rid of that. and you can understand that. sure. one of the areas where many would argue he
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failed, though, is foreign policy, especially when it comes to syria. the front page of the arab newser looks to monday's peace talks. very complicated, not even clear who's going to be there at the peace talks. very complicated. at astana, in kazakhstan. that's quite an interesting location. this is very much in the sphere of putin and russia. i think that's important. perhaps this is the people involved there saying, "let's take it out of there saying, "let's take it out of the usual rounds of the movers and —— realms of the movers and shakers." this isn't the us or the un. this is completely different. i think the message is coming out — they're think the message is coming out — they‘ re really think the message is coming out — they're really interesting. saudi arabia and qatar are not going to be involved, necessarily, although there's no clear commitment there. i think that points to two things. this is a whole, um, new negotiation. very much different from the un. perhaps that gives it some hope. i have to say, as somebody who watches this closely, my goodness, we need some hope here! they're not looking for a peace deal
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here, although assad trying to say that — they're looking simply to reinforce this cease—fire or actually get it working, and then get a place from where they then can go to geneva and the un. yes, because then, in geneva, they will possibly — only there — begin to address the future of bashar al—assad. as you say, the kazakh peace talks are about trying to extend the cease—fire. iran, turkey, russia — the three main players in negotiating, getting these two sides, or multiple sides in syria, to the table. the united states recently being extended an invitation by the russians. but iran, of course, is not on the same side as saudi arabia. but mohammed juvod zarif, foreign minister of iran, saying in the same paper, "we can work with the saudis."m iran, saying in the same paper, "we can work with the saudis." if that's true, wonderful. i'll believe it when i see it. at the same time, we've also got turkey and russia working together. it's onlyjust over a year ago, of course, that
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turkey downed a russian plane. i think this is, again, a reflection of these very swiftly moving politics here. and also, an element of desperation. but also, let's not be under any illusion. president putin is looking to engage and looking to influence within this region. he's stolen a march, because the west, very much, has had its eyes on other things. the west has had its eyes on donald trump, and he's on the front page of the new york times. this is an image of him in 2013 at the ms universe contest in moscow, i believe. when you say president putin is looking to engage, he is looking to engage, isn't he, with the new president of the united states? he's put things on hold, saying, "i'm waiting." firstly, this is a very new york times front page, in a sense. they will do anything to have a dig at trump at the moment. i think the picture, of course, perhaps is slightly embarrassing to trump, although nothing seems to be particularly sticking. the volume of
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these sorts of stories is such that you think, "maybe it's these sorts of stories is such that you think, "maybe its beginning..." it doesn't seem to, which is interesting. donald trump is also a businessman. russia and the luxury end of the russian market is incredibly valuable. it's lucrative. it shouldn't be a surprise that trump inc had been looking at moscow asa trump inc had been looking at moscow as a destination. i don't think that's a surprise. what is, though, concerning is this shadow, this hangover it's going to have over the presidency. we've already seen that his business interests are taking up lots of column inches. it's only matter of time before some of that mud might begin to stick. you see, but this article here about his popularity in a number of polls says that he's got the lowest poll ratings of any modern president entering the white house. and presidents usually, the article says, after their election, before their inauguration, use that time to try to bring people together, rather than continue the division, which most elections produce. than continue the division, which most elections producelj than continue the division, which most elections produce. i think it
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would be difficult to say that trump has been particularly conciliatory on many things. he's gone straight in and put in place legislation to get rid of the affordable care act, obamacare. get rid of the affordable care act, obamaca re. let's get rid of the affordable care act, obamacare. let's be under no illusion. at the same time, the election of donald trump is what the american people wanted. it was anything other than the establishment. again, that's not just american — that's a global movement at the moment. and we better get used to it. ok. world economic forum is under way in davos. lots of different people are there from various countries. this isa there from various countries. this is a showing from the uae who are nailing down solar energy deals, as it were. this article's all about machines, how they'll impact us in the future — electric cars being the majority... driverless, is it, by 2035? interesting... yeah, very interesting. of course, the united arab emirates is somewhere i know very well. it's somewhere oxford business group has worked very closely with a lot of people involved with this. it's a very exciting story. the uae, of course,
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has a lot of oil, particularly in abu dhabi. this is a wonderful story in the sense that they're using some of that wealth now to invest in these alternative and renewable sources of energy. the electric car is just sources of energy. the electric car isjust one sources of energy. the electric car is just one manifestation of that. we're talking interestingly, in a few yea rs' we're talking interestingly, in a few years' time, we'll be able to send energy. one of the big problems with solar energy has been storing it. that seems to — the science seems to be catching up. excellent. ollie, thank you. this is called the state of the future report. if anybody‘s interested, they can hopefully find something about this online. ollie, thanks forjoining us. online. ollie, thanks forjoining us. really appreciate it. bye—bye. have a good day. we'll see you same time tomorrow, if you're on bbc one. bbc world, see you in a minute. not me, i'm off! hi, there. there is definitely a pattern emerging with our weather. i will say that much for the weather over the last few days. here is monday's satellite picture. a lot of cloud across the uk underneath building high pressure. spot the difference on tuesday.
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a bit of sunshine coming into south—east of england. otherwise it was cloudy. and yesterday's satellite picture also shows a lot of cloud. again, the south—east poking out in the sunshine. can you guess what the forecast will be for thursday? yes, today will be another cloudy day for much of the country. the cloud will be thick enough as we go through the first part of the morning to give a spit of rain in the midlands, maybe north—west england and wales. but under this blanket of cloud it's a mild start for most. perhaps a touch of frost in aberdeenshire. and certainly for southern wales and southern counties of east anglia it will be a cold start to the day. underneath relatively clear skies a widespread frost. but just as we've seen for the past couple of days there will be sunshine working across southern counties of england. cold, but bright. a weather front continues to dangle across central portions of wales and england, where the thickest cloud is. that's where we could see the odd spit of morning drizzle. but temperatures about 6—9 celsius as we push into northern parts. in scotland, the cloud thick enough for a few spots of rain. this is the picture
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through the rest of the day. a cloudy day weatherwise for most of the uk, but again some faring better for sunshine than others. southern counties of england will keep the sunshine. breaks in the cloud across scotland. the best in eastern areas. generally the cloud is a little bit higher in the sky across the northern half, compared to yesterday, so at least it will look brighter underneath those cloudy skies. that's thursday's picture. through the night we're stuck with this cloud through thursday night. again there could be a few mist and fog patches forming, a bit of drizzle through the night. with those clearer skies across southern england and wales we will have pockets of frost. maybe a bit of frost for northern ireland and eastern areas of scotland, but where it stays cloudy temperatures about 5—7 degrees overnight. into friday and the high pressure is still with us and so is the cloud for a good part of the country. again, some breaks in the cloud. the best of these towards southern england and parts of scotland. where sunny it's cold.
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underneath the cloud temperatures near normal for the time of year. as we go through the weekend and into the start of next week, don't expect any major changes. we keep a lot of cloud, but at least there will be bright or sunny spells and a little bit cooler through the weekend as well. that's the forecast. to the . hello, this is breakfast,
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with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. british holidaymakers begin arriving back from the gambia, amid growing concerns of political unrest in the west african state it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children and they have no work. thousands more tourists are still waiting to be flown home as a deadline for a political agreement passes. good morning, it's thursday 19th january. also this morning: theresa may heads to switzerland to explain her brexit plan to world business leaders, as she's warned that leaving the eu could mean more economic pain.
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